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Full text of "The Saint Paul Daily Press; The Saint Paul Press"


A 




1' 











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Title: ^^' ^^"^ daily PRESS 



4:1 - 4:152 



Inclusive 
Dat js: 



Jan 1 



Jun 30 



1864 



1864 



PLEASE NOTE: Jan 1 Part 1 P. 3 

History of the 
Newspaper Press of 
St. Paul 

Part 2 p. 2 

(A) History of area 
1680-1849 

(B) Annual Report of 
the trade of 
St. Paul 



Part 1 p. 1 

History of : 
Schools and 
Churches 

1847 - 1863 



88- 5-1979 



>r i gin ais heU_bx^ MHS _Ji ut 
Prepared by: ^Q Date: 



JOHN ALLEY DOUGHERTY 



May 3, 1979 



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Date: 



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Reduction Ratio 



Voltmeter 




Camera. No, 

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THE 



SAINT PAUL 



DAILY 



jPRESS 



VOr^XUVLE iV. 



S^INT nPj^UIL., FHID^Y, J^ISrUA.IlY 1, 1864. 



I isruM:BEii 1. 



She ^jiittt f aul %m% 

^.Z" . A r.N r PAUL, FRIDAY, JAX, 1. 



DOUBLE^JET 

Ix accorJauce with a time honored cus- 
tom no paper will be issued from this 
ofKcc to-morrow. We wish our patrons, 

one and all a IIai'I'Y New Yeau. 

♦^t ♦ 1 » 

OI'R UOrDLE MHEET. 

"\Vc present our readers this morning 
with a New Year's paper. On the sec- 
ond page will be found a concise hiistory 
of Minnesota, and an article on our rail- 
road system ;^tLe third page contains 
miscellaneous matter, the fourth, a his- 
tory of the early settlement of St. Paul ; 
the fifth a Review of the Trade for 1803 ; 
the sixth, an excellent poem, and a very 
interesting letter from our correspondent 
"Xrrwood," the eighth page, conclusion 
of the Review of the Trade, origin of 
New Years and social matters. "We also 
publish an inijjortant letter from ^Ir. 
r>rvdi;es, concerning our telegraphs and 
railroads, a history of the schools and 
churches of St. Prid, telegraph, editorial 
news &e. 

This is the largest amount of matter 
ever published in a single isiuc of a St. 

Paul daily. 

» t ♦ « » ■ ■ 

TaiE :vEvrfi. 

Wiikeler's rebel cavalry attacked Col. 
('filbert at Charleston, Kast Tennessee, 
on Monday, and succeeded in capturing 
a supply train. Wheelt-r wasoubsetjucnt- 
ly badly defeated and fied in confusion. 

Cir.N. Kkli.y reports the safe return of 
Gen. Sullivan from an expedition in the 
Shenandoah Valley. He captured 40(.i 
prisoners and a large <piantity of proj>- 
erly. 

A correspondent states that Maxiniil- 
H^n has made his acceptance of the Mex- 
ican throne, dependent upon the recog- 
nition, by the United States, of the mon- 
areliv. and that the United States having 
emjihatically refused, he will decline. 

TiiK rebels refuse to recognize But- 
ler as an ofHcer of the United States, 
and the Government has devised a plan 
to bring them to terms. 

T!£K Riehmond Examiner is still be- 
w ailing the loss of East Tennessee. It 
savs that bv this means th«y lost the onlv 
copper rolling mill in the Confederacy, 
upon which they depended for their sup- 
ply of caps. 

Gold "»1 7-8. 



lantic to the Pacific. To-day slavery is 
dead in Missouri ; dead in West Vir- 
ginia ; dead in Maryland and Delaware ; 
dying in Kentucky and Tennessee and 
Arkansas, and the death seal sei upon its 
brow over the whole South. 

But bett- r and more than this, the spir- 
it of slavery is dead in the hearts of the 
American people ; dead m the White 
House, dead in Congress, dead throughout 
the civilized world. 

The sorrows and sacrifices of the war 
are ours. We share its triumphs with all 
mankind forever. 

With three years and perhaps a fourth 
of b'.ocd we will have purchased an illim- 
itable future of Peace. 

With this hope and faith we greet our 
readers this Ilapi)y New Year's morning 
and our worst wish for them as wc stretch 
out our hands in loving benediction upon 
them all, is that the next New Year may 
fulfil the happy omens of this, which itself 
fulfils the happy omen of the last, when 
Abraham Lincoln gave the nation its 
most precious New Year's gift — the Proc- 
lamation of Emancipation, 



T1IRE£ YEAR'S A«0 A^» ITO^T- 

Three years ago to-day the St.Paul Pkess 
was launehed "r>on tho ocean of journal- 
ism undjr a sky already black with por- 
t;nt3 of national disaster. Twelve days 
before the Ordinance of Secession had 
passed the South Carolina Conrention. 
Immense popular demonstrations had 
been held and were still in progress 
throughout the South, in approval of the 
course of Sout'i Carolina, and the South- 
ern Legislatures were assembling to 
throw their States into wild maelstrom 
of Secession. 

The nation stood helpless and paralyz- 
ed, with the helm of Government in the 
handi of the imbecile Buchanan and his 
Cabinet of traitors, hopelessly drifting 
towards destruction. Congress was fran- 
tic with iinposiilble compromises. Mason 
and Hunter and Davis .and Benjamin and 
their brotherhood of predeterminad trai- 
tors were belching treason from their 
seats in the Senate and the Hou.se, and 
bullying the Noi'tii with menaces and in- 
sults. Hope seemed lledlrom the world, 
and God only remained. 

Yet on January Ist, 18G1, few at the 
North understood the significance of the 
4vil omens that swelled every breeze from 
the South. Hardly any one, except the 
few whowL^hrd it, believed in the possi- 
bility of a general Secession of the 
Southern States, or regarded it as any- 
thing more than a temporary abtration. 
Bnt events followed quickly after that 
first New Year of ours. 

The three years which span the brief 
existence of the P«es«; have been, with- 
out doubt, the most eventful in the calen- 
dar of time. In those three years, under 
the pressure of the prodigious forces 
•which they have called into play, forces 
which have been growing and gathering 
in the mind and heart of this great Ame- 
rican people lor three centuries back, the 
world has been pushed lorward three 
centuries in civilization, three centuries 
nearer the millenial era of L^iiiversal 
Peace and Brotherhood. 

The milestones in this advance are 
marked, it is true, by battles and blood, 
but they are battles whose trophies ar 
not gazetted in the dispatches of victo- 
rious generals. The victories of war 
after all are but negative. Of themselves 
they count nothing. They are not the 
fruit ; they but break the shell around 
the truit of victory. That fruit is Eman- 
cipation. Freedom is the one victory of 
the war. 

Three years ago to-day the nation, for 
the sake of a little more peace, was all 
but ready to take the yoke of the Slave 
Power upon its neck forever. 

To-day the nation stands with its 
feet upon the neck of the tyrant, and 
its spear already plunged into his heart 



THE l.VTERXATIO!VAIi PACIFIC' 
KAI1.VVAY A.^'U TE:I.E(WRAI>U. 

While active measures are in progress, 
on the one side, to engraft ^linnesota 
upon the great central trunk of the I'nion 
Pacific Railroad, and give the vast com- 
merce which is destined to flow over that 
highway, its most natural and cheapest 
outlet, through Minnesota to Lake Supe- 
rior, a new impulse has been given to the 
project of a Northern or International 
route to the Pacific through the level 
steppes of the Rod River and Saskatche- 
wan valleys, which has, for some years, 
been the favorite scheme of interoceaiiic 
commanicatiou with the people of jNIinne- 
sota, as being more in conformity to the 
physical system of the continent than any 
other. 

Moreover a railroad which should fol- 
low that route would develope immense 
districts of country which are necessarily 
tributary to ^Minnesota, and make the 
termini of navigation jn the Mississippi 
and Lake Superior the toUgates of the 
commerce of two worlds. 

It has been known that, for some time, 
negotiations have beeu pending bcfween 
the St. Paul and Pacific Railroad Compa- 
ny and the Hudson Bay Company, look- 
ing to the consummation of that part of 
this great scheme, which is embraced in 
the projected branch line of the St. Paul 
and Pacific, from St. Anthony to Pembina 
and its continuation from that point to 
Fort Garry, and finally to the Pacific 
coast. It is also known to the readers 
of the Pkess that measures have for some 
time been in progress by the authorities 
of the Hudson Bay Co. for the construc- 
tion of a line of telegraph from St. Paul to 
Fort Garry, to be also continued lUence 
to the Pacific Coast. 

So great is the public interest here in 
whatever concerns the development of 
this northwestern region, that we have 
begged of Mr. J. W. Taylor, to whom 
so large a share of that interest is due, 
permission to publish the following pri- 
vate letter from i^Ir. Brydges, the Man- 
ajiinfj Director of the Grand Trunk Rail- 
way, of whose visit to St. Paul last sum- 
mer, and subsequent public movements 
in connection with these questions, our 
readers have been fully apprised. It is Mr. 
Taylor's New Year's Gift to the readers 
of the Press, and this announcement of 
the satisfactory progress of measures for 
the completion of an International Pacific 
Telegraph and Railway, comes appropri- 
ately through him as the prime mover in 
these great projects : 

Gkaxi) Think Rait, way of Canada, ^ 

Mana<;ino DiitKcron's Office, > 

Montreal, Dec. 24, 1863. ) 

3f'/ Dear Sir : — I returned from Engltmd 
about a week ago, where I have been for the 
last two months. * * « 

I have no doubt wliatevcr that the line of 
telegraph will be completed from 8t. Paul to 
Fort Garry, and thence across the Hudson 
Bay Territory to the Rocky Mountains, and 
thence to the Pacilie. 

I thinV: I am also safe in saying, that nego- 
tiations, which are now in progress, witli refer- 
ence to the continuation of the line of railway 
from St. I'aul northwards to Fort Garry, will 
result in the actual construction of that line 
of railway before verj'long, and that steps will 
immediately be taken to continue the line 
across to the Pacific Coast. 

I lind very great interest existing in London 
about the Hudson Bay Territory, aline of tele- 
graph, and a wagon road, and ultimately a 
railway, and I have no doubt of the accom- 
plishment, at no very uistant date, of these im- 
portant enterprises. 

Whilst I was in London I had an interview 
with His Excellency Generrl Gucrbard, who 
is die Director-General in Russia of the tele- 
graph system of that conntrj-. From him I 
learned many important facts counectcd with 
the telegraphic enterprise across Siberia, and 
found that the construction of the telegraph 
to the mouth of the Amoor river, was a matter 
not only absolutely decided upon, but in ac- 
tive pi'ogress at the present moment. 

The General appeared to be quite convinced 
of tlie probability of the line being continued 
from the Amoor river, by way of Behring's 
Straits, to the borders of British Columbia, 
and from the information which 1 have de- 
rived from him,I do not think wc sliall have as 
much difHculty or anything like it in connecting 
St.Paul, by way of the Hudson's Bay Territory 
and the Rocky Mountains, with the northern 
boundarj' of British Columbia, as the Russian 
Government have experienced in the lines of 
telegraph which they have made across Si- 
beria. 

Yours very truly, . 
Three years ago to-day slavery sat c. N. BRYDGES. 

seemingly on the throne of more than ] J. W. Taylor, Esq., St. Paul, 
half the continent. Insolent, defiant, That Mr. Brydges' anticipations will 
revelling in dreams of aristocratic do- ultimately be realized we do not ourselves 
minions, founded on the degradation of la- doubt, and it is not easy to see how any one 
bor, it stretched its haughty sceptre fro m who has studied the geographical features 
the Ohio to the Gulf, and from the At- of the continent can risist the con- 



clusion which has been long insisted upon 
throujrh these columns, that this is the 
natural path to the Pacific. 

The ideas of the first explorers, before 
they have become confused with artificial 
interests, generally afford the clearest 
views of what the future must bring forth. 
Their instincts arc prophecies. 

One hundred and eightyifour years ago, 
Hennepin, standing on the slopes of the 
great water-shed, and crediting the In- 
dian tale of vast reaches of navigable 
water stretching westward to the 
Pacific, believed he had found at 
last what French explorers a hundred 
years before had sought in vain : a \vest- 
crn route across the continent to Japan 
and China. Carver, 98 years ago, fore- 
saw and predicted that the chain of lakes 
and rivers stretching nothwestward from 
the summit of the Mississippi, would be 
the future path of commerce between the 
Atlantic and Pacific ; and Humboldt, 
whose genius was the first to sieze the 
true geographical relations of the ques- 
tion, nearly forty years ago, fixe<l the 
navigable waters of the Winnepeg basin 
as the true trans-continental avenue o' 
Asiatic commerce with Europe. 

It has been the custom among a class 
of small people who never see beyond 
their noses, to sneer at the arguments 
which have been often reproduced here 
in favor of this route, and by no one so 
forcibly as Mr. Taylor. We confess that 
one source of the great gratification we 
experience in publishing Mr. Brydges' 
letter, is the practical vindication it.allords 
of viewswhich have been so often derided 



as extravagant and visionary. 
i<EAtii:v(>} AD A :« uo:iED pi,a:vta. 

We understand that immense profits 
are being made by individuals who have 
leased plantations of the Government that 
were owned by disloyal persons or which 
have been abandoned by their owners. 

Under tl^c authority of Adjutant-Gene- 
ral L. Thomas, three commissioners have 
been appointed, called Commissioners of 
Plautations, to whom has been entrusted 
the letting and charge of the plantations 
in the Valley of the Missisbippi, north of 
the Department of the Gulf. 

They meet at A'icksburg every three or 
four weeks to decide upon applications 
of persons desirous to lease plautations 
under their control. 

As rent, the lessee pays four dollars 
for every bale of four hundred pounds of 
cotton, and five cents a bushel for corn 
and potatoes. 

The usual season for ploughing, on 
cotton plantations, begins in February, 
though crops which yielded a fair profit, 
were last year put in as late as 
the latter part of April and beginning of 
May. 

We are authorized lo state that a 
gentleman of this city who is fully ac- 
quainted with cotton raising, is desirous 
of associating with parties who have capi- 
tal, for the purpose of leasing some of 
these abandoned plantations. He is con 
fident that the profits will reach one thou- 
sand per cent. Parties desirous of en- 
gaging in this enterprise can obtain full 
particidars by applying to Messrs. 
Thompson & Bros., or Parker Paine. 

SCHOOLS AND CHIJRCIIES. 



The Early Schools of St. Paul. 



PROGRESS MADE SINCE 1847. 



First Churches Organized. 

The Number of Members at the 
Present Time. 



school house. Mr. Wm. H. Randall 
gave a lot on Jackson street, between 
Fifth and Sixth, and the citizens sub- 
scribed a sufficient amount to erect a 
small one-story frame school house. 
This building still stands on its original 
site, and is now used by Dcgraw & Judd, 
as a carpenter shop. !Miss Scofield was 
the first teacher in this building. The 
district was soon afler divided into the 
upper and lower, D. A. J. Baker hav- 
ing charge of the lower, and Mr. H. 
Doolittle the upper. At the same time 
Rev. Chauncey Hobart was teaching a 
boys' school in the Market street Meth- 
odist Church. It was during this year 
that the College of St. Paul was incorpo- 
rated. A commodious stone building 
was erected on Exchange street, and 
though the Colle,'>e is not at present in 
operation, it will doubtless be re-opened 
at some future day. 

In 1851 there were two public schools 
in each district, Geo. H, Spencer, Sr., 
and Miss Bass, teaching in the lower dis- 
trict, and B. B. Ford, (since deceased,) 
and Miss Brewster, in the upper. 

A High School was established in 18o2, 
in what is now Stees' Furniture Ware- 
house, but was soon discontinued. 

During 185:1 the Baldwin School was 
established. M. W. Baldwin, Esq., of 
Philadelphia, a liberal gentleman, ex- 
pended ten thousand dollars in starting 
this school. The brick building adjoin- 
ing the City Hall, was erected and a 
school opened. The school was orig- 
inally designed for both sexes but the 
Trustees finally decided to make it a 
Female Seminary. The building has 
since been used for the Post Office, but 
is now occupied by private schools. The 
Baldwin endowment is not, however, lost, 
but lies dormant ; the Trustees in the 
meantime deriving considerable revenue 
from the rent of the building. 

From this time both public and private 
schools increased rapidly. In 1H5G the 
Board of Education as it at present exists 
was incorporated by the Legislature, and 
Rev. Edward D. Neill, who had bee" 
President of the Board of Trustees, was 
chosen President. To the efforts of this 
gentleman our city is largly indebted for 
its present school system. 

The city was called upon, and did ap- 
propriate $30,000 for the erection of 
proper school buildings and as the result 
of that appropriation we have the Jeffer- 
son, Adams, and Washington schools. 
The Washington building was first com- 
pleted and was formally dedicated in Sep- 
tember 1857. The school had been pre- 
viously held in a small one story frame 
building in the First Ward. - In No- 
rember 1858 the JelTerson and Adams 
scho-^l buildings were dedicated. The 
former had been conducted in what is 
now the Walnut street primary schools, 
and the other in a building on Robert 
street over Scheirmann'a ginseng store. 
The advancement of the schools has 
bef^n so great that the present buildings 
have been found to be inadequate to ac- 
commodate the throng that eeek admis' 
sion. Several other buildings are occu- 
pied for the primary departments ami 
during the past season, a new and large:." 
building than any of the others, called 
the Franklin school, has been erected on 
Broadway and will be ready for occu- 
pancy during the coming year. 

When the schools were first organized, 
no permanent reports were made so that 
we are unabled to give the number en- 
rolled before 1859. Since that time it 
stands as follows : 

Number of scholars enrolled in 1859, 
•' " '» " 1S()0, 

18(51, 
Average Enrollment 



18(ii 
1W3, 



OVn SCHOOLS FROM '47 TO '64. 

Probably few, if any, of the children 
who attend our present public, or private, 
schools are aware of the improvement 
that now exists over the early schools of 
this city. 

t^ixteen years ago, (in 1847) when a 
few log cabins were all that composed St, 
Panl, Kev. Dr. Williamson, who was a 
missionary among the Sioux, came up 
from Little Crow's village (now called 
Kaposia) three miles below, and propo- 
sed to the inhabitants the organization 
of a school. This proposition was readi- 
ly accepted and a correspondence took 
place with Governor Slade of Vermont, 
President of the National Board of Edu- 
cation, the result of which was that the 
services of Miss Harriet E. Bishop, now 
Mrs. McConkey, were secured. 

Arriving here thti same season, she 
opjned a school in a log hut. 10x12, 
mud-wiiUed, with a bark rooi', three 
small windows, and a door adapted to 
the height of the children. Nine pupils 
comprised the first school children of St. 
Paul, and of these seven were Sioux 
youngsters, and two Americans. When 
the pupils had increased to forty, nine 
only were American children. 

The next year was one of improve- 
ment, and a small frame school house, 
the first building ever erected for that 
purpose, was built upon a lot donated by 
John R. Irvine, next door to what is now 
Bailey's furniture store. This budding 
was also used for a church, ur.t was final- 
ly sold for taxes, when it was transform- 
ed into a saloon, and was used for that 
purpose until It burned, in 1855. 

In December, 1849, Revs, E. 1). Neill, 
B. F. Hoyt and J. P. Parsons, and 
Messrs. W. II. Forbes and Edmund Rice 
were appointed a school committee, cor- 
responding to trustees of a district school. 



- 682 

- 7% 

- 7o4 

- 888 

- 1,063 
Number of dillerent scholars enrolled 

in 1862 L-550 

Numtwr of ditf'erent scholars enrolled 

in 18(33 1,844 

There are in the city 3,200 persons be- 
tween the ages of five and twenty, at 
least 3,000 of whom should be in schools. 

THE PRIVATE SCIIOOI^S. 

When we take into consideration the 
number of private schools in the city, it 
will be found that the number who are 
neglecting the advantages offered them 
is comparatively small. ~ 

The Cliarches of St. Pianl. 

Our space will not permit as extended 
a review of the rise and progress of the 
Churches of St. Paul as we had intended. 
We are accordingly compelled to con- 
dense the article we had prepared. 

CATHOLIC CHCKCIIES. 

As usual in new settlements, the Cath- 
olic Church was the first religious organi- 
zation that commenced its labors in St. 
Paul. This place was originally included 
in the diocese of Dubuque, under charge 
of Bishop Loras. In 1839, he sent Rev. 
Mr. Gailter to establish a mission at Men- 
dota. In 1841, the unlicensed settlers at 
the mouth of the Minnesota were ex- 
pelled from the Reserve for sel ing liquor 
to the soldiers. Of course, a community 
that had been tabooed from the jjrivilege 
of selling whisky, could not exist without 
a church, and they accordingly erected a 
log chapel on the corner of Bench and 
^linnesota streets, which wa.« the first 
church ever built in the city. 

In 1844, Bishop Cretin, (since de- 
ceased) came up with the Rev, Augustus 
Ravoux to establish a missiona mong the 
Sioux. The Bishop went to Chaska, in- 
tending to make that his permanent resi- 
dence, but afterwards went to Europe to 
be consecrated, and returned to St, Paul 
in 1852, where he resided until bis death 
m February 1857. 



shaw Street, now used for a hospital, was 
erected and used as a church until the 
present Cathedral was erected in 1854. 

The German Catholic (Assumption) 
Church on Ninth Street, between Vine 
and St, Peter, was erected during 1854- 
55, through the elVorts of Rev. Mr. Shel- 
ler. 

Bishop Cretin's successor. Bishop 
Grace, was appointed to the Diocese of 
of St. Paul in 1859, and still reoiains in 
charge. 

PROTESTAXT CUURCII. 

Dr. Williamson, a missionary among 
the Sioux Indians, who resided at Kapo- 
sia, where the Indian village was located, 
held the first protestant service in Saint 
Paul in 1846. The service was held in 
a log cabin situated on the high bluff 
which overhangs Constan's Warehouse, 
on the Lower Levee. Here he continued 
his occasional ministrations until 1849. 

THE FIRST PKOTESTANT CUURCII. 

April 9th 1849, Rev. E. D. Neill, arrived 
and proceeded to establish the First Presby- 
terian Church of St. Paul. A small frame 
building was erected on 'Washington street, 
opposite the City Park, and here on the 26th 
of Novemljer 1849, the Church, consisting of 
nine persons, was organized. The next May 
tlie church was burned and services were 
held in a frame buildiug on the comer of Wa- 
bashaw and Third streets, until Nov. 10th 
l^>oO, when the briek church ou Third street, 
which is still used for the First Presbytcrir.n 
Church, Rev. J. Mattocks, Pastor, was ready 
lor occui)ancy. 

FIRST HAITIST ClimCH. 

The Baptist Church wds the second reli- 
gious organization in the city. The society 
was organized on December 31, 1849. Three 
of the foundiitiun members are still on the 
roll, Mrs. 11. E. U. McConkey, and Mr. and 
Mrs. A, II, Cavcnder. In the following suiii- 
mcr their church on Fifth street, (now used 
by Shiere and I<eonard as a shop,) was erect- 
ed. Tlicir first pastor was J. C. Parsons, wiio 
died before he really entered this pastorate. 
Rev. E. C. Cressy was next onlained, follow- 
ed by Rev. A. M. Torbet in 183.3, jind in Au- 
gust, 18.57, Rev. J. 1), Pope was called to its 
charge, and still remains. lu ISGl their pres- 
ent commodious house of worship (jn Wacou- 
ta street was erected, at a cost of $.3,000. The 
.•society is out of dclit and in flourishing cir- 
cumstances. 

OTHER DENOMINATIONS. 

The Market Street Methodist church was 
actually organized in 1848, but their church 
Mas not erected until '49. Rev. Mr. Nelson i» 
the present pastor. 

In 18.50 Christs Church (Episcopal) was or. 
ganized, and during the year their present 
church was erected. Rev. Dr. J*IcMasters as- 
sumed the pastoral charge nearly ji year ago. 

The Central Presbyterian Church Rev. J. G. 
Riheldcfl'er, pastor, Mas organized in 18.52, ct 
the private residence of the pastor. Their 
present cdilicc was commenced in '52, but 
was not ready for use until 18.55. 

The German Methodist Church, on tlic 
comer of Rosabel and Sixth streets, was or- 
ganized in 18-52, thougli their cliurch building 
was not erected until 18.59. 

In IS.3.5 the House of Hope Mas or/iauized. 
The first meetings were held in the 'Walnut 
street school house, afterwards in Irvine Hall, 
and on the 22d of December, 18-38, the present 
house of M'orsliip was dedicated. Rev. Mr. 
Neill, the founder of the Church, was suc- 
ceeded by Rev. F. A. Nolde, who is the pastor 
at this time. 

During 18.50 a portion of the Market 
Street Methodist Churcli left that ur- 
ganization, and formed the Jackson Street 
Methodist Church. 

The St. Pauls Episcopal Church was 01 gan- 
ized in December of this year. The first ser- 
vice Mas held in July '57. Religious services 
Merc held in the Washington school building, 
until the following Christinas Miien the pres- 
ent edifice, on eighth was used though in an 
unfinished ccmdition. The clmrch luiiiding 
and its furniture involved an expenditure of 
§18,000 and within the past few months the 
last dollar of indebtedness has been wiped out. 
Rev. Dr. Paterson has remained at the heailof 
this church from its foundation. 

NCMllKU OV THE MEMHEItS AND CONOllEGA- 
IIOXS. 



WHEELER'S BEBEL CAY 
ALRY DEFEATED. 



GEN. 



SULLIVAN CAPTURES 
400 PRISONERS. 



Maximilian Won't Accept. 



rnon RxcHMO^o. 



Kichmond Lamentations. 



FU0.1& tv.4.ftiiji3rc:T<>]y. 



IiMportant Conimiinication— C'onflaca- 
tiou— Mc-CIc^Ilau's lt^i»ort— IBunnfi«« 
for VetcTiiii* — liiitlcr's Ktatus — 
fr«ncii Tobaccu — Cotton --<>iuerril> 
la« Captured— JBarl>tirlti<>« 

Washington, Dec. 39. 
JleraUVs dispatch— This morning, E. 
C. Claybrook, of the 9th Virginia Regi- 
ment, (rebel cavalry) was granted an au- 
dience with the Tresident for the purpose 
of making an important communication of 
secret character. 

Chief Justice Taney is thought to be 
somewhat better. 

Forty decisions of condemned rebel 
property, seized under the confiscation 
act, have been issued here. 

On account of the enormous amount of 
work to be previously done. Gen. Mc- 
Clellan's Keport cannot be issi ed for sev- 
eral weeks yet, as there arc to be twenty 
maps engraved for it. 

"Wasuington, Dec. .30. 
Time's special — Immediately on the re- 
assembling of Congress, bills will be intro- 
duced in both houses extending the time 
lor the payment of bounties to veterans. 
Measures will at once be iiaugurated 
by our Government which will compel the 
rebel auihorities to recognize Gen. Sut- 
ler's status as an officer of the United 
[ States army. Until that is done no pro- 
positions relative to exchanges made by 
the rebels will be recognized. 

New complications are sa d to have 
arisen in the matter of the removal of 
French tobacco from Richmond. It is 
believed the rebel (Government will refuse 
permission to the French war vessels to 
ascend James River. 

Letters rect;ived from offici^rs in Gen. 
Banks' army say the cotton held by plant- 
ers in Texas which will soon be brought 
into market, is over 30i),OOU bales. 

Fifty of Forest's guerrillas, a Col. Maj. 
and a'Chaplain, were captunid by Gen. 
Dodge's mounted infantry, near Tulaski, 
Tenn., on the 2.jth. Three of them are 
in chains charged M'ith the nurder of fed- 
eral soldiers last summer. Skulls ot the 
murdered men placed as memer.tos on the 
mantle piece were found in their rooms. 
Seven members of the Gth Ohio battery 
were captured by rebels near TuUahoma, 
and brutally murdered. They were tied 
to a tree, shot and their bodies thrown 
into the river. 



Tbe Bebels liqalmiinir— ^Vhat tlaejr 
loat with Chattanog-a. 

FouTUi:.ss MoNKOE, Dec. 30. 

The Richmond Examiner of the i4th 
says our losses by the enemy gaining pos- 
session of East Tennessee are incalcu- 
lable. We are not only deprived of the 
vast flouring mills in that country, which 
previously supplied the army, but of most 
of the machine shops, expensively arrang- 
ed atlvnoxvillc. Besides this, we are cut 
off from coal, iron and sulphur mines 
which are M'orth noillions to us. The cop- 
per rolling mills at Cleveland, erected by 
Col. Teet, government agent, which were 
burned bv the eneni} , formerly turned 
out 0,000 lbs. per day. Over .S0,000 lbs. 
have been turned out to the government. 
This was the only copper rolling mill in 
the country, and which kept us supplied 
with copper for our caps and cannon. 

These are among our losses of the bat- 
tle of Chattanoga, which is spoken of as 
merely resulting in the loss oi a few thou- 
sand men and ;3y cannon. 



roBEiox :vEvrs. 



The U. ». A«ke«I to »eco(fiilje the 
Crench in Mvxico — U. ft. I>ecllne«' 

Foreign news by the Adriatic, St. Johns 
Dec. 30 : 

The following was received via Gal- 
way, not through our agent. 

Mkxico — The Pi.ris correspondent of 
the Times says Arch 1) ike Maximillian 
considered the recognition by the Wash- 
ington government of the new Mexican 
monarchy as indispensable to his accept- 
ance of the throne. The proposal was 
formally made by the French govern- 
ment to President Lincoln's cabinet, 

A dispatch from Washington, in reply, 
was to the effect that the American Re- 
public would never tolerate, much Ic^a 
recognize a monarchy established at their 
very doors. It is supposed this will decide 
the Arch Duke to abandon the idea of 
accepting the throne of Mexico, 



AUCTION, AUCTION. 

FAIRCeiLD & CO., sell 2 Hor.«e8, 4 Cowf , 1 
Yoke of Oxen, a lot of Furnittire, Candles, Soap, 
.<aloraluP, Starch, &c., Saturday, January 2, at 
10 o'cl ck. 

Sale at Roffers' Block, Third street, one square 
above the Uridge. janl-2t 



GRAND STEREOPTICON 

Dissolving A^ie\v 

EXHIBITION, 

.A^t Ing-ersoll's Hall, 

MOXDAT EVENING, JANUARY ith. 



FllC».tl C'lIATTA.^t'OOA. 



We append below the number of members 
of the various churches in the city, and also 
the numl)cr of the congregations. The con- 
gregations are, of cour.se, estimated and are 
designed to include those who arc in the habit 
attending the re!>pcetive churches : 

Ko, Con 

t^HCRCHE?. No. Members, gatiou 

Cathedral •'i.OOO to 0,000 .**ame. 

(ierniiin Ciitliolic, '.',000 to a,000 .Same. 

(Jerman Methodist, VH 200to:.;i0 

Chrl8t"s(Kpi(;copjd)Cb'ch l.'iO 4(K1 

German Lutli«?ran. l&O 3f»0 

Baptist 1-5 250 

.St. haul's (Kpiscopal) IK) .'JiS 

Jackson Stre«'t M. E lO:; — 

First Presbyterian 90 2C0 

Central Precbyterian i^o 150 

House of Hop.' 75 200 to 300 

Market Street M. i: CO 100 

riymouth.Congregalional 50 200 

.Scantlinavian M. !•> 50 — 

Ist Scandinavian Lutlieran 24 



<J.Mi 



Total >S,245 

Catliolic Church Members 7,000 to 9,000; Protes- 
tant, ditto, 1,245. 

Commiaaioner !.««* ia. 

Wc arc informed, and Ik'Ucvc, tliat our 
Washington correspondence of Friday la.«t 
did injustice to Judge Lewi-, in the statement 
that he liad removed a soldier's wile, a co])y- 
ist, on the ground that tMO of the same family 
could not have employment from the Gov- 
ernment; and that he "had appointed his own 
son an Assistant Commissioner. Tlic facts 
arc that the lady in questiai Mas appointed at 
his reiiucst, and removed (wc believe, l)y Ncc- 
retiirv Chase) agninst his wish. There is but 
one son of the Judge employed in any capac- 
ity of the Government — Charles T. Lewis, 
Deputy Coinniissioner of Internal Kcveiine, 
who has just beeu appointed to that ofiiee, 
without the intervention of his lather, and ai 
the request of leading gentlemen in financial 
circles in Ncm- York acciuainted with his mark- 
ed ability for the discharge of the duties of 
the ofllce. Mr C. T. Lewis, however, has ac- 
cepted the office only for a short time, and 
until an eftieient successor can be appointed. 
Netc York World, 236'. 

The Pioneer Mith its usual alacrity in con- 
demning any one connected Mith the admin- 
istration, quoted M-ith great gusto the origi- 
nal statement made by the World. Wc shall 
see whether it is as ready to retract. 



Themtonietrical Record, 



On the Bishop's return, the brick build- 
1850 witnessed the erection of a second ' ing on the Catholic grounds, on Waba- 



KEPT BY PAY & JHNKS, DKUGGISTS,COEXEnor 
THIRD .".afD CEDAR STREETS. 

7:30 A.M. 1 P, M. 6 P, M. 



Dkcembeb. 



Nuppl.r 'fralnCapturfd— A I»or»fon of 
%V !•«•«■ I ««r> <:avMlr.v Of rsat«"«l— In- 
• iiccvasful Attach on C'liarleston, 

Washixgtcx, Nov, 30. 
The following has been received at the 
Lcad(iuarlers of the army : 

ClIATTAXOOC A, DCC. 28. 

To 3Iajor General Ilalleck: 

Col. l.ong, of the 4th 0!iio cavalry, 
commanding the 2d division of cavalry, 
reports irom Calhoun, Tcnn. Dec. 28th, 
that the rebel General Whe<lcr, with 1,- 
ijuij or 1,."(H) cavalry and mcuiited infan- 
try, attacked Col tiilbert, iind captured 
a supply train from Chtatano^a /or Knox- 
ville, about ten o'clock this morning, at 
CharUr-ton, on the south baiili: of the llia- 
M'ahte. Their escort had rciichcl the en- 
cauipiueni, at (Jharleston last night, and 
Col. Gilbert became hotly engaged with 
the enemy this morning, belore Colonel 
Long was apprised of their ajiproach. He 
moved the small force for duty in his 
camp at the time. One 1 undred and 
thirty men crossed to Col. Gilbert and 
engp'ged the rebels hotly, wha afterwards 
gave way. Col. Long pursuing them 
closely, discovering a portion of their 
force cut off on the right. lie charged 
them with sabres completel r scattering 
them in great confusion in cvt ry direction. 

Several of the enemy's number were 
known to be killed and wounded; 121 
prisoners were captured, including five 
commissioneil ofhcers. The main rebel 
column lied, M'as pursued f ve miles on 
the Dalton road, and when last seen was 
fleeing precipitately. Col Long's loss 
was one man slightly wound<;d. 

The olliccr in command ol the station 
at Cleveland, also reports that he was at- 
tacked this morning, Dccemlier 28, by a 
force of luO rebels and that they drove 

them oil", 

GEO, H. TFOMAS, 

Maj. ijcn, Cora'g, 

FltOTI IIAIBa>l-:R'.«« JEl&ItY. 



JSS* Ticket* 25c- 
janl-2t 



-Children 15c. 

E, KGC.LBSTtlX, 



IVevr 'boar's Grz»o«?tlii4C, 

FUOM 

r^r. C. TV. nOBACK, 

TO 

INVALIDS EVERYWHERE. 



t^ncceaa of Gvn. II£<*]Ij'a ICxpcdition— 
400 I*risouer« C'a|itur<'«1— I'oaition 
of llfUfl Xroopa— Ui«8ai:i«ifaetion. 

ll.vuri;ii'.s FcnuY, Dec. 25 — 9 v. m. 
To Brig. Gen. Collum, Chief of SiafT : 

Gen. Sullivan's column returned safely, 
bringing 100 prisoners an 1 about 100 
horses and equipments, and my dilferent 
columns are safely back — t icy captured 
in all, over 4(10 prisoners and a large 
quantity of property. 

My plans aufl orders have' )een prompt- 
ly and faithfully executed, and, with a 
single exception, with but small loss on 

our part, 

A. F, KELLY, Brig, Gen, 
CtMBLiiLAxi), ^Id., Dec. 30. 

Gen, Kelly received infor nation from 
Gen. Sullivan, the latter getting it from 
nine deserters just from the Shenandoah 
Valley, that the rebel (ren. Early, with 
I), 000 nicn, is between New Market and 
[Mount Jackson. General lloss'^r also 
has 1,7(0 rebel troops, and Gen. Imbo- 
den 1,500 men. 

There is great dissatisfa-'tion among 
the rebels, and deserters heard of the 
President's Proclamation &c., with sur- 
prise and hastened to come i;i. They de- 
clare that if the Proclamation could be 
distributed freely among the rebel troops, 
thousands would at once en:er our lines. 
They say that the Proclama ion is kept 
from the men although their officers have 
received it. 



Time's Throne— since Order, Life and Ligiit 
Sprang, nt (iod's call from >^hapeles8 night- 
ies ne'er Iwen vacant ; still we sing 
" Tlie King ia dead" and " Live the King," 
When of the royal race of Year* 
The reigning monarch disappi'ars. 
E'en as booms fori/i the Deatiibells tone 
A young succfssor mounts tl;e throne, 
Ki'xii .SiXTY-TiiHKK's career is o'er— 
lloil to -he new King SjXTV-Foiu ! 
Thoiigli t?attli''s thunders shake tlie nir. 
And war drums beat, and trumpets blar*, 
Smiles in the North, Tnir.MriiAST Thaok, 
Sustained by r.NTKueniS'c and skill, 
Slatertal interests lloarisli still. 
TliC tillers of the Iruitful soil 
Enjov the harvest of th"ir toil, 
And in our citi<'s plenty reigns. 
While HOVE the Natioii's heart sustains. 
We know — ihe UmIdu on>.-e restored. 
Into its slicAth shall drop the SROr'^, 
And from war's smoke, Mith strife's surceasft, 
Hursts— I ob d in light— tlie ange! Pkack. 
IMcanwliile mv pleasant ta>k sliall be 
To set DiSKASh-'d Cactives free, 
I'ain to : revent, relieve, and cure. 
And health build up on ba^is sure. 
3lY St<'MA< h Bin y.Hs, void of harm, 
Art on DvsrKi'siA like a charm, 
Itestore the system's iotu, and cinite 
15ring back tlie long lost upjittilc ; 
Dihilitj/ with gtrer,<flh replace, 
With health's hue tint th« palid face, 
And new vitality dispense 
To every organ, nerve and sense. 
If virus, M'ith infection rife, 
I'oUutes the ruddy stream of life, 
C eane it at once antl health instil 
With the Hlooi) I'ciuriKt and 1'ili.. 
In short, there's not an ailment known 
That has not as by proots I've shown. 
Been con'juered, since acrost the seas 
I brougfit my peerless reraedies. 
Or, if a stimulant you need. 
From everything pernicious freed, 
I'ure, soothing, coniforting and mild, 
The (JKVPK'S KliXIH UsUr.FILEL), 

My old CAf AM itA Bhaxdy try, 

EU'lorsfd by all the. FuruUy. 

In Soi.DiKi'.'s HoMK5and Hospitals 

For tills the caieful surgeon calls, 

liccause no other stimuli 

Can, for the sick, its place supply; 

Adulteration spoils the rest. 

But this comes out tree from every test, 

Eike thrice tried gold— pure, unalloyed — 

Of every base ingredient void. 

Some wiA'/ithoir friends a joyful vkar, 

I will do more. 1 offer here 

The means to solace pain and woe. 

Ami keep at bay the stealthy foe 

Who robs us of our strength and ease, 

That curse with many names — DiSKAsr, 

If you prize health, on Roback call. 

And now A Gl vO Xew Veab to a L. 

JanMt» 

QRIENTAL POWDER CO., 

Offer for sale a superior qualitv of 

RIFLE SIZE TO COARSE DUCKING, 
In kegs and canni>t.'>r. Also the famous Diamond 
(irain Powder. G. NE WH ALL. .Jr., Agent, 

dec.io-3in Id Kiver street, Chicwgo. 

1ST. I*. IVICHOLS, 

General Insurance Agent, 
THIIiO-ST., 

St. Faul, M^ixinesota,. 

Policies issued in the following New YorkCoi* 
panies : 

Lorillai'd, Metropolitan, 
ISTiagara, 7.^h.eiiix» 

AXD MUTUAL BKNEFIT LIFE INS, CO,, OF 
NEW JEUSEVn 

«3~ Combined cash assets over $A,SOO,000 

decll-t novlo'M 



'■iC, Saturday 

27 Sunday 

2K Monday 

20 Tuesday ■ 

ao Wednesday . . 
31 Thursday..., 

♦Below Zero, 



29 
2f) 
29 

2* 
4 

T* 



32 


;« 


32 


rui 


29 


24 


29 


4 


If. 


1 


nr 


Ui 



Murderer B«-arr«'ated. 

Clevel^ixd, Dec. 31, 
Strceter, murderer of the Coy family 
at Medina was re-arrested at Richfield, 
I Ohio, on Wednesday. 



E C T U R E S . 

Prof. C. 8. POWEK-S, 

Will commence a short course of Lecture s on 
various ScieutiAc and Social Questions, at 

INaERSOLL'S HALL, 

in this city, on 
SATl 11 DAY EVENING, January 9th, 18<?4 
jK^ See posters and circulars. 
dec27-td A, TOWNSOX, Agent. 

FOR SALE.— A yoke of Oxen •uit- 
able for the Pineries. Enquire of 

G, N. BEMAN & CO,, * 
degd Corn«r Kob«rt« and ftth-ttc 



•> m — f 



_« s> «» ^,.-»^ 




m *■! ■ > w I" 



»a,, , , , J|i n 




^ 



I 

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II 



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TTEB ^BA^? PAUL PRESS, FBIDAY. ' JA^IJART 1. 1864. 




®Ue c^iviut i^ttl fw^ 

PUBl7l3HKD^AILT,TKI-WEEKLY ASD WEEKLY. 

Oflfioe— Adioinins the Bridge. 

TeriM»:-bAlLY IMtKSS-By ma!I, «8.00 per 
annu'Ti, or 7<X! por month innxrtnbly tn advance, 

TRI-WEKKLY PRESS— $5 p«>r annum: *2.50 
(orsixmontl.s; $1.25 for three mouths; ^ve cop- 
les, to onp address, $4.50 each; ten do., t4 each. 

WKKKI.Y rUKSS— <:>no copy, one year, $2; 
five or more, $1.76 each ; ten or more, to one «d- 
dre.^H, $ i.iweach ; tweuty or more.toone address, 
$1.50 each. 



HISTORY OF MINNESOTA 
FROM 1640 TO 1861. 



EAHLY TERRITORIAL 
IIIoTORY. 



IVEinnesota in lS4rO. 



Progress of the State in Pop- 
ulation and \Vealthf 



IVAME a:* O HIJ4TOHY OF MIJTXE- 
MOTA. 

Minnesota derives its nmsicalsyll;il>lesfrom 
a Dakota coinpounil— .l//"«<', water— SotoA, 
b'.car or bluish— by which they describe the 
cliar.icteri.-tic tint of the water of the Minne- 
sota Kivcr, its principal seconilary stream, 
and which Mr. Neill p^x-tically translates into 
" sky tinted water," Tlic pecnliar hue has, 
however, a nnuli less celestial origin, in the 
sedimentary Idue ciays brought down from 
tlie IJIue Karth, 1,000 iinintals of which Le 
Sueur sent to France for copper cartb, 170 
years .igo. The successive steps of discovery 
and adventure from the east and south, which 
led tlie early explorers of the St. Lawrence 
and fheMis--issippi to the sources of these 
rivers in Minnesota, are not within the range 
of t ipics prescri'ncd fur this sketch, which we 
cast chronologically as being the most concise 
and comprehensive ariangment of the few 
conspicuous events of the period in qncstion. 
KVio— Paul Dc Jeune, a Catholic missionary 
is the first writer who makes distinct mention 
«f the Dakoias, the aboriginal inhabitants of 
Minnesota, called by the lirst voijageiirs " Peo- 
ple of the Lakes." 

\<\:y\ — Father Pierre Menard i!i crossing 
from Lake Superior to the Dakotas, was lost 
in the forest, his cassock and breviary, long 
.".fierward-; preserved among Dakotas as mcd- 
itine cliarnis, allording the only clue to his 
fate. 

Ifi.jG.— Two Frenchmen, names unknown, 
arc said to have visited the Dakota villages in 
pur>uit of furs. 

IGG").— Fatlier Claude Allone/, a Catholic 
priest, the successor of Menard, who visited 
FonduLac in this year, is the first white 
mm wh ) is known to have set foot on the 
soil of Minnesota. 

lG7o-S.— Daniel Grcysolon DnLuth erected 
the first trading post, probably the first Kuro- 
pcan house, ever built in Minnesota, at Fort 
Charlotte, still maintain 'd on the north shore 
of Lake Superior at the entrance of Pigeon 
River. 

1G78.— Dn Lutli visited the Sissctons, and on 
the loth of September visited Mille Lae which 
be c.iUcd Lake 15uadc. 

1680.— About the first of May Louis Henne- 
pin arrived at Saint Paul, a prisoner of a Da- 
kot.i war party, the first white man who ever 
trod upon its soil, the first who ever saw the 
Falls of St, Anthony, the first who ever per- 
formed the rite of baptism in Minnesota, the 
first to predict the overland communication 
botwecn the headwaters of the Mississispi and 
the Pacific ocean. 

1089._>-icli(jlas IVrrot first planted the 
cross and arms of France on the soil of Min- 
nesota, and first laid claim to the country for 
France. He built the first French post in 
Minnesota, on the shore of Lake Pepin, a lit- 
tle above the entrance. 

lG9.^._Le Sueur built the second French 
post in Minnesota on an island below Lake 
St. Croix. What Island ? 

1700._Le Sueur established Fort L'nuillier 
at the mouth of the Blue Earth, and the first 
who suppli. d the Sioux with fire-arm^.T 

17f,3._Vrance ceded Minnesota, east of the 
Mississippi, to England, and west of it to 

Spain. 

1766.~Jonathan Carver visited St. Antho- 
ny's FalU and the Minnesota river, discovered 
the cave in Dayton's Bluff, now a root house, 
once the famous retreat of Indians, and in a 
pretended treaty with the Sioux, laid the 
foundation of the "Career tract" title, the 
scrip of which used to l>e floating about some 
twelve nr fifteen years ago. 

177j_oO— The Northwestern Fur Company 
established itself Iti Minnesota. 

1800, Mar 7.— The part of Minnesota east 
of the Mississipt i became a part of Indiana, 
l>y the divi>ion of Ohio. 

1803, Dec. 20.— Minnesota west of the Miss- 
issippi, f'>r fortv years in possession of Spain 
as a part of Louisiana, was ceded to the Uni- 
ted States by Napoleon, who had just obtained 
it from Spain. 

ij^Oo. — Upper Louisiana was organized as 
Missouri Territory ; Capt. Zel)ulon Pike, who 
afterwards fell fighting for his country at 
York, Canada, visited Minnesota to establish 
government factories, but the chief traders, 
Dickson. Cameron and Rolette, disregarded 
Lis regidations, and continued to occupy the 
country with posts on their own account. 
Their influence was all on the side of the 
British. 

1S12.— The Dakotas, Ojibways, and Winne- 
bagoes, nnder the lead of the traders, joined 
the British in the war against the United 
States. In this year the Red River Colony 
was established by Lord Selkirk. 

1819._Minnesota,cast of the Mississippi, be- 
came a part of the county of Crawford, Michi- 
gan, I,cwis Cass, Governor ; Col. Leavenworth 
arrived at the mouth of the Minnesota to 
bnild a fort there ; Taliafcro appointed Indian 
■ agent. 

1820, Sept. 10.— The comer stone of Fort 
.Snelling laid ; Governor Cass, of Michigan, 
>isited Minnesota by way of Lfwke Superior, 
crossing from St. Louis river to Rainy Lake, 
and descending the Mississippi to Fort Snell- 
ing; concluded a peace between the Ojibways 
and Sioux ; Col. Snelling relieved Leavenworth 
this year, in command of the Fort. 

1823.— The first steamboat arrived nt Men- 
dota, the Virginia; Major Stephen H. Long 
sent by the Government to explore the Min- 
nesota river, and the immediate frontier. 
Beltrami, who had accomimnied the expedi- 
tion, explored the sources of the Missis- 

1825— The dividing line between the Sioux 
and Chippewas fixed by treaty at Prairie du 
Chien from near St. Croix Falls to Red River, 
at Buffalo river. In this year a number of 
Swiss were driven from Selkirk Settlement by 
a flood and settled in Minnesota 



the Mississippi. The present mission estab- 
lished by the Rev. "\V. T. Boutwell at Leech 
Lake. 

1834. — The west side of the Mississippi was 
attached to Michigan, having, since the admis- 
sion of Missouri, been without an organized 
government. 

183.5.— Cat! in, the artist, and FeatherSton- 
augli, geologist, visited Minnesot a, the latter 
exploring the Minnesota river. 

18;36. — The Territory of Wisconsin organ- 
ized, and embraced all of Minnesota east of 
the Mississippi. In 1838 Iowa was formed, 
embracing all west of the Mississippi. Jean 
N. Nicollet, geologist and naturalist, explored 
the Minnesota, the Red River, and the sources 
of the Mississippi. 

1837.— Gov. Dodge, of Wisconsin, made a 
treaty at P'ort SnellinfT with the Chippewas, 
by which they cv«od to the United States all 
the pine lanJ on tlio Sf. Croix and its tributa- 
ries, a treaty was also effected nt Washington 
with a deputation of Dakotas for all their 
lands east of tlie Mississippi. 

1838.— The first claim was made at St. Paul 
by a Frenchman, Parrant by name, a whisky 
seller. 

1839. — Joseph R.Brown, elected as a repre- 
scnfcitive of Crawford county, which then in- 
cluded all the Wisconsin portion of Minneso- 
ta, procured the organization of St. Croix 
county with Dakota (Stillwater) as county 
scat. 

1846, Aug. 6.— The Wisconsin Enabling Act 
passed. Dec. 23, The Wisconsin delegate, 
Morgan S. Masters mtroduced a bill for the 
organization of the Territory of Minnesota, 
making the western boundary the Sioux and 
Red Rivers. 

1847,— The Wisconsin Constitutional Con- 
vention in session. Their Constitution fixed 
the western line of Wisconsin on Rum River. 
A protest sent to Congi-ess against the bound- 
ary. 

181S, May 29th.— Wisconsin admitted with 
its present western boundary and Minnesota 
ceased to form a part of Wisconsin. 

From the point tlius reached by this se- 
quence of historical epochs, whose interme- 
diate detail belong to the history of the fur 
trade or the genei-al chronicler, Minnesota 
starts upon an independent career of her own. 
Upon the admission of Wisconsin, John Cat- 
lin, the Secretary of the old Territorial Gov- 
ernment, assumed the Governorship of the 
disjecta membra, upon the advice of Mr. Bu- 
chanan, Secretary of State, that the laws of 
Wisconsin were still in force in the unadmit- 
ted Territory. II. II. Sibley had already Ixen 
appointed, at a meeting of the settlers at Still- 
water, to press their claims at Washington for 
aTerritorial organization, when the Wisconsin 
delegate resigning, Catliu ordered a special 
election for delegate to Congress. On the 30th 
of OctolK-r. 1848, II. H. Sibley was elected 
delegate over H. M. Rice, his opponent. On 
the loth of January, 1849, Mr. SiJdey, aiter 
some opposition, took his seat as delegate for 
Wisconsin. On the 3d day of March, 1849, the 
last day of the session, a bill was i)assed organ- 
izing the Territory of Minnesota, with its 
present eastern boundary, and its western on 
the Missouri, with St. Paul as its Capital. 

On the I9th day of March following, Presi- 
dent Taylor appointed the following otlicers 
for the administration of the new Territory : 
Alex. Ramsey, Governor; C, K. Smith, Secre- 
tary; Aaron Goodrich, Chief Justice; D. 
Cooper and B. B. Meeker, Associate Justices ; 
Joshua L. Taylor, Marshal ; H. L. Moss, "J. S. 
.\ttoniey. 

♦• More than a month," says Mr. Neill, "af- 
ter the adjournment of Congress, just at eve 
on the 9th of April, amid terrific peals of thun- 
der and torrents of rain, the weekly steam 
packet, the first to force its way through the 
icy ba rier of Lake Pepin, rounded the rocky 
point, whistling long and loud, as if the bearer 
of glad tidings. Before she was safely moored 
to the landing at St. Paul, the shouts of the 
expectant villagers announced that there was 
a TeiTitory of Minnesota, and that St. Paul 
was the seat of government. Nine days after- 
ward, there arrived Jas. Gooilhuc, with press, 
types, and printing material." 
' On the 7th of July, an Executive proclama- 
tion divided the Territorj' into seven circuit 
districts, and ordered an election of delegate 
to Congress, and eight councillors and eigh- 
teen Representatives. 

In the month of August the first Court was 
organized at Stillwater, at what is now Minne- 
apolis, and at Mcndota. 

On the First of August, H. II. Sibley was 
elected first regular Delegate to Congress. 

On the 3d of Septeml>er the First Legisla- 
ture was held. 

On the 24th of September the first organiza- 
tion ot the Democratic party was effected at 
the American House. 

On the 4th of November, the first County 
election was held. 

l}j.50.— The Minnesota river was first naviga- 
ted by steamboats in June and July, when 
the "Anthony Wayne," followed by the 
"Nominee" and the "Yankee" went up to 
Mankato and l)eyoud. 

18,51 .—The first apportionment Bill was 
passed. 

The Treaty was affected with the Sioux, by 
Luke Lea and Alex. Ramsey for all theur 
lands in Minnesota— comprising half the area 
of the present State. 

In 18.53. a new Territorial Administration 
was sent out by Pierce, Governor, W. A. Gor- 
man, Secretary, J. T. Rosser of Virginia, now 
in the rebel army,Ch et JusticOjAV. II. Welch, 
of Minnesota — deceased last Summer ; Asso- 
ciate Judges, Moses Sherburne of Maine, and 
A. G. Chatfield, of Wisconsin. 

The Sioux Indians removed to their new 
Reservation near Fort Ridgely. 

The State Capitol was completed this 
year. 

18,54.— June 29th, Congress gave a land 
grant for a railroad from St. Paul to Lake 
Superior, and on August 3d, the bill was 
repealed on account of a fraudulent altera- 
tion, in the interest of the Minnesota and 
Northwestern Rail Road Company. 
,7.December 27th, Yuhazee, a Dacota was 
hung for killing a woman above Shakopee, 
two years before — the first instance of capital 
punishment in the State. 

185.5.— The first bridge ever built across the 
Mississippi, a wire suspension bridge, com- 
pleted at St. Anthony in January. 
Republican party organized at St. Anthony. 
1857.— A bill passed the Legislature, remov- 
ing the Capital to St. Peter, which was defeat- 
ed by Jo. Rolette who ran off w ith the enroll- 
ed bill, hid away in an upper story of the 
Fuller House, they say ; Sam Medary becomes 
Governor. 

The first Indian Massacre takes place in 
March at Spirit Lake, by Inkpadutah's band. 
Thirty or forty in all were murdered. 

On February 23d, the Minnesota Enabling 
Act passed Congress. 

On March 3rd, an act. passed Congress grant- 
ing 4,400,000 acres of lands to contract certain 
Railroads in Minnesota. 

An Extra Session met April 27th, to give 
I the lands in trust to certain companies. 

In June an election was held to elect dele- 
gates to a Constitutional Convention which 
met in July. Democratic members being in 



of their own. The two conventions finally 
agreed through a Committee of Conference, 
on the same Constitution which was adopted 
by the i>eople on Oct. 13th First State Legis- 
lature met on Doe. 27th. Rice and Shields 
elected First U.-'?>. Senators. 

On April itfi Minnesota was admitted into 
til J Uniojp 

In ^Ifrch the Five Million Railroad I^an 



migration from the Northwest and moreover 
until 18.53, the whole of that porti.n of the 
State west of the Mississippi, was in the occu- 
pancy of the Sioux Indians. For these rea- 
sons population did not settle rapidly towards 
Minnesota till in 18,54. 

2. Accordingly it was from 1854 to 18.57, in- 
clusive, that the chief immigration to Minne- 
sota took place. Between the falls of 18-55 and 



bill j><isscd the Legislature, and in April was i lSo7, nearly 100,000 immigrants came to Min- 



ralilicd by the people. 

18-59.— The bridge across the ilississippi at 
St. Paul completed. 

1860— Telegraph line is completed from La 
Crosse to St. Paul and St. Anthony. 

18()1.— A grand event happens. The St. Paul 
Press is established on the First day of Jan- 
nary. 

MiNXi'.sor.v IX 1849. 

When Alexander Ramsey arrived at the 
seat of government, as the Governor of Min- 
nesota, the area of his actual jurisdiction, or 
the numbers embraced in it, would have been 
very limited, if he had not akso brought with 
him a commission as Superintendent of Indi- 
an Affairs. For. of the 147,000 square miles 
over which he was aiUed upon to preside, 
four-fifths were owned and occupied by the 
ab.original Indian tribes— the Dakotas occu- 
py ing the southern halfofthc .State west of 
the Mississippi, the Chippewas and Winneba- 
gos all the rest, except the delta of countrjr 
embraced between the St. Croix and Missis- 
sijjpi, south of a line drawn from Crow Wing 
to Sui)Crior. This angle comprised the 
lands within Minnesota ceded l)y the Chippe- 
was and M'dewakauton Sioux in the treaties 
cf 1837, The one county of St, Croix, an old 
Wisconsin division, which contained this 
ceded tract, was the only county in the StJite, 
with Stillwater as its county seat. In had an 
area ot about 14,000 square miles, and con- 
tained all the white settlements and trading 
points in the Territory, 

8KTTI.EMENTS. 

The first settlement on the ceded tract w.ns 
made in 1837, when the treaty v itli the Sioux 
and the Chii)pewas opened up the pineries of 
the St. Croix, and was made nt Taylor's Falls 
by Jesse Taylor. Baker and others, of the 
Northwestern Company, and in 1819 contain- 
ed two or three log houses. The first steam- 
boat that ever navigated the St, Croix, the 
Palmyra, brought up Sajuuel Burkleo, of 
Delaware, and Orange Walker, of Vermont, 
who, in 18:38, founded the settlement of Ma- 
rine Mills, which, in 1849 contained a saw- 
mill, a tavern .'^Uind, one or two frame houses, 
and was a place of business importance. In 
1837, Joseph R, Brown made a claim at the 
upper end of .Stillwater, which in 1841 became 
the county seat of St. Croix countv. 

In 18U the present site of Stillwater w.is set- 
tled by John McKusick, of Maine, (now a 
State Sen.itor,) Calvin E. Leach, of Vermont, 
and Elias McKeaii, from Pennsylvania. In 
18^14 the first frame house was built there by 
Anson Northrup, for a tavern. In 1849 it con- 
tained, with a large saw-mill, several frame 
houses and stores, and was, as now, the de- 
pot of the lumbering operations of the Saii.t 
Croix. 

In 1836, Franklin Steele, N. W. Kittson, 
and W. Stainbangh, made a claim .it St. An- 
thony Falls, and in 1817 Mr. Steele laid out a 
block of lots there ; then the place contained 
Init one house. In the spring of 1849, it con- 
tained a sawmill, built there by F. Steele, two 
jx three stores, and less tlian a half n dozen 
dwellings. A small settlement at Point Dou- 
glas, founded in 1839, contained in 1849 two 
or three prairie tenements, some log houses, 
and a saw mill in process of erection. Sai.it 
Paul, "just enuiging," says Mr. Neill, "from 
a collection of Indian whisky shops and the 
birch-roofed cabins of half-breed voyagers" 
will be elsewheix' described. 



ncsota 

3. The commercial revulsion of 18.57, ar- 
rested the tide of immigration. For the three 
years from 18;57 to 18G0, only 2,000 immigr.ints 
came to the State. 

4. In 11*60, the St.itc had recovered from the 
prostration which followed the disastrous col- 
lapse ot 1S.57, and had entered upon a new 
career of healthy and vigorous growth, when 
the civil war broke out. In spite oi' the heavy 
draft of the war upon our able-bodied popu- 
lation, immigration has steadily flowed in to 
repair the gaps made by military levies and 
the State was never more i)rospeious in all the 
elements of growth than now. 

I'ROITIITY. 

The table shows an average incre.ise in the 
assessor's estimate of property in Minnesota 
up to 1857, the last year of its Territorial his- 
tory, of 82.6 per cent yearly. The decrease in 
18-58 and 1859 was a natural result of the coni- 
raercial revulsion of 18-57, of the dissipation of 
fictitious e.«timates, and the new adjustment 
of values in all kinds of property to the more 
c aitraetcd basis of monetary calcilation. 
Since 1860, the assessed va'uation has again 
slowly increased, and when llic next biennial 
assessment shall have been had in 18Gt, the 
aggregate value will doubtless stand as high 
as at the summit of the speculative excitement 

of 1857. 

♦ » ♦ « ♦ • 

MINNESOTA RAILHOADS 



Congressional and 
Land Grants. 



State 



5. From the Southeast— the swamp land j 
Branch of the St. Paul and Pacific will bring j 
the tribute of the counties which front upon I 
the Mississippi. 

G. The Xorth— the Saint Paul and Superior 
Railroad will bring the mineral, of the Lake 
Shore and goods from New York to exchang'^ 
at St. Paul for all the products which pour 
into this common reservoir from other direc- 
tions. 

The Saint Paul and Superior Railroad is in 
fact the root of the whole .'system of Railroad 
communications in this State; the outlet of 
the reservoir to wliieli all the rest are tributary. 
As an absolute physical fact Minnesota, with 
this outlet upon Lake Superior, is as near 
New York by water as Illinois — .and when the 
St. I'aul and Superior Railroad is built, the 
farmers of Minnesota will sell their grain at 
the same rates as those of Illinois, and Saint 
Paul will i>ay as much for wheat, and sell her 
goods as cheaply as of Chicago. 

The mean distance from all the settled 
parts of Minnesota to Milwaukee, our nearest 
port on Lake Michigan is about 400 miles, 
while the mean distance to the head of Lake 
Superior is about 200 miles. H.-lf the di.<- 
tance and half the cost of transit to the lakes 
is thus t aved by a railroad from St. Paul to 
Superior. 

It was in view of these facts — and because 
the building of this road centralizes the whole 
system at St. Paul— th.it the city council re- 
cently passed and the people ai)proved an or- 
dinance granting, $-'.5i),0t)0 as abonus to the 
Lake Superior and Mississippi Railroad Com- 
pany, upon the completion of the road direct 
from St. Paul to I^ikc Superior wlihin five 
years. 

Application has also been made to Congress 
for a land grant foi the whole line from the 
headof Lake Superior via St. Paul to .Sioux 
City. 

At the same time the Chamber of Com- 
merce of St. Paul have agreed to give a binus 
ol $t^n,000 to the ^linneapolis .nnd Cedar Val- 
ley Railroad, for building abridge across the 
Mississippi, at this point, and extending their 



^iutllnmctxii 



SPECIAL NOTICES. 



JOSEPH I. BEAUMONT, 

DEALER IN 

TEAS, COFFEES, SPICES, 
Sng-a-rs, Syrups, 

AND ALL GOODS rERTATNI^G TO THE 
GROCERY BUSINESS, INCLUDING 

TOBACCOS, CKiARS, 

Wine.s, Liquors, and 
Pure Old Rye and Bourbon 

TT H I S ICI E S - 

Comer 3d A J^ackton Kt'c iio2*.)-d&w8w 

Wmi^S AKD Liq>UOES, 

FOR 

Medicinal aud Private Use. 



Statistics of Construction. 



TkcRailwavCeatreoflheStale 



road into tliiscitv. 



» « ♦ « » 



PURE OLD RYE WHISKY, 

PURE OLD BOURBON WHISKY, 
FINE OLD FRENCH BRANDY, 
FINE Sc:orCiI WHISKY, 
PALE SHERRY ^VINE. 
PURE JUICE P()RT WINE, 
OLD BURGUNDY PORF WINE, 
WOLFE'S SCHH:DAM SCHNAPPS, 

OLD JAMAICA R JM, 

MUMMS' CABINET CHAMPAGNE, 

CURACOA. 

KOR SALK nV 

no2lt d&wbw J. I 



liffiiiUMOHT. 



W 



IIOLESALE LA Ml fiXORE, 



Land Grants for Educational Pur- 
poses. 

COMMON SCnOOL.S. 



TUAUIXO rosTS. 
An Indian Tr.iding post, or tavern, at Sauk 
liapids. Crow Wing, and one or two interme- 
diate points, with some scattering French Jind 
Swiss farmers, were all the settlements within 
the ceded Territory. Over the Indian coun- 
try, along the Mississippi and Minnesota 
rivers, chains of trading posts extended at 
large distances up to Big Stone Lake and Pem- 
bina, generally in the interest of the Amer- 
ican Fur Company, whose depot for twen- 
ty years had Ijoen at Mendota, but who 
had recently established a general outfit for 
the Winnebagoes and Chippewas at St. Paul. 
Alexis Bailly's post at Wabashaw, a trjid- 
ing post at Read's Landing, James Wells' post 
farther up on Lake Pepin, a Presbyterian mis- 
sion at Red Wing, a few farmers at Red Rock, 
Dr. Williams' mission at Kaposia, the Sioux 
outfit at Mendota, a cluster of huts around 
the stone dwelling and warehouse of Mr. 
Sibley, Oliver Faribault's post at Six's village, 
and Pond's Mission nt Shakopee; Alex. Gra- 
ham's post and the Hopkins' mission at Trav- 
erse de Sioux, Jos. Lafrainboisc at Little 
Rock, Martin Mcl-eod with Riggs' mission at 
Lac qui Parle among the Sioux; a number of 
similar posts and missions in the Chippewa 
conntrj', and at Long I'rairie : Fort Snelling 
.ind Gaines with their outlying Indian Agency 
and settlers' houses, and a few tenements of 
Indian farmers scattered near the villages of 
the Sioux, contained all the population .ind 
property of the Territory outside of St. Croix 
county. 

These Indian trading posts presented a con- 
stant recurrence of the same picture ; one or 
two log or frame houses, with an Indian vil- 
lage in the background. 

The whole population of the Territory, a 
heterogeneous mixture of French or half- 
breed voyagers, teamsters, American or Cana- 
dian traders, with a few blacksmiths, fanners 
and missionaries, were all, except the lumber- 
ing settlements on the St. Croix, and the sol- 
diers at the forts assoclAted with the Indian 
trade, directly or otherwise. Such was th<; 
external picture of Minnesotii in 1849. 

» ♦ » » ♦ 

Prog'rcss of mnneaota In Population 
and "fVealtli. 

The following table shows the general in- 
crease of population and assessed property 
valuation in the State at large, from the date 
of its Territorial organization, and the super- 
ficial expansion of settlement as indicated by 
the number of counties assessed. The census 
enumerations of population arc given for the 
years 1849, 18-50, 1857 and 1860, the population 
for the remaining years being estimated from 
the popular vote : 

TABI.K SHOWING THE GROWTH OF THE STATE 
SINCE 1849. 



ItaUroiiil K.vst<>ni of Tliiineaota. 

On March 3d, 18.J7, Congress granted to the 
then Territory of Minnesota 4,:i9L),141 acics of 
land to aid in the construction of certain rail- 
roads, the grant consisting of the alternate or 
odd numbered sections of the public lands 
along the surveyed lands of the proposed 
roads, in a belt six miles in width on each 
side of said road. 

COXGRKSSIONAL LAND GRANT RAII.MO.iI)S. 

These railroads, as originally projected and 
surveyed and located in 18-57, .ire as follows : 

1. The St. Paul and Pacific main line 
from !>^tillwater, via St. Paul and St. 
Anthonv, to a jioint seven miles south 
of the "junction of the Sioux Wood 
and Red Rivers, as projected and 
survevcd . . - . - 

2. Rrancli line of the above from St. 
Anthony via Crow Wing to St. Vin- 
cent, as pnjected, - - - 

Of which are surveyed and locited IIG 
miles. 

3. The Minnesota Valley road from 
Weft St. Paul along the south bank 
of the Minnesota river to the Iowa 
line in the direction of the mouth of 
the Big Si!*ux as projected 
Of which is located 111 1-2 miles. 

The Minneapolis, Faribault and Ce- 
dar Valley road iroiu MiiMicapolis 
via Faribault tc the lov.a line as loca- 
ted 

The Winona and St. Petev railroad 
from Winona to the western l)oundary 
of the State south of Lat. 4o, as pro- 
jected 



2-22 



400 



165 



112 



2G8 



Survevcd to St Peter 112 miles. 

6. A branch of latter from Ro-hester 
to I«i Crescent as surveyed and located 79 

7. A branch of the Minnesota valley 
- from Shakopee to Minneapolis - - 24 



1,270 
84.5 



Total Congressional Land Grant as pro 
jccted - - - . - . 
Surveyed and located 

STATE LAND GRANT RAILROADS. 

In addition to these the State has given Tal 
uable grants of swamp lands tor the con- 
struction of the following roads : 

8. Branch of the Minnesota and Pacific 
froni St. Paul to Winona— surveyed 
about ...--- 

9. I^ikc Superior and Mississippi rail- 
road from St. Paul to the headof 
Lake Superior . . - - 



1<53 



140 



Total length of all projected lines - l,-5t;3 

The whole number of acres of land granted 

for railroad purposes is as sollows : 

Congressional Land Grant 

State grant of swamp lands al>out 



4,399,141 
1,185,440 



Year. No. aesessed 


Val. of pprs. 


Population. 


counties. 


and real estate. 




1849 1 


$514,0;W 


4,049 


1H.W G 


hOC,447 


0,077 


1S51 3 


],,>S2,li;3 


7,0<H) 


IKO'^ 8 


J,715,8;i5 


10,000 


1W3 


2,70i,4:5r 


14,<XX) 


ltS54 13 


3,5"8,518 


'Ai.im 


if^ 18 


10,4-.'4,l5r 


40,0(KI 


ipSii 24 


24,3<H,3<.)5 


lOO.fKKI 


jssr 31 


49,33r.,Ci73 


15",0:i7 


ISiW 37 


41,)yJC,778 


15(>,lKl(l 


18o9 40 


.•tt,5<H,4<.>2 


lti2,(»0U 


Ihtio 41 


3(i,753,4n« 


a7-',02*.i 


1S«)1 44 


3t»,077,53l 


ItXJ.OOO 


1S(V2 




200,000 


am 




225,000 



POPULATION. 

The swell and sul)sidence of the wave of 
population as indicated in the above table 
mark four well detined phrases in the pro- 
gress of the population of this State 



1. In the years immediately following 1849, 
i83-2.--Schoolcraft discovered the source of a minority, seceded and formed a convention ' the gold discoveries of California diverted im- 



Total 5,584,581 

The whole number of miles to be 

constructed is - - - - l,o63 

The whole number of miles sur- 
veyed and located - 2 - 1,016 
Oft hesc lines the St. Paul and Pacific Com 
pany has completed, and is now running the 
cars on twenty-seven and a half miles of their 
ro.ad from St. Paul to Anoka. The grade is 
made and iron is purchased to push itthrough 
to Watab. 

The Winona and St. Peter Railroad has 
built twenty-five miles from Winona to St. 
Charles, and has completed its grade some 
thirty-five miles farther. 

The Minneapolis and C<idar Valley Rail- 
road has completed the gra. ie from Mendota 
toNorthficld. and have pi'achased the iron 
and rolling stock for puttin g the road in ope- 
ration to Faribault next y ear. Nothing has 
been done since 1859 on any other line. 

tit. Paul (lie nailroail Center of tlie 
Mtate. 

The six principal lines above enumerated, 
comprising more than three-quarters, or 1192 
miles of the whole distance traversed, and 
more than three-quarters of the whole Land 
Grant, will, when completed, have their com 
mon meeting point near the junction of the 
Mississippi and Minnesota Rivers at St. Paul, 
which is the common point of evnrergence and 
radiation for eight great transit lines. 

By her six railroad lines, if, or rather when, 
built, St. Paul will box nearly the whole com- 
pass, and draw tribute from every part of the 
State with her communications. 

1. From the Northrccst— the St. Paul and 
Pacific branch line will bring her the trade of 
the Upper Mississippi and Red River Valleys, 
and perhaps before long, as Mr, Brydges as- 
sures us, from the far Pacific. 

2. From the If 'es<— the St. Paul and Pacific 
main line will empty into her lip the products 
of the wide region between the Vppcr Missis 
sippi and the Minnesota. 

3. From the Southwest— tho Minnesota Val- 
ley Road will form a new avenue to St. Paul 
for the commerce of that beautiful region, the 
building of which and its continuation to 
Sioux City will secure a connection at that 
point with the Great Union Pacific Railway 
to San Francisco. 

4. From the Sotith— the Minneapolis and 
Cedar Valley Railroad which actually termi- 
nates at St. Paul by what is nominally a 
branch, but really a continuation of its main 
line fVom Mendota to St. Paul, will bring here 
all the rich harvests of interior counties of 
Southern Minnesota. 



Tn no State have the foundation? been laid 
so deeply and broadly as in our own for that 
Ih-st ol ject of a free government— the free cd- 
ucition of the children of the State. 

By tiic munificence of Congress, two sec- 
tions out of every township in the S^atc, that 
is to say, one eighteenth of the CTitire landed 
arcaoftlic State, or about 2,700.000 acres in 
all, have been donated for the support of edu- 
cation. 

Under the operations of the Land Depart- 
ment created l>y the Legislature in 18fi2, about 
one tliirtictli, part of this magnificent 
domain has ^bccn sold, yielding an aggre- 
gate product of !»-552,0OO, averaging §.'3.25 per 
acre. At the same rate the whole school land 
grant will realize some !ifflO,COO,000. The 
niinimiini price of the school lands is $5 per 
acre, The amount reali/cil from sales of 
school lands constitutes a pcnnancnt fund, 
the interest of which is distributed among the 
counties in the ratios of their schoolable pop- 
ulation (between the ages of 5 and 21). The 
whole permanent school fund is $552,000, 
which yi elds an income of !s;J8.040. 

Besides this a tJix of 2 1-2 mills is now im- 
posed for the support of schools, which will 
soon be superseded by the revenues derived 
from the school lands. 

STATK UNIVERSITY. 

By the organic act of the Territory of Min- 
nesota 72 sections of land were set apart for a 
State University. These have been Isng since 
selected in desirable situations. 

In 1850 the University was located at Saint 
Anthony Falls. One of the first steps of the 
Board of Regents was the establishmDnt of a 
Preparatory Department, in a frame building, 
opened November 24, 1851. In 1856, this was 
replaced by a large and luindsome edifice of 
stone, designed to form one wing of the future 
University. To build this structure which 
cost over $f45,000, the Regents were authoriz- 
ed by the Legislature to issue their bonds se- 
cured by mortgage upon the property of the 
University which is now largely encumbered 
by debt. 

An elTort Is to be made this, year to get the 
State to assume the debts of the University, 
taking its lands under the management of the 
Land Department, and to open the University 
immediatelj'. 

AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 

In 1861 Congress donated to each loyal 
State a portion of the public lands in support 
of an Agricultural College. 

The share of Minnesota m this grant is 
120,000 acres which have not been selected. 
No steps have Ikcu taken to establisjj a college 
in connection with this grant. 

• « ♦ « ♦ • 



next door to 
IMCarvin's d-ool£<M*y Im- 
FOi-tingf Mouse. 

LAMP?5 SHADES. CHIM- 
NEYS, on, 

AND ALL THE ARTICLES BE- 
LONCilNG TO THE TRADE, 

Can be found f.t tho Storf a'Vj ||_dn? MarvinV 

mc-it the 



f'rockory laiiiortin;.' Slouse. 
Anexclacive l.:iniiiaii(I<»ii Sitre to moittlic 
domuncl* of the VVholesylc and ictail trQd.\ has 
long been desirable in Si. Paul. Country -Mer 
chants can now ho 8-ipi.!iod iil Kastern pncee 
(Uuusportation added.) Call at th«^ Curbon Oil 
and Lamp Store ailioiiiinji IJa-vin's Crockery 

llouso. . ,, , ... J 

Aif- Country Merchants are e ipecially invitrd. 
Call and ?oe. BPpt29 



XXO! FOR THE CAVALRY! 
Cnpt. .A.. Tt. ItTissell, 

Having received authority from tho Governor 
proposes to raise a CoiujKiiiy for the 

2cl Miniie.sota C^avalry. 

All who wish to avoid tho Dkakt which is I'osi- 
nvKLV lo take place on the I'tli ol Jan., 18(h- 
liave i< clrincH to enlist in a regiment that wiil 
ro-;rrivix\ never leave tiie t'tiitc in any case as 
lonit as forces are needed on our frontier. The 
lUlL'NTV islhe same as in an ' other rcRiraent, 
old or new. Subsistence and irinsportation fur-^ 
1 ish.'d to ever:) recr. ii. I'ersoi s desirine M en- 
ll-t in (apt. Kussell's Company, can see him be- 
tween tlie hours of 9 A. M. and 4 r. M.. at the 
Union Uotol, corner of ^th and Wabashaw-sts., 
.St. Paul. CAIT. A. U. ttCSS K r.L. 

dec9-lm Uo( ruitingOfliCfr. 



Bnowx's BiioxcniAL -Troches, for 
Coughs Axn Colds.— A neglected Cough, Cold 
an Irritated or Sore Throat if allowed to progress 
results in seiious Pulmonary Bronchial and Asth- m^ 

matic Diieajes oftentimes Incurable. Biiows'a 
BuoxciiiAL Tkoches reacii directly the afTccted 
parts, and give almost Iramtdiatc relief, lot 
Bronchili-s Asthma, Catarrh, and CossvMPTi^t^ . 
Coughs the Troches are usefal. I'ublic Speakers i 
and Singers ehould have tlie Troches to clear and 
strongtlien the voice. Military Officers and Sol- 
diers who overtax the voice, and am exposed 10 
sudden changes should use them. Obtain only 
the ffenuinc. " Brown's Broncldal Troches" hav- 
ingprored their cQicacy by a test of many jesrs, 
arc J ighly recommended and prescribed by I'hy- 
ician? and Surgeons in the Army, and have re- 
ceived testimonials from many cmincDt men. 

Sold by all Druggists and Dialers in iledicino 
in the United States and mo»t Foreign countries 
at lio cts., p er box. dicslmd&w 

HoM£ Life Ixsuuance Compant, 
Xew York, offers the most liberal advantages to 
parties deniringto effect inturance. 

IIEV. EDW D. K'^OLKSToN, 

SrAT» AGEIlT for MlNNEPOTl, 

th nol9-t sept 2 '64 St. Paul. 

^^». ami - 

ABEAUTIFULCOMrLEXIOX, FRE« FROM 
Tan, Pimples and Freckles, may easily b«» pro aaOT 

cured by using the " Balmot Thousand Floweri. 
For shaving it is unsurpassed. It is composed o 
palm oil, honey, and other valuable articles, high- 
ly perfumed by its own ingredients, and when 
used for washing, night and morning, renders 
the skin soft and white, and free from blemish 
Price 50 cents. For sale by 

DAY It JEXKS, St. Paul, and 

geptl'J-eow ly N. H. H K MiUP. St. Anthony. 1 ^^ 

TiiF. Mutual Like Insurance Com- 
pany OF NViscoNsiN, is the best Company for 
Western men to insure in. 

Itis made upof and managed by Western men, 

andis thus having its risks all reside iu this the 

healthiest part of the Union. Itis believed that 

its rate of mirtallty will be lower than that of 

the Eastern Companies, in the future as it ha ••^ 

been in the past. 

the Comimuy is now In Its fifth yoar of busl. 

ncss, and has proven an entire success, liaviug 
issued over four thousand policies, and accumu- 
lated in reserve premiums two hundred thousand 
dollars. It started without guaranleo capital, and 
experience has proven tliat none was necessary. 
The business ot the Company is conducted upon 
the same general basis as that of the most suc- 
cessful Eastern Companies with ihcadvantage of •** 
having the experience of tho older ones as its 

^"l here are now a large numl er of mendM>rs of 
the Company in St. Paul and vicinity, among 
whom are soine of ojr best business men. 
NORTHWESTERN AGENCY, 
Thompson's Block, Third street, St. Paul. 
O. CUKllS, JIanaper. 
S. P. SNYDEU, Agent, ilinncajKi'U. 
Either of the above naniPd gentlemen will be »■ '•" 
hofpv to give information to members or others 
dcsirinj, in ^-^garJ to the Comi^ny, and assist in 
making api bcations for Policies. noS-3m 



-I3UCK WHEAT 1-LOU::?, 
A SMALL QUANTITY JUS rEECEIVED. 

IL.E]>XO]VS. 

Dried Raspberries. 

Dried Cherries, pitted. 
Dried Blackberries, 

Dried Pared Peaches, 

all new Fruit. 
Freeh Citron, Raisins and Currants, at 

E. & II. y. BELL'S, 

Third-Ft. 



nol5-3m 



J. 



H. MURPHY, I.I. D., 



PBYSICIAX AND SURGEON. 

Office on Jackson street, in Ihe office formerly 
occuj.ied by Drs. .Alorton & \\ barton, (opposite 
the Tempemnce House.) 

Especial attention paid to Surgery, 



dec2.3 Cm 



CTEW BOOK OF CHURCH MUSIC. 



N 

TUE HARP OF JUDAH; 

Sacred and Soc.dar JIusic fo' 



A Collection of 
Choirs, Schools, 
Home 
Gold- 



Musical Conventions, Socielii s and the H( 
Circle ; By L. O. Emerson, Aulhor of the G 
en Wreath." " Sabbath Haniu ny," &c. 

A book embracing every vark-tv of choice mu- 
sicadoptedto the ciipadtics of all grades of smg- 
ers. Tliougii published but a few months since 
it has already been used by tv^clve Musical Con- 
ventions, anfl nearly aU the leiding conventions 
in the United .<tates are efTocung arrnnssements 
to do so the coming season. Clioirs ai.d icach- 
ers are rapidly adopting it be r.ui^e they can find 
no book ei|nal to it in everv requirement desira- 
ble in such a work. Spccimc i piges (20 tunes) 
will be s( nt frei; to any one on application. 

Price of the " Harp of Judih" $1 per copy, 
$9 per dozen. OLIVER D: T.SON & CO 



dec2:M)dc*w 



Pu jlishers, Boston, 



rpo 



Unaacresafnl Attempt of Col. Atrefg-ltt 
and Itia Adjatant to Eacape from 
Iticliniond. 

From the Richmond Enquirer, Doc. 21. 

The Yankee oflbers confined in the 
Libhy prison h.ave, on several occasions 
latelv, made unsuccessful attempts to es- 
cape Irom that institution. The desire lo 
escape seems to have grown with them 
since the successful evacuation of the 
premises by Capt. Anderson and Lieut. 
Skelton, herelofore noticed, and which 
was produced by bribing the sentinel on 
dutv at the time'. On Friday evening a 
sentinel on duty in the rear of the Libby 
prison was sounded by two oflicers on 
the subject of an escape, which they wish- 
ed to effect at half-past three o'clock that 
night. He agreed to their proposals ; 
they promising to give him an hundred 
dollar greenback and two %vatches for his 
services. Major Turner being notified of 
the airair, directed the sentinel to let the 
parties escape and receive the bonus for 
so doing, and that he would take care that 
they did not get very far off. Accord- 
ingly at half-past three o'c^lock, a rear 
wind/iw of the middle tenement of the 
Libby establishment was raised, a blanket 
rope e.xtended to the ground, and two 
men descended. Hastily approaching the 
sentinel, they handed him the greenback 
and two silver watches, and was making 
remarkable good time when they were 
hailed bvr Lieut. LaTouche, and command- 
ed to stop. This accelerated their speed 
in the direction of Rocketts, but they bad 
not gone far when the guard who had 
been posted, closed around the fugacious 
Yankees, and their capture was complete. 
On the approach of Lieut. LaTouch, he 
recognized the notorious Colonel A. 1). 
Streight and his [Adjutant Lieut. Reed. 
Thev were conducted back to the Libby, 
furnished with substantial irons, and put 
in the dungeon of the prison, where they 
were at last account, " chewing the cud of 
sweet and bitter fancies." The Yankee 
oflicers had. previous to the attempt of 
Streight, determined to celebrate Christ- 
mas night by a grand musical entertain- 
ment. Whether their purpose will be ef- 



niOMOTE GOOD HEALTH 

USK Tin: 

AXIJ 

Wild Cherry Bittei*s. 

In Pint Bottles, priceSOc; ii. Quart Bottles, 75, 

These Bitter'* are composed of tlie best Roots. 

Barks and 11 eiba known, and peculiarly adapted 

to the Immediate cure of all diseases produced by 

an inactive liver. 

Dandelion and Wild Cherrj' Bitters 

CURE SIC1<. HEADACHE, 
Dandelion and Wild Cherry Bitters 
CURE JAUNDICE. 

Dandelion and ^Cl^BUters^^^^ 

Dandelion and Wild Cherry Bitters 

CURE HEii KT BURN. 
Dandelion and WiM ^h-y Bitte^^g^ 

Dandelion and W^'J^^^-y r^AlU'ETITE. 

Dandelion and Wild Cherry Bitters 
CURE AGLE, 
In its worst forms. They pf>rform these cares 
simply, by one office, regulating the liver. 

For sale by d>'alers in Med cines, everywhere 
6. HUNTINGTOJf, Proprietor, 
Farraersburg^^Iaytan County, Iowa. 

For gale by E. U. Biggs, H. W. Robinson, Paw 
Reicer St. Paul ; S N. Wicker sham, Charles Ben- 
fonf L Weinand & Co., and t. Ed -ards Whole. 
BftleAsent Wipona: Charles Hawley, Chatfield ; 
D B.«t, PrestU; «• V Uyde Fllhnore; 
Charles Morrill, Marion; Capt. Mills andJ.D. 
Bunce, Pleasant Grove ; S. B. Rob'n«)n, General 
Wholesale Agent, address Ch itfield Mm. 

Also-Huntington's Writii ? 1- uW I H^c fe 
Stevens' Family Dye Colors ; V an puseu's Worm 
Confections; V an bnsen's Ms meal Blueing; Al- 
den's Condition Powders; lalman & CoUina 
Concentrated Extract ol Lenon: Talman & Cor 
lins' Leather Preservative; Uutcher^s Dead Shot 
for Bed Bugs ; Sleeper's Lighi ning Fly KiUer. 
I>AY & JESrit», St. Paul, 

Wholesale a id Retail Agenta. 



The Amkrican Exprkss Comp.vny, 

would respectfully announce lo the Merchants of 
thii city and vicinity that they are now prepared 
to bring forward from La Cros'se, Wis., and de- 
liver to points of destlnalion all "Morchauls' 
Dis'patch" and ordinary Railroad frtight. 

Merchants and others who may wi^h to avail 
themse'ves of this means of transportation, will 
please mark the'r goods to our ca^e at 1^ Crosse, 
at the same time giving us notice so that WC- msy 
see that such goods are delivend ta us at La 
Crosse, without any unnecessary dt Uy. 

For tariff rates call at their olBco, 21'J Third-8t., 
opposite Stage OfBce. 

deCJ E. F. "WARNER, Agout. 



■S— T— 1860— X. 

drakj:'s plantation bitters. 

They purify, strengthen and invigorate. 

They create a healthy appetite. 
They are an antidote to change of water and diet. 
They overcome effects of dissipation and late hours 
They strengthen the system *nd enliven the mind. 
They preT»>nt miasmatic and intermittent fevers. 
They purify the breaf h and acidity of the stomach. 
They cure Dyspepsia and Constipation. 
They cure Diarrhoea, Choleraand Cholera Morbus. 
1 hey cure LiverComplaint and Nervous Headache 

They are the best Bitters in the world. They 
make tho weak man strong, and are exhausted 
nature's great restorer. They are made of pure 
St. Croix Rum, the celebrated Callsaj-a Bark! 
roots and herbs, and are taken with the pleasure 
of a beverage, without regard to age or time ol 
day. Particularly recommended to delicate per. 
sons requiring a gen le stimulant Sold by all 
Grocers, Druggists, Hotels and Saloons. P. H, 
Drake & Co , MZ Broadway, N. Y. au»-eowly 



WYNKOOP'S ICELAND PECTORAL. 

Diseases ot the Throat, Chest and Pulmonary 
organs are ever prevalent, insidious and danger- 
ous. The properties of a medicine to alleviate, 
cure and uproot these complaints, must be Ex- 
pectorant. Anodyne and Invigorating, loosening 
the mucus ol the throat, and imjiarting tone to 
the entire system. No discovery in medical sci- 
ence over mastered this class of diseases like Dr. 
Wynkoop'8 Iceland Pectoral. It is used with the 
most asi.wnishingresultslnall cases of Bronchitis, 
Influenza, Whooping Cough, Diptberla or Putrid 
Sore Throat, Asthma, Croup, Coughs, Colds, 
Nervous Irritability, &c. 

Tho Rev. J. J. Potter certifies, "that I have 
nsed Dr. Wynkoop's Pectoral for several yearo, 
myself and in my family, for severe Pulmonary 
Complaints, and have recommended it to many 
others, and have never sec n its equal." 

Rev. J. J. POTTER, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Hundreds and thousands of important testi- 
monials could be produced, showing its remarka- 
ble cures and that it never fails. 

It is composed of pure Iceland Moss, Balm ol 
Gllead, Peruvian Balsam, Elecampane. Comfrey. 
Burdock, and other inviluable expectorant and 
tonic ingredients^ It is harmless, prompt and 
lasting. Invalids and sufferers cannot afford to 
neglect a trial. Eve.ry family should have It. It 
is ntmarkable for Croup. Full descriptions, re- 
commendations and directions accompany each 

bottle. 

Sold bv all principal Druggists. 

Prepared by Dr. U. D. v\ ynkoop, and sold by 
D. S. Barnes & Co., New York. aul5-eowdtwfcw 



■ 



Ik 



N 





> 


. ' "1 


I 


, 


1 

1 





my2"-ly 



hanos and melodeons. 
F. o. \^n:Li>E:R, & CO., 

Dealers in > i.ino-Fortes, M 'lodeons, narmonl- 
urns, Cabinet Organs, Sheet Music Music Books, 
&c., &c., No. 2w lhird-8t.,coi uerof St. I eter-st.. 
St. Paul. Minnesota. Agent) for the ce ebrated 
A M. McPhail & Co.'s Star und Grand Scale Pi- 
anos. Also, the Prrlor Gem 

Mr. Wilder is a Piano Maker, andhasl^enin 
the business over 20 years, «"?.*>» sell "othing 
but first-class instruments. J^-very instrumenl 
will be warranted, and all Pianos sold by the firm 
will be kept in tune one yet r free of charge, if 
within a reasonable distance. .„„.«~v,i 

as- Pianos and Melodeons .uned and repalreu. 

Lesson given on the Piano iind Melodeon. 
no26-d*wly 



F 



OR SALE CHEAP. 



stoves, Tin "Ware, Hardwire, Hollow Waw, 

Steel Traps and Shingles. II ighest price paid in 

., , - -,. ■ cash for Wheat, Wool, Old Copper, Iron, If «l 

fected by Streight's proceedmg, remains ^^^ i^ags. Bobert-st., ftrat »tore from Thirdit, 
to be seen. « marn-u 



HAGAN'S MAGNOLIA BALM 
This is the most delightful and extraordinary 
article ever discovered. It changes the sun burnt 
face and hands to a pearly satin texture of ravi 
Ishing beauty. Imparting the marble purity ol 
youth, and the dMingxu appearance so invitlnft 
In the city belle of fashion. It removes Un, 
freckles, pimples and roughness from the skin, 
leaving the complexion fresh, transparent and 
smooth. It contains no material injurious to the 
sklu. Patronized by Actresses and Opera Sin*; 
era. It Is what every lady should Lave. Sold 
everywhere.^^^g 8. BARNES h, CO., 

General Agenta, 
aa8 dtw&w ly W2 Broadway , N . Y. 



[Communicated.] 
PULMONAKY CONSUMPTION A CuRABUB 
Disease Ml- A Cakd.— To Coksumhtivks.- 
The undersigned having been restored to health 
in a few weeks, by a very simple remedy, after 
having sufiTered several years witli a severe lung 
^ffealon, andthatdread disease ConsunyHloii— is 
anxious to make known to his feUow-sufterers 
the means of cure. ^ 

To all who desire It, he wlU send a copy of the 
prescription nsed (ftee of charge). w«th th* di- 
rections for preparing and using the same, which 
they will find a ture cure for CossuMFTloB, 
Asthma, Bromchitis, Coughs, Colds, fcc. 
The only object of the advertiser in sending the 
Prescription Is to benefit the afflicted, and spread 
Information which he conceives to be invaluable ; 
and he hopes every sufferer will try his remedy, afl 
it will cost them nothing, and may prove a bless- 
ing. Parties wishing the prescription will please 
address REV. EDWARD A. WIL60H, 

Williamsburgh, Kings County, 

008-Smdfcw New York. 



■ I ar ■ I I 



2C 




DEFECTIVEPAGE 



u.-^ 



\ 




'»'« te. g. ' 



y 



\ 




Wl » l" 




THE sAnrr paul press, friday. January i, i864. 



[CONTINTED FROM yiF lII TAGK.] 

Our Flour exports this year foot up to 
65,48.". barrels, in which we have includ- 
ed about 22,000 barrels which were not 
marketed here, altliongh inanulactured 
lor this market, but shipped from another 
port. A much greater (luantity would 
have been shipped but for the low water. 

Our Exports and Imports show as fol- 
lows : 

IMrORTS. 

Per Min. Kiver, 1,081 
I'crR. 11. - - l^.^^-> 

15,910 



cleaned out the market. The crop last 
fall was lighter than usu^l, owing to the 
drought. At St. Louis, Minnesota pota- 
toes hare always commanded the highest 
price. Our exports for several years 
show as follows, the amount in bushels : 
1S61 - - 3,000 I 1863 - - 82,973 
18G2 - - - 3,000 I 





EXVOUTS. 


\9f,\ 


- 2.5,600 


lSrt2 


. - 42,S(« 


1863 


- 5.5,48-5 



of 



%V002<. 

The great increase in our exports 
wool is another gratifying item of our 
trade. It is now settled by the experi 
•nee and close observation of numerous 
intelligent sheep growers, that our cli- 
mate is more favorable to the raising of 
sheep, and they produce more lambs and 
more wool than in any other part of the 
United States. The average clip is almost 
b li'S. per head, and at the high price of 
wool the jast year, sheep raising here 
has been very profitable. The followin,7 
table compiled from our volumes for past 
years, will show the progress of this im- 
portant branch of our trade : 
Year. No. ofShctp. 



It was not until 1858 that the woods of 
Minnesota were discovered to be full of 
ginseng, and all the settlers and their 
children began to make good wages dig- 
crlng it. The enormous quantities ex- 
ported at once called the attention of 



dealers to the source of supply. 



and 



18.50, 

i8.y.), - 

I860, 

I8';i, - 
IS-;;?, 



No. of lbs. 
[wool raised 
1.50 
7,000 
- 19,306 
70.00''» 
. 500,000 



80 
. 4,0)0 - 

12,.595 
. '2 5,00-.) - 

1,50,000 

The large mcrease ot the past three years 
ia a remarkable fact, resulting, first, Irom 
natural increase (a Hock mostly doubles 
every year) and— second, from the large 
impmt's of Hocks. The past season 25,- 
000 came into the State via La Crosse 
ferrv alone. Tiie shipments from the 
port of St. Paul for three years have 
been— lSGl,r.,Ui.O; 1S02, 3G,105; 18G3, 
11 1,G"J8. Our Saint Paul dealers control 
the mirkct over moiethan half the State. 
[I'art of their purchas-^sare shipped from 
other ports.] 



during the past lour si-aoons the Ginseng 
Trade has bttn an important one in our 
economy. Buyers are to be found every- 
where, and the root is bought green or 
dry, at every little town and country 
store. The Minnesota Ginseng is said to 
be of superior quality, and commands 
GO cents per pound dry. Enormous 
profits are made by the buyers and pack- 
ers, and for fear that their monopoly 
should be broken up and others share 
their profits, they have carefully concealed 
the amount of their shipments this season. 
One firm in Minneapolis is believed to 
have shipped 150,000 pounds in casks, 
most o{ which go direct to China in the 
same pkg. They clarify and prepare it 
complete for the Chinese market. The 
shipments from our port since 1858 are as 

follows : 

pounds. pounds. 



1F.59 
18!j0 



203,000 
21.5,434 



The decrease in t 



1861 - 208,650 

1862 - - 241,245 

1863 (est.) 1.54,830 
>e quantity exported 



last season is not owing to any falling off 
in ihe supply, which is inexhaustible, but 
to the fact that many of the settlers in 
counties which had hitherto furnished the 
chief supply of ginseng had abandoned 
their clearings through fear of Indians, 
and in other counties the high price and 
scarcity of labor interfered with the dig- 
.'iiic Ginseng must continue for years 
to be a valuable item of our exports. 



Ill » CM AX» XAtl-OW. 

Tiie rapid increase in the exports of 
Hides and Tallow is a gratifying item in 
our progrej=s. During 1HG3, 21,000 hides 
10,802 calf hides and 4,102 peUs were 
shipped below, against 13,310 of all kinds 
in \^u-l, while the Tallow exported was 
180,205 lbs. This large business has 
grown up within the past four or five 
years, and now employs a capital of 
$l."»(>,0('0. 

The illimitable room for the produciion 
of herds on the rich prairies of INIinne- 
sota and the R- d lliver Valley, and their 
vast a!;d rapid increase, points to a day 
not far distant w}i,-n the exports o( Hides 
and Tallow from iSIinnesota will, like 
those of Rus;:ia, be a main branch of our 

wcilth. 

p s._Oi,r dealer, reported to have 
shipped .•?15,0fX» worth of Hides an.l 
Skins, we weri^ unable to see in time to 
include in our li.-t. 

Tiie low price at which Tallow can be 
purchased here, compared with other 
markets, allows our dealers to ship it to 
New York with good profit. It is ren- 
dered into empty kerosene barrels, which 
packages are often exported direct to 
England and other ports of Europe frcra 
New York. Could we have railroad con- 
nection with Lake Superior, and thus en- 
able us to throw our freight into New 
York at cheap rates, it would develop 
the Hide and Tallow business more yig- 
orouslv than it is even now progressing. 



T£IE CATFI-i: MARKET 

The trade in live stock is becoming 
very large. Only six years ago beef 
cattle were imported from Illinois and 
Iowa in droves, as the farmers of ilinne- 
sota had not begun to raise horned cat- 
tle in numbers sufficient to supply the 
home demand. Five years have wrought 
a wonderful revolution in this respect. 
Our rich prairies and luxuriant meadows 
are dotted with droves of fat beeves, 
many of them of miported breeds, and 
beel is plenty and cheap. During De- 
cember of 1 -fCi. and e'.evon months ot 
1SG3, the butchers ol this city alone made 
the following returns of cattle slaugh- 
tered : 



No. 
1,.5>5 

1,1^0 

231 

1,077 



Value. 

831,100.00 

,5.750.00 

2,312..30 

5,385.00 



34 


Sheep, 


45 


60 


Swme, 


76 


69 







Homed cattle 

Calves 

Hogs* 

Sheep - - 

*Tliis is in addition to 3,126 cut up by 
packers. 

The revenue tax paid on the above an- 
imals slaughtered amounts to 8415,00. 
Compare this with the entire amount of 
live stock reported by Ube assessors in 
1850. 

Milch cows, 
"Working oxen, 
Other cattle, 

At present prices their total value 
would be .?5,7.-)5. The value of the cat- 
tle slaughtered in 18G3, rated at the same 
prices, would be .S44,577,.50. A number 
of small dealers manage to evade the tax. 
Perhaps a fM return would make the 
value .<i!50,0i.)0. 

The value of the hides, together with 
the tallow of these animals, is very great, 
(see UicLes and Tallow,) making a large 
item in our manufactures and exports. 
When the immense areas of Minnesota 
are settled up with graziers and shep- 
herds, and pork growers, the expansion 
of the live stock trade will, at the rate oi 
its increase during the ten years of our 
infancy, be very great. 



FUEI.. 

Fire wood has been scarce and ruled 
high all last year, owing to the low water 
in the Minnesota river, which cut down 
our usual supply from 50,000^ cords to 
3,800. Parties from St. Paul last season 
bought about 2U,000 cords of wood on 
the St. Croix, but were unable to market 
it here, owing to the fall of water. Im- 
mense beds of Peat were discovered 
on the edge of the city late in the fall, of 
excellent quality for fuel. Next season 
will doubtless witness the cutting and 
curing of thousands of cords of this val- 
uable and cheap fuel. 

MANUFACTURES. 

Through the kindness of AVilford S. 
Wilson, Esq., the Collector of Internal 
Revenue of this district, we have been 
enabled to compile from the returns in 
his ofiice some statistics of the most im- 
portant branches of manufacture in our 
city. Mr. Wilson has got his Bureau in 
good working order, but owing to de- 
fects in the return law, a number of small 
luanulacturers manage to entirely evade 
making returns. The statistics which 
we give, therefore, must be understood 
as rather understating the value and 
amount of manufactures, than otherwise. 

I-l'MiSriTl-ItE. 

The manufacture of furniture is (luite 
large. Five houses are engaged in it, 
who manufacture about $20,000 worth 
per annum, Messrs. Bailey & Roedler 
and J. A. Stees' returns being about 
$G,000 each. The rest of the shops are 
small. The value of fine mahogany and 
rosewood parlor furniture imported from 
the east is about $25,000 annually. In 
1^;G3, 500 bedsteads were imported. Our 
man ufacturers are doing all they can to 
deve lop the furniture-making business 
here, have good workmen and good ma- 
chinery, and turn out some excellent 
work, but complain that they cannot get 
a good supply of lumber. Good walnut, 
of which millions of feet could be got out 
in the Big Woods, costs $60 per M, and 
good maple ^2o. Good butternut com- 
mands $25 and $35. It is in good supply, 
and of fine quality, and makes elegant 
furniture. Let this branch of manufac- 
tures be encouraged. 



quite an important branch in our indus- 
try, and 13 steadily on (he increase. The 
great consumption of malt liquors in our 
midst, (retailers of which are not com- 
pelled to pay any license,) has tended to 
promote this, while it has to some ex- 
tent become ah article of commerce. The 
following are the returns made foi 1863: 

No. of breweries, ^ 

No. of barrels Ale brewed, - - " „ ^1 - 
No. of barrels IJccr brewed, - - "^-^/J? 
Value of hops consumed, - - - ^.'*'""J; 
Bushels of barlcv consumed, - - \yJ^ 
Value cf manufactures, - - - _ i6,oou 
The ale and beer manufactured in our 
city is said by connoisseurs to be superior 
to that of any other place in flavor and 
body. This is attributable to the sand- 
stone caves or storage cellars in which 
all of our breweries place their ale and 
beer to season and acquire age and 
strength. These cellars exist in no other 
city in the United States. The tempera- 
ture does not vary a degree the year 
round, thus giving the ale and beer a 
stocky flavor and tone that cannot be pro- 
duced in any damp cellar, or any storage 
cellar above ground. Here is where our 
St. Paul breweries have such an advan- 
tage — onewhichhas given their ale agood 
name as far as Chicago. Orders from 
there were received last season for ale, 
and about $600 worth was actually ex- 
ported. The hops used are all imported 
from New York, our farmers not thinking 
it worth while to supply the brewers with 

a home article. ^^ 

ci^oTuiirc 
A very large business is done in the 
manufacture of clothing. Ten firms are 
engaged in it, and return to the U. S. 
Re'venuo Collector $53,059 in value 
made during 18G3. This branch ol busi- 
ness gives employment to a number of 
families, usually soldier's -tvrves, who, 
with sewing machines, make good wages. 

iirA«o:v.'>i Aaro »i.i:i>». 

The returns of this business are not so 
full as we could wish, a wrong construc- 
tion of the law allowing a considerable 
amount of work done to remain unas- 
sessed. Ten firms are engaged in th -. 
business, turning out about $10,000 per 
annum in work. 



T H B C I T ^ 



' king calls" on their lady friends. Bundled 

1 up in furs, in choicest attlrc, and "got up kill- 

. inglv," he enters his cutter, and starts out. A 

In anticipation of the demand for this i ggjjtjgmjm ^jn make perhaps fifty calls in a 

morning's issue of the Press, a hirge number | ^^^^ merely stopping at the residences of his 

of extra copies have been printed. For»sale in I fj.j,.m2j^ ^^ j^jjc a sip of wine and a crumb of 



Price 



wnippcrs at thcPiiKss Counting Koom. 
ten cent*. 

NEW YEAR^ DAY. 



Its Origin as a Social Festival, 

and Ancient Customs of 

Observing the Same, both 

Among Pagans and 

Christians. 



Its Observance as an Amer- 
ican HoUday, and tiie 
Castoms Prevalent in 
its Enjoyment. 



The demand for light stoves and tin 
ware makes this business a large one. 
Nine firms are engaged in it, turning out 
work to the value of $22,000 annually. 
(We include copper and zinc work in 
this.) 

Two firms are engaged in distilling vin- 
egar. In 1863. 125 barrels were ex- 
ported below, to the value of $705. One 
distillery is reported who returns about 
SUO barrels of whiskey manufactured. 
Of mineral water, $3,120 worth wjis man- 
ufactured last season. 

UAnmEMS. 

Six firms are reported in the manufac- 
ture of harness and saddles, producing 
$9,000 worth of articles. 

^ — -^ - ^ 

liOAPA]»I> CAWOIKS. 

Two firms, L. Beach and John Dorn, 
are engaged in this trade. The loxmer 
returns about 20,000 ILs. candles, and 
55,0(X) lbs. soap, employing $13,000 in 
capital. The L tter 6,479 of candles, 
and 4,080 of < oap. In addition to his 
manufactures Mr. Beach exports 33,601 
lbs potash,and 32,185 of tallow, render- 
ed by himself. 

OTHER ^WAXIEACXUHES. 

We append below a glance at the bal- 
ance of our manufactures, not having 
space for a more extended review : 

No. of Value of 

houses. Man. 

1 . . $919,17 

'-4 ' - - - 6,212,7') 

. 1 . - - fi.StC) 

3 . - - 3,100 

. 6 - - - 3,700 

1 - - - 757 



Article. 



Confectionery, - 
Spices and Cotlee, 
Boots and Shoos, - 
Foundry castings. 
Furs, - - - 
rigars, - 
Plows, - 



cHAins. 

We have one chair factory, (Messrs. 
Galley & Jansen, on Wabashaw street, 
near Fifth,) who return 1,614 chairs made, 
valued at $5,733. A number of these 
were fine cane-bottom chairs. Their fac- 
tory executes good work, and their suc- 
cess is so encouraging that they arc about 
to add a bedstead factory to their busi- 
ness. 



were 
time that 



POTATOES. 

The potato shipments in 18*^3 
▼ery large. It seemed for 
everybodv was in the potato exporting 
business.'and every steamer that depart- ^^ ^ ^ 

ed for St. Louis, to which point the ship- ^^^^^ prjpg of cooperage has been— 
mentswere made, went loaded to the 
brim with potatoes, some having as high 
3 C>00 barrels. When the water pot 



COOPERACiE. 

The trade in Cooperage is becoming of 

great importance, our Pork business 

and Flour exports consuming a great 

number of barrels. Last summer 10,000 

bbls of inferior quality were made here 

and used in packing hard bread alone ; 

the flour business required nbout 30,000 

barrels. We have three manufactories 

in this city, one of which, F. M. Stowell 

& Co., returns to the Revenue Collector 

13,310 bbls made, at an average of 70 cts. 

There have also been imported via the 

St. Paul & Pacific R. R., 10,348 barrels 

of which 10,000 were new. About 1.000 

were exported to Hastings, for a <lou#ng 

mill there. The forests near Anoka are 

relied on for the supply of staves. The 

hoops come from the Minnesota river. 

The supply ot both is good. Staves and 

heads command $22 per M ; staves (flour) 

$10 per M., pork, $14 per M. The av 



Aiiotlier JohuBon'B Island Plot-TIie 
llebrls to Escape on Ihe Ice. 

From thP Clevelanii llorald, 24th. 

It is reported that intelligence has reached 
the authorities of another plot to release the 
rebel prisoners on Johnson's Island and take 
them over to Canada, after doing what mis- 
chief they can on this side. The exact details 
of the information have not been divulged, 
but it Is believed that the leading features of 
the plot are as follows ; 

The ice is now making rapidly in the lake, 
and if the present weather continues there 
will soon be a safe passage across the hike 
from roint I'eUe, Canada, by the wayot 
Point Pelee Island, and the American cluster 
of islands, to Danbury township on the penin- 
sular closing in Sandusky Bay. From the 
mainland of Danburv township to Johnsons 
Isl.ind (Bull Island] is only hnlf a mile. The 
plan is to get a sufficient naml>er of desperate 
men over from Canada, secrete them m the 
woods of Danbury township, and signal the 
prisoners. At a concerted signal a simulta- 
neous attack will be made on the guards by 
the prisoners within the enclosure inid their 
friends without. If the movements arc suc- 
ecsstul the rebels will then arm themselves, 
destroy the govemincntestatdishments on the 
island, proceed to Sandusky and bum it down, 
seize everything they can cjirry otl", and then 
either continue their work ot dostruetion m 
Ohio, or make a straight course across the ice 
for Canada. It is said the rebel sympathizers 
in Ohio have full intelligence of the proposed 

plot. ... . 

In this juncture the inquiry comes up as to 
the position of the United States ste.amer 
Michican, with her powerful armament. 
For some inexplicable reason she has lieen 
taken to Erie, where she can be of no possible 
service, and has been laid up for the winter. 
Whv the Michigan should ever make Erie 
her "headquarters has been a mystery; but 
the fact of her wintering at that place, when 
her presence is so urgently needed to overawe 
the rebel prisoners, and protect the lake Ixir- 
der from reljel assaults, is a pu/zle past find- 
ing out. ^^^^^^^^^^^ 



A 



PPLEt— APPLES- APPLES. 



A very choice lot of selected Winter Fruit, for 
sale by the single bbl. or quantity, by 

J. P. HUTCHINSON k, CO., 
no20 Siblcyst, between Third and Levee. 



as 



too low for the boats ^o run, the army 
contractors here took the supplies, and 



Flour barrels, - 40 a -t-'S 
Pork, " 1.40 a 1.50 
Firkius, • 7o 



1-2 Flour, - .30 
Cranberry, (3 bu) 30 



Aft.i: A!fIB BEEU BREITEIIIKS. 

The manufacture of malt liquors is 



Mits. Lkonaud, late from Mt. Auburn 
Seminary, Missi.«sippi, Tiahes to inform the pub- 
lic that she will give le.ssons in Vocal or Instru- 
mental MiiMc, I'iano, etc. Persons not having 
an instrument of their own, can practice on Mrs. 
L.'s Piano. For terms apply to her rooms, at Dr. 
Crary's, Robert-st., or Dr. C. D. Williams, fith-8f 

Kefkrejceb.— Rev. Dr. McMasters, Mungor 
Brothers, A. T. C. Pierson, Rev. Dr. Crary, Fred 
DrlacoU, Dr. C. D. WilUama. dec20.3in 



The year 1863 has nin its course, and as the 
last saiid dropp-d from the hour-glass at mid- 
night, "Eternity's great Bell" tolled off anoth- 
er" year into the slowly lenglhvning Fast. 
The Great Ituler of Earth pushed forward 
the hand on the Dialplatc of the Horologe of 
Time, and it now marks the Nctr Yiar, 18 il ! 

While the rejoicings and festivities that 
mark the birth of another year are in progi-css, 
let us glance back at the origin of the custom 
of celebrating the first day of January as a 
holiday. 

M- W YKAR's .VMONO TUK llOMANS. 

The llomans made an especial holiday of it, 
olfering sacriliics to Janus, whose principal 
Ic^tival occurred on the first day of the month 
iiainod for him, taking care that all tliey did 
or said should be pure and favorable, since 
everything was ominous for the occurences of 
the whole year. They api)eared in the streets 
iu festive garments, exchunged kindly saluta- 
tions, and gave to each other presents called 
Slrentc, consisting of gilt dates, Jigs, honey- 
cakes, and copper coins. Nenhis Marcellus 
ascribes the origin of New Year's gilts among 
the llomans, to Titius Taliun, King of the Sa- 
bines, who reigncl at Home juintly with 
Romulus, and who, having considered 
as a g(joil omen a prcscot of some branchc 
cut in a wood consecrated to Stieiiia (the 
Goddess of Strength) \Vhich he received on 
the first day of the New Year, anthorisc 1 this 
custom utlerwards, and gave the name Strcnie, 
to such presents. Under Augustus, the Se- 
nate, the Knights and the people presented 
such gifts to him, and in his absence deposited 
them in the Capitol. The Emperor Claudius 
aholi.-'hcdthis custom, but it always continued 
among the people. The ciuiy Christian Em- 
perors, however, conUnucd to receive them, 
notwithstanding they were condemned by the 
ecclesiastical councils as a Pagan custom. 

NEW YI-.AK's AMOXO THE r.AKIA- CUltlSTIAXS. 

According to Bra<ly, *' The first day of Janu- 
ary having been observed by the heathens as 
a , lav of extreme rejoicing, and for otferiug 
profane and superstitious sacrifices to their 
idol Jnnus, the pilmiiive Christians held it as 
£i fast to avoid even the seml)lance of joining 
in their aljwniinable customs. The firs; men- 
tion of this day as a festival p.mong Christians 
was during the pontificate of Felix III., a. i». 
487, who denomin.-.tcd it 'the octave of Christ- 
mas.' " A feast called " tiie circumsion" was 
held on this.day, to commemorate the occur- 
rence ot that cveut during the life of Christ. 

IN ENGLAND. 

Among the ancient Pruids, branches of the 
sacred misth'toe were cut with peculiar cere- 
mony, and distributed among.thc i.eople oti 
New Year's Day. January was called by the 
Anglo Saxons Giuli aftera, signifying the 
second Giul or Yule, or as we should say, the 
second Christmas. Many of the gports and 
cur-toms incident to the celebration of Christ- 
mas, or at least that closeiy resembled them, 
seem to have been in vogue upon New Year's 
day in England. They pass it in feasting and 
jollity. The omens of the day were at one 
time' accounted very important throughout 
England. The habit of wishing a happy New 
Year, and making presents, dates back many 
hundred years, but it is said now to >>c more 
honored in the breach than iu the observance, 
although the day is still observed as a holi- 
day. The custom of ringing in the New Year 
from the belfries of churches is now about 
the only ancient custom kept up on that day 
in England. 

IN THE CNITF.n ST.VTES, 

New Year's Day is obsei-vcd quite as generally 
as Christinas. This custom arose among our 
Dutch ancestors in the early days 
of New York, and as New York 
customs govern all American society, has 
gradually extended to every city in Yankce- 
dom. And even now New York makes more 
of it, and proceeds to enter into its fullest en- 
jovraent to a greater extent than any other 
city in the world. In leW, l>oth upon Christ- 
mas and New Year's, the New Amhterdam- 
mers used to go out to the ice on Beekman's 
and other swamps to shoot at turkeys ; every 
one paid a price for his shot, as a mark, and 
if he hit it so as to draw blood, it was his for 
.a Christmas or New Year's dinner. 

GENEKAL WASHINOTON TXSTITITKS IT AS AN 
AMKRICAN HOLIDAY. 

In Watrow's Annals of New York, an ac- 
count is given of how General Washington 
and his lady received their friends on the 
first of January, 1790. "General Wa.shington, 
in the first year of his Presidency upder the 
new constitution, resided in the Franklin 
House, at the head of Cherry street. On New 
Year's dav, 1790, he was waited upon by the 
principal" gentlemen of the city. The day 
was uncommonly mild and pleasant. After 
being severally introduced and paying the 
usua*! compliments of the season, the citizens 
mutually interchanged their kind greetings 
and withdrew, highly grtitified by the friendly 
notice of the Fresident, to most of wh >m he 
was personallv a stranger. In the evening 
Mrs. Washington held her leree. After the 
guests were introduced, and seated, tea, 
coffee, plain and plum cake, were handed 
round. Familiar and friendly conversation 
ensued, and kind imiuiries on the part of Mrs. 
Washington, after the families of the exiles 
with whom she had been aciuninted during 
the revolutionary war. To a lady standing at 
the side of the President she remarked, 'Of 
all the incidents of the day, none has so 
pleased the General as the friendly greetings 
of the gentlemen who visited him at noon.' 
To the inquiry of the President whether it 
was casual or customary, he was answered 
that it was an annual custom, derived from 
our Dutch forefathers, which had always been 
commemorated. After a short pause, he ol>- 
served— 'Let whatever changes take place 
that mav, never forget the cordial, cheerful 
observance of Xeu> Tear's clay.'" This in- 
junction of the great patriot seems not to have 
been lost upon us. New Year's day is now 
an American institution. 

HOW YOINO AMEIUCA CEI.F.BUATES IT. 

Out young geutlcmcu pass the day in "ma- 



cake, and pass the "compliments ol the sea- 
son," which consists in merely saying"! wish 
you a Happy New Year." Madam or Miss, 
who is usually entrenched l>ehind a tabic load- 
ed with delicacies, gracefully receives and re- 
turns the compliment. « Our hero then rushes 
off to renew the same feat as long as he can 
stand on his feet ! 

New Years Eve is a favorite time for balls. 
The gay dancer., trip the hours away until the 
bell tolls 12, when noisy wishes of a happy 
New Year are exchanged, and the "dance 
gees on"— "joy unconfined"— "no sleep till 
morn." There was such a bull as this at the 
Athcnaum last night, given by the German 
School Society. 

TUB Methodist's 
Hold what is termed "Watch Meeting's" on 
New Year's Eve. They assemble in their 
churches al>out an hour before midnight, and 
spend the intciTcning time in singing and 
prayer. About ten minutes before 12, all 
kneel iu silent prayer, in a spirit of contri- 
tion for past sins and time misspent, and res- 
olving to lead a l>etter life in the year about to 
commence. Just as the clock points to 12, 
they rise, and burst forth in a chant of praise 
to Gotl for his mercy in sparing their lives to 
see another year. Tli<jse exercises arc very 
impressive and solemn. Such services were 
held at the Market Street and Jackson Street 
M. E. Churches last night. This custom is 
said to have been instituted by John Wesley, 
the founder of the Sect, a hundred years ago. 
Other sects al.so observe the custom. 

THE festivities. 

And now that the moniing of eighteen hun- 
dred and sixty-four has fairly dawned, happy 
smiles are seen everywhere. The tables in 
every household arc laden with dainties, and 
the iadics of the family await the calls of their 
numerous friends. "A happy New Year!" 
greets each new comer, and the festivities of 
the day grow with the hours. 

And reader— iu closing, wc wish you, too, a 
Happv New Year. May ISOl for you, be la- 
den with the best gifts of providence, and 
when its dving moment occurs, may it find 
you wiser, richer, and better, and happier, too, 
if possib'e. 



BISTORY OF THE :f E W»I»AI»E» and materials of the Minnesotian which was 
PREMS or ST. ¥»>AV'l-. ' then discontinued. 

On the 18th of April, 1810, James M. Good- | The Daili/ Union was established in the fall 
hue who had been rccentlv publishing the of 1862 by Mr. F. Driscoll, and published till 
Grant Countv Herald, at Lancaster, Wis --on- the 1st of March,1863,when it was united with 
sin, arrived at St. Paul, with his prhi :ing appa- | the Press, of which Mr. Driscoll became ono 

ratiis. He located his offtee in the c;irpcnter : of the proprietor.-^. 

shop of C. P. V. Lull, on Third strict, which ^.^__^^ __- rTF^'uti 

stood near the site now occupied by Alderman ] \\12S JlS AJN D lii^J U U1\0 
King for a saloon, and on^he 2ah of the 



^mt 



i rm- mm 



month issued the first number of the "Pio- 
neer." The paper was Democratic iu politics 



I 



-»•• " 



Pl!«)SlXlTIOXS KOIt KVADlXG TIIE 

r. S. Revi.me — J. W. Smythc, a builder of 
this citv, was prosecuted before U.S. Commis- 
sioner Cardozo on Tuesday, on charge of fail- 
ure to pay license as contractor. The price 
of a license is #^2.5, and the fine, license and 
costs would h-ivc amounted to §123, but Mr. 
Smvthe got off for only ??50. 

Fred Yolk, for failure to pay a liquor re- 
tailer's license, $10, was mulcted to the ex- 
tent of $38. 

Those who suspect that they owe the Lm- 

tcd States anything, should reflect on this. 



— — ■ 



Rkv Jamks Pki:t, of the Minnesota 
Conference, has been appointed Chaplain of 
the 12th Regiment Eouisiana Volunteer In- 
fantrv, of African descent, now (luartered at 
Vicksburg, and left last week for his new field 

of toil. 

Mr. Pcet was formerly engaged in the Five 
Points Mission, N. Y. After -vai-ds spent some 
time in teaching and preaching in this city; 
labored several years on Lake Superior, and 
for three or four vears past has filled appoint- 
ments in this portion of the State. His heart 
is in his work, to which he carries an expe- 
rience and zeal that will render him a valuable 

ac luisition to the regiment. 

— »' 

It will be seen by the advertisement 
in another column that Mr. Eg.^deston's great 
Stereopticon Exhibition will take place next 
Monday evening at Ingcrsoll's Hall. This 
moral and wonderful entertainment will at- 
tract all lovers of the beautiful. Mr. Egg'c- 
ston's photographic transparencies are well 
selected, and when magnified and illuminated 
on canvass fifteen feet in diameter will make 
an exhii.ition rarely equalled by anything 
ever exhibited iu St. Paul. 



His brother, Isaac N. Goodhue, \ras snbse 
quently united with him, and the ofiice was 
moved across the street over the stere of S.H. 
Sergent, which old settlers will reerllect stood 
near the building now occupied by G. P. Pea- 
body. In ISOO, the ofiice was removed to Mr. 
Goodhue's dwelling, Mhich stood on the site 
of II. Marvin's store, where it was continued 
till 1854, when it was removed to the old Fur 
Company bailding.thenonthe comerof Third 
and Jackson. In 1860, it was removed to its 
present location. 

On the death of Col. Goodhue hi 18.52, the 
ofiice was purch.iscd by Joseph K. Brown, 
who continued its publication till the Spring 
of l«-54, when Earle S. Goodrich became assc- 
ciated with him, and the first number of the 
' Daily Pioneer' was issued on the irst of May. 
In the fall of 18>5 the " Daily Deia.crat" was 
consolidated with the Pioneer, and the paper 
was called the" Pioneer and Dei locrat," till 
within a few months I'Uot, when :hc name of 
Democi-iitwas omitted. Mr. Brown's name ap- 
peared at the head of that paper t.ll 1836, sub- 
sequent to whi.h the paper has generally 
been under the editorial control cf Mr. Good- 
rich. 

About the time the Pioneer was first issued, 
there was printed in Cincinnati, by D. A. 
Randall, the first num\.er of the "Minnesota 
Register." The second number of this paper 
was printed at Saint Paul iu July following, 
the ofiice being located in a small building 
which stood near the site of the Hope Engine 
House. It was published by Major McLean 
and J. P. Owens. The " Minneso a Chronicle" 
was established hi May, 1849 by Colonel 
Hughes, now of Hudson, Wisconsin, 
and located in the building near the comer of 
Fifth and Jackson, now occnp ed as a shoe- 
maker shop by Mr. Rocll. In the summer 
of the same year the Chronicle was consolida- 
ted with the Register, Messrs. McLean and 
Owens becoming the purchasers, and the 
paper called the Chronicle and Register, 
Whig iu politics:, and j.ublished at the old 
Chronicle office. In the summer of 18.50 the 
esl:ibli»hmcnt was sold to L. A. :3abcock,Ksq., 
who published it for a few months, when Mr. 
C. J. Henniss became proprietor, and the 
establishment was moved to the building 
known as the "Rice House," then standing 
on a portion of the site now occupied by :Mac- 
kubin's block. The paper was discoutiued 
early in 18.31, and the materal passed int» 
the hands of Col. Robertson, olthe Democrat. 
On the IGth of December, 1830, the Minne- 
sota Democrat, owned and edited by Col. D. 
A. Robertson, made its appw ranee. It was 
printed in the "Rice House" bi ilding, but was 
rem >ved in 1851 to the frame building on the 
corner of Tnird and Wabashaw, then just 
erecicd by Col. R. In 18.33, the Democrat 
was purchased by David Olmsted, Esq., who 
established the Dai!;/ Evening Democrat on 
the 1st of May, 1854. During the fall of that 
year the paper passed in'.o the hands of C. L. 
Emerson, Es*i., who removed the ollice to the 
stone building on Wabashaw street, between 
Third and.Fourth. and continued ils publi- 
cation till 185.3, when it was united with the 

Pioneer. 

In November, 18.30, the Dakota Ta-trax-tt- 
kn-/:in,ov "DakoUFrieud,"a Qionthly,half in 
English and half in Dakota, was issued and 
published for a few months by Rev. Gideon 
11. Pond. 

The Weeklv 3/<«n<>so<mn was first issued on 
the 17th of September 1851, in the building 
corner of Jackson and Fifth saeets heretofore 
noted. Itwas published by J. P. Owens. F.arly | 
in January of 18-52, the establishment pass- 
ed into the hands of Messrs. Owen & Moore, 
who removed the office in August 1853 to the 
3d story of Lambert's new building. Third 
street, now occupied by A. S ^'"'■'- '^'"' 



SriTAULE FOR 

Medicinal and Family Use. 



of/ 



OLD BOURBON AND RYE >VIIISKT, 

OLD QUEEN'S PORT WINE, 

OLD MADEIRA WINE, 

FINE OLD 1 ALE SHERRY. 

FINE OLD COGNAC BRANDY, 

CHOICE OLD H0LLAN3 GIN, 

JAMAICA AND ST. CROIXRUM, 

CHAMPAGNE WINES, 

SPARKLING CATAWBA, 

And all other Articles in our lino of bmincM 

3. VFJLTBOTt IfTEBB, J^r., 

Suooeesor to WALTER W. WEBB, 
my 19 Sibley Bloek. 



1 



^ 



E W S 



r^ o O D N 

Ju*t received by express, another lot of 

rterosene Oratex^? 

Will warm food for the Baby, make feai and hot 
drinks for tlie sick, will cook a few eggs, &c., for 
tho " Hearty," adiustaWe to any l4imp, and only 
i.'5c each — worth a trial. 
Also, received a fresh supply of 

Grlass Cones, 

Will fit any Lamp, saves half the Oil, and is fre« 
from that unpleasant odor caused by th« bras* 
Cones. Costs but 15c. 

A GOOD TUIXG JUSr OUT, 

The IVo Cliimiiey Oiirner, 

The best ever before offered to the pub'lc, freo 

from smoke, will fit any Lamp, and only 34 cent! 

each. 

500 DOZEN EXTKA AXNKALED CHIMNEYS 

in store and for sale at Eaftern prices. 

All other Goods pertaining to the trade in end. 
h»s8 variety, for sale low, at TUiiS ST. PAUL 
LAMP srOBE, Third street, opposite the Plo- 
near Offic^^ (ivMlir 

^O. 1 CARBON OIL, 

For pale low, wholesale and retail to close con. 
signmcut, at 

Tlie St. Paul Lamp Store, 

dcc3.tf Opposite Pioneer OflSce. 

Viy ANTE B . 

Two good Girls, one to do Kitcben wort, tad 
one to ttUo care of Children. ^I'l'b.to, Dr. T. 
WILLIAMS, at hi' office iu Concert Hall, in ilio 
forenoon. ilec303i|*^ 

A COMFORTABLE SLEIGH 

RIDE 

Can be had by using tha 

IVe^v Foot Stove. 

LAMPS CHEAPER THAN EVER, 

Some as low as 

THIRTY-FIVECENTS. _ 

Those usually sold for $150, wenowseUfor 
$1.35. 



f 

i 



E. & H. 

St. Paul, Dec. 29, 1M53. 



Y. BELI.. 
dec-lO 



V 



TTURRY UP! HURRY UP! 

All you Mechanics, that want TOOLS, com« 
right along, and fill up your chests, while you can 
do it at low prices. 

no2l-3a JOHN McCLOUD, Brown's Bloek. 



I I 
I 



_ 



An "Anxious Incjiirkr'' is respect- 
fully informed, that the "Photograph Album" 
presented, last Evening, to Lieut. G. W. Prcs- 
cott. Superintendent of the Baptist Sabbath 
School, came from the beautiful collection at 
Merrill's store. Mr. Merrill would also say, 
that he has more of the same and other kinds 
left, which he will sell to "Anxious Inquir- 
ers," "or any other man" at very low prices. 
"How are you Postage Currency." 

MF.TuoroMTAN.— The new year will 
receive a happy welcome at Jo Hail's to-day— 
probably all day and night. Joseph has made 
great preparations for the particular observ- 
ance of the day by preparing a full barrel of 
errg.nogg, spiced rum punches, apple toddies, 
fom-and-Jerry's, etc., etc. Six huge turkeys 
will be caived at 11 o'clock. 



Elfelt. The 
BaWy Miimesotian was estallished by them 
on the nth of May 1851, and Mr. H. P. Pratt 
associated himself as a co-purtner, who con- 
tinued in that capacity till 1 is death in the 
spring of 18.5.5. In the fall of 18-57, the inter- 
est of Mr. Owens was purchased by Dr. Foster 
and the establishment was removed in the 
summer of 18.58 to a part of the building now 



Do You Want a Sleigh Ride? 

If 80, you will need 

SLEiaH BELLS AND 
Horse Blanl^ets. 

The largest assortment of which in the city of 
Saint Paul may be found at the Harness Store Of 

S. B. LOYE, 

Who is selling them as low as the lowest. 
«- Store next door to Edgerton's Bank, Third 
street. ^^'*' 



occu 
the 



iupicdby the Press. In December, 18.59, y ADIES LOOK FOR YOURSELVES. 
5 Minnesotian was consolidated with the X-i 

SO Fer Cent. 



The Cold Weatukr.— The old yea. 
died last night iu the coldest weather. The 
thermometer was quite low, and what intensi- 
fied the cold, was an icy norther that penetra- 
ted to the very bone. But few were abroad on 
the sti^ets yesterday, and those only from 

necessity. ^ 

The tunera of Thomas Martin will 
ta^<; place from his late residence on Jackson 
street, to-morrow, at two o'clock p. m. Ihc 
friends and acquaintances are invited to attend 



without further notice. 



Snowed Up.— The wind yesterday 
having drifted the snow into the cuts along 
the railroad, the running of trains was badly 
interrupted. Indeed, we believe the afternoon 
train did not get throu gh at all. 

Egg Nogg at George Benz's. 
-George Benz will have Egg Nogg and Lunch 
for his friends to-day. 

Rafklekor AN Elegant Gun.— There 
will be a rame for a double-barrel gun (rifle 
and shot barrels,) worth §150, at George 
Bcuz's to-morrow (Saturday) ewning. A 
few tickets ate yet for sale at that place. 



G B Salmon, Agent, Madison Mu- 
tual Insurance Company, for the counties of 
Ramsey, Washington, Dakota, and Scott. Office 
n Parker Paine' s Bank. St. Paul. noJ5 janSdfcw 

info N E T A R Y . 

[By Telegraph.] 
Hew York Money Market. 

Nkw York, December 31—1 p. m. 

Gold 61 Ji. 

♦I ♦ » ♦ ■ — 

COMMERCIAL. 



[By Telegraph.! 
Hew York Market. 

New Yobk. Dec. 31—1 p. m. 
Flour quiet and unchanged. 
GRAiN-Wheat firm nud qnlet. Com steady 
Oats quiet and ftnn. 



'limes and published for nearly six months 
by Messrs, Newson, Moore and Foster. On 
the dissolution of the Minnesotian and Times 
in June 18G0, the publication of the Minneso 
tian wa:; resumed by Dr. Foiler, who continu- 
ed the same till the winter of 1861, when he 
sold the oliicc to the proprie;ors of the Piir.ss. 
The Daily Times was established on the 
15th of Mav, 1854, by Messrs. Ncw«on, Mitch- 
ell & Clum', in the third story of the brick 
building on Third street, nearly opposite Em- 
pire Block. Mr. Newson subsequently ob- 
tained the entire control of the establshment, 
and in 1856 removed it to the basement story 
ofMcClung's Block on Tlird street, where 
the publication was continind till the merge- 
ment with the Minnesotian in 18-59. On the 
dissolution of that union, Mr. N«wson re- 
sumed the publication of th ; Times, which he 
continued till the close of the year 1800. 

In the fall of 1855, the St. Paul Free Press 
was established by A. C. Hmith, Esq. This 
made five daily papers in St. Paul. It was 
Democratic in politics, and was printed m the 
third story of the building occupied by J. C. 
Ra-uet, on Third street. 1 1 maintamed a fee- 
ble" existence till the spring of 1856, when it 
"died lor the want of breat'i." 

In the spring ol 1856 ttic St. Paul Real 
Estate and Financial .4(/«,</56r, published by 
Charles H. Parker and J. A. Wheelock. and 
afterwards by the latter :donc, was started. 
It was discontinued in the fall of 1858. 

The " Minnesota Staats Zeitung was es- 
tablished in 1855 or '56 ^ ^7' ^rthwein n 
the fall of 1856 he published the Daily ' Ze.- 
tung" for a few weeks. Ihe establishment 
subLquently passed into .he hands of M . S 
Ludwig, who continued its publication till it 
was purchased by the present proprietors. 
The ^^ Democrat," a Germm paper was print- 
ed in 1858 and 1859, when it was discontinued. 
The ^^Voksblutr was established by Ph. 
Rohr, in 18G1, and soon after passed into the 
hands of its present publis her. 

In 1860 the Sorth Star, daily, was started 
in Empire Block by Mr. H. H. Young, and 
advocated the election ol Mr. Brcckmridge. 
It did not live till election. 

In 18G2the St. Paul /(«rna/, weekly, was 
established by Dr. Masse? , and was continued 
for nearly a year. 

On January let, 1861, the St. Paul Dailt 
Press Republican, wase itablished under the 
editorial super^•ision of \7m. R. Marshall, J. 
A Wheelock being nominally assocuited as 
one of the editors. The P ukss superseded the 
Daily Times, whose presi and materials were 
rented for its first issues. In January, 1861, 
th« proprietors of th© Pa S8» bought the prew 



BELOW COSTl 

LARGE REDU-TION IN 

MTLLINERY GOOr>S, 

From this date till tho Ist of February. 

MRS. J. B. LYGO, 

Proposes sellng 
WINTER M%LINERY GOODS. 

At the following low prices, via : 

Velvet Bonnets at »600 ^o^th f 6 .00 

SilkBonneti »♦«» *' ± 

Velvet Flowers 30ceach " 60o 

FeltHats ♦>•=» " •*•'* 

do »!•»> " *Y 

Beaver Hats • wl->0 f-.uo 

Muslin Flowers ^^c each. 

C L O A. K S , 

And all articles usually sold In a 

MILLITVERY STORE, 

Including a very large assortment of Ribbons at 
a proportionate reduction. Call and see for your- 

selves I 

NO HUMBUG! 

MBA. J. B. l.Y«0. 
P. S.— Mrs. LTGO having imported one of the 
largest M lllnery »tock of Goods ever brought to 
the West, and paid cash prices for the same, I* 
thus enabled to offer to the PubUc the above 
Goods at tlie largely reduced prices to her Patrons 
and the PubUc in general. 

N, B.— Having such a large stock of Goods on 
hand, I am obliged to sacrifice my Goods to make 
room for my Spring Importations. 

MBtt. M. B. l.ir«0. 
Third street, two doors below 
dec30-2w Thompson's Bank. 



■ 11 « 



fc » l » w 



M: O N KT A. R Y . 
COIN AND EXCHANGE QUOTATIONS Of 

Tlioiiipsoii Bro's., 

'SAIST Paul, December 28, 18C3. - 
Bankers and licensed Dealers in Land »»'«»TS*?! 
B^Mionary and Adult Ealf Breed Scrip.ifc 
■XCnASOK katks. 

Selling for. rr«nlu« 

Bankable Funa« ^ perct.prem 

American Gold 4<>>iperet. 

Orders for United States Land WarranU, Stat 
warrants, fcc, promptly executed. 

Bute and United SUtes Conpont paia at oai 

Korway, tor lale at oar olBce. 



I 



f 



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m <w»— ■ -wiw^i^^ Sf 



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It 



SAINT PAUL PRESS, FRIDAY, JANUARY 1, 1864. 



FOll 90 DAYS I 

RARE BARGAINS 



IX 



^imllmm^ 



COME ONE, COME ALL, 



T31ZY OOOOS, 

May be made at 

IVo. 13S5 Tliira Street, 

SAINT I>AUL. 

We offor at reduced prices to close out the stock : 
S50 pe». Frencli Mierinos, 

At $1.00 to $1.50, worth J1.13 to $1.75. 

lO pes. riaicl Repps, 

At rSc, worth OOC. 

100 pes. MOHAIR 

DRESS GOODS 

At 30 to r/kJ, worth 40 to 75c. 

lOO pes. milSTS, 



AND BUY YOUE 



^mtiAt^. 



I i^e^r. 



1804. 



§m\ §t^tUu^ 



§X^ ^00&». 



G 



o 



T O 



At 20c, worth •.'5c. 



5 



O PIECES 

COTTON FLANNELS, 

At .15 to 55c, with 40 to COc. 

r>i> pes. i>eivim:s. 

At .10 to 50c, worth 40 to 65c. 

500 POUNDS 

WOOLLEN YARN, 

At$l.-J."., woHh$1.50. 

IjOOO Foixuds 

WOOLLEN YARN, 

At $1.50, worth $1.75. 
A FULL LINE OF ALL OTHER 

DOMESTIC GOODS, 

At Piopoi'tionate Priee.s. 
IN HOSIERY, 

GLOVES, 

WHITE GOODS, 

ASD 

EMBROIDERIES OR NOTIONS, 
We will not be Undersold. 

Itemember the rule, 
ALL GOOD? GUARANTEED AS EEPRE 

SENTED, OR NO SALE, 

And the place, 

No. 132 Third-St., St. Paul. 
CATHC^I^T & CO. 

decll Im 



s. Ta. bailey & CO , 

Are not the Aponts for Cooper's Cabinet Photo- 
graphs, but they have on hand the 
largest stock of 

Oabinet and Chair 
FUP^MVITXJRE, 

TO BE FOUND IN ST. PAUL. 

Crtil Framcx, Gilt and Fonrwood Monldings, ifc. 
AUo, a few rhotofjraph* which they will sell 
(not at cost) but at (Cahill & Co.'s) the Agents 
pricea. decH-lm 

TpOTw THE HOLIDAYS ^ 
AT COMBS' BOOK STORE, 

CAS BK irorxn a lakck stock of 
Oliilclrens' Books, 

Oirt Boolc*^, 
I»liotogrrai>li uAHJiime-, 

Bil>les, Praj-er Boolcs, 

&c., suitable for presents. Call in and examine. 



CHRISTMAS 

i>RESENT8 

AT 

THE CHEAP CASH STORE, 

For that is the place you can get your 

MONEY'S WORTH. 

We have a splendid assortment of 

IVlJBiMlVOES 

AND 

EMPRESS CLOTHS, 

Which we will ^ell 

A.S IL.01PV as til© LoTvest. 

IF YOU WANT 

Sontags, Nubias or Hoods, 
(lO lo llic Cheap Cash Store. 

IF YOU WANT 

bail.m:oba.i:. skirts, 

OR 

HOOP SKIRTS, 

GO TO THE CHEAP CASH STORE. 
We havo a fine assortment of 

LA.I3IES' CLO^IiS 

Which we are selling low to 
CLOSE OUT THE STOCK. 

IF YOU AVANT 

HOSIERY OR GLOVES, 

For the cold weather, go to 

H. li. TAYLOIt'S. 

FOR THE GENTLEMEN WE HAVE 

Cloths, Beavers, Cassiraeres, Satinetts, Neck 
Ties and ColUrs, which we will sell 

CHEAP FOR CASH. 

Th© Clt©ai> Oasli Store 

Is the place to buy any kind of Domestic Goods, 
either Cotton or Woollen. 

Kemomber the place, 

And that we will sell goods as cheap as the 
cheapest. 

H. KNOX TAYLOR, 

No. 218 Third Street, St. Paul, 
iM^inriesota. 



i> u T Pf A m: ' s 

* FOB 

FRESH CAISTNED 

RASPBERRIES, 

BLACKBERRIES,'^ 
STRA WHERRIES, 
PEACHES, 

PINE APPLES. 

TOMATOES, 

CHERRIBS 

ISTEW DRIED 

BLACKBERRIES, 

RASPBERRIES, 
CHERRIES, 

PEACHES, 

APPLES, 

RAISIXS, 

CITRON, 
CURRANTS, SAGO, FARIXA, 

TAPIOCA AND IIOMONT. 

Stuart's Wlilte Drip, Extra Honey, Golden, Am- 
ber and Sugar House Syrups. 
New Sugar Cored Dried Beef, and Pine Apple 
Cheese, and a complete and desirable 
stock of Fresh 



COOLEY, CARVER & CO., 
WHOLESALE GROCERS. 

IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 

FOKEIGN A]S"D DOMESTIC LIQUORS, WmES, 

CIGAES, &0., «&0. 

Jackson Street, bet^reen Levee and. Third, 



=a. 



SALE -CIRCUIT 

STATES OF 
FOR 



C Jo?i& (^ THE UNITED STATE 
^^F«ICA--NINTH CIUCUIT-IN AND 
PJ:,^XRirT OF MINNESOTA -SS. 



THE DISTRICT OF MIN 
Augustus O. Heister vs. Lyman 
iaria B- l^ayt. 
Walter W. Webb, .Tohn C 



Dayton and 



ayl 
Li 






Maria ll:.l>ai^on,^his^wi.. 3rom|^L^ 

-- villc,.John 

ton 



V l«K ATadison Clarence Do Montreville, .u 
b" Cro'i.iu; teSWa llurxthaU and I. New 

Sears. __ 

FORECLOSURE IN CHANCERY. 

Decree, Juno Term. A. n. 186a-§3,S95.98, with 
interest, c )sts and expenses o; sale. 
Pur«uant to the decretal order o : the Circuit 
Courl of the United States for the D »;trict afore- 



janl-tf 



SA-rN^T FAXTLi. 



Oroceries 



Sc ProviHioii*. 

S. K. rUTNAM, 
near the Foat Office. 



CIDER. 

100 bbls. pure Juice of the Apple, at PUTNAM'S. 

O R A. P E S . 

25 boxes Isabellas and Catawbas, at PUTNAM'S 



BRADFORD BROTHERS, 

WHOLESALE DEALERS, 
JVos. IST and ISQ East TVater Street, 

Are now opening an immense Stock of Domes- 
tic, Staple and Fancy Dry Goods to wliich they 
call the attention of the Merchants of the North 
west—among which we offer the following : 




to the highest 



OF 



APPLES. 

400 barrels Winter, at PUTNAM'S. 

EO. E. SCHNABEL 



no4 



G 



GENERAL DEALER IK 



Family Grroceries, 
GRAIN AND PROVISIONS. 

In Moffet's Castle, corner Jackson and Fourt 
street. 

Goods delivered to all parts of the City firee ol 
charge. n&iO-U 



25 Cases M. De Laines, 
25 Bales Twilled Flannels, 
20 " Plain colored do., 
100 Cases Denims, 

75 

30 

50 

20 



u 



A 



P P L E S 



200 bbls. selected 
Fall and Wiiiteir Apple* 

AT PUTNAJPS. 
Choice Wliite 

Winter Wheat Flour, 

AT PUTNAM'S. 

CHEESE— ONE THOUSAND LBS. 
E:x:tx*a Hamtoarerli, 

oc9tt AT PUTNAM'S. 



Stripes, 

Ticking, 

Cotton Flannels, 

Linseys, 
3000 lbs. Wool Yarn, 
1000 (loz. Wool Socks, 
200 Bales assorted Batting, 






(( 



250 Cases Prints, 
200 Bales Shirtings, 
50 Bales Fine Shirting, 
24 Bales Satinets, all grades, 
10 " Grey Cassinieres, 
10 Cases Fancy Cassinieres, 
100 Pieces Alpaccas, 
2000 " Cobergs, 
Twine, Wicking, 
AV^adding, Cotton Yarn, 



posei^wiUscfr at public auction, 

cash bidder, on 

MONDAY, THE TWENTr-FIRST DAY 

DECKMIiiat, 186:J, 
At eleven o'clock in the forenoon, at the front 
entrance to the place of holding sdd Court, in 
Brown's Block, Third street, in the pity of f?aint 
Paul, in said District of Minnesota, the following 
described i;remis»"s : . , ., j , , 

All and singular ihe following dei cnbed lands 
and real esUte, with their lieredi aments and 
ai)i)urtonaucefi, Mtuate in the com ty of lym- 
?uy, and State of Jlinnesota, to wit: Block 
lumber thirty-two (.TJ), Mock nuinl or forty-four 
(H), block number forty-five (45), an 1 block num- 
ber sixty- live ((m), all in Lyman Di yton's Addi- 
tiontothccityof:.ai.^,PauL ^p^^.^^j^^ 

Special Master in Chancery. 
O Dvt.BYMPLK, Plaintifi's Solicitor. 
Dated St. Paul, Nov. Cth, 18o3. f no6-7w 



COMMISSIONERS' NOTICE. 




audit all claims, axainst the estate of Philip VF 
Nichols, dccoascd, hereby give n<'tice that all 
persons ha\ing claims againet the -state of said 
deceased are require toprerent then to said Com- 
misbionors for allowance within six months irom 
the fourth dav of .November, l*<f.:5, or be forever 
barred. Tht* Commissioners will iieet for such 

" ' month dur- 



&c., 

ALSO, 



&c., &c., &c. 




Minnesota. r.p.pUKJKR, 

Commissioners of t state of 
Philip W. Mchols, deceased. 
Daied Nov. 4th. I»ti3. f noO 4w 



dec20-tf 



AT COST ! AT COST ! 



p W. WOOLLET, 

LOWER LEVEE, SAINT PAUL, 

AND 

Oomn&issioa 3£ex*cliaiit» 

DKAUBR IN GROCERIES 

GRAIN, PBO VISIONS, LIME, &C., fcC, aC. 

AND 

AGENT FOR THE 

PENNSYLVANIA RAILROAD AND 

CONNECT IONS. 
Contracts for transportation between St. Paul 
Boston, New England, Montreal, New York and 
all points East, made upon the lowest and mo»t 

favorable terms. „ , ^ „^ 

Mark packages, «K!. W. WOOLLET, 

St. Paul, 
janl-dly For 



A FULL LINE OF YANIJ:EE NOTIONS, 

WHITE GOODS, RIBBONS, HOODS, 

SHIRTS and DRAWERS, RIBBED JACKETS, 
BLANKETS, SAXONY PLAIDS, HOSIERY, 
GLOVES, BUCK GLOVES and MITTS ; 

AND 

Inniimerable other goods pertaining to the Jobbing 
Dry Goods Business, making an Immense Stock 
whicli for.EXTENT, ASSORTMENT and CHEAP 
NESS is unrivalled in the West. 

To those wishing to buy at New-York Prices 
and less, we would solicit an examination of our 
Stock and Prices. Respectfully, 

BRADFORD BROTHERS.^^^ 



Milwaukee, Sept. 28, 1863. 



IMIL^W^UKEE. 



/><HANCERY SALE- CIRCUIT 

KJ COUPvT OF THE UNITED «TAT*:'^. .^?^ 
AMERICA-NINTH (iRCUIT-lN AND lOR 
THE DISTRICT OF MINNESOTA— ss. 

Augustus O. Heister vs. John II. Irvine and 
Nancy Irvine, his wife. 

rORECLOSUBE IN CHAIfCERY. 
Decree, June Term, A. n. lH(J3-S-',487.22, with 
interest, costs and expenses of sale. 
Pursuant to the decretal order of the Circuit 
Court of the I'nited States for the District aforo- 
<aid, made in this c.iuse at the June Term, A. n. 
1S03 the undersigneO, a Spedal Master in Chan- 
cery of said Court, duly appointee, for such pur- 
pose, will sell at public auction, lo the highest 
cash bidder, on 
MONDAY, THE TWENTY-FIRST DAY OF 

DECEMBEU, ISftl, 
At eleven o'clock in the forenoon, at the front 
entrance to the place of holding said Court, in 
IJrown's Block, Third street, in tlie city- of Saint 
Paul, in said District of Minnesota, the following 
described promises: ., , . 

All and singular the following described pieces, 
parcels or tracts of laud and real es tate with their 
appurtenances, situate, lying and being in the 
coiinty of Kamsey, and State of Minnesota, to 
wit : Lot mimben'd seven (7), in b ock live (5), in 
Rice & Irvine's Addition tothe Town of St. Paul : 
Also, lots numbered twelve (1-'), aid thirteen (i:i), 
in block numbered seventy (70), id Dayton & Ir- 
vine's Ad.'.ition to St. Paul, as designated on the 
plans or plat;; of said Additions, on record in the 
otfice of the Register of Deeds n and for said 

'*'""*^' WM. A.- SrENCER, 

Special Master in Chancery. 
O. Dm.rvmpli:, Plaintill's Solicitor. 
Dated St. Paul, Nov. 0th, lb03. f noC-7w 



D. W. IN GERSOLL ft CO , 

Are BOW eoeMag an exton&iTe ttock of 

Fall and TVinter 

DRYGOODS, 



flrom 

Lale Cash Sales in New York 

Consisting In part of 

MUSLIN DE LAINES, 

LUPIN'S TRENCH MERINOES, 
EMPRESS CLOTHS, 

FRENCH REPS, 
PARIS SILK STRIPES, 
PARAMATTAS, 

Alpaccas, Mohairs, &c., &c 
Miou.iiiiiig' Ooods. 

LADIES' LONG AND SQUARB 

In every variety. 

Gloakings, Balmoral Skirts, 



J. 



P. HUTCHINSON & CO. 



decl-tf 



foi' lSG-4r, all Styles, 
AT COMBS' BOOK STORE. 



ST. PAUL LAMP STORE, 

(Branch of the great Aladdin,) 

Opposite Pioneer Office. 



FOR THE NEXT FOUR WEEKS WE WILL 

SELHi A.T COST 

Our stock of 

CLOTHING, 

Shirts, Drawers, Hats 

ARD 

Fiirnisliingr GroodLs, 

Aa at the end of that time we intend leaving for 
the East to purchase our 

^T^itiisG^ stock:. 

Those who want BARGAINS IN CLOTHING, 

w ill find this a rare chance. 

BLOOMmtiDALE & RHINE, 

«13 THIRD-ST., ADJOINING THE AMER 
ICAN EXPRESS OFFICE. 

decl5-lmd&w 



Oommisision M!eirclia,iit« 

AND 

FBODTJCE DEAI.ERS, 

SIBLEY STREET, NEAR LEVEE 

ocKVljr St. Paul, Minnesota. 

T3EAUPRE & KELLY, 
FORWARDING AND COMMISSION 

AND 

Wholesale Grocers, 

Prince's Block, Jackson-st., St. Paul 



CASH BUYERS OF DRY GOODS 



ARK OFFERED THE 



MOST MANIFEST INDUCEMENTS, 



N 



O T I C E 



BY THE NEW HOUSE, 



FREIGHT AGENTS FOR 

Milwaiikee & Prairie du Chien R.R 



LAFLIN, SMITH k CO.'S 

OXJ]VI*O^I>ER. 

St Paul, October 13, 1863. ool3-0m 



SHER^VTIV, TVO^VELL. & 3PRATT, 



172 and 174 East Water Street. 



au20-d tw&w 



CUTTER, SECOMBE & CO., 

HAVE ESTABLISHED A 

WHOLESALE PAPER WAREHOUSE 



C 



A R P E T S 









cc 


CO 


rt 












J?; 


H 


CO 








en 




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The I.argest Stock, 




















The Greatest Variety, 








and ,the 








Cheapest 


Groods 


EVER 


EXHIPI 


TED 


IX 


THIS 


CITY. 


j»- Wholesale Buyers 


supplied 


at 


Eastern 


cash prices 






^ 


1 






dec3-tf 



A 



T A. BLAKEMAN'S 




JUST RECEIVED 

A.T^T> F O I^ SALE, 

lOO Barrels 

CA£^B01V OIL. 

CHAS. A. UPHAM & CO., 

ITo. *, Prince's Block, J^ackson Street, 
Mt. Paul, 9Ilnii. 

nolO-ly 

Af\ BUSHELS CHOICE RIPE 

Just received by A. II. WIMBISII, 

no^ Jackson Street. 



DEEDS 



rp A X 

THE PRESS PRINTING COMPANY 

Have now on hand the latest and best form o 
tax deeds. It is suitable for sales under the sev 
eral acts of the Legislature, and in confonnit7 
with all their requisition 8, and ii prepared b^ tac 
State authorities «. w .. ^ 

Pricft SO ft»>nts i>«r dox«B. or ts per nanared. 



THE NEW JEWELRY STORE, 

Four doors below THOMPSON fc BROTHER'S 

Bank, and next door below SHAW'S 

Fashionable Hat Store, 

On Third Street, 

Can be seen splendid 

SILVER TEA SETS, CAKE BASKETS, ICE 

PITCHERS, CASTORS, 

Solid Silver Spoons — Pure as Coin, 

Diamond, Opal and Ruby Rings, Solid Gold Ear- 
Rings and Pins in seta, 

From 01S to 0SO. 

$10,000 worth of SETH THOXAS CLOCKS 

JUST RECEIVED. 
Those wishing to supply themselves with a per- 
fect Clock, will buy the SETH THOMAS 
CLOCK of 

A.. bil.a.k:em: A.N. 

N, B.— The Cheap American Gothic Clock, at 
Factory prices. Ail warranted to run well. 



STRONG'S CARPET HALL, 

225 Third-St., Rogers' Block, 

where will be found a large assortment of 

Carpets,Oil Cloths, Mattings, 

CURTAIN AND SHADE MATERIALS, 

MATTRESSES, FEATHERS, WALL FAPER, kC. 

New Goods constantly arriving and sold at 
low as the lowest. 

UPHOLSTERING I>ONE TO ORDER. 
marl2-ly ». O. gXROUC 

Tj^NLIST AND AVOID THE DRAFT. 

THIS Regiment will POSITIVELY never leave 
the State in ANY emergency. This I state on 
the highest authority, while the bounty is the 
same as elsewhere, to wit : 

$102 for New Recruits, and $402 to any one 
who has already seiTcd Nine Months 
and been Honorably Discharged. 
Subsistence and Transportation will be furnish- 
ed to every recruit from the date of enlf^tment. 

Persons desiring to enlist in this company can 
get any particulars by applying to, or addressing 
M. C. RUSSELL, Belle Plaine, or MaJ. L. L. 
BAXTER, Shakopee. 

M. C. RUSSELL, 

dec8-tf Recruiting OfBcer. 



In this city, in connection with their 

I>AI>ER, MILL, ITV ST. A^IVTHOIVY, 

And desire to call the attention of buyers to their 

Inimeiise Stoeb of ' 

LETTER, NOTE AND CAP PAPER, ENVELOPES, BOOK AND NEWS PRINT, FLAT AND 

ALL KINDS OF WRAPPING PAPERS, PRINTERS' AND WRITING INKS 

AND FLUIDS, PENS, PENCILS, &C., 4c. 

Agents for 

GREENLEAF & TAYLOR'S MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

We will sell as low as Eastern Jobbers with Freight added. 

THE HIGHEST MARKET PRICE IN CASH PAID FOR 
PAPER RAGS, ROPE, GUNNIES & OLD NEWSPAPERS. 



oc22-tf 



Office No. 220 TKird-St., St. Paul, IVLin. 



ST. PAUL & PACIFIC RAILROAD— WINTER ARRANGEMENT. 

On and after TUESDAY, DECEMBER 8th, the Passenger Trains will run as follows: 



MORNING. 

Leaves St. Paul 7:00 a.m. 

Leaves St. Anthony 7:45 a.m. 

Leaves Manomin 8:10A.M. 

Arrive at Coon Creek 8:30 A. M. 



EVENING. 

Leaves St. Paul 3:00 p.m. 

Leaves St. Anthony 3 :45 p. 51 . 

Leaves Manomin 4:15 P. M. 

Arrive at Coon Creek 4:35 p.m. 



In the matter of the application of the Minne- 
apolis, Faribault and Cedar Valley Railroad Com- 
pany for the appointment of three Commissioners 
to oxamine and assess the damages whicli may be 
sustaiiad bv the several owners iv clainuints of 
the lands through which the road of said Compa- 
ny (the St. Paul branch) is located within the 
ctjunty of Ramsey in the State ol Minne ola, by 
reason of the appropriation of such lands for 
Railroad i)urpos<-s by said Company : 

To the several owners and cliimants ol the 
lands in this notice mentioned or of any part 
thereof, and to all and every person or persons 
having cr claiming any estate, rigUt or interest in 
anv portion of such lands : You :ind each of vou 
are hereby notilied that an application will bo 
made by and in behalf of the Minieapolis, Fari- 
bault and Cedar Valley Railroad (!onipany, to tlrtJ 
lion. I.dvvard C. Talmer, .Judge of the Di>trict 
'v ourt, of the Second Jndic'al Disfilct, of the 
State of JUnncsota, at the Couit House, in the 
city of Snint Vin\, in said Raiii^ey County, ou 
the thirteenth day of .lanuiry, a. i>. 18C>4, at 
ebven o'clock in the forenoon jf that day, for 
tl'.e ;,i poiiiime it of three Commi-^sioners to ex- 
amine and iistoss the dn mages which may be sus- 
liiiiie,-, by the several owners aud slfiimants <i the 
snveral pi-ces, parcels, lots or tracts of land, 
through r.r upon which the road of said Conipan> , 
to v. it : tilt Sc. Paul branch then of, is located in 
said county ol Itamtey, by reasm of the appro- 
priation and taking thereof by said Company, for 
Kaiiroadiiurposes, to wit: for the rv^hx of way 
for their said road, the necessary turnouts, sites 
for water buildings, conduits, tanks, d( pots, 8t« re- 
houses, machine and other sh )ps, aud extr.a 
tracks necessary therefor, and 10 ascertain and 
fix the conipensiiiion to be paid therefor by said 
Coiiipauv. . . ,. ^L , J 

The following is a descriptu n of the lands 
willnnthe t-aid county of Rain»ey, through or 
upon which said road is located, and which is 
sought to be taken and appropriated for the pur- 
poses afores-id : 

hi Jiicc <j- I.rin<i*8 Addition to St. PauL 

Partof lotsS, r>, 7and^inblcck3r). 

fart of lots 0, 7, )S, '.», 10, U aul 12, m block Z,. 

Tlie whole of bkick ?,^. 

The wholo of block 39. 

The whole of block 40. 

Part of lots 5, (5 , 7, 8 and 9, in )lock 41. 

The whole of block 43. , „ . x., , , , 

Part of lots 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 0, 7, 8 i nd 9 in b ock 44. 

Purt of lots 1 , 2, 3, 4, 5 and 11 , in block 45. 

'i he wholo of lots 1,2, 3, 4, 5, und . , in block 4fi. 

The whole of block 47. 

Tlie whole of block 48. ^ ^ . ,,, , ,« 

The wliole of lots 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and C, in block 49. 

Ill Irvitit's EnJuryumvnt. 

Part of lots 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 and 13, and the whole 
of lots 17 to 25, inclusive, in block 08. Also, the 
strip of land Iving between lot f 8 and '.», in said 
block (JS, aud the whole of blocks 09 and 70. 

In Leaches Addition to .U. Paul. 

Part of lot 7, in block 7. 

In jriiislow^s Ad'liiinn ti> St. Pant. 

Part of lots 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5, in block 14. 
Part of lots 4, 5 and C, in block 15. 
I'art ol block 17. 
In Stins< n, Brown cj- Bamsey's Addition to St. 
Pa Hi. 



Kid Padded Hoop Skirts, 

Hoods, Scarl's, Soiita««. 
HOSIER.Y, 

Consisting of English and German Cotton, Wool- 
len and Worsted Hose. 

LADIES k CHILDREN'S BALMORAL HOSE. 

White and mixed 

WRAPPERS & DRAWERS. 

CLOTHS andCASSIMEBES. 

White, red and mixed] 
rLiVINTVELS. 

Sheetings, Shirtings, Tickings, 

X>e]fiixxis, Blanltets. 

ALL COUNTRY MERCHANTS who pnrcliase 

FOR CASH, 

Should examine oar stock before purchasing. 
We will not be undersold in this market. 
jy, "W. Injireirsoll Sc Oo.» 



Sept. l:ly 



ST. PAlTli. HUJr. 



/CLOTHING AND 

Gent's Furnishing Goods, 

AT THK 8TOKE OF 

^W. H. te:w[3ple, 

THIRD ABOVE MINNESOTA ST. 

Overcoats. 

FINE BEAVER $14, $18 and $25. 

BLACK DOESKIN, CASSIMERE 

AND CLOTH tUtoftaO. 

PETERSHAM, PILOT k SATINET.. »8 to $18. 

Business Coats, Frocks & Sacks 

A large assortment, $6 to $20. 

Pantaloons for the Million. 

From a coarse Satinet to a fine Doeskin, all new 
goods, and made up in style. 

VESTS. 

Black Doeskin, Ch th. Figured Cassimere, Bilk 
and Silk Velvet, of dill'erent grades. 

Sh-irts a.iid Drawers, 

Winter Caps, Hats, Gloves, Socks, Ties, 
FINE WHITE AND FANCY WOOL SHIRTS. 

We have now in store one of the largest stocki 
of Clothing in the t^tate. Our goods have been 
bought so that we can give bargains. Those in 
want of any article in our line would do well to 
give us a caU. 

mi:JO-tf ir. H. TEHPI^K. 



^y ANTED. 

Spikers and Laborers on the construction work 
of the St. Paul and Pacific Railroa-l. Liberal 
wages will be paid. Payments made weekly. 
Apply to F. R. Delano, Assistant Superintendent, 
at Freight Depot, St. Paul, or John Murphy, 
Foreman, Manomin. 

o«»Otf W. B. LITCHFIELD fc CO. 



BARRELS 



I 
1 



400 

GOOD "WINTER APPLES, 



A FINE ASSORTMENT of the American 
manufactured Watch adjusted to heat and cold, 
and the most perfect timer made. A. BLAKE- 
MAN sells them at manufactory pricea. Don't 
mistake the place. Be sure that you call in at 
THE NEW JEWELRY STORE. apl8-ly 



l^EW PHOTOGRAPH GALLERY, 
Third St., between Cedar and Wabashaw, 

m:. c. txjttle. 

Has Just opened a New Gallery on the ground 
floor, where he will be pleased to see his old 
friends and customers. His stock and apparatui 
are new, and have all the latest improvements. 

*^ Especial Attention given to taking 
Childkkn's Pictures 

Pictures from Locket Size to Life Size, in the 

Finest St^'le. 

US' Photograph Albums furnished as cheap as 
any other House, and a Carte de VisUe taken 
qraiis I no2i»-t< 

/CORDAGE, SLEIGH SHOES AND 
. FANNING MILLS. 



Leave Coon Creek ♦ .40 r. M. 

Leaves Manomin 5:00 p. M. 

Leaves St. Anthony 5:30 p. M. 

Arrive at St. Paul 6:10 p.m. 



Leaves Coon Creek 8:35 a. m. 

Leaves Manomin 'J :05 A. M. 

Leaves St. Anthony » .:» A . M. 

Arrive at St. Paul 10 : 10 A M . 

The above time table will give passengers coming to Saint Paul upon the morning, and leaving 
upon the evening train, about five hours for business in the city. . » • „ „,u i,o,ro 

Passengers going to St. Anthony and Minneapolis upon the morning or evening trains, will have 
about two hours before the same train returns, or by stopping over will have about ten hours. 

WM. B. LITCHFIELD, General Superintendent, 
apistf 



THE GALENIC INSTITUTE. 

FOR THE TREATMENT OF 

VEISTERE^L DISEASES, 



Part of the south half of block 15. 

Part of lot 11, in the north half of block 15. 

Part of block IP. 

Part ol lots 11, 12, 28, 20, 30, 5'.'. 00, 61. 63, 04 and 
05 in the .i«''-f'«'"'sto»i of block i8, 

I'arf of lots 2, 3, 4 and 5, in the sub-diviston of 
block 29. 

A r.<:<), Part of the b e U of tl e s e V of sec. 1, 
of township 28, range 2:J, and jiart of the n w fi 
of I he n e ,'* of sec. 12, of the si me township and 

"^®* H. R. BIGELOW, Attorney for the 

M., F. & C. V. U. R. Co., S't. I'aul, Minn. 
Dated December 12th, A. ti. li^H . d«€l2-td 



D 



ESIRABLE LANDS FOR SALE. 



Tj^OSTER 

SHIP 

SAIL 



; HARDENBURGH, 

CHANDLERS AND 



For sale by 
Jel4-tf 



NICOLS, DEAN k CO. 



/CHICAGO 



BREWERY. 




AND 



All Affections of the Urinary and Generative 

Organs, &c., &c. 

TnsT PuBT.isHFn-A Mkdical report, 30th edition, containing 80 large pages, and 60 fine 
engrovin^ price only 15 cents, on'the Improved Treatment of -^PtlT/l k"''^^^ t.friHjHv 
, Simons and Sexual DebUity, and the effects of Masturbation or Self Abuse on the Body 
including a Treatise on 



goo 



T S AND SHOES 



AT 



LHuds in the valley of the Upper Mississippi, 
and sfdjaceot to Uie line of the St. Paul aud Pad- 
tic Railroad. 

The SU i'aul and Pacific Railroad Company 
MOW offer in tracts of 40, 80, 120 and 100 acres and 
upwards — 120 sectiors, or 70,800 acres of land. In 
the following townships, viz : 

I'own. 32, Range 22. 
33, " 22. 
32, 
3:t, 

32, 
33, 
24, 
85, 
33, 
34, 
35, 
34, 
85, 

Theso lands are situated in the counties of 
Anoka, Isanti and Sherburne, and comprise some 
of the most valuable lands in the townships 
named. 

They vill be sold for cash, the bonds of 
Companjr at par. or on long credit. 

For price? ana terms of payment apply to 
I.AND COMMISSIONER, 
St. Paul and Pacilic liallroad Company, 

oc27-d&w6m St. Paul, Minnesota. 



tl 


32, 


II 


23. 


« 


3:{, 


K 


23. 


tl 


32, 


rl 


24. 


It 


33, 


II 


24. 


«t 


24, 


II 


24. 


<l 


85, 


II 


24. 


II 


33 


II 


25. 


tl 


34 


II 


25. 


•1 


35 


II 


25. 


il 


34, 


II 


26. 


tl 


85, 


11 


26. 


are 


situated 


in the counties 



NEW YORK PRICES, 

20 per Cent. Saved. 



MAKERS, 



Ho. 217 Sootli ^rat«r Street, Clilcaaro* 

Have constantly on hand a largo assortment of 

IMCanilla, Sc Tarred JRape, 
I>itcliiii^ IS>ope«>, 



FOR SALE BY 



Oeo. E. Scliiiabel, 



decl2-tf 



Cor. Jackson and 4tb-8ts, 



Old Canvass, Oaknm, Tar, Pitch 



CHAINS, TACKLE BLOCKS, TENT«, AWN 

INGS, WAGON COVERS, COTTON 

AND RUSSIA DUCKS, 

FIL.A.OS, Sec, Sec. 

Common and Patent Hoiat 'l¥li«ela,for build 
ings, constantly on hand. 

OBO, r, rosTER. (Jei3-i7) 0. u. aAanwmMvmun 



LIL.JL1 &> niVERSY 

BREWERS OF 

LILL'S SXOCK 

A11D 

Oream. Pale .A.le9 

PORTER AND BROWN STOUT 

FOR SALE BY 



WM. CONSTANS, 

▲aavT. IT. Favl, 



plates and 
NVeakness 
and Mind, including 

VElSfEREAL DISEASES, 

Gonorrhea Gleet, Strictures, Syphillls, and affections of the Testicles, Bladder, and Kidneys, with 

?bse^aSi8ontKrDisK.A8Ksm^EM:vLKS.M li«P'°?*rV'?^^!."l**l^C«°'''* 

cention &c Sent to any address in a sealed wrapper on receipt of 15 cents or stamps. ^... 

This I'nlttutlon was ofganized under a special charter in 1850. The method of treatment adopted 
l8thesamea"thatTmplo?pd in the best French, English and American hospitals. The attenaing 
Dhvs?cia"is a regular graduate of the'Collegii Medici Ohioensis. Without degrading it m p em^yrf- 
cism as°s pracirced by advertising quacks, " former sufferers ," and " benevolent associaUons,^' he, 
uMcord'^cfviale.Vida^Bnmstcad, &c.. has made this branch of Surgery a speciality during the 
M^^tteTyK and is prepared to give patients aa good treatment as they could obUin in Eastern 

Thos » afflicted with any of the above diseases, should let no false delicacy deter them, but apply 

**Female''^skases.— Particular attention given to all Fere -le Disciies, such as suppressed, or 
nnhealthy Jlenstruation. Leuchorrhea, Chlorosis, Diseases of the Womb and Ob U.eri, fcc. Also, 
A»ent for Dewee's Female Pills, for obstructed Menstruation, price $1 per box. 

Patikxts at a Distance— By sending a brief statement of their symptoms, will 
Chart containing a list of questions, our terms for the course of treatment, &c. M 
anv part of the country to cure any case at home, free from damage or curiosity. 

JB- Office In Concert Hall Block, near the Post Office. Consultations private and oonfldentlal 
hou?8 from » A.u. to 1 r, m. afternoons, from S to J. Sundays 9 to 10 a. m. All letters should be 

'^'''^ *° THE GALENIC INSTITUTE 

j^ P«x 109 J Saint raol, Iflnnetoto 



BY 



N 



O T I C E 



BUYING YOUIl SHOES 



JATl 



receive a Blank 
Medicines sent to 

Offiob 



BROWN'S 

NE^\^ STORE', 



113 Third Street, 

One block above the Mei chant's HoteL 
je5-y 



MADAME ANDREWS, 
Clairvoyant, 

Has returned and taken the two story frame house 
on Tenth-st., two doors west of St. Peter-st , on 
right hand side, nhere she can be consulted for a 
short time only. 

Clairvoyant Examinations (1. Past, Present 
and future, 50c. 

Persons wishing to consult her, are request^ 
to walk up stairs without knocking. Hours from 
9 a. M. to 9 P.M. dec8-Sm 



T 



HIRD STREET PROPERTY. 



1 00 ^^^^^^^^ CJDER, 
Justreceived on cons ignmeiit^and for stlejow. 
©oift-tf J. C. fc U. C. B URBAN K 6; CO. 



FOR SALBJ, 

Lot 2, Block 22, Rice k Irvine's Addition— comer 
lot, 72 feet front on Third street aud 160 feet on 
Hill street, adjoining Hope Engine Uoase. Will 
be sold low. 

TERMS— Part cash and part credit. 

Apply to D.COOPEBi 

aplOtf 



Irvine's Bloek 






" 



^■•M 



N 



■ 




DR. DkMONTREVILLE, 

DKNTIST, 
(Office in French's Block,) 
Third Strvctf BCttr tlie r—t •■ui, 

SAINT PAUL MINKKSOTA. 

J»n2»-ly 



•fc^* 



1 



f.^ . — - ■. 



i W i.>»^. 






.UL. > ■ - ' ■ ■ 



. t » 9 umn 



















IB ^-»-> 


- <« «••»» ». 






P"* '^ 



^ 



■■ »' ■» > ' I ' 



•aavriMW 



F 



■*— .r 



) 



m^ 



1 ^ ^^ 



^ 




THE 




PAUL 




JrlvESS. 



SA1:NT PAUL, FKIDAY, JANUARY 1, I8G4. DOUiiLE bHEET. 



P R S P^C T U S . 

1 ^ C> -i . 



Til K S. VI ?^rT I*^VU L. 

P 11 E S S , 

Daily, Tri-Wrrhly an<l Weekly, 

li nnlversally admiK'id to be tlio 

Best Newspaper Published 
Northwest of Chicago. 



By Its oarnest, foarloss and consistoat advocacy 
of t'.r.' Kri'iit prinoipliT* for which tin' Arinio.-' (t 
l!u' I'liit.n ari' co::!iinlii;K ag.tiii.-'t Ihn liostfl of 
iSlavL-ry, ami by its f iipt'i ior fntt-rprisi? ns a News- 
papor, it has, in tlii> lliirtl y^-jir of ita publication, 
ro:iebc'<r:icirculalion DOUIJI K TUAT OF A.NV 

(>Tii!:i: joi' i:\AL. in tmk statk. 

Till' trpincndoiii issues of tht? contest wliich i* 
to ciilir.iiiitP In the approacliiiig I'rcsldfntlal 
i.'auiM-ii^ru of 1mV<— tlio result of wiiii-h will ilociUf 
wlicthcr f^l.>ve^y, tlio inotlicr of tlio Uele'lion, 
shall ixTij'a uith hor inrtTiiai oir'^prinjr, or sur- 
vive til )ron< rate a new progony of Xation:il 
criin<^4 an.l ilisasters— ih'maiiJ tli.it iucreaaed ef- 
fort bi p:.t furth t0ixt«'nil the lirciilatiou of tin 

Lea ding Republican Journal 
of Minnesota. 

5linn<-sota cm b-j can it <l next fall by a majority 
of tiftocn t»!Oti-an«l for tin' twin c;n« ' of FKK.K- 
DOM AND TIIK UNI«>N, if in evi'i y city, town 
ami ward tho cunvass beat ouccbo;^>n by peri^u;;- 
clii>)j »v>'r,' iuleliiij.'i t voter to 

Take the Press. 

Lvcry Kopublican and Union man shou! J 

Take the l?resfi, 

Bcciu^o it 1« thf only Kopublican or reliable Un 
i n Journal published a! the capital. 

Kvoryboily who wan^i a lirat-olass Xewspapor, 
should 

Take llio Pre^sr^, 

•iJer?.ii«<' in all it?» deparfmi-nts of Tolographic, 
(Ji'.ieral, State, Local, ai;d Co-.ninoreial News, In 
•the extent, variety and interest of its l'oiii<> and 
Military Correspondence, it is univorsally adniit 
led to b'-' the he.'ft stiul most eul-^rprisiuy iuic>>i'(f 
Jtcr X»,thir,gt of (.liif'go. 
J'lvery puliticiau should 

Take tlie I^ress, 

'Becavsc it ctintains every important j ublic docu- 
ment, fpccch or letter b.-^riug on the great ques- 
tions of the day. 

Every lawyer aal every citizen intf rested as ail 
are in th3 legislation of the State and Nation 
should 

Take the Press, 

Because it ia the OFFICIAL PAPEU OF THE 
STATi: AND «»K TIIK UXITF.D STATES, and 
the only Journal which p;iblishes all tht^ LAWS 
OF -MINNESOTA, AM) ALL THE ACTS OF 
CONCUESS, and during th-! coining wiuter will 
contain fi.ll an<I c.refully prepared reports of tho 
PKOCEH>lN(o OF THE STATE LEGlriLA- 
Tl'UE AND OF CONGRESS. 

Every merc'iaat, business inan, farmer and me- 
chanic, should 

Take the Pre^s, 

'Oecau'c it is the only Minnvsoia piper which 
contains full and accurate daily Monetary and 
Coinnuriial r.'p'tts ...f the LOCAL AND CEX- 
EKAL MxVUKETS and because its circulation 
being noiui.E that ©:•' ANY other i-apkb, T 
Is the f^ivorlte nudiuia of advertising in all depart 
inents of trade and indu.-try. 

Everybody inten^sted in the progress and pros- 
Jierity of the .State, sliould 

Take the Press, 

Because it. devotes more labor and more columns 
to the advoKicy au'J st,atistical exposition of sub- 
jact-" connected wirh TitVfK, AaEicii.TfiiE, 

M\5t lAiTlKKS, iNTKKNAI. I^rPBOVKMKNT.s, 

and the General De-.elopment of the State than 
any and all other papers combined. 

Everybody desirous of promoting immigration 
to Minnesota should 

Take the Press, 

Because It is tlu' best paper to send abroad to 
disseminate a correct appreciation of thj re- 
sources of the Slate. 
Every soldier should 

Talce tlie I^i-es^, 

BecanseTt is tha best medium of Home news, 
and of military irtelligence from the various reg- 

rimenls which is published in Minnesota. 

FIverybo'ly who wantsa FIRST-CLASS FAM- 

iILY JOURNAL, should 

Take the Weekly Press, 

Special attention being given to the Department 

•of T.\LKs, I'UKTUV and Geskkaf. Ukadin'g. 

THE WEEKLY PRESS contains tho cream 
of ali the Editorial, News and Miscellaneous mat- 
ter of the Daily, and is especially prepared for 

• Family Jieadin?, aud for Eastern Subscribers. 

THE TRI-WEEKLY PRESS contains nearly 
all till" matter of the Daily, aud has reached a cir- 

• culation four times that of any other Tri-Weekly 

■ )n Minnesota. 



LYRICS OP LOYALTY. 



THE POETRY OP THE WAR. 



I can sec wlieic the moonlicaras steals trcmb- 

linglv through ; 
It is cold, but not windy— how dreary and 

damp 
It must be fur our soldiers exposed in the 

cam]) 1 
Thougli I know iti.s warmer and balmcrtherc. 
Yet I shrink irom the thought of tlie chilling 

nif,'lit air; 
For lie never was used to the hardships of men 
When at home, for I shielded and c-licrishcd 

liiiii then ; 
And to all that could tend to his comforts 

I saw — 
For he seemed like a child till he went to the 



war 



Teriii«» of Subscription. 

To city subscribers, by the year, payable 

quarterly iu advance $9 00 

To city subscribers, payable weekly 20 

By mail, payable for any time in advance, at 



the rate per year of.. . 



.... 8 00 



One copy, by mail payable for any time (in 

advance) at the rate per year of $5 00 

• Clubs of live, to one address, each 4 50 

Clubs of ten, to one address, each 4 00 



"VVeeltl;:^' Press. 



•One copy one year 

Fi.'e or more coi)ies each, one year.... 
Ten or more copies each, one year — 
Twenty or more copies each, one year 
Address, 

PRESS PRINTING COMPANY, 
St. Paul, Minnesota 



...$2 OO 
... , 1 75 
.... 1 CO 
.... 1 50 



BOOK AND JOB PRINTING. 

The I?i*ess I?i*iiitiiigr Co. 

In order to keep pace w ith their rapidly incrcas 
Ing business are constantly extending their fa- 
•cilitles for Book and Job Printing. They have 
recently introduced Steam into their establish 
meiit, and put up another of 

HOE'S LARGE CYLINDER PRESSES, 

We are prepared to Print all kinds of 

BOOKS, PAMPHLETS, BPJEFS, 

rOSTERS, PROGRAMMES, BILLHEADS 

BLANKS, BILLS OF LADING. 

CIRCULARS, 

And every other description of 

pLAfy AND ORNA3TENTAL miNTI^Q 

At moderate rates aud at short notice. 



Fiom the very beginning oflJie present 
Efnat American war up to the present 
n>;inent the struggle has ])resented fea- 
tures of romantic or pathetic interest 
which have at once struck the poetic in- 
stincts of writers in all parts of the coun- 
try ; and while many poets of extended 
local and even national fame were moved 
to patriotic utterance, many more anony- 
mous contributors to provincial and often 
obscure journals exhibited^ when writing 
of our w.tr, a poetic fire and skill as ad- 
miiMblc as unexpecti.-d. i^Ir. Frank 
Moore, the editor of the Uchdllon Jlecord, 
having preserveil almost all these war 
poems, has, from the enormous accumu- 
mtdation, jiidiciou.sly selected the best 
for preservation in book form, under the 
general title '"Lyrics of Loyalty,"' and 
Putnam has published them in a neat 
pocket pocket edition, printed by Hough- 
ton, of the lUi'ciside Pre.^-s, and bouml in 
the new style of "red, white and blue." 
Tlic volume is an admirable one for pre- 
sentation to friends in the army, where it 
may enliven many a tedious hour of camp 

life'. 
The collection opens with Mr. Bryant's 

poem " Our Country's Call," beginnitig 

with the lines : 

" Lily down the axe, fling by tlie spade ; 
Leave ht its track the tuilinir plou^Mi." 

Whittier, T. B. Read, Longfellow and 

O. W. Holmes are among the more noted 

contriliutors ; but ns tiieir Avar songs 

have been copied and read all over the 

country, and arc probably familiar to 

most of our readers, we prefer to give 

iiere, as examples of the style of the book 

a few of tlie poems emanating from less 

celebated pens, or .still more modestly 

attributed only to anonymous authors. 

We begin with this spirited war-cry : 

THK CAVALRY CHARGE — BY FttANCIS \. Dlltl- 
VAOK. 

M'ith braj' of liic tnuniict 

And roll of the drum. 
And keen ring of Inijrlcs 

The c.ivalry come. 
Sliarp clank the steel sc.il)bards, 

'i lie bridle-chains riii^% 
And fonii from red nostrils 

Tlie wild chargers lling. 
Tram]) ' Tramp ! o'er the green sward 

That (|tiivers below. 
Scarce held f)y the curb-bit 

The tierce horses go! 
And tlie grim-visaged Colonel, 

With ear-rending shout, 
re.ils forlli to the squadrons: 

The order— "Trt out," 
One hand on th;- sai>re. 

And one on the rein, ' 
The tr(;opcrs move forward 

In line on the pl.iin. 
As rings the word "gallop!" 

The steel scabbards clank, 
And each ro.vcl is jtn-ssed 

To a horse's hot dank ; 
And swift is their rush 

As the wild torrents flow, 
\Vhcn it pours from the crag 
• On the valley below. 
''Charge!" thunders the le.ider: 

Like shair from the bow- 
Each miul horse is hurled 

On the wavering foe. 
A thousand bri-dit sabres 

Arc gleaming in air; 
A thousand dark horses 

Arc dash'.'d on the sciuare. 
Resistless and reckless 

Of nught may betide. 
Like demons, not mortals, 

'The wild troopers ride. 
Cut right ! aud cut left! — 

For the parry who needs ? 
The bayonets shiver 

I.ike winil-shattered reeds. 
Yn'm — vain the red volley 

That bursts from the sqnare— 
Tlie random-shot bullets 

Are wasted in air. 
Triumphant, remorseles«, 

Uiuiring as death, — 
No sabre that's stainless 

Returns to its slicath. 

The wounds tli.at are <lealt 

By that nmrderous steel 
Will never yield case 

For the surgeons to heal. 
Hurrah ! they are broken — 

IIiiiTah ! boys, they lly — 
Xoue linger save those 

Who but linger to die. 

Rein up your liot horses 

And (•■■ 11 in your men ; 
The trumpet sounds "Rally 

To color" again. 
Some saddles arc entity. 

Some comrades are slain. 
And some nobic horses 

Lie stark on the plain, 
Ent war's a chance game, boys. 

And weeping in vain. 

(^iiite different in style and sentiment 
— the reverse of the medal — is this touch- 
ing picture of 

THE PEAD DKUMMEH-BOY. 

Mid tangled roots that lined the wild ra- 
vine 
Where the fierce fight raged hottest through 
the day, 
And where the dead in scattered heaps were 

seen. 
Amid the d irkling forest's sliade and sheen. 
Speechless in death he lay. 

The setting sun, which glanced athwart the 
jdace 
In slanting lines, like amber-tinted rain. 
Fell sidewisc on the drummer's upturned face. 
Where death had left his gory tinger's trace 
In one bright crimson stam. 

Tiie silken fringes of his once bright aye 

Lay like a shallow upon his cheek so fair; 
His lips were parted by a long drawn sigh, 
That with his soul had mounted to the sky 
On somj wild martial air. 

No more his hand the fierce tattoo shall beat, 

The shrill reveille, or the long roll's call, 
Or sound the charge, w hen in the smoke and 

heat 
Of fierj' on.«et, foe with foe sliall meet, 
And gallant men shall fall. 

Y'et may be in some happy home, that one, 
A mother, reading from the list of dead, 
Shall chance to view the name of her dear son. 
And move her lips to sav, "God's will be 
done !" 

And b)w in grief her head. 

But more than this what tongue shall tell bis 
story ? 
Pcrhaps'his T)oyish longings were for tame; 
He lived, he died ; and so memento mori, — 
Enough if on the page of War and Glory 
Some hand has writ his name. 

Maternal anxieties find their expression 
in many of these poems, but in none of 
them are they couched in more beautiful 
lanjruaiiethan in "The Soldiers MoihtT," 
of which pathetic anonymous lines we 
can only find space to copj a few : 
"It is night— almost morning — the clock has 

Who can tell where, this moment, my darling | preserving what would otherwise be the 

maybe! .^ , ., •. I ephemeral souvenirs of the war; and 

On the window has gathered the moisture I . , , . ^ , . , r *i ^ 

like dew ; ^ should the forthcoming volumes of the 



series, now compiling under the titles I 
" Songs of the b'oldiers " and "Person- i 
al and Political Ballads of the War'' ] 
prove to be as admirably arranged and as j 
judiciously selected as the present volume, | 
they cannot fail to remain among the most I 
interesting and characteristic specimens 
of our war literature. 



lie is twenty, I know; and Ijovs younger 

than lie, 
In the ranks going by, every day we can see; 
And ilr>.-e stronger and prouder by far I 

have met. 
But I never have seen a young soldier, as yet. 
With so gallant a mien or so lofty a brow — 
How the sun and the wind must h.id dark- 
ened it n<;w! 
How he will have Ijccn changed when he 

conies iVoin t!:c South ! — 
With his licard shuttmg out the sweet smiles 

<<f his inoudi; 
And ti;e tremulous iKjauty, the womanly 

£rrace. 
Will be bronzed from tl;e delicate lines of his 

fa<'e. 
Where, of late, only childhood's soft beauty 1 

saw, — 
For he seemed like a child till he went to the 

war ! 

Here is a little gem, like a cabinet pic- 
ture in a gallery of large landscapes : 

THE VOLUNTEER. 

Hard by the porch of the village church, 
.\ dusty traveller lialts awhile to rest; 
His head <lroops tired down upon his breast. 

But the word of prayer wakes new life there. 

"God bless the brave, who go to save 
Our country, in her dark, dread hour of 

danger!" 
The good man's voice was comfort to the 
stranger. 
Duty wipes away a tear as he hurries to the 
war. 

Another incident is thus described at 
greater length : 

CARTE DE VISITE. 

Anont/motts. 

'Twas a terrible fight, the soldier said • 
"Our colonel was one of the first to fall. 
Shot dead on the field by a rifle ball — 

A braver heart than this never bled." 

.\ group for the painter's art were they : 
The soldier with scarred and sunburnt face, 
A fair-hain'dgirl, full of youth and grace. 

And her aged mother, wriiikleil and gray. 

These three in the porch, where the sunlight 
caiue. 
Through the tangled leaves of the jasmine- 
vine, 
•Spilling itself like a golden wine. 
Ami flecking the docrway with rings of flame. 

The soldier had stopped to rest by the way, 
For the air was sultry with summer he.it. 
The road was like ashes under the feet, 

Aud a weary di tance before him lay. 

"Y'cs, a teiTible fight ! our Ensign Mas shot 
As the order to charge was given the men, 
When one from the ranks seized our colors, 
aud then 

He, too, fell dead on the self-same spot. 

"A hand.some boy was this la-st : his hair 
Clustered iu curls round his noble brow ; 
I can Almost fancy I see him now. 

With the scarlet stain on his face so fair." 

'•What was his name ? — have you never heard ? 

Where was he from, this youth who fell ? 

And vour regiment, stranger, which was it ? 
tell !" 
"Onr regiment ? It was the Twenty-third." 

The color fled from the young girl's cheek. 
Leaving it as w hitc as the face of the dead ; 
The mother lifted her eyes and said : 

"Pity my daughter — in mercy speak!" 

"I never knew aught of this gallant youth," 
The soldier answered ; not even his name, 
Or from what part of our state he came — 

As God is above, I speak the truth ! 

"But when we liuried our dead that night, 
I took from his broast this picture — see! 
It is as like him as like can be ; 

Hold it this way, toward the light." 

One glance, and a look, half-sad, half-wild. 
Passed over her face, which grew more pale. 
Then a passionate, hopeless, heart-broken 
wail. 
And the mother bent low o'er the pro.strate 
child. 

In conclusion, we quote a characteris- 
tic marching song of the style which will 
probably find a wider circle of admirers 
than more finished and elegant strains': 

TO CANAAN — A SONG OF THE SIX HUN- 
DRED THOUSAND. 

Where are you going, soldiers. 

With banner, gun and sword ? 
We're marching South to Canaan 

To battle for tlie Lord ! 
Wliat Captain leads your armies 

Along the rebel coasts ? 
The Mighty One of Israel, 

His name is Lord of Hosts ! 

To Canaan, to Canaan 
The Lord has led us forth, 
To blow before the heathen walls 
The triumph of the North! 

What flag is this you carry 

Along the sea and shore ? 
The same our grandsires lifted up — 

The same our father's lx)rc ! 
In many a battle's tempest 

It shed the crimson rain — 
What God has woven in his loom 

Let no man rend iu twain. 

To Canaan, to Canaan 
The Lord has led us forth. 
To plant upon the reoel towers 
The banners of the North ! 

W'hat troop is this that follows. 

All armed with picks and spades ? 
These are the swarthy lK>ndsnian — 

The iron-skin brigades! 
They'd pile up Freedom's breastwork. 

They'll scoop out rebels' graves; 
Who then will be their owner 
And march them otf for slaves ? 
To Canaan, to Canaan 
The Lord has led us lortli. 
To strike upon the captive's chain 
The hammer of the North ! 

What song is this you're singing? 

The same that Israel sung 
When Moses led the mighty choir, 

And Miriam's timbrel rung! 
To Canaan ! To Canaan ! 

The priests and maidens cried ; 
To Canaan ! To Canaan ! 
The people's voice replied. 
To Canaan, to Canaan 
The'Lord has led us forth. 
To thunder through Its adder dens 
The anthems of the North ! 

When Canaan's hosts are scattered, 

And all her walls lie flat. 
What follows next in order? 

—The Lord will see to that ! 
We'll break the tyrant's sceptre — 
We'll build the'people's thnme — 
When half the world is Freedom's, 
Then all the world's our own. 
To Canaan, to Canaan 
The Lord has led us forth, 
To sweep the rebel threshing-floors, 
A whirlwind from the North. 

Mr. Moore has in making this admira- 
ble collection, not only placed the lovers 
of national and original poetry under 
great obligations, but has done a real 
service to our country and its history in 



Adveiiliiies of a Teuclicr ia 
DL\ie, 

"I will be revenged on the accursed 
Yankee cur I I will teach him what it is 
to thwart a Southerner !' 

These words were uttered in a sort of 
undergrowl by a figure just emerged from 
the shade of a large dwelling. Jt was 
that of a man apparently about thirty 
years of age, active and well built. lie 
glanced upward at the house, then mut- 
tered a deep oath, and strode rapidly 
down the lawn toward the gate, where 
he mounted his horse and rode off. 

A ride of iifieen minutes brought Lim 
to a low, dingy-looking building, which 
answered the double purpose of a store 
and hotel for such weary travelers as 
tired nature forced to seek a resting 
place for the night. A crowd was assem- 
bled about the door listening to an ex- 
cited individual who was delivering a har- 
rangue from the top of a molasses hogs- 
heail. His theme was, '"The Constitu- 
tional rights of the South,'' "Xortbern 
de>p«)tism," and "the Military dictation 
of Abe Lincoln and Bill .Seward." But 
he Avas unceremoniously cut short by one 
of the sovereigns, who proposed "Three 
cheers for Captain Daniels?"' as the horse- 



man rode up. The cheers were given 
with a hearty vigor; but the Captain dis- 
I mounted without even acknowledging the 
salute, and forcing his M'ay through the 
crowd, entered the hotel. He proceeded 
directly to the bar and called for whis- 
key. After slaking his thirst he went 
into an adjoining room, where a dozen or 
more men were congregated about a 
long table. At his entrance a large, 
ruii'anly-looking man arose from his seat 
at the head of a table, and greeted him 
as follows : 

" Well, it is about time you were here, 
Captain. The boys are getting tired of 
this kind of a life — they are growing lazy 
and want something to keep the fire up. 
Anything new stirring?" 

The C'aptain, without making any reply, 
strode forward and took the vacated 
chair at the head of the table. Drawing 
a piece of tobacco from his pocket, he 
cut off a huge chunk Mitli his bowie- 
knife, then passed it to the man nearest 
him, on the right. Plating the ' chaw' 
ho had cut off in his mouth, he gave it 
two or three turns with his tongue, and 
tliei* looking around, said : 

" What reports to-night?" 

" ^Vell not much," said the man who 
had vacated the chair. " Joe says that 
old Benson will need a visit. He onlj* 
gave twenty dollars toward fitting us out, 
and now refuses to fork over any more. 
The old houud has made enough money 
out of us Southerners, and now he should 
be m.ide to shell, out l-berally. 1 go for 
visiting him." 

*• Then visit him !" exclaimed the Cap- 
tain, bringing his fist down on the table 
with great violence. " And there is that 
sneaking Qankee schoolmaster — he wants 
visiting too, and that (juickly !"' 

" Wh:it has he been doirtg. Captain? I 
reckoned that he was safe enough," said 
rather an ehlerly man as he knocked the 
ashes from his pip**. 

" Do-inyr thundered the Captain, cast- 
ing a fierce glance at the sjjoakcr. " He 
has been doing enough He has been 
tampering with Parker's niggers." 

" I always thought that he was an Ab- 
olition skuiik. Never thought mnch of 
schoolm.asters anyhow : and ;is this one's 
suit is getting rather shabby, go for giv- 
ing him one made by Southern produc- 
tions." said the man at the Captain's 
left." 

"Give it to him!" "Let her rip!" 
"Clear out the Abolitionists !" "Hang 
the nigger stealers !" shouted several. 

"If you are agreed," said the Captain, 
"I suppose the sooner that it is done the 
better." 

"To-night!" "To-night!" "To-night!" 
was the response. 

"Then let it be to-night. You will 
find him down at Packer's. I left him 
there a short time ago, and I don't be-' 
lieve that he will leave for an hour or two 
yet. But what is best to do with him ? 
Give him a notice to quit — the black 
snake — tar and cotton— or — " Here the 
Captam gritted his teetii, and after a 
slight pause, continued, "Let him stretch 
hemp down in the hollow?" 

"Give him a little snake and tar!" said 
one. 

"With the cotton rubbed in !" ejacula- 
ted another. 

"Oh, give him the hemp and done 
with it !" said a third. 

"Let us leave it till we hear what he 
has got to say for himself," said the old 
man with the pi[)e. 

"Hear what he has got to .«!ay," sneer- 
ed the Captain, "as if any one here would 
believe an Abolitionist !"' 

"Abolitionists or not, I go for giving 
every man a fair chance ; and say try 
him first and give him what he deserves 
after." replied the old man in a firm 

V02CG» 

" Yes, a trial !" "Try him !" A trial !" 
"Old Buckskin will be his counsel," in- 
terrupted several. 

"Let us have some whisky before we 
decide," said the Captain. 

"Ay! That's it! Whisky! Couldn't 
expect a man to give a fair vardict till 
he's had his whisky, could yon ?" ex- 
claimed one of the crowd, raising his head 
from the table, where he had been dream- 
ing on the affaire of the nation, until 
aroused to consciousness by the magic 
word "whisky." 

The Captain gave an order for a gal- 
lon ol whisky, which being brought in, 
together with a number of tin cups, he 
told each man to help himself and gave 
as a toast, 

"The Southern Confederacy !"' 

While the above scene was being en- 
acted at the hotel, a far different one 
was taking place at the dwelling the 
Captain had recently left, and which he 
was anxious to have his band visit. 

In a pleasantly furnished room over- 
looking the lawn were seated two young 
persons. One was the niece of the own- 
er of the mansion, the othera young man, 
the teacher of a neighboring school. The 
•planter was a bacheler, and his niece was 
the mistress of the house. She was not 
what would be called a belle ; ytt she 
was of pleasing demeanor, and one who 
improved upon acipiaintance. The young 



f^ 



man had resided in that vicinity for the 
past three years, and by his quiet, gen- 
Oemanly conduct had made many friends, 
and of course some enemies. He had 
always refrained from taking any p.irt 
whatever in politics, aad had never even 
allowed himself to be drawn into conver- 
sation in relation thereto. With the in- 
mates of tho house he had long been on 
very inliuiate terms ; but for the young 
lady he had cherished a feeling of some- 
thing more than Iriendship, although ho 
had never made it known to her, not hav- 
ing received sullicient evidence that it 
would qe reciprocated if it were known, 
and he was aware that Captain Daniels 
had lonj; laid sie^e to the heart which he 
was anxious should beat m unison with 
his own. On the evening in question the 
young lady had paid more than usual at- 
tention to his conversation, much to the 
indignation of Capt. L>aniels, who be- 
came convinced that in tiie schoolmaster 
he had a formidable rival, and growing 
restless at what he considered an attempt 
to give him the cut direct he quitted the 
house in high dudgeon. 

It Avas thus that matters stood. The 
young man hail called lor the purpose of 
saying farewel', previous to his depart- 
ure Irom that section of the country, 
which, for very good reasons, he had de- 
tennintd should take jilace as j rivafely 
as possible, and had therefore not men- 
tioned the subject in the presence of Cap- 
tain Daniels. As he rose to go the young 
lady started up somewhat suddenly, 
seized his hand, and, after a deej), earnest, 
melancholy gaze into his countenance, 
said, in a mournful tone, 

'•Are you determined, William?" 
It was the first time she had called him 
by that fanii'iar name; he felt a queer 
sensation within his breast, and it was 
some moments before he could answer. 

"lam, //•<'//e .'" He had spoken what 
he had heretofore considered a forbidden 
word to his lips, and paused as if startled 
at his boldness. But love laughs at 
locksmiths, and why not at cereinon\ ? 
William had now crossed the llnbicoii, 
and he ventured forward. "1 am deter- 
mined, Irene," he said. "1 can not lon- 
ger remain ; for nothing could induce me 
to become a traitor to my country by 
taking the oaiii of alle<riaiice to tlie South 
ern Conii.;deracy ; and if 1 should 1 would 
be unworthy of your esteem — your love." 
He hesitated an instant and then contin- 
ued : "For he who will prove false to his 
country will prove false to all else." 

"1 would not have you prove false to 
your couiitiy, William. IJut you have 
been so (juiet no one will think of moLsl- 
mg you," she replied, as she gazed fond- 
ly upon him. 

"Ah I Irene, you little know the men 
engaged in this foul conspiracy, rhey 
only hope of success is in keeping down 
all 0!>position to their luovemeuls at 
home by an unmitigated despotism. I 
must go !" he said, as lor the first time he 
pressed her to his bosom. 

"Then / will go, too !" she exclaimed, 
and as ^he spoke her features, hitherto 
illumed by a soft melancholy hue, as- 
.'-uined a fixedness of purpose that plain- 
ly told that she was in earnest. 

"I'o?/, Irene?" ejaculated the young 
man with a look of bewilderiueut. 

"Yes, William. I will have no tie to 
bind me to this place when you are gone, 
and my soul haf long revolted at this un- 
holy rebellion. IMy father foflglit brave- 
ly in many a battle under the glorious 
old Star-Spangled IJanner, and ho would 
not le.-t easy in his grave if his only 
child should countenance the madmen in 
their desperate schemes to drag the proud 
emblem ol our nation in the dti ;l." 

As she spoke her features were illumed 
with a bright glow that :it that inoiiunl, 
rendered her exceedingly beautiful, and 
the young man clasp id her to his bosom 
and fervently exclaimed : 

" Mv own Irene! Spoken like a (rue 
daughter of Columbia 1" 

After a few moments' pause he con- 
tinued : 



him — kase you lub Massa Holmes better 
dan Massa Daniels, and lat whar de rea- 
son why he got mad." 

"Love yiv. Holmes! Who told yea 
so?" interruj)ted Irene. 

"Excuse me, missus— nobody told me 
80 ; but I kinder taught so — dat was all 
— and 1 couldn't help da!, you know. So 
as Fse knows dat his ( otnpany whar a 
going to be up to de store to-uig'at, kase 
1 seed a good many ob 'em goin' thar, 
i'se run along in de shade round behind 
de house, crejit close up by de winder in 
de room v.-faar dey meet , and dar heerd 
Massa Daniels tell 'em dat dey whar to 
Lake de Yaj;kee schoolmister down ia de 
hollow and hanghiui, kas:' he'd bin talkin" 
to de niggers 'bout bob.ishun. He tol'.l 
'em dar whar down heic, and dat when 
day had drunk enough ob whiskey, d.it 
dey whar to cum down and tak • blin. 
And, missus, dey will be here putty 
soon, kase I tauoht I h.iaid 'em when i 



cum in de 



missus 



on 



gate. 



Diln't 1 do ri'dit 



missus, dat Ma.«sa 
get out qb de way 



Holmes 
mighty 



"Yes, yes! Thanks, Bob. But what 
is to bp done?" she iiujuireJ, with much 
agitation. 

"I tinks 
had better 
soon." 

"Good night!" said tie young man, as 
he started tovrard the uoor. 

"Siop, William! You must slay hc'-e 
to night !'' said Irene, an she sprang for- 
ward and canght hold of him. 

Bob, who was glaucin:; eagerly out of 
the whidow, now turned quickly about 
and said, 

"Too late to run now ! Dv-y is cumin* 
up de lawn, and de'll he round de hull 
house. You know, mis.sus, what dey 
done at JLissa Gordon's t udder right." 

At this iiist;int a noise was heard at the 
front door. 

"There! quick, William! My room ! 
Fly : ipiick !"' And as sho spoke she push- 
ed him toward the door which Bob had 
opened, leading to an adjoining room. 
As scon as he had Ci-o.ssi;d t!ie thr* sh dd 
she closed .and locked the door, putting 
the key in her pocket. 

The iiciic at the out;r dcor now in- 
creased. Bob took up Ji lighteil candle 
and tardily descended the stai:\s, taking 
care to make enough noise lor those out- 
side to hear. Beaching the lower land- 
ing he .vlowly unfastened the door, r.nd 
then, holding the candlo up full in the 
face of the man who had been knocking, 
said, 

"What am de matter dis time ob night 
wid so inuch noise? What do you 
want?" 

"We want the scholmaster," growled 
the man. 

"Well, dis ain't de {lace to cum anj 
m:d;e such a noise about de schoolmas- 
ter. Go along wid you to his house, and 
not.fiighteu missus to death. Ma.-^ta 
Paeker'U t;ib it tovouw len he cum Lome. 
See if he don't!" ' 

" Xone of 3 our jaw, but go and tell 
the school-master some gentiemen want 
to see him, replied tht man, in a fierce 
tone. 

" De schoclmastcr ain't here, tell you. 
lie has i;one hoiiiu along time ago, an- 
p-.verrd Bob, with the nt most .s'o'/////)o/(/. 

" Ydw lie. you black scoundrel, you!'' 
hiiSed forfii a voice from the crowd. " I 
saw his shadow in the loom as we capie 
up the lawn." 

"Dat you, INlas^a Daniels?" 

" Yes, it it; me," said that personage, 
.stejiping forward. "Go and tell Mr. 
Holmes thath!-' i.s wanfcu."' 

"Massa liuliiK's ain't heri>," r( iterated 
Bob, not at all thrown off his guard at 
the sav.i'xe demeanor of f!ie captain. 

you see in de 



will 



you go : 



Then— 



" But where 
your uncle?"' 

" O'y.'" she exclaimed, as the fire dart 
ed from tin; hitherto mild i^yeif., " v.-hy go 
with you, to be sure! Tiiat is, if you do 
not object loo stretu'.ously. As ior u.icle 
— thank God he is only an uncle b}' mar- 
riajie ; for none of our blood courses 
through a traitor's veins — he in too much 
engaged in this rebellioui^ war to care ior 
anything else, and he will not return for 
a fortnight yet." 

" You would willingly, then, share my 
destiny whatever it may be?"' he said, as 
he gazed at her tenderly. 

" Willingly!"' she replied. 

" Do you know how sm.all my fortune 



IS 



Ti 



" I care not for your fortune. It i.s 
yourself 1 care for, and know that you 
jiossess the noble traits of human nature, 
and that is sufficient lor me."' 

"Ah! but Irene, I am poor. ily 
whole fortune is in my own exertions. I 
have but a few hundred dollars in tlie 
world ;"' and as he spoke he heaved a deep 
sigh. 

" i1/// fortune will do for both; and 
thank lleaven that the hirgest portion of 
it is invested in the North," she re|)lied. 

" But your uncle is your puardian." 

"He tcrts- my guardian. Last month I 
became my own guardian, and shall re- 
main so until I choose another. And 
my next guardian must nj: be a traitor,'" 
she said, smilingly, as she looked up into 
his face. 

At this moment the conversation was 
interrupted by a knock on th door. 

"Come in," she said, as she resumed 
her seat. 

The door opened, and in hurried a 
stalwart negro with the perspiration 
streaming down his sable cheek.s, while 
consternation was pictured in his counte- 
nance. It was Irene's favorite slitve. 

''Why, what is the matter, Bob? 
Speak, quick!" she nervouslv exclaimed, 
as she arose and approached towards 
him. 

"Oh! missus, excuse us for comin' In, 
but dey is ar.er him, and I taught um 
best to come as fast as I could to let you 
know." 

"After him! After who ?" she ejacu- 
lated, as she caught him by the arm. 

"Arter Massa Holmes, dere!" ex- 
claimed Bob, pointing ta wards the young 
man. 

"After Mr. Holmes ! What do you 
mean, Robert ?'' she exclaimed, while a 
nervous tremor seized her. 

"Why, missus, ye see, I'se whar jlst 
commin' round de corner ob de house as 
!Massa Daniels went out, and whar 
ewarin' to hisself 'bout wengeance on de 
Y''ankee ; and as I didn't know ob no 
udder Y''ankee 'bout here but Masea 



" Dat v.iii" my ^lla'J^]el 
room, ^la.'-.-a Daniels." 

"Men, do your duly 1"' exchumed the 
captain, not delgiiing to hold further par- 
ley. 

A liumber of the ban;] now surrounded 
the liou.-e, ilhiminaiin^; the 8ec;:e with 
their torciies, which tluy tiow lighted, in 
order to discover their \iclim if he should 
attempt to escape, wh le oihers entered 
tho dwelling. A party, with the Captain 
at tiieir head, at'cemled the stairs and 
entered th« room whtTc Irene was sit- 
ting. 

Irene had by this ti no recovered her 
presence of mind, and gazing sternly at 
the Captain, she s.i.id, 
J.i,"Why this outrage in my uncle's ab- 
sence. Captain Daniels i" 

"We are but doing o ir duty. We are 
in search of .an Abohiionist, whom we 
have good r»;ason to fcujipose is concealed 
in this house,"' ho repliid. ".Search that 
room," he continued, iurning to the men, 
and point!!. g to tlie room where thoyoung 
man was concealed. 

One of the men trie 1 the door, and 
fiu'llng that it would not yield to his 
pressure, said, 

"The door is locked." 

" Th;it Is my room, Mr. Daniels !"' ex- 
claimed Irene, iddignantly, '■ and I for- 
bid either you or your men entering i^J' 

' We are no respecters of rooms, while 
In discharge of our duty. You will save 
trouble by giving u.s (he key," he an- 
swered as he held out h s hand, as if he 
expected to reoeiye it. 

" You shall not have it," ; he said iu a 
firm tone. " Courageous men indeed, 
to thus endeavor to break up:n the pri- 
vacy of a female .'"' 

".Men do your dut;y ! ' exclaimed the 
C.tptain. 

The next instant the <loor was shatter- 
efi, and two men entered the room. They 
fcon returned, bringing with them the 
object of their search. 

" I see your are partial as to what men 
shall enter your room," sneeringly cx- 
clainied the C?ptain, as he turned toward 
Irene. 

She attempted to speik, but her heart 
Avas too full, and she sink powerless in 
the chair. 

"Away with him!" shouted the Chap- 
lain, as he observed Irene drop so list- 
lessly m her seat. Supposing that she 
had iainted, he bccanu^ anxious to get 
away. 

In a few moments the whole party were 
assembled on the lawn. Here they 
bound their victim, and, after extinguish- 
inir a number of the tor .hes, hurried for- 
Wi'.rd. 

"Here! here! you Hannah! you Ilan- 



which the rufBanly-looki'ng man who had 
olliciated at the hotel during the Captain'd 
absence took his scat, and shouted. 

"Let the prisoner stand out !" 

Ihe young man's fetters were taken 
off, and he was tcld to step Iu front of 
the judge. He took the j>otilion pointed 
out, and then tw.j of the band ranged 
themselves on each side of him, each with 
a pistol leveled at his head, and warned 
him what to expect if he shyuld attempt 
to escape. AVhen this ceremony was 
through the man on the stump demand(»d 
in a loud tone, 

"What are tho charges agin the pris- 
oner?"' 

At this the C.iptalu came forward and 
said : 

"I charge hlin with being .in abolition 
emissary, and with endeavoring to in- 
duce slaves to run away from their mas- 
ters !"' 

The young man turned and gave a con- 
temptuous glance at the Captain, but did 
not reply. 

"Prisoner, what have you got to say 
agin the;-e ere charges !" demanded tho 
rufii.in judge. 

"As God Is my witness,! am innocent. 
The charges arc falic !" he replied, in a 
firm voice. 

"Oh! we want some other witness in 
this court! Whar ar your witnesses? 
Briiig 'em on and don't keep the court a 
wait in," answered the judge. 

"I have no witnesses ; but I deny the 
charges and challenge jiroof," exclaimed 
the prisoner, in the same firm tone. 

"It is your place to pr-^ve the charges 
agin you false, and not the court's to 
prove 'em true. So bring on your wit- 
ficsses," said tho judge. 

"I have none !" responded the young 
man, In the same decided manner ; but 
this time there was a mixture of sad- 
ness in It. 

" (ientlemen of the jury!" said the 



nab! look out for your missus !" bhoutcd 
Bob, in a stentorian tone, aud then darted 
out of the house. 

Captain Daniels and his band proceed- 
ed a short distance upthe main road, and 
then turned oil" and descended a long hill 
at the bottom of which \ natural amphi- 
theatre was formed b} the surrounding 
clill's. The party arriving at this spot, 
all the torches which had been extin- 
guished" were re-lij:hted, and a circle 
Holmes, I taught ob course it must be | formed around a large stump, upon 



judge, rising and 



a pompous 



air, "the case is a plain one. The piis- 
oner is c'*^arged with a very heinous 
crime — the i-.orst known in the country 
— and wh'jn i-alled upon to dear himself 
and prove the charges agin him not true, 
he only dcuies 'c.n (just as if any one 
here ivas a goln' to iielieve an Abolition- 
ists before the word of a good Southern 
man like Captain Daniels), and sa\s he 
has no witnesses. No man as ever came 
into court without witnes.-cs could ♦•x- 
pect to get clear — .and it would bo agin 
the law i( he did ; for any man as can't 
prove himself not guilty liy good wit- 
nes.'^es must of course be guiltj", So says 
the Court; and wh.at man among you 
dare say that ain't the law ? So the casa 
is closed. What i.^ vour verdict ?" - 

"Guilty!" "Guilty!" "Guilty!" 
s'loutcd the crowd. 

"Prisoner," said the ruffian judge, 
"you've hearn the vardict of your lellow- 
cilizens, after as fair a trial as I ever seed. 
Now it is my duty to jirotionnce tho sen- 
tence of the court ; which ia, that you be 
taken to yonder tree, thar strip and get a 
dozenlashes, then receive a coat ol tarand 
cotton as salve for your wounded feeliugs, 
after thai you will be allowed to stretch 
hemp lor the rest of your nat'ral life. 
Amen !" 

A smile of satisfaction spread over the 
Capt.'.in's countenance as he heard how 
Well uh instrument in villainy delivered 
the sentence which he had dIelate«L 

The prisoner was taken to the spot 
the 1 ulfian judge had Indicated, and was 
there rt;lieved of liIs clothing, alter which 
he was tied to the tree anrl received a 
dozen lashes. He was then released 
and warm tar t)0'iied over his head and 
shoul lers. While thi.s was going on a 
number of the crowd .amused themselves 
by throwing hindfuls of cotton at him. 
When this part of the fiendish orgies was 
exhausted, :i lope was jirocured and one 
end placed around the prisoner's neck and 
the other over a bough of the tree. Th« 
captain then stepped up close to him and 
said, 

- " Have you any word to send to the 
ladyr 

Jiut receiving no answer from his vic- 
tim he turned aw.ay, mounted his horse 
an drode oH", followed by a number of his 
band. 

The men whose busineas it was to ex- 
ecute the prisoner, in their hurry to join 
their companions, so as not to be behind- 
hand in participating in the revel at the 
hotel which the captain had promised 
them, only pulled the rope taut, leaving 
their viciiin with his feet resting upon tho 
ground, to die from strangulation and c.t- 
posure. 

Three weeks from the night the above 
.«;cene occurred a young couple were 
unitcil in the bonds of matrimony in the 
city of Cincinniitl. The bride-groom had 
expeiieneed the reverse of tho adage, 
that "it is but a step from the altar to the 
grave." To him il had be n but a step 
from the grave to the alt.ar. J^eft by a 
band of ruffians to die a horrible death, 
lie had been jirovidentlally rescued by 
a faithful ne^ro. Bob, with the instinct 
or Jniuition that he would be r.f service, 
had taken a short road to the hollow, and 
there concealed himself; and as goon a.'* 
the rullians had reached a safe distance, 
he released their victim and conveyed 
him to a deserted cabin in the woods, and 
there kindly ministered to his sufferings 
until he was able to make his escape from 
that section of the country. 

Irene, when she heard the result of 
Captain Daniels' expedition from Bob, 
immedi:Uely made preparations to leave, 
and gave out that sho intende 1 to visit a 
relative who resided at some distance in 
a neighboring Slave State, and there 
await the return ol her uncle. To Bob 
she gave a sum of money, telling him to 
get such articles as were necessary, and 
accompany I^Ir. lIoime.<» tq CIncinuatti 
where she would meet ihem. They met 
and after the marriage ceremony she pre- 
sented Bob with his freedom papers ds a 
reward for his conduct. 

The young teacher and his bride soon 
left Cincinnati. After a visit to his na- 
tive vilhige he committed his wife to the 
care of his mother, and with their bless- 
ings he enrolled himself in the anny of 
the Union — was chosen by his comrades 
as their Captani, and he is now doing 
battle for God and his country. 



♦ « ♦ » ♦ 



— The murderous assaults of guerrillas 
Oil gtcamlx)ats below Meniphi.* renders it al- 
most impossible to navigate to New OrlcaH". 
All addition:il force is rciiuircd to pmte<'t 
transport*, as the loss of life lately is too great 
to udiuit of any further risks. 

— There is a report at Cincinnati froro 
rebel sources, that our tbrecs ia West 
cru Virginia are moving t;) cat the 
railroad J»ehind Gen. Drngstrect — the pre:it 
Virginia and East Tennessee road. TUic is 
practicable, and Longstrcet's communications 
by mil on'ce destroyed, and elVectually, wlih 
Richmond, his ciijiturc or retreat into the liar- 
len mountains of North Carolina must follow. 






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SAmT PAUL PEESS, FRIDAY, JAJS^UARY 1, 1864. — DOUBLE SHEET. 



I 



Win Mni f »wl E^^^± 

rjnUAHKV DAILT.TRI-WKEKLY ASD WEEKLY. 

Offloe— -A-tl.joiiiins the Bridjre. 

Trrm*:— DAILY PltFSS— By mall, ^t^M per 
»auum,or :oc p.^r inontJi inraruiHy in advance. 

litl-WKKKLY I'KKSS— i'.'j per :immm ; $-'.50 
l<ir six luo-.itliH ; Sl.-'."> for thn-o months ; tive cop- 
ies, to on«- addrt-.-s, *4.50 tach ; teu do., «4 each. 

U'KKKLY l*l!KSS— On.' copy, one joar, $-'; 
five or !noi-«s $1.:.". oaoh ; ten or more, to one ad- 
dres->. :»'.(Vo each; twenty or more, toone address, 
^I.oOeacii. 



sandstone, gleaming wliite, which tenni- | and the frst deed signed in Minnesota. ■ any comprehensive view of the topical 
nated the upper plateau upon the river's This was the instrument by which the ; relations of the situation which inlluenced 



SAINT PAUL, JANUARY 1, 1864. 



DOUBLE SHEET 



SAINT 




T^i:: IKTE-DSUVUr^ ER.4 
FU03I IG80 TO 1849. 



brink, St. Paul derived its primitive In- 
dian name of Im-ni-ja-ska, or "White 
Rock." 

EPOCHS. 

The history of what is now St. Paul, 
divides itself into three distinct periods, 
marked by corresponding changes of 
names. 

1. The period of Indian occupancy till 
1838 when it was known as Imnijaska. 

2. The period of squatter settlement 
from 1838 to 1819, when it was known 
by the Indians as "the place where they 
sell wlii.'-key,"and by the whites as "Pig's 
Kve." 



It.s Oeog-i'apliy and. 



HISTORY OF ITS EARLY 
SETTLEMENT. 



TheFirsnVhiteMau at St. PauL 



THE FIRST YANKEE. 



•J'lie Ortiele of" tlie 
Oveal Oave. 

St. Paul tho Capital of Min- 
nesota a Hundred 
Years Ago. 

THE FOINDERS OF ST. PAl L. 



Early Real Estate Operations. 



THE I'inMT I.i:«>iX»£iAT«.IlE. 



Tlic Fii>=t Town Council. 



GKOGKAPIiV OF ST. PAlT. 

"When the Organic Act of Minnesota 
passed Congress on the ;>rd of March, 
1811), designating St. Paul as the seat of 
(lOvernmL-nt of the infant Territory, its 
name was upon no existing map, or if 
any enterprising chorographer bad pushed 
so fir beyond his age, it was invariably 
placed above St. Anthony Falls, wliich 
reversal of relative position it holds on 
mativ of the extant maps of the year en- 
suing. 

But the best of geographers might be 
pardoned for some confusion upon the 
subject, when as the heroine of "Floral 
Homes'' informs us, she was assured, 
while en mute for the scene of her labors, 
by a g«ntlfiiian just returned from a trip 
TO St. Anthony Fall , that iliere teas no 



3. Since l*-'i9. w] en it was selected as 
the Capital of the Territory of Alinnes- 
ota by the name of St. Paul, wiiirh had 
been bestowed upon it two years belor;-*. 

KIKST WHITE MAX IN ST. P^l'I.. 

Louis Hennepin whose name is immor- 
tally associated with the history of Min- 
nesota as the first white man who aseend- 
the Jlississippi within its borders, and as 
the discoverer of the Falls ofSt. Anthony, 
was undoubtedly the first white man who 
ever set foot upon the site of St. Paul. 
On April, 30th 1G80, nearly one hun- 
dred and eighty- four years ago Hen- 
nepin, a captive in the hands of a war 
party of Dakotas on their way to Mille 
Lacs landed "in a bav, fiveleajnies below 
the Falls of St. Anthony, "a description of 
which, with other circumstances fixes the 
locality under Dayton's Bluff, at the 
mouth of Trout Brook — about three 
({uartersofa nnle below the Pkkss of- 
fice . 

TIIK I IRST AMERICAN IX SAIXT PAUL. 

Eiglity-seven years have passed since 
the arrival of Hennepin. Perrot has 
built and abandoned a fort on Lake Pe- 
pin and planted the arms of France in 
Minnesota. Le Seuer has explored the 
Minnesota and given it the name of his gal- 
lant friend Capt. St. Pierre. The Dakotas 
have been driven from the northern lakes 
by the Chippewas, and Minnesota, by the 
treaty of Versailles, has just passed from 
the dominion of France to the flajr of 
England, when on one fine morning, in 
Xovember, 17GG, a keen, practical Yan- 
kee, the forerunner of all the Yankees in 
tiiis part of the world, stepped into St. 
Paul near where Hennepin had landed 
three generations before. It was lirotLer 
Jonathan Carver, fresh from Connecticut, 
come to trade : Carver, great jfrogenitor 
of the land-speculators of Minnesota, 
iirst and greatest of the race. 
cakvkk's cavk. 

Jonathan's landing was at the foot of 
Dayton's bluff, and his account of the 
discovery made there, is the first me- 
morial which links St. Paul with the tra- 
ditions of the Dakotas : — 

About thirteen miles below the Falls of St. 



Aiuhonv * 



is u rcniarkablc cave of 



i,uc]i ]>lai-i' as **•/. I'uul. Bu. as there 
has turned out to be such a place as St. 
Paul, and the name has crept from the 
Organic Act extensively into the newspa- 
p *rs, let us first find out what sort of a 
jdace It is, and how it came there — this 
upstart, which salutes the world as the 
capital of a Territorj' 149,000 square 
miles in extent . 

And first to prevent mistakes by future 
googiaphers it will be proper to fix its 
exact position on the map. Saint Paul, 
then, tuc Saint Paul of 1310. is situated 
in latilade 44 deg. C2 min. 10 sec., and 
longitude 'Jo d^g. 4 min. 54 see. ; some 
14 miles by the river below St. Anthony 
Falls and five miles below the mouth of 
the St. Peter, n iw Minnesota river, at 
or near the head of continuous steamboat 
navigation on the ^Mississippi, and, as we 
learn from Nicollet, 2,13(J miles above its 
mouth and 7Ul miles from it source in 
Lake Itasca. It lies on the east bank of 
the Mississippi on a grand exterior curve 
or elbow of the great river, where, after 
receiving the waters of the Minnesota, it 
sweeps backwards from its northeasterly 
detour and reg.iius its general southeast- 
erly direction. 

TOPQGKAPUY OF ST. PAUL. 

Before the white man had moulded the 
topography of the place into new forms or 
the axe had filched itof its sylvan charm 
it presented to the ladianwho floated past 
it in his canoe, or gazed at it from the an- 
cient burial ground which overlooked it 
from the Ea.st, a terraced plateau of oak 
openings, ringed with a seini-cireular 
chain of tree-crowned hills in the rear, 
and termiualing on the river in a steep 
mural front of white sand stone, flanked 
b/ thick wooded bottoms on what are 
now the upper and lower levees. Where 
tho latter now slojie upw.ards in smoothly 
graded streets, three brooks leaped in 
cascades or dashed in torrents down 
rocky and winding ravines whose out- 
lines are not yet obliterated. Tradition 
— the tradition of twenty years ago — 
says that this was the favorite pasture of 
the deer; while upon the tiite of ihe costly 
dwellings which now adorn the grounds 
behind the International Hotel, a broad 
lake spread over many a modern lot and 
street, in whose reedy banks the duck 
ne&tleJ or the muskrat built his lodge. 
From tha bold esc;irpment of quartzose that ihefrst conveyance of land was made 



inna/.iiijr depth. 'Jhe Indians term it Wa- 
kan teetiC, that is, the (hcfUiitg of the Gods. 

'ilio arch within is near liftecn feet high 
and ahout thirty broad; the bottom consists 
of ckar sand. About tlurty feet from ihc en- 
trance begins a lake, the water of which is 
traii>p.ueiit, and extends to an unsearchable 
distance, for the darkness of the cave j)rcvents 
nil attempts to ac(iiiirc a knowledge cf it. * 

* » s « I found in tliis cave many In- 
dian hieroglyidiics, which appeared very an- 
cient, fur they so covered were with 
moss that it was with ditficulty I could trace 
ilicin. They were cut in a rude manner upon 
the in>ide oithc wall which was composed of 
a stone s > extremely soft that :t might be eas- 
ily penetrated with a knife. * * * At a 
little distance from this dreary cavern is the 
burying plate of several liands of Naudow- 
ossie [Dakota] Indians. Though these peo- 
l)le have no fixed residence, being in tents and 
seldom but a few months in one spot, yet 
they always bring the l)ones of their dead" to 
this i)lace," which they take the opportunity of 
doing when the chiefs meet to hold their coun- 
cils and to settle public affairs for the ensiiinff 
summer. 

These ancient burial mounds still exist 
on Davton's blufl", and, a few years ago, 
Mr. XeiU had one of them opened. In 
this, which was 218 feet in circumference 
and 18 feet high, he found the remains of 
skulls and teeth at the depth of three or 
four feet. 

The "dwelling of the gods," or what 
remains of it, is now a root house where 
Mr. Dayton will, we doubt not, be glad 
to show the curious visitor to what base 
uses we may come at last. The brittle 
wall has crumbled under the frosts of a 
century till little of the original cave was 
left before the gods gave place to tur- 
nips. In 1807, Major Long was obliged 
to creep through the sandstone debris at 
its mouth on all fours. In 1837, Xicol- 
let worked for two days to efTcet an en- 
trance, and confirmed the accuracy of 
Carver's desciption. 

"A Chippewa w.iirior made a long ha- 
rangue on the occasion, threw his knife 
into th> lake as an offering to Wakan 
tibi." Indian pictographs still remain, 
grey with age, upon portions of the wall 
still standing. 

ST. PAIL TIIK CAPITAL OF MINXESOTA A 
I1LXI)REI> YEARS AGO. 

After a voyage to what is now Anoka 
and up the Minnesota river for 200 miles. 
Carver; on the 1st of May, 1767, returned 
to the "Great Cave" where he officiated 
as the first representative of the whites in 
tho great Annual Legislative Session of 
the Dakota bands, and made the first 
speech ever delivered by a Yankee in St. 
Paul. 

" At this season," says Carver, " these 
bands go annually to the Great Cave be- 
fore mentioned to hold a grand Council 
icith all the other bands loherein they settle 
all their operations for the ensuing sum- 
mer.'''' 

Thus early was Saint Paul the Capital 
of Minnesota 

Nothing could be more significant of 
the geographical centrality of Saint Paul 
than this fact, that from immemorial 
time it had, at that date, been the politi- 
cal centre of the scattered bands of the 
Dakota nation. 

THE FIRST LAND SPECULATOR IN 8HXT 
PAUL. 

It was here too, at this " great cave," 



heirs of Carver founded their title to . Parrant's selection of it. It is not re- 
to Carver's tract, which contained Saint , corded that, like Hennepin or Carver, he 
Anthony, Saint Paul and a large part of , had any prophetic visions of future inter- 



Wisconsin. The document is curious 
and runs in this wise : 

" To Jonathan Carver, a chief under the 
most mighty and potent George the Tliiid, 
King of the English and other natir.ns, the 
fame of whose warriors has reached onr 
ears, has l)een now fiiliy told us by our good 
brother Jonathan, afoivsaid, whom we rejoice 
to have eoine among us and bring us good 
news from his country. 

We, the chiefs of the Xaudowcssies, who 
have hereunto set otir seals, do. by these pres- 
ents for ourselves and our heirs forever, in le- 
tuni for the aid and otlurgood services done 
by the said Jonath ui to ourselves and our 
allies, give, grant and convey to him, the said 
Jonathan, and toh;s hens arid assigns forever, 
the whole of a certain tract of territory or land, 
bounded as follows, viz: From the Falls of 
St. Anthony, running on the east side ot the 
Mis.sissippi, nearly south east, as far as Lake 
Pepin, where the Chippewa joins the Missis- 
sippi, and fn.iu theiuc eastward live davs 
travel,aei<.untiiigtwentyKnKlish miles per dav 
and from thence again to the Falls of St. An- 
thony. We do, for ourselves, heirs awd as- 
signs forever give unto the said Jonathan, his 
heirs and assigns, with all the trees, rocks and 
livers therein, reserving the sole liberty of 
hunting and lishing on hunl not planted or 
improved by the said Jonathan, Ids heirs and 
assigns, to which we have allixed our respec- 
tive seals, at the Great Cave, luav 1st, 17()7. 
[Signed] lIAW-N'()-I'A\V-A-TOX, 

O-TOII-TUN-GOUM-LISU-llAW. 

A right smart speculation for "Brother 
Jonathan." In 1817 his English heirs 
revived their claim in a petition to Con- 
gress ; but in 1823 the Senate decided 
adversely to the petition. A.s late as 
lsr>l, holders of Carver scrip ceding a 
pretended interest in this tract, used to be 
seen about St, Paul, looking up their im- 
magiuary estates. 

CARVER HEADS THE ORACLE OF THE 
GREAT CAVE. 

It was here, too, nearly a century a5:'0 
— that Carver anticipated that splendid 
scheme of commercial inter-communica- 
tion whose realization in our day is to 
make St. Paul the focus of the internal 
commerce of the continent. With the 
Delphic 7H«;?e?j of the cave upon him he 
foresaw that in the fat soil and lauiihin'' 
waters of Minnesota, the elements were 
ripening for the sustenance of future pop- 
ulations, who, he says, will be "able to 
convey their produce to the seaports with 
jrreat facility. * * This might also in 
time be facilitated by canals or shorter 
cuts, and a communication opened by 
Kilter with A'ef(? York, by icoy of the 
Lakes.'' 

Never dreaming that within a century 
we shall cut across froai the Mississippi 
to the lakes in six hours on wheels, with 
a kettle of boiling water for a horse. 

Here too Caiver conceived the project 
of a Northern Pacific route by the way of 
the Minnesota and Oregon rivers -which 
ho says "would open .a passage for con- 
veying intelligence to Cliina and the 1-Mg- 
lish settlements in the East Indies" — an 
idea which will doubtless bO' consummated 
ii: cur day. 

THE ORACLE OF THE CAVE DUMl*.. 

After Carver robs the " Great Cave" of 
its mighty secret that has throbbed for 
ages at its heart, the " Dwelling of the 
Gods" is henceforth shut to all the world. 

Henceforth for seventy years the or- 
acle is dujnb, silent, stony, impenetrable 
as the Sphinx, its white face turned in 
speechless prophesy towards the terraced 
slopes which lay there before its closed 
mouth. 

History rolled over " White Rock" and 
past it but took no notice of it. The 
brave Pike goes past it in ISOo, and ig- 
nores it. Long besieges the unutterable 
oracle in vain in 1807. Fort Snelling is 
established in 1819. Mendota becomes 
the depot of the fur trade. Events are 
clustering around it, but all look past it, 
till 1837, when the Dakotas were per- 
suaded to cede their Imds on the east 
side of the river to the United States on 
account of the valuable pine lands and 
water power tliereon. The treaty was 
ratified at Washington in 1838, and Im- 
nijaska ceased to be Indian Territory. 

AROl^XD ST. PAUL IX 1838. 

The treaty of 1837-8 was a whiff of the 
whirlwind of speculation which made that 
year an epoch in the commercial calen- 
dar. The steamer which brought the 
news of its ratification to Fort Snelling 
had hardly touched the shore when every 
white m?n there set off to make claims at 
the most conspicuous points in the ceded 
tract. Frank Steele and Norman W. 
Kittson, then trading together at Fort 
Snelling, started off" at dead of night to 
take possession of St. Anthony Falls. 
Quick after the main chance Jo Brown. 
Esq., who was trading down at Grey 
Cloud, scents the news and posts oft' to 
the head of Lake St. Croix, where, near 
Stillwater, he drives the first stake of 
"Dahkota," as he used to call it. Tay- 
lor's Falls is promptly appropriated and 
the woodman's axe already resounds in 
the pineries of Kettle river. All the 
grand strikes have been made now and 
there is nothing to do but to wait. 

PARRAXT — THE FOUXDER OF ST. PAUL. 

"L'homme propose, mais Dicu dispose." 
The prophetic hieroglyphics of the 
Great Cave had come nigh not being read 
at all, when fortunately, about this time, 
there happened along an old Canadian 
voyageur from the Missouri, a gross, ill- 
favored, one-ej'ed, miscreant, on his way 
to Sault St. Marie. The position of af- 
fairs here interested him. The ceded 
tract opened to him a sphere where he 
might indulge his taste for mercantile 
pursuits, without the disagreeable formal- 
ity of a Government license. He de- 
cided to go otie eye on it at least. He 
went and Sault St. Marie lost a valuable 
citizen, and St. Paul gained its founder. 
He first made a claim at Fountain Cave, 
which he sold in three or four months, to 
Vetal Guerin and one Beaumette, and 
on the spot now occupied by Louis Rob- 
ert's former residence on Bench street, 
laid the first stone, or rather the first log 
of the future city of St, Paul. Parrant 

was the name of this historic individual. 
It must be confessed that it was not 



course with China or the Gulf of ilexi- 
co. In fact, he regarded the Head of 
Navigation as simply a commanding posi- 
tion for selling whiskey to the Indians, 
beyond the jurisdiction of the Indian 
Agent or the Fort officers ; and the Miss- 
issippi, which rolled before his door, and 
whose mighty volume inspired Carver 
with such sublime prospects of c :mmerce 
with the tropics, was^lookedupon by Par- 
rant from a commercial point of view, 
it is true, but as eheajdy valuable in im- 
proving the quantify and quality of his 
whiskey. 

In fact Parrant looked at the subject 
with a single eye to whiskey,with as(]iiint 
at the Indians on the other side of the 
river. 

Thus was laid the foundation of the 
commerce of St. Paul. It began in whis- 
key, h.is been brought up for twenty-four 
years on whiskey, and to a certain extent 
thrives on whiskey still. 

OUIGIX OF pig's EYE. 

We have said that Parrant had but one 
eye. He had another, but ■■^uch another ! 
It was a marble-hued, stone-blind eve 
with a sinister white ring around the pu- 
pil, glaring glassily above his pug nose 
and porcine chaps, that had already gain- 
ed for its owner the contemptuous nick- 
name of "Pig's Eye." 

Edmund Bnsette, a clerkly Frenchman 
for those days, was one day seated at a 
table in Parrant's cabin, with pen and pa- 
per, about to write a letter for Parrant 
(for Parrant, like Charlemagne, could 
not write) to a friend of the latter in 
Canada. The question of geography 
puzzled Brisette at tlie outset of the ej)is- 
tlo ; where should he date a hotter from 
a place without a name. He looked u|i 
inquirinply at I'arrant, and met the dead, 
cold glare of the Pig's eye fixed upon 
Imn with an irresistible suggestiveness 
that was inspiration to Brisette. 

He dated the letter from "Pig's Eye " 
An answer in due time came to "Pier's 
Eye ;" and Pig's Eye was immortalized. 
[Another story gives the credit of this 
euphonious "Eponym" to Sam. Fiiulley, 
late clerk of Franklin Steele.] 

It may be considered a resistless proof 
of the natural advantages of St. Paul that 
it survived the swinish origin of its first 
name. Nothing but the centre cf the 
Universe could have stood it. One shud- 
ders to think of what the place would 
have come to, if it had not been re-bap- 
tized ; of the horrible marble squint of 
a Pig's eye following it round t'le world. 
The Head of navigation with such an eye 
glaring from its socket, were a ])C8tifer- 
ous Medusa head, blasting everything in 
the reach of its stony leer. Imagine the 
effect of Pig's Eye in a Senate Commit- 
tee I Think of Pig's Eye for a seat of 
(iovernmentl Who would have come to 
live under the bristling lashes of a 



More, at the Fort, who again sold this ; The New Year's address of the Pioneer 
half to Irvine, who entered ihe whole for 1850 announces the close of the strug- 
claim in Sept. 1818, at the St. Croix i gle. 

Land Office, for $200, and in November 1 'Tig's Eye, converted thou slialt be like Saul, 
14, 1818. by deed, dated at the Winne- j '^^'^' ""'"^ hcncefoith shall be St. Panl." 
bago Agency, sold one half of his interest 



for .$l,oOO to one Henry :M. Hice who had 
just been acting the jiart of Moses in an 
exodus of Winnebjigo Indians to Long 
Prairie. 

THE LAST OF P!1ALIX. 

Plialin afterwards made a claim at the 
beautiful lake within four miles of Saint 
Paul, whivh is still called by his name. 
This claim, in 185D, he sold to Edmund 
Rice, and left the country with E. B. 
Weld lor California, and has never been 
heard of since. Rumor says that he came 
to the bloody, treacherous death at the 
hand of his friend, which, ten years be- 
fore he had visited on the grey head of 
his sleeping patron. Phalin was a stal- 
wait Irishiuan, measuring six feet in his 
stockings, a powerful, brutal man, to 
whom the law of the strongest was all the 
law. 



Pig's eye? What should we have 
done for clothes ? What Jew would 
have domiciled in the leering eye of a 
Pig? Could the Pig's Eye Press have 
reached its Third Anniversary, or anv 
pen have been held in honor but a Pi"- 
pen ? 

Parrant lived .ibout eighteen months 
on the site of Robert's old dwelling 
house, and then on the IGth of April, 
1849. sold his claim of 160 acre.", house 
and all, to Benjamin Gervais, who had 
just been expelled from the Military Re- 
serve, for ten dollars. Parratit in the 
meantime built himself another shantj' at 
the lower landing on the ground now oc- 
cupied by Borup & Champlin's large 
warehouse. In 1842 the restless Par- 
rant sold his new claim and cabin to 
Louis Roberts, and moved down the river 
to confer the immortal honor of his name 
on the locality which now bears it. Soon 
after he went to Sault St. Marie, where he 
since deceased. 

PHALIX AXD hays AXDTHEIR CLAIMS. 

Next in the gallery of the first men in 
the order of time is Phalin, a soldier just 
discharged at Fort Snelling when the 
news of the treaty arrived. Sergeant 
Hays, an elderly man, who had laid up a 
considerable sum of money against a 
rainy day, in anticipation of an early 
discharge, engaged Phalin to build a 
house for their joint use. and to hold a 
claim for him adjoining Parrant's. 

Accordingly, in the summer of 1838, 
Phalin built a log shanty on the ground 
where the old steam mill (late Fuller's) 
stands under the Hill street bluff, at the 
Upper Landing. This was the second 
house built upon the present site of St. 
Paul. 

It was ere long the scene of a dark 
and bloody deed. Hays, who had re- 
ceived his discharge from the army and 
was living with Phalin, was found dead 
on the river bank, with marks of violence 
upon him. All the circumstances made 
it evident that Phalin was the murderer. 
He was arrested and sent to jail at Prai- 
rie du Chien, but, no witnesses appear- 
ing against him, he was released by the 
inffuence of an offic(5r whose servant he 
had been. 

In the meantime the claim he had held 
for Hays had been appropriated by Vetal 
Guerin, who had built a large house 
thereon, and after some contest on the 
part of Phalin, a legal decision confirmed 
Guerin's claim. Feeling himself in an 
uncomfortable neighborhood, Phalin, in 
1840, sold his own claim, which embraced 
what is now known as Rice & Irvine's 
Addition, to Rondeau, for 8200, half 
cash and half maple sugar, to sweeten 
the transaction. 

In 1841, Rondeau sold the southwest- 
ern half of this claim, or 80 acres, to John 
R. Irvine, who arrived then, for a team 

of horses, and the other half, on the side 
adjoining Market street, to Sergeant 



THE FIRST SAIXT PAUL BAXKER. 

Parrant is living in his first cabin on 
the Bench Street bluff'. Phalin is plan- 
ning a dreadful doom for his friend under 
the Hill Street blulf ; and these are the 
sole inhabitants, when in 1838 a stranger 
calling himself Johnson, comes from 
no one knows where and budds himself 
a log house, the third one in St. Paul, 
and which we believe is still standing on 
the summit of the blulf below Burbank's 
old dwelling on what is now Kittson's ad- 
dition. Tiie mystery which surrounded 
the man excited suspicion. The authori- 
ties were going to arrest him on the 
charge of counterfeiting^ bank notes. 
Johnson smelt a " large mice" and left, 
and the first bank of issue ever started 
in Saint Paul incontinently suspended 
payment. Tlie first banker sold his 
house lor a song to James R. Clewett, 
and vanished. Clewett sold the claim to 
Norman W. Kittson for A 150, in whose 
possession, though occupied by various 
parties, it remained till in 1.S51 when it be- 
came Kittson's addition. 

THE THREE FOUXDERS. 

Such was the triumvirate of 1838, the 
founders of the city ; Parrant tlie found- 
er of Saint Paul proper, a miserly, pig- 
eyed retailer of contraband whiskey ; 
Phalin, who laid the foundation of Rice 
ec Irvine's addition in the blood of his 
friend and patron, and Johnson a lorgor 
and counterfeiter. Not Rome itself 
could date its urbc condita from a meaner 
set of rascals. 

THE MEN OF 1839 AX1> '40. 

In 1830 Vetal Guerin, a Canadian 
voyageur in the service of Jean Bapti^te 
Faribault .at INIeiidota, appropriated the 
claim of the murdered Hays, extending 
from Minnesota street, we believe, to 
Market street, and gave the western half 
of it, or SO acres, to Peter Gervais. 
Peter signiiied his high appreciation of 
the gift by Belling it a year after to Scott 
Campbell — Indian Interpreter at Fort 
Snelling — for fifty dollars, and Scott 
made a splendid thing by selling in it 1842 
to Win. Hartshorn for $35'). 

lu 1S25 a few Swiss, whom Lord Sel- 
kirk had enticed to Red River, driven 
thence by a disastrous flood, were per- 
mitted to settle on the Reservation near 
the Fort. Abraham Perry lived for 
tw^elve years in a liitlehouse between the 
Fort and the St. Louis House, where he 
had a farm well stocked wilh cattle. 
Benjamin and Peter Gervais, Canadians 
from the Reil River, lived in the same 
locality. 

After the treaty of 1838, Perry and the 
Gervais' took claims on the ceded lands. 
Perry's claim resting on the creek above 
Vance Brown's residence, and Ben. Ger- 
vais — abandoning the claim he bought of 
Parrant, near the cave— made another, 
embracing Leech's Addition. This land 
was then held to be within the military 
reservation. The settlers were ordered 
off', and not consenting to go peaceably, 
orders were solicited and received from 
Av^ashington for their forcible ejection. 
Accordingly, on May Ctli, 1840, the 
troops sallied out, drove off the claimants 
— three or four families in .all — and de- 
stroyed their homes. 

Perry moved to the Johnson place, and 
died in the old log house still standing for 
a landmark of twenty years ago. Ben. 
Gervais bought Parrant's claim, embrac- 
ing St. Paul proper, for ten dollars, and 
in 1843 sold it to Louis Roberts and Alex. 
McLeod for $350. 

At the same time, Augustus Larpen- 
teur — father of our Larpenteur — offered 
Vetal Gervais $1,000 for his claim of 80 
acres, which Vetal wisely refused. 

THE OLD LOG CHAPEL. 

In 1840, then, the little settlement con- 
sists of Phalin's little haunted house un- 
der the hill ; Vetal Guerin, who was 
about to marry a daughter of Abraham 
Perry and is building a neat log house in 
the site of Ingersoll's block opposite the 
Press office ; Ben. Gervais in Parrant's 
original claim shanty, and Jas. B. Clew- 
ed and Perry on the Johnson place. It 
was in this state of things that Father 
Gaultier sent up here in 1840 by Bishop 
Loras of Dubuque, to look after the wan- 
dering sheep of the Catholic flock, builds 
a little log ;:hapel on Vetal's claim behind 
what is known as the Catholic block for 
the spiritual benefit of the little settle- 
ment, not more than fifteen feet square, 
but large enough the good father thinks, 
to garner all the harvest of good Catholic 
souls that will grow up here for many a 
year. A congregation of hardly a dozen 
witness the consecration of the little 
Chapel of St. Paul. 

Henceforth there is laughter in Heaven 
and the contest thickens yearly between 
the Great Apostle of the Gentiles, and 
the mortal Parrant for the tutelar Saint- 
ship of the future Capital. 



SAINT PALL IX 184 '. 

In such a state of barbarism have we 
sunk now that the abject condition of us 
touches the heart of the pious missioniary 
down at Kaposia to rneltiiig. What he 
writes about us in the Spring of 1847 to 
ex-Governor Slade, requesti ig, for the 
love of God, a teacher for these wretched 
heathen, is the first written picture of 
Saint Paul : 

My present residence is almost on the verge 
of civilization in the noithwcstcin put of the 
United States, within a tew iiiilcv of the prin- 
cijial village of white men in hi- 'Jeni:orv, 
that wc suppose will bear the na iic of Minne- 
sota. 

The village referred to lias grown up within 
a few yc:iis in a romantic sitnUion on the 
high blutfof the Mi^.-issippi, and has bLVii 
ba;)ti/ed b\' Jloman Catholies hv tlie name of 
Saint I'juil. 'J hey liave eiecied" n it a small 
chapel, and constittite inucii tJu larger por- 
tion of the inhibit nits. ^ * This villa;;c 
has live St res, as tli>'y call then, at all of 
which iiuoNieating drinks constitute a p iit, 
and I snpi) ise the iivineijial part ^f what they 
sell. 1 supp 'se the village I'ont: ins twelve (Ir 
twenty f.iiniHes living near enough to send 
children lo school. 

With the patre.s familias o! this exten- 
sive population cur readers hive now for 
the most part the pleasure o^a personal 
acquaintance — all going to the devil if a 
female teacher be not sent by the National 
I'oard of iCducation. Nothinj; will do but 
a female, dear Ciovernor, for civilization 
must be put in petticoats to. have any 
charms of these wild French raen. Sure 
cnongh, in July, fast upo.i his appeal, 
Miss Harriet E. Birhop, sent by Heaven 
and Ex-Governor Slade — especially Slade 
— comes to set up a school here and save 
these poor wild children of :he prairie, 
from sinking quite out of sight in ignor- 
ance .and dirt. She survived the shock 
of her first impressions to write of us as 
we looked in 1817— thus, in "Floral 
Uotuos" : 

A few log huts composed the town— three 
families the entire American poi)uIation. Tiic 
atttamn *»f 1817, brought some a • iiiisitions to 
the society of St. IV.ul, so that the American 
))opiilation consists of six instead of three fam- 
ilies. 

J. W. Bass, arrived and opened a 
hotel, a little log house at the corner 
where the Mercnants' Hotel low stands. 

The Fur Company had established a 
Sioux outfit here, W. H. Forbts agent. 

ST. PAIL IX 1818. 

The year 1848 is lull of events. 
Wisconsin becomes a State in 
Maj-. The lines had been drawn 
around tlie destined Territory of 
Minnesota two years before, a Ijusled and 
readjusted and at last settled in place. 
Cut loose from Wisconsin we are now 
without a govern .nent. A Territorial 
organizaiion, then, we must have, what 
there is left ol us, and a si?at govern- 
ment — more especially a seat of gov- 
ernment. 

Meetings and conventions were held. 
Catlin, Ex-Secrctaiy of Wi.'ccnsin Ter- 
ritory, assuming to be our Gorcronor ex- 
oflicio, tells us by proelamatijn to go on 
and elect a delegate, which wo do. The 
first Minnesota election came jff at.Still- 
water, our county seat — for we are then 
in St. Croix county — and Henry II. Sib- 
ley is elected delegate over H. M. Rice. 

Meanwhile the first sale of public 
lands in Minnesota comes ofl' at the St. 
Croix Land office. 3,32G acres are en- 
tered, among which are St. I'aul proper 
and Rice «fc Irvine's addition. David 
Olmsted, afterwards our first Mayor, 
comes on the wake of the Wime'oagoes, 
and with his partner, Rhodts, sets up 
business here in the Indian trade. 
1849 — year of territohial organi- 

ZATIOX. 

In January news arrived that Taylor 
was elected last fall. Sibley and Rice, 
they tell us, are working hard at Wash- 
ington to make a Territory and a capital 
of us. On the 9th of April new.' is brougtit 
by the Dr. Franklin No. 2 — first boat of 
the season — that the bill for organizing 
the Territory of Minnesota has become 
a law, and that St. Paul is its capital. 

The annual Councils were to be renew- 
ed at the Great Cave henceforth by an- 
other race, before whom, ir. less than 
three years \Xw "leagued people" of the 
Lakes shall become strangers and out- 
casts in their ancient heritage. 

You sold your claim too clu'sp, friend 
Gervais ! /W^ / 

Cn(Aprip27th, Gov. Alex. Bamsey and 
family arrived, but there being no accom- 
modations at St. Paul fit for a Governor, 
he accepts the hosjiitalities o[ Hon. H. 
H. Siblej', and on the 1st day of June 
proclaims tl;e Territory orgaiiized. On 
the 26th of June the Governor and family 
come from Mendota in a birc i bark ca- 
noe and take up their residence in a neat 
cottage on Third Street — where Pollock 
& Donaldson's store now is — long since 
in ashes. 

the first LEGlSLATUIlE. 

The First Legislature convenes in the 
Central House, Bob Kennedy's Hotel, at 
once capitol and tavern. Representative 
chamber and Secretary's office on first 
floor; Council chamber and library up 
stairs. Old C. K. Smith, Secretary, and 
a (jueer fish, has a liberty pole put up in 
front of the house, and the stars and 
stripes run up for a sign to the nations. 
Both houses — 18 Representatives and 9 
Councellors — meet in the Dining Hall, 
where Rev. E. D. Neill prays lor us all, 
and Gov. Ramsey delivers his inaugural 
message full cf hope and prophecy to 
comfort us withal : then leave!; the poor 
devils sitting on rough board be nches and 
chairs to work out as they ma/ this old 
problem of self-government through the 
appalling labyrinth of parliamet tary rules 
and tactics, motions, amendments and 
previous questions, that perple:c their in- 
experienced souls. Yet no Legislature 
which ever sat in Minnesota was ever 
made of better stuff tElln that which as- 
sembled to lay the covnor-stone of the po- 
litical edifice. 



David Olmsted, — row diad, alas ! — is 
President of th? Coun -il up sta'rs, with 
eyes drooping aslant from native modes- 
ty, never looking at you, yet seeing 
straight through you ; sileiit, ambitious, 
with a will to be thi; Ibiemost man, and 
very nearly being so. Then t J.cre is Norris 
and Loomis and :\Iartin SIcLcod— also 
gone to the grave— knitting his cle.ar- 
skinned Scotch 'brow over a School Law 
he is hatching ; and close by the Presi- 
dent, whispering in his ear, sits that 
placidest of Joe Brown's, wlio has been 
in the Wisconsin Legislature and knows 
several things as the <hief chrk, grand 
pariiameiitarian, tactician, and Jelfer- 
son's manual of both 1 ouses. We should 
never have got along withoat Joe. His 
broad, sleek face is the cer.tral sun of all 
the young parliamentary pLuuts of the 
lassembly. 

Down Stairs — chiefly consjiicnous in 
the lower assembly is William 1>. Phillips, 
mark you ! round and ripe and red, and 
grand with conscious clerkship, whom to 
behold is to ad:uirc ; and by his si le sits 
L. B. Wait, rosy and sleek and benijr- 
nant, jerking his arms out of his sleeve 
cutis, which he does with great gravity 
and deliberation, laying down h's pen for 
that purpose. 

William R. !Marsh.all fromSt. Anthony. 
Mort. Wilkinson from Stillwater, Jere- 
miah Russell from Crow Wing, Setzer 
and Bronson and Fuiber do the buisncss 
here mainly. Never was there an odder 
collection of eighteen souls set to law 
making. James Wells was the central 
and inspiring oddity of the session, whose 
tutetar deity was the virgin Diana of the 
Ephesians : Tom Holmes, then of Sauk 
Rapids, long Tom with a quid of tobacco 
between his teeth, like a rusty rifle at 
half cock. But the greatest thing v/as to 
hear Trask talk at Mr Speaker and spit 
at the assembled wisdom. Trash's si»it 
was by far the most eloquent part of his 
speeches. It took .a random er.'-atio cir- 
cuit, but it was sure to hit somebody 
everytime. 

How strangely these strange names 
have grown familiar to us since ! Ram.^ey 
County, with others, is established early 
this session with an uncommon amount 
of land and water, and a law is passed in- 
corporating the little town of St. Paul- 
In November our first county election is 
held and Dr. David Day is elected Regis- 
ter, and C. P. V. Lull Sheriff"; J. W. 
Simpson, T-easurer Louis Roberts, Ben 

(Jervais and Russell are County 

Commissioners. 

1850 — year of first towx orgaxiza- 

TION. 

On New Year's day the Historical 
Society is organized — Chief Justice Aaron 
Goodrich in the chair. Rev. E. D. Neill 
delivers the annual address. May IGth 
Mr. Neill's little chapel is btirnt down 

On Slay Cth an election was held for 
the first town coun-il of St. Paul. T. 
R. Potts, President, Edmund Rice, and 
after him H. ' F. Masterson, Iteeorder. 
There are no records of tha old town 
council extant. Among its first ordi- 
nances was one to root out the stumps 
on St. Anthony and Third street. 

Steamboat navigation is first introduced 
upon the Minnesota River. 



The history of St. Paul after this pe- 
riod, to do it anything like the justice 
we desire, would cover fourteen colums 
of a double daily, and we will therefore 
reserve it — Beo vole7ite — as a special treat 
for our readers on next New Year's daj', 
closing this history with the following 
concise re ord of the progress of St. 
Paul in population, from 1849 to 18G4 : 

PROGRESS OP ST. PAUL. 



From 1849 to 1801. 



IN AREA AND POPaLATION. 



abea. 

In November 1st, 1849, a bill passed 
the First Territorial Legislature incorpo- 
rating the town of St. Paul. It enacted 
that "so much of said to-;vn as is included 
within the original plat made bj Ira Bron- 
son, together with Rice & Irvine's Addi- 
tion, be, and the same is hereby created 
a town corporote." Its jurisdiction thus 
extended over a total area of 290 acres. 

By act of March 4th, 1854, the city of 
St. Paul was incorporated with enlarged 
boundaries, including 2,4l)0 acres, which 
under a new charter granted in 1858, 
were still further extended, making the 
whole present area of the city about 
3200 acres. The western limit of the 
city now runs due north and South 2 ;J-4 
miles ; its oorthern boundary due east 
and west for 3 miles ; its eastern, due 
north and south for about a mile, while 
its southern boundary along the river is 
nearly four miles lorg and embraces the 
islands in the Mississippi, known as Mc- 
Boal's, Ame's, Lamb's, Raspberry's, 
Barne's, and Harriet Islands. 

NUMBER OF BUILUIXCJS. 

In the spring of 1849 Goodhue counted 

about 30 buildings on the town- plat of St. 
Paul. 

By the census of 1860 the city con- 
tained about 2,300 dwelling bouses alone, 
and about 150 business and manufactur- 
ing establishments, separate from dwel- 
lings. Without pretending to accuracy, 
we estimate the number of dwelling 
houses in St. Paul at about 2,500, and 
the number of stores, warehouses, mills, 
shops, and other building separate from 
dwellings about 200, or about 2,700 in 
all, exclusive of stables and out-houses. 

POPULATION. 

The following table M-ill indicate the 
growth of population since 1849 : 
Year. Population. Year. Popnlation 



1849, 


400. 


1856, 


8,600 


18;j0, - 


. 840. 


1857. - 


- 9,973 


18.52, 


- 1,800. 


18-58, 


1 •2,000' 


1855. - 


2,500. 


1860, - 


- lO.COO 


19.54, 


- 4,.500. 


1864, 


13,000 



We have above official enumerations- 



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SAIKT PAUL, FEIDAT, JANTJAET 1, 1864.-— DOUBLE SHEET. 



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: 



I o*' • •••••••••••*•■>■■••■••• 

lh>! 

J ^•k'la •••■■•••••••••••••■••■I 

i"*.'>'<, iar};fl.* tVu:iital;'iit .. . . 
IKjii, Uirg ly fi'auii-jl«>iit.... 

1> 1 

K- 



ma.!« in VMO, 1850, ]8.">7, 1«.j8 and ISOO 
— .vhilo the intennedwte figures are 
b.ised upon tLe vote of the city. 

Up to 18"»S, St. l*ai:l had inoroLsod in 
po;">i'.'.i'!-Mi more rapidly than any city in 
the west. 

T':e 3 pvulslon of 1 857, however gave 
i* a sliofk froui which it did not begin to 
r-jviv.? till 18'>(), sini'o which time its pro- 
pre:»s — thou-^ij afffcti'd greatly hy ihr 
war — !i:is pcrliap? been relittivchj greater 
than any city in the West, north of the 
MifSfi'iri. St. i*anl has jriven over 1 liiM) 
of iLs pojiuhition to tJie Union army, ar.d 
co;in'i:)jj; l,(!i)<) of them as now liviuc:— 
a id a-; ti'inporarily abfenf, li; r re-il pcp- 
uiatiun would now V)e about 1-1,<)(X> souls. 

VOTE'S. 

Th- fdiowiiig is th« vote of St. Paul 
since l'v'»l : 

No. of Voto. . 

S-l 
... 1,J> 

••• ^i'r:' 

• • • 'kytt^i^t 

. . . :t.?04) 
. . . 'i:ii<\ 

. . . -j^co 

'^''' l,7iS 

To wliich last add l,:i'X) votes abi^ent 
in tho arii\y. 

rUOPKKTV. 

The folii>wing table indicates the pro- 
gresiivu vabiatio'i of Real E>tate in !St. 
Tanl .siiice lSi9, throu;>h the wild timers 
of IS 7 ;iiid ls.'>K, and !«liowin;^ tlie sud- 
den jirrest of the upward movement at 
that point in con'cqMLMice of tlv: revid.sion, 
.sii^-e whit'h the value of property has 
been niea.-ured more by itd coiuinereial 
utiiitv :nui rcntalthan by the (•\trav;i;;;ant 
e.\ptnt.itions rn which all v.ilues were 
based belorc that : 

T.>t:!l vriliip It.^al KstatP 
uiiil lVr:-0!nl fropcrty. 

l>f'.> 1-}.),IHH» 

j.vi! ;,Vi,ri- 

!>C>t l,:ii;."(,ti:v! 

Ix.'t') ;-',:i,s(),4 '<7 

1 vVi :i,Hifi,,-(i-i 

Ivi* ^I'kStilfci-'t 

!>*•.•< S,;V>»,7;S 

]v.» ."i,r:i,-'"ti 

) ^ V ' i>,<lO..>,<)ilO 

The last valuations were fixed by the 
Board of Equalization. V»'e find no rec- 
ord of the biennial valuation of 1802, 
hut in order to make it conform to the 
sfandnrl of valuation in other parts vA 
the State, so that the eity should not pay 
more than its fair proj^ortion of the State 
tax, tlit> valuation was reduced to less 
than f<:'.,t«)0,()00, which is certainly not 
one third of the actual valuation of the 
real and personal property of the city. 



ty bonds, which pay only 7 per cent, in- 
terest, are taken quite readily, and 
8l.<>0*),000have been invested in U. S. 
.0-2O"s, which pay but six per cent. Loans 
have been easily obtained, and confuler.re 
been general. Large amounts of money 
have been brought from the East, and in- 
vested in farming lands and improved 
city property, and in manufactures and 
business, so that the close' of 1803 finds 
our mercantile community on a sounder 
ba*is financially than ever before, and 
comnjanding more capital. 

Only one National Banking Company 
has bien established in our city as yet, 
with a cai)ital of .f 2-50,000. The curren- 
cy for this bank will be received and di-;- 
tiibuted in a sliort time. It cannot fail 
to become popular among the people, as 
the high price of exchange in the West 
will render it valuable as a moans for re- 
iuitting. 



ANNUAL BEVIEW. 

OK THE 

Ti-fide of Ht. I^aixl. 



Fi»r »lt~ Y««ar E:n«1iu<;- l>pc. 31, !**©•«. 



TUIi TTKATITKn AX» THJB 

C'I»<>fe»M. 

The drought of the autumn of 18G2, 
and of the succeeding winter, more fe;ir- 
iul than ever known in this Staff*, was 
pratr;'.<ted ditring the whole of the past 
year. There was only one good rain 
during the entire summer (May 22), and 
the crops suffered fearfully. The Wheat 
croj), it is true, from the nature of our 
soil, turned out ainiostthe usual average, 
!)ut Corn, Oa's, Potatoes, Cranberries, 
and all root crops were parched up, an<l 
the yield per acre was much below the 
average. Tlie low water in the Minneso- 
ta and r^Jississippi Rivers, occasioned liy 
ilic drought, was as sore a calamity as 
the partial failure of the crops, as it 
checked our import Trade .and depressed 
some brandies of busiaess very greatly. 
Had the water been en an averajre stace, 
our exports would have been from 20 to 
■)0 per cent, greater than the tables else- 
wlure Aiovf them to have been, gratify- 
ing as they are. 



largely reduced the number of steamboat 
arrivals at this port. There were only 
about thirty days of good water, and 
during the rest of the season it was with 
diliiculty that even the lightest draught 
boats, drawing lo inches, could run. 
The entire number of arrivals were 731. 
Below we give a tabular view of the 
number of arrivals since 184-1 : 



i&i.j.. 

l>v|(i., 

1-.JS . 

i»m» . 

l-vii). . 

1 >.■.!.. 

1«.V.'., 



41 l>i."i4 310 

■ii* ItCt't 5i>3 

•-'4 IS'Xi 7J'J 

O-'J IKW •• 1(J<5» 



H5 IW.t 

KM l«(W 

ll'J is<;i 

171 \s6i 

I.':i5 ISO:! 



. . . 77ri 
... «f-'7 
...lOl.J 

... 7:!1 



Had there been a fair stanrc of water 
during the season, the arrivals would 
have amounted to fully 1,200, as the 
great increase in trade and travel de- 
m.mdtd such an amount of tonnage and 
trips. But notwithstanding the energy 
with which Capt. Davidson, President of 
the La Crosse Line, endeavored to sup- 
ply the line with low water boats, build- 
ing sevei-al exjirrs>ly to accommod.ate 
and carry on his business, btill a great 
eh(?ck occurred to the trade. 

The first boat which arrived "throuf:!! 
the Lake" last season was the Keokuk, 
Capt. Hatcher, April Gth, and ibe "last 
boat"' down was the Cutter, which de- 
parted on November 2ith, making the 
season 233 days in length, being longer 
than any season (with tv»o exceptions) 
for filteen years past. The following 
table will give a bird's eye view^for four-" 
teen years past : 

Di'parturo 



river will be very large, employing proba- 
bly 20 boats during high water. The 
warehouses along the river artf crammed 
to their utmost capacity. Some parties 
estimate that nearly half a million bush- 
els will be exported next season, including 
that now in store (400,000 bushels,) and 
part of next season's crop. 

[For a table of Imports from the Min- 
nesota river, see Lmpojits.] 

- — ♦ -. _ 

IIAVJLnOAUS. 

As yet we have but one railroad to 
enumerate under this head, the St. Paul 
Paul and Pacific. This was finished in 
July, 1802, as far as St. Anthony, ten 
miles. Early in th": spring of 1803, the 
iron for the balance of the road (wldch is 
graded, and was to have been ironed as 
far as St. Cloud ere winter) was got on 
in small Jots, but the river soon became 
so low that only enough iron to lay the 
road to Anoka, twenty miles beyond St. 
Anfhon\ , could be got up. About No- 
vember 1 the road was finished to Mano- 
min, and the trains commenced running 
to that point. About l>ecember 14 the 
iron was laiil to Anoka, and the passen- 
ger trains will commence running there 
to-»lay. We give below a statement of 
the receipts of the road since its opening : 
Mouth. J'axsfPffers. Freltia. Mails ^f Hent. 

July, fvVJ.OO .",',».(•;() 

August, 8'.nt.'.».S 107.00 



KX'i*OnT.<i !-<»» i<<o.-i. 

The subjoined table has been prepared 
from shippers' books, and will be found, 
we believe, correct : 



We lay before our rtaders this morn- 
a carefully prepared review of the trade 
and business of our city, for the year just 
end»'d. Thi-< i-^ the first attempt ever 
made to prepare such a document, and 
the immense labor requisite to its pro- 
duction can only !)e imagined by those 
who have ever undertaken similar tasks. 
As we have no Chandjer of Conmu'rce — 
(or one only in name) the task of gather- 
ing the stat istics fell on our reporters, 
who have visited every business house in 
the city, and drawn from their shipping 
books the items contained in the follow- 
ing sfateineiit. In most instances we 
were met cordially, and every facility 
shown us. In others, doubtless from a 
suspicion that we were federal tax asses- 
sors in disguise, a very reluctant though 
jiCrhaps not false reply, wa'? made to our 
inipiiries. It is to be hoped that ere au' 
other year our Chamber of Commerce 
■will go to work with life, and that our 
business men will see that the difference 
between a merchant and a mere store- 
keeper lies in the mind and breadth of 
liberal views with wfiich the former opera- 
ates. and rot in the amount of capital 
with which he c irries on his business. 



Whoat, hii 


Zi»,\>:y> 


iNiiils, ketr.s 


•n 


Fl.iur, bbis 


i>:>A<> IVIts ....~. 


4,':".' 


!'..tattt.-.s. ba.... 


K,".i7:t JVarhsh, los 


4r,:^';i 


r.iitUr, lln 


lM»,777il'otali, do.... 


:;.Mi 


UiiK'.-i, iJry 


7,V.»i)|Bnir:iIo rb ,bls.. 


r> 




nvsr-jji-a-tin-s, lbs 


■i.iu''^. 


f.ard IL'S 


y7,4M|Cranb('rrii's, bii. 


:j«)1 


r.iiiow \bs 


isii.ji..-, !<Vati„.rs, bales. 


1 


U'o.i, 11,.* 


1I4,'V.»> Fur-:, valuo ^ 


25ii,f(lKl 


BurUv ba 


-"l,4:i» i i'rni coir.'P, bils 


40 


(ii:i.-riij; lbs 


1.".»>:»| I'oik, brls 


4i; 


i{;i;;s 11)^ 


•SjJ'.i: 


.'lint pi'.j'fT, lbs. 


f.'-.l.i 


tall skiii-j, (iry.. 


ll,4'.>-.i 


l£')otf», black, lbs 


■VKJ 


gnvn.. 


4A.:0 


" SPUPca ... 


70 


l>i'or skins 


i>,C,'X> 


" b!oo(i 


1.0.-;! 


It. lint bu 


■2,irK 


I!ye, bu 


It'. '- 


Ke 'ywax, ib8... 


4,5011 *• tiour, brii... 


4.' 


Itacoii, lbs 


5.1-', v>l 


St'Cds,f;r'(l!i.bxs 


y 


Wofxkii lails... 
" tubs 


-'j>,-,'l-' 


.Majilc >u;;f.r, Is 


<.l,S13 


4,'.t:t4 


" syrup, brls.. 


1 


" ilmriK-i &o 


41J 


robufci), Ib'i.... 


4.:!7.> 


liiinl bn'iid, lbs. 


5.ir>,:i.- i 


Viiii^'j.ir, bbls... 


i.).") 


lA'ailuT, lbs... . 


!':.'•> 


Uliiskfy, bbls.. 


•Jl) 


< >.its, bu 


2.M70 


Wino, bbls 


1 


y-<i^<' pk^rs 


I.IKM 


VVikl J;ic('. bUU. 


- 


Aiclal !»L'iui>s, lus 


S,,i«>- 







Year. 
is:!» 

1 K't'J 

1N.>1 

\Kt-i 

l^iVt 

IK>t 

InVj 

l)vii> 

1S67 

1 cVV> ••••■« 

l'^iJ*/« « • • a • 

ISiiO 

1-il 

ISI'i-J 

l>>iW 



Arrival of 
lirst bunl. 

..April '.». 

.. " lit. 

.. " 4. 

. . " lO. 

.. " 11. 

. . " IM. 

.. " 17. 

.. " in. 

..May 1. 

. .Mar. '..'.'i. 

..April '-'0. 

..Mar. a.S. 

..April 8. 

.. " 18, 

. . " 0. 



of Iftst boiit. 

Kov. I'J. 
" hs, 
" -Zi). 
" 10. 
" 2V. 
— -*. 
" I'.t. 
" 10. 

" u. 

" 10. 

" 'M. 

" 2:1. 

•* »i. 

" 1:., 

" '-'1. 



LoDgth of 
se:ison. 

Til d:iys 
2::! '• 
2:m) " 
tutu " 
T>5 " 

210 " 
200 " 
IVS " 

zm; " 
•iio " 

•»;;.» i« 

211 " 



We give below a tabular statement of 
the amount of wharfage collected since 
18.01, the year in which our city was or- 
•ranizcd and incorporated. It should ]>e 
recollected that between the seasons of 
IS.'iC and 1857, the rates of wharfage 
were changed from $3 per boat irrespect- 
ive of si/e, to a cents per ton, Custom 
House measurement. Wharfajre col- 
lected for 



IS.--,.-). 
i>-..o. 
l,N-i7. 
is.'.s. 



$1,2*2 fit) 

i,o'.n (X) 

'.>,177 ."io 

l!,:h.". 2:! 

7,-'i'.i) (.•:> 



18C)0. 
Iftil. 
Ih02. 
lN-.;i. 



$0,375 0(.' 
'J, 'Mr, ;i2 
'.>,ISO<> 04 
5,2!5v'S UO 



fOMPAKA-rAVE xj.vuanxT. 

We give below a comparison between 
our exports last year and those of ISdl 
and '02. It will be seen tluat while wheat 
has fallen oft" on account of low water, 
and cranberries 6wing to drought, pota- 
toes. Hour, butter, lard, tallow, hides, 
wool, bacon, barley, furs, etc., have 
largeU- increased. The balance of the 
table explains itself: 

lb*n. 

Flour, barrolii, 2j,*i<k) 

Wlit'ttt, bushels, 52?,<is7 

ISuiley, bu.slifls, 7,200 

Folk,' barn-Is, 2,4;tO 

H,i(v>u. i)(>uiuls, ]0'>,o<i;i 

l.:ir,l, biirrrls, s(jO 

(lunbi'rrics, bush, 4,512 

UuttiT, pou.ids, <t,(MlO 

Hides, uuuiber, 27, UK) 

(ilnsi'iifr, )>oisu(Is, 2<>s,';>,5'> 

J u;nloes, bu-iivis, .'(.lAiO 

Wool, ixtuiids, :{,(KJO 

Furs.viiliic, 

t'»eaii<, bushels. 60O 



1802. 

42,Wi:! 

420,2iVs 

4,r.()2 

h77 

107,7.50 

544> 

5,24:J 

."0,tV12 

l.!,:»:0 

241,J4.> 

3,011.) 

.".0,105 



180.1. 

.50,4^5 

3-.1i,V.5i 

21,47<t 

40 

.'■j:J2,Ns4 

<J7,4:j',.(lbs) 

201 
1?!0.777 
::4,.s22 
l.'i4,K'!0 
N'J.o:;; 
1 I4,r.ii,s 



$20;),mK) $250,iK)(» 

2,oy7 



CiEWKRAI. UKtIEM' OF THE 
I'AMT VE.IlSI. 

Commercially, the past year has been 
one of great prosperity in all branches of 
trade. The large sums of money spent 
by the Government in our midst h.ave in- 
oreasc'l the supj)ly in tlnr hands of all 
classes, who have spent it freely, and 
even extravagantly, so that trade has 
flourished, and wealth increased with a 
rapidity and generality unknown before. 
The wealili of our merchants has there- 
lore increased rapidly and there has been 
a stea«ly demand for the luxuries, as well 
as th2 necessaries of life, giving constant 
employment to our work shops, while 
labor of all kinds has been scarce, com- 
manding unusually high rates. There 
are none unemployed. All are prosper- 
ous. The demand for fine goods, rich 
clothing, elegant furniture, horses and 
pleasure carriages, jewelry, plate, furs, 
etc., w.as never so great, because they 
are now within the reach of all. Thus 
Trade has been stimulated, 'money circu- 
lated freely, and wealth accumulated by 
the frugal. Our merchatits are out of 
debt, buy and sell for cash only, and are 
amassing j)roperty and building fine resi- 
dences. Everywhere confiden« e and 
quiet energy prevails. 



Jt.npouxd iron iaos. 

Below we give a list of imports by the 

Minnesota River, and by the St. Paul 

and Pacific Railroad : 

Per Min. Per Total. 

Kiv. 

211,00!} 

(!,.')!J'2 

3.S.J.3 

18,8fiG 

6,(1.1 

4,:i62 

1'j2 



THE EFFKCT OF HICi«f PRICES. 

The high prices, consequent on the 
premium on gold, has enhanced the cost 
of living, but the nerfSifaries of life are 
yet reasonalilft in. th<;ir price, and the 
poor live well. We ^ivf^. the Retail price 
of a few leading items : 
riour, pi^r b'-'I-.- $4ri.) 
J'otatot'S p^r •"' • "•"'^^ 

Jieef ppr lt< "(•'♦<' 

<orn inMi'. cwt. #2,14 
Wood per cord.. go 



Pork, per lb RsOc 

r>f a n s per bu ... 2,50 ii .^25 
IJultor per lb.. 18a20c 
Lard, per lb.... 12'il.5c 
Hay, per ton... %Vi}i 



Ulicat, l.u. 
narlev, do 
Oats," do 

Potatoes, do 
live, i|.) 

Corn, do 

Beans, d;) 

Pens, d') ,'■) 

Pork, lihls. .SC!> 

i'lour, do l,0«l 

Corn Meal, do 2;{ 

Lime. , do l,Oi)S 

Lard, do lU) 

Cows, . 22 

Calvurj, * 4/i 

Coops Ponltrv, .37 

P.utter, lbs. 19,200 

Egjrs, doz. 11,1)00 

Hives of bees, IS 

Bees wax 1I)S, 4r»0 

Kaj,'s, ll.s, 37,800 

Gingscng, lbs, 7,800 

Furs, bundles, 39 

Hides, 2,912 

Pearlasli, lbs, 24,800 

HiU-d lumber, ft, 3,000 

Pine " " _ 

Paper, n)s, — 

Shingles, M, — 

Lath " — 

Scrap metal, lbs — 
Maple syrup, bbls, — 

*' suj'ar lbs, — 

Fence pickets, — 

Harreis, — 

Tobacco, lbs, 100 

Tallow, " — 

Ilaiii, " _ 
Jjunbcr. drs'd ft, — 

IJcef, brls, — 

" fresh, n) , — 

Fish, ~" " — 

Ven'sn " " — 

Cranberries, ba, — 

Shoulders, lbs, — 

Ca.stings, " — 
Wagons and sleds — 

Plows — 

Tubs — 

Pails, — 

Churns, &c., — 
Ciarden Seeds, hxs. — 

Ale, barrels, — 

Bran, sacks, — 

Clothes horses, — 

Deer Skius, lbs. — 
Calf *' No. — 

Doors, — 

Sash, — 

Hand Sleds, — 

Wo;id, cords, 3,800 

limits, bbls. — 
Bed stead turnings, — 
Bear skins, bdis. — 

Chairs, doz. — 

Wool, Ib.s. 17,000 

live Hour bis. — 

Wine, brl. — 

Soap, b.xs, — 



I'er 
U.K. 

1,817 

409 

1,3.52 

13,072 

•> 



The abundance of currency and accu- 
mulation of capital, has kept the money 
market quite easy during the entire year. 
As an evidence of this, our city and coun- 



48 

89 

14.83.5 

48 

8,.548 



3,900 
1,400 



21,0.33 

229 

10 

3.52 

6,440 

7,680 

82.5,233 

249,-539 

3-)2 

279 

164 

1 

il.OSl 

2,600 

10,.348 

41.5 

4,750 

tK3 

10,000 

473 

14i) 

3,) 

800 

5,000 
43,.542 

2 

9,372 

41,892 

i,a-32 

17 
1.5 
283 
.51 
608 
Lj 
13 

9 
14 
20 

4 
20 

4 

4 

808 

42 

1 
21 



212,817 
7,011 
5,20.5 
31,9:5s 
(i9.5 
4,302 
200 
5 
C.58 
14,916 
71 
1,0G8 
8,667 
22 
• 45 
37 
23,100 
13,300 
18 
400 
58,8.53 
8,029 
55 
3,265 
31,240 
10,6,S0 
825,233 
219,.5.39 
352 
279 
1()4 
1 
5,081 
2,600 
10,318 
,515 
4,7.50 
a43 
10,000 
473 
140 
30 
800 
7 
5,000 
13,512 
5 
2 
9,372 
41,802 
1,032 
17 
15 
283 
51 
608 
15 
13 
9 
14 
3,820 
4 
20 
■ 4 
4 
17,898 
42 
1 
21 



■••••>•< 



The record of porta from which the ar- 
rivals during 1863 were made, was not 
very carefully kept, but stands very 
nearly as follows : 

From tlie Minnesota Elver 

From >*^t. Louis 

From La Crosse 

From the St. 'Moi.v 

From l>iicleith 

From I'ittsburR 

t>thcr points unknown 

There is a very large amount of cai>ital 

invested in the steamboat lines on the 

Upper Missis:,ippi. The La Crosse Line 



.Sejiteniber, 
Oelober, 
NovenilxT, 
December, 

ISO:!. 
January, 
•■ebriiarv, 
Slarcli, 
April, 
May, 
.June, 
.luly, 
August, 
.Septi'mbor, 
^►ctober, 
No\t;niber, 



«;22.40 
770 00 

s'.)4.2;{ 

715.00 

709.20 
r.07.10 
71H.40 
llUS.:5o 
l.WO.lO 
1727.70 
IS'Jil.SO 
1,5'.M).00 
1074.00 
1.V14.25 

i.viy.i-i 



310.7.S 
4t>1..5'.> 
224.57 

ioy.7i 

12.1.e5 
150.4<i 
2.55.57 
814.-22 

5'k,'..'i'.l 

422.:{« 
222.95 
.O.Vi.K') 
37t»,;«i 
h5f».4.'. 
044. -si 



$4.1 75 



18 06 

2.'> 00 
fiO 00 
4'J 45 
*25 00 
2.1 00 
•Mi 00 



It will be seen by eo:ap.aring the re- 
turns of July, August, September, Octo- 
ber and November of 1,SG3 with those 
same months of 18C2, that a gratifying 
increase of business has occurred. [See 
Lmi'OIjts ehiewhere.] A fine passenger 
and freight depot, costing $2,^00, was 
built at the terminus of their track on. the 
Lower Levee, during the summer. 

Ol'JR RE» niA'ER TRAUE. 

One of the most important branche.'c of 
our Trade is with the Red River coloni es, 
carried on mostly by means of ca.-ls. 
The first record.td trading journey frem 
the Red River to the Mississippi was iai 
l.'^20, when the settlers at Selkirk were 
compelled to go to Prairio du Chien, then 
the most northerly settlement on the 
Mississippi, to procure seed. At a later 
day, when tha settlements were more 
wealthy, drove.^ ol the Red River cattle 
were sometimes broughtacross from Scl- 



alone owns 20 boats and 2') barires. It 
is impossil.'le to predict with any certainty 
the luture of our steamboat trade, as the 
completion of railroad connection be- 
tv/een here and Winona, which will oc- 
cur before two seasons more, will rob it 
of its importance and value to our city. 
[For the steamboat business on the 
Minnesota River, see "Mixxk.sota Rt\'- 

EU Tu.VDE."] 

THE :VIi:v:VE>40TA RIVER 
XRAItE. 

The increase of the Trade between St. 
Paul and the Slinnesota river is as re- 
m.arkable as it is gratifying. 

The first steamboat whose prow ever 
divided its sky-tinted waters was the An- 
thony Wayne, Capt. Able, who ascended 
as far as the Rapids in June, 1850. The 
Nominee, Captain Orin Smith, ascended 
as far as Lawrence in July of the same 
year, followed by the Anthony Wayne, 
which this time got as far as Kasota. 

In August the Yankee, Capt. Keeler 
Harris, ascended as far as the Blue 
Earth. 

All the.se boats had pleasure trips of 
St. Paul citizens and eilitors on board. 
That rich and now well settled valley 
was then an utter wilderness. But so 
rapidly did it settle up, from the glowing 
accounts given by the first voyagers, that 
in 18")2, one boat was running in the 
Trade "regularly," which means, making 
trips as often as it was able. 

In 18o3, three boats, the West Newton, 
the Tiger and Clarion ascended as 
far as Fort Ridgely, with material and 
supplies for the establishment of that 
post. Boats frequently ascend that hi"h 
now. 

So rapidly did the trade increase with 
the rush of settlers to the rich valley of 
the Minnesota, that in 1.8,37 three new 
boats were built expressly for that trade, 
(lue I-iu..!; Steele, Jeannette Roberts and 
Antelope,) another in 'o9, (the Favorite,) 
a fifth in 18G0 (the Albany) and a sixth in 
1.^02 (the New Ulm Belle.) The number 
of arrivals during the past 13 years are 
as follows : 



18.50 
18;52 
18.55 
18.56 
1857 
1858 



4 
13 
119 
216 
240 
293 



ia59 
I860 
1861 
1S02 
1863 



THE »tea:«iroat trade. 

The unprecedented low water during 
the summer of 18G3, resulting from the 
intense drouth of that season, (lower than 
known before for twenty years,) very 



The remarkable decrease in the year 
1.^0.3 is explained by the unprecedented 
low water, there being only 40 days in 
which the boats could get above the Rap- 
ids. Had the rate of business during that 
time continued during the entire season, 
the arrivals would have been fully ,oOO. In 
fact there never has been a season in 
which there was so much business to be 
done. In wheat alone , the freights would 
have employed a fleet of boats and barges. 
Vide the following table : 

^.„. Bushels, 

Crop of '02 deported in '(^^ - - 200,000 

" instorcDcc. 1, '63, - 
Crop of 1863, - . . . 

To be shipped in 18»)4. 



kirk to Mendota, 

It was not until 1844, two or three 
years before the settlement of St. Paul, 
that the first Trading Trip was made be- 
tween these points. It was undertaken 
by our fellow-townsman, Xorman W. 
Kittson, who established a trading post at 
Pembina, on the edge of the Hudson 
Bay Company's jurisdiction, but on the 
American side. The first three or four 
annual ti ips were made at a positive loss, 
but attention was thereby called to the 
advantages of the new route, and it soon 
drew tjuite a travel over it. From this 
time, which was about the date of the or- 
ganization of the Territory, the trade an- 
nually increased, and soon became of 
gi'eat importance to our growing young 
city. 

The transportation soon began to be 
made by the peculiar two-wheeled vehi- 
cle still in use, called a "Pembina cart" 
— being constructed by the colonists en- 
tirely without iron, at a cost of about . 91. 'J 
each. Into this cart, by a rude harness 
of hide, is hitched an ox or pony, and 
a load varying from oOO to 700 pounds is 
diawn steadily for ten or fifleen miles 
per day, during this four weeks annual 
journey over the smooth prairie roads. 

From 500 to GOO of these rude carts, 
drawn by the swarthy half-breeds of the 
Red River colonics, have visited our city 
each summer for the past 12 or 15 years. 
During 18.30, and the two subsequent 
seasons, the number was reduced some- 
what, as the steamboat running on Red 
River took a part of the trade usually 
done by the carts. Last season the boat 
was not running, owing to low water, but 
the Indian troubles and the high price of 
goods, reduced the number of carts to 
275. A large number of these carts 
come from the British side. In 1857, 
300 of them came from beyond the line. 
Their return loads were estimated at 
$1.30 each, or $4.3,000 in all. The fol- 
lowing year 400 came from that side. 
This is in spite of the duties levied on 
both sides of the line. 

The carts generally bring down furs, 
and in such quantities that $100,000 worth 
have been received here in a single year. 
ISee Fur Irade.} They take back loads 
of such merchandize as they most need 
in their settlement. Among these we 
note groceries, such as teas, coffee, su- 
gar, spices, liquors and tobacco. Dry 
goods, mostly cloths, blankets, and ready 
made clothing, hats, boots and shoes. 
Tin, wooden and hallow ware, stoves 
and other household articles arc largely 
purchased. Powder and lead, guns and 
tools, are als^ staples with them, while 
drugs to some extent, leather, nails and 
glass complete the list. In farni and gar- 
den implements the trade is lar^e. 
Ploughs, hoes, spades, forks, scythes, 
and every other agricultural tools is 
bought. Since about 185G a number of 
reaping and thrashing machines have 
been taken to Red River, and more lat- 
terly. Sewing MaeJdnea are observed to 
figure. If the average of past years holds 
good, and taking into vie* the increased 
price of goods, over $GO,000 worth of 
goods were bought by these swarthy 
.30o;ooo i Northmen in 18G3, One house reports 
40o'ooo having sold them $4,000 worth ol tobacco 



300 
2.50 
318 
413 
177 



becoming populous and wealthy, con- 
taining a population of about 10,000, 
generally English and Scotch immigrants 
and their half-breed descendants. They 
are brave, hardy, frugal and intelligent. 
Their annual buffalo hunts enrich them 
withhides, meat and tallow. In 18.3C there 
were 9,253 head of horned cattle. 2,799 
horses, 2,429 sheep in the settlements. 
The climate is mild and the soil rich, 
readily producing all grain crops except 
corn. 

The settlements are rapidly becoming 
infused with American enterprise. News- 
papers, Schools and Churches &c., are 
latterly being introduced. A steamer of 
GO tons, owned by Burbank & Co., navi- 
gates the Red River, and they naturally 
look to the United States for their com- 
mercial relations. 

The Trade, the rise and state of which 
we lave thus hurriedly sketched, will be 
of great importance to our city. When 
the rich areas to our Northwest arc set- 
tled up with a flourishing popidation, 
consuming our manufactures and using 
Saint Paul as a market for their produce, 
that future will be realized. 



dealers, and $50,000 wus brought from thus commenced a trade that must ere 
Red River on the Pembina trains, and long be an important one, and wield eon- 
shipped from here. ' siderable capital. The next winter there 
In the PitEss of August 29th, we gave ^ere four houses in the trade ; in 1861-2, 
a copious review of the far trade of our scxan firms, and last winter four. The 



?]ct,022 i l|5^: 

. 19.S 000 
, 202;000 
. 250,000 



Should the water be high during next i alone 
summer, the Steamboat Trade on that I The colonies on the Red River are now 



• 



at 



.StHI.OOO 
. 471,0011 
. 10.1,00(t 

. :u,<»o'» 



city for the year IStiJ, and a reflex state- 
ment of the few years preceding. The 
followinjr bird's eve view of the amount 
of furs annually exported — copied from 
that issue — will show the progress of the 
trade : 

l,s44 S«1,4C0 M^Tii 

IS-rOa ••••• ••■•••• tt^'rj^i ItSi* ■••••• • 

isj) 15,000 ISO! 

3^55 * 4<i,0C'0 ]«(■..• 

lNV;i '.17 .iS"? IS'" 

l^5'J lt;2,49i I 

These amount have been drawn from 
year to year from the books of the deal- 
ers, and can be relied on as correct. 
Those of the past seven years have been 
drawn up y<!ar by ye.ar by the commer- 
cial editor of this journsl, who has got 
the statistics from the shippers them- 
selves. 

The decrease in the yjar'slSoS and '59 
were from the decrease 1 value of Furs, 
and not from .any dec'ine in amounts 
shipped. Since that date, however, the 
value of Furs has stealily appreciated, 
and ai'c now higher than perhaps ever be- 
fore in this country, owing to "fashion" 
making a lady's or gent's wardrobe in 
complete without more or less of them. 
The fancy fur trade is one of great im- 
portance in every tyt} . amounting to 
$2,500,(X)0 in value innually in New 
York city. The demand for Mink skins, 
oaee not worn at all, Jut now "all the 
rage.." has rai.sed their price from 30 to 
50c'eat«, to ten times tlat amount. 

The Houses which were engaged in the 
trade thu p.ast season ^vere J. & C. M. 
Dailey, Joseph Ullmann, II. Bromley, 
A. Moore, Bassett &: Hammond, D. 
Loviiz, D. I\!arvin. One or two of these 
houses used a capital of c75,000, all of 
which was expended in Furs and Robes 
last season. 

Since the close of lh<! seajson of 18G2 
there were marketed he re^ 3,-'>00 bull'alo 
robes ; 3,000 wolf robes ; 8.30 bear skins ; 
1,G50 red fox; 23,000 mink; 250^000 
muskrat skins : 2,258 otter ; G40 fishers ; 
l.GOO martens ; 7it cross fox ; 2 blue fox. 

The Furs from the II idson Bay region, 
and the lied River v: lley (from which 
m^OAt of the St. Paul firs come,) almost 
rival tlie elegant and renowned Siberian 
Furs. They rank nex) to the latter in 
the markets of the world. 

We spake of the Robi', trade as being a 
separate brancli of the Trade. Hitherto, 
all buffalo robes from the Nortliwest 
plains, our source of si pply, have been 
taken to New York or lioston, and from 
thence jobbed in bales to different points. 
Tiie entire lots marketed at Saint Paul 
an«l Saint Louis, the t*io uu;in Fur marts 
of tiie West, have thus been gobbled up. 
The past year, however, Messrs. Dailey 
& i^yder concluded tha; Saint Paul might 
as well be the market ns any other point, 
and secured ;{,000 fine robes and com- 
meiuod the a.ssorting, dressing and pack- 
ing trade^^here, designiiig to job them out 
to dealers elsewhere. The supply last 
year was not large, ane. the price was en- 
hanced grextly. The Hudson I^ay Com- 
pany did not export jwy. Tieir robes 
are taken to England, 1 ut are eventually 
re-.siiipj)ed to Americu. rob/>9 of that 
kind not being used in ]']uroi>e. 

TJkj greater part of the Fur« mak-ketcd 
here eome from the Red Rivra- region, 
and are brought in by Indians and haU- 
breecis., -who exchang(^ ihem for ammuni- 
tion, blankets, &c. Tie Furs so collect- 
ed are brought here by tiarts. (See *'Rki> 
RiVKK Tu.vDK.") The balance of the 
Furs are caught in our forests and 
streams by profei:&ional as well as ama- 
teur hunters and trappers. The intro- 
duction of cheap spring traps allows any 
settler and his boys to eatch a, few dollars 
worth of furs every wir ter. 

The Fur-bearing reg on of T^'hich our 
city is naturally the entrepot and mart, 
really embraces the em ire Hudson Bay 
Company's District, kr own as Rupert's 
Land, all of ^Minnesota and Dakota Ter- 
ritory to tlic jNIissouri River. The Fur 
exports of this region sre valued at from 
$1,000,000 fo $2,500.0(0 annually. There 
J are 51 trading posts in the II. B. Co.'s 



following table will show the progress of 
the trade : 



Year. 



T5 
O 3 W 






> »• * 






1801-02 

l«52-63. . . . 



VOO 
1,0(0 
3,410 
2,->0 
3,120 



175 
180 
185 
'.iiafi 



4.:iO 
4 25 
3.75 
S.48 



»>>»j* ^^9 



We give below a statemeut of the Cin- 
cinnati Pork Trade, for the same year, as 
far as weight, prices, &c., is concerne*! : 



Year. 



Average 
weight. 



Av. price 
per ft. 



At. yfpid of 
'arJ per liojf. 



TUE DRY CiOODS TRAUE. 

The Dry Goods Trade of the city is 
one of the most important branches of 
business, e::»bracing eleven wholesale and 
retail houses, employing a capital of one 
hundredthous\nd dollars, (.SMl.OGO) and 
whose sales for the year 18G2 amounted to 
four hundred and seveniy-one thousand 
dollars {^\l\,Om.) Compare this with 
the entire trade of the village of St. Paul 
in 1849, the sales in all branches o^ 
which only amounted to $131, 0<X) ! 

The first regular and exclusive Dry 
Goods house was established bv the 
Elfelt Bros, in 1819. At that stajre of 
the trade, however, the merchants of the 
growing settlement dealt in various arti- 
cles — hardware, groceries, dry goods, 
&c. As time advanced, however, they 
found it more profitable to confine their 
attention to a single branch of trade. 

In 1853 the Cathcart Bros, established 
their house, and still remain in the trade, 
the pioneer house of the city. In 185G 
this firm erected the first building in our 
city constructed expressly for the Dry 
Goods business. 

In 1855, from statistics published in 
that year, we learn that the capital in- 
Tested ill the Dry Goods Trade was 
$115,000, and the annual sales $2.30,- 
000. The names of the Houses then in 
the tTjule were : 

Cathcart & Co., ' I^uii« Rlum, 

Chnrlfs 1>. K!f.'it, r.,oui.s Itoborts, 

Chatnblin (A. T.) & Mor- ( Oscar Kinjir, 

gau(('. A.), J. E. Full-rton, 

Culver & FouHt'ca, ] J. W. llass. 

— comprising eleven houses, only two of 
whom are yet in the trade. There are 
now eleven firms engaged in the Dry 
Goods business, as follows : 

Xaincs. Voar oslablisb.p''. 

Catlicart & Co IW.T 

D. W. IngorsoU & Co lh.50 

Jlogau & Camp I^OO 

Wni. Loc \'s'%'} 

H. Knox Taylor ISOo 

,lu!itict> * Foropaugh l.'^ol 

■*A . .S. F.Ifplt 1800 

*L. C. Burt 1K02 

*i't. W. I'hflns 1,S02 

'^'Alvah Smitii 18.')5 

*i\. U. Blum IMil 

These marked with a * are retail houses 
only. The others are both wholesale 
and retail, there being no exclusively 
wholesale houses. 

The actual condition of business 
present is about as follows : 

l^holc amount of capital 

Total ^alcs \i«\l 

"Wholesale sHli's lso2 

'iU'tail 8aIos 1802..... 

k.'apital invested in retail tra<ie only. 

The sales for 1 80.5 are not yet as( er- 

tcaaaed, as the books of that year could 

not be closed in time to enable us to use 

the flatistics for this review. The gen- 

^'raliissertion of all dealerj is, however, 

that tlie total sales for 18G3 will be fitlhj 

one Ivalf greater than for 18G2, o<{iuvalent 

to SETEa'^ IIUNDUKP THOU.'i.VXn t>OT.L.VR.«^ ! 

This is owing both to the higher price o^ 
goods, acd the increased consumption. 
So far from the war having had a dele 
terious efi'ect on the trade, it has actual- 
ly helped it. Never were our Dry Goods 
stores •S9 crowded, while fine dress 
jTOods that was almost unsalable two 
years since, are now eagerly bongtt by 
ofliicers wives and others, who have the 
command of more money than formerly. 

The jobbing, or wholesaling of dry ^ ^^-^^'^'-^ ' 

jroods was commenced at a ve, , ^».. . v , , , ,, , ^, . 

, , -.1 X • I ir * f 5 cnly are taken, the tall) wand meat benig 

dav. and without any special efforts of S , ^ , , , , i .l • 

•^ * . .f wasted. Could these be saved, their ex- 



1850 W ].<!) 6.21 2.1 

1800-01 221 6.97 :4S'i 

1801-02 2>4'j' .V28 4-5 Sy-; 

1862-fV3 203 4.35 20 

These tables present some carious 
facts . The average weight per hog packed 
last winter in St. Paul, exceeds that of 
Cincinnati, hy eight and a half pounds ! 
Minnesota pork raisers, the last to enter 
the field, have plucked the wreath from 
the veteran farmers of the Miami and 
Scioto Vallies^ whose pork, cured by Cin- 
cinnati packers, has gained world- wi Jo 
fame. The average yield of lard per hog, 
however, is considerably in favor of our 
Cincinnati friends, as their skill and ap- 
pliances are doubtless superior to ours. 
Well cured, though, St, Paul pork caunou 
be excelled in quality or flavor. Commend 
us to Thomas Lamb's sugar-cured hams ; 
we can brag of them conscientiously. 

The success of the Pork growers la.<t 
winter in obtaing a good market for their 
hogs, and of the Packers in curing and 
selling to advantage, gave a great impetus 
to the Hog Trade last summer. Farmers 
doubled and trebled their droves, and 
great pains were taken to get superior 
breeds for packers' use. The pig-styea 
in early summer bid fair to give us fully 
10,000 fine porker? ti is winter. Several 
new firms prepared to enter the Pack- 
ing Trade, and made contracts for bar- 
rels. But the terrible drought of the 
summer reduced the usual yield of corn 
so badly, that many farmers who had an- 
ticip.ated marketing, aay twenty head, had 
feed for only two or thiee, or perhaps 
more, above home necessities. A large 
number have been marketed here, it 
is true, but they are small and light, 
and but few are corn-fed. There are 
now eleven houses in the Packing Trade, 
but from the causes named, our winter's 
business will not make as favorable a 
show as it would have done had the feed 
crop not fallen short. 

Some difficulty was experienced for a 
year or two by our packers in procuring 
good pork barrels. That diiliculty is 
now obviated, and a good supply of well 
.eea.'^oned barrels are continually in mar- 
ket. The price this winter ranges from 
.f l,3p to $1.G0, which is 50 per cent more 
than is paid by packers in Milwaukee 
and Chicago. This ought not to be. See 
"Cooperage." 



I district; and 150,000 buffaloes are killed 

/ 1,-pnnuallv. The hides, tcngues sLnd humps 
?rj' early ? , ' o 



our merchants to attract such trade 
early as 1854 or '55 small lots were job 
bed to country traders. The panic of 
1.S57 threw a large interior trade into the 
hands of our merchants, and wholesaling 
has since then been quite brisk. The In- 
dian War gave it a temporary check, but 
it is again extending. We are naturally 
the wholesaling point for the country to 
our Northwest, and our DrA' Goods job- 
bing trade must continue to increase with 
the gi'owth of the interior. 

THE (GROCERY TRADE. 

The Trade in Groceries both a rliole- 
8ale and retail, this year, has l.»een very 
large. We have not been able to pro- 
<.>ure any accurate statistics of the ai aount 
of capital invested, or the amount < if an- 
nual sales made. 



THE FI:R TRAUE 

The purchase and export of Fnrs» and 
the sale of supplies connected thci ewitb, 
is another most important branch « »f our 
commerce. St. Paul may now cl aim to 
be the second largest, if not the I. irgest 
Fur market in the United States. It is 
stated by our merchants here and at the 
East, that it even exceeds St. Lou' lS as a 
point of export for furs, the latter place 
outranking it in the robe shipi nents, 
which is a separate branch of the trade. 
The exports of St. Ijouis (of rob< js and 
furs both) amount to between $3t X),000 
and $400,(X)0 annually; while the c rports 
from St. Paul last season amoun ted to 
$2.50,000. Of that amount, .* 



poet value would average $1,5C0,000 
axinntally. 

Oar dealers here are laboring to bring 
this v»st Fur business ID and through St. 
Paul. They out bid ;he II. B. Co.'s 
airents ia order to do this. Could the 
RecipFocitr;' Treaty be extended over this 
region, our fur exports would quadruple 
in two or three years. American houses 
coidd thftn go,t most ol the profits that 
have hitlierto enriched ]inglish firms. The 
duty often per cent (t) be paid in gold) 
gives the 11. B. Co. a virtual monopoly 
of the Fur Trade, and ihey use it vigor- 
ously. This once abolished, and Amer- 
ican capital and enterjirise given a fair 
chance in that rich regi jn, the future of 
the fur trade, which in the infancy of our 
city was its chief source of wealth, would 
again become of immer!fee importance to 
our commerce. 



^VHEAT. 

This cereal has been, and must continue 
to be, our great article of cxpoit, as our 
soil and climate is so well adapted to its 
culture. It employs in our city alone a 
capital of not less than $253,000. There 
are four houses, who buy about 75,lX)0 
bushels each, and the wheat market in 
towns on the Minnesota river is mainly 
controlled by their agents. There is no 
limit to the expansion of this trade, be- 
cause the production of wheat is illimita- 
ble. In 1860, according to the census, 
only one acre in 155 was tilled, and the 
average yield of wheat was 22.02 bushels 
io the acre harvested ! The davelopment 
thus far is as follows : 
Year. No. bu. harvested. 

1849 1,401 

18.W 2,374. 41. -i 

18G0 5,101,4V2 

Since 18G0, no statistics have been 
gathered oi the yield of wheat. It can- 
not have decreased, even viewing the la- 
bor extracted from agriculture by the 
war, since an increased area has been 
tilled each year until J.863, when in sev- 
eral counties the settlers abandoned their 
farms through fear of the Indians. It is 
safe, therefore, to estimate the yLeLd of 
18(i;], at 5,000,000 bushels. 

Our exports of wheat the past summer 
have been smaller than in either 18C1 or 
'02, on acQpunt of the low water. Fully 
125,0W bushels are yet stored at and be- 
hind this port, which could not be moved, 
there not being sufficient tonnage. We 
give a review of the annual exports from 
our levee : 

bn. 

- 42f.,'.ir>8 

- - :j24,'.nt 



18.50 
IBfiO 
IStil 



1862 
1863 



THE 1H»RK TRA1>E. 

Saint Paul has already become a prom- 
inent Pork curing point. The first pork 
packed in Samt Paul was by Charles Col- 
ter in the winter of 1857. About 900 
head were] slaughtered and packed 
by him that year, in ( onnection with his 
business as a meat dealer. The first reg- 
ular Packing House, however, was 
established by Messrs, C. D. Strong and 
W. R. Miller, in the faU of 1859. That 
year they cut and packed 1,000 head, 
cured considerable meat, and rendered a 



bn. 

- 12,848 
- - 19.5,000 

- 527,087 

In addition to the shipments of 18G<}. 
there were 40,000 bushels in two bulk 
barges whir h was billed from here, but 
taken direct from the warehouse of the 
shipper above, to La Crosse. Adding this, 
and the amount yet lying in store not 
shipped for want of tonnage, (a deficieiicy 
that will be added to next season's ex- 
ports) our exports for 1863 should be reck- 
oned at not less than500,(j00 bushels. 

We have spoken of the Minnesota Val- 
ley as the great wheat district in which 
our S*;. I'aul buyers operate. We are 
furnished by one of them with an average 
list of prices during the season : 



Shakopee 05370c 

Tarver and Chaska do 

Jordan W >{70c 

St. Peter 50^550 



Mankato ,50 oOtie 

booth Bend 50^600 

LeSupur and Ot- 
tawa 50S55C 



largq lot of lard. The venture proved 

2i )0,000 I profitable, and at one 3 St. Paul sprang 

worth was bought m this market bj- our I into the list of pork curing markets, and 



From the Upper Mississippi, only 12,- 
t)00 bushels were received, which were 
brought from St. Cloud in wagons. Four 
or five hundred trips were made, and the 
cost of the transportation above what it 
would be by boat and car, was $15(X), or 
20c per bushel. This shows what we will 
gain by the completion of the St. Paul & 
P. R. R. 

Next season we may expect larige im- 
ports via that road from Anoka, to which 
point it is now running. Last sia <ou only 
1817 bushels were received through thfs 
medium — a good commencement, how- 
ever. 



[CONTITUED 0-V LA'T PAGE.] 



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4* 



SAINT PAUL PRESS, FRIDAF, JANUARY 1, 18C4. — DOUBLE SHEET. 



( 



For the St. Piiuirresa. 
Satan Making Up His Jewels. 

Till' nnli (IcceivLT of niankiiul 

Sat on his throne of fire, 

And spoke in thunder tones ; 

"Tlie mighty fiame of dcatli is phiycd ; 

The elForts of our hosts h:ivc failed, 

And now Secer'ssion wails her hist! 

Go summon Judas here, that traitor prinee 

AVlio trc.i son's record keeps ; 

To-day upon the rebel States 

I'll make my jc%vels up. 

And now with «ly and cat-like tread 

Conies in the King of Traitors, with his 

book. 
Wherein are writ the traitorous acts 
Of all who shared, by sword or deed 
In that rebellion dire. 
Quoth Satan, "summon the noblfst here, 
Jetf. Davis and his crew of traitor hosts, 
liis chiefs and servants all ; and .Judas 
Open wide thy ponderous fire proof book 
To read their honors out." 
Then ilid Iseariot speak : "Dread Prince, 
There is upon this !x)ok a name 
Of greater worth than his.*' 
"Av.iunt" cried Satan, "who shall greater 

he 
In all their noble band than he ?" 
"Go call him here, and on my right 
Prepare a seat of honor bright, 
Where he may sit." 

Then on they brought thcambiti )us chief, 
And all bis traitrous band; 
And made him sit in honors place. 
By Satan's red right hand. 
Then followed .Iu;las with the mighty acts 
Of Davis and his crew, 
While Calhoun ^tood and prompted him 
To read the record true. 
WLde thus confusion thus confused 
Ileigned in the council hall, 
An artful knave stepped in the place 
Of honor with them all. 
Then Satan, "Who art thou, who thus 

intrude 
Thyselfainoug the honored liere ?" 
The knave replied, "and is the traitor 
Chief of all so little known ? 
Methought VallantUgham of all 
Should claim the traitor throne / 
While Darls served for power and pelf, 
1 f>nly served thee. 
No six ijears Presidency for me ; 
Xo pay.no name on earth but one of shanjc ; 
Have I no lionor here f 
I heard the call across dread Le:he's pool, 
And slew myself because notraitoi's rope 
Was ctlVred me, and came to claim 
The highot post of honor here." 
Then Satan, "Judas si)eak, is the old man 
Of honor brightest on the page f" 
Then Judas lie, " Aye mighty prince, 
*Tis here se* down as he hath said." 
Then Satan spoke, awhile the Stygian 

HxhI 
Did thunder with applause. 
Vall.tndigham, thou always hast 
Me letter served than Ue, 
Becau.-e tlie more ungrateful thon. 
Davis desceml take thon the left, 
ValUindini-'ham the right. 
With all thy crew of copper Imc, 
And traitors black as night." 
December IV.h, 18<i:j. L'INX'ONNl'K. 



hi"hlv "Conservative." Gen. Soloman am getting to be an old man, and having • them are many deserters frotn Price and held back among the reserves, watching 
onViscor.sin, Commanding the Third Di- held oflice under the Confederate rule, I ; Hindman, and who if they must fight, for Johnson. We have never yet had a 
vision, cccupies a champing residence should be imprisoned. This I could not ' choose to fight on the Union side. The ^ chance to retrieve ourselves." 
just above where I am boarding. Next | endure at my time of life." Not one of j Major of ihis regiment told me that they | I had touched a sore joint, and could 
1 above that is the head(iuartcrs°of Col. ! all these leading men of Little Rock re- 1 had now 800 men in camp, and that in 10 ^ only assure them, I believed the people 
Merrill, the famous leader of the "Mer- ! main. They were the red hot "fire- , days more they woidd have the 12 com- ; of Minnesota did not blame the "Third" 
rill's Horse," who occupies a part of the ' caters," who, because they had the panics full. This regiment, like the oth- ' for the one great misfortune of their ca- 
snacioiis arid elegant villa of the noted power, but against the will of two-thirds : er cavalry regiments before it, is oHicered [ rcer, and that thoy had as warm and true 



Oni 1KM¥ (0!1!;ESF0.iDE^( E 



THE WAR IN ARKANSAS. 



Albert Pike and *Daddy Price.'' 



Increase 



of Union Senti- 
ments. 



The Third Begiment Without a 



Flag. 



Corre«pondencp St. Paul I'ress. 

Livn.r. KocK, Ark., Dec. 5th, 1803. 
l.ITTI.K ItOCK. 

Pe.\r Press : — Little Rock is a beauti- 
ful town, situated on the south bank of 
the Arkansas Rive-, upon high, sloping 
land, and in the midst of noble native 
groves of oak and pine, it excels in pic- 
turesquencss and rural elegance most 
southern villages. They call it a cifi/ 
here. It had, I am told, before the re- 
bellion about three thousand inhabitants. 
The large number of its neat, white cot- 
tages, surrounded by tasteful grounds 
and choice shrubbery, not to mention its 
numerous cosily and almost palatial resi- 
dences, show that the town had few poor 
white people within its limits. Many 
weaUhv planters, whose cotton plan- 
tations were on the Ark:insas and Red 
River bottoms, reiided here, whose man- 
sions were located in the midst of exten- 
sive grounds, embellished with the choic- 
est v.arieties of semi-tropical shrubbery 
and flowers, and furnished within in a 
sLyle of sumptuous ina;^niticeuce. 

Here too, lived the noted politicians of 
the State, who had controlled its politi- 
cal destinies for twenty years precedings 
the war. 

Among the most charming residences 
I observed, was that of Gov. Ashley, 
now occupied by fJen. Steele and Staff 
as Headquarters. This is one of the ol- 
dest mansions of the town, built in 1825, 
has a spacious portico with a row of no- 
ble ionic columns. Its rich carpets 
yield to the tread of Union olhcers and 
old family pictures still ornament the 
walls. Another was that of Tom John- 
son, whose extensive grounds ornamen- 
ted with most elegant shrubbery and 
flowers, particularly arrested my atten- 
tion. A blue-coated sentinel, pacing 
back and fourth before the front gate, 
politely informed me that within was the 
head<iuarters of Gen. Davidson, Com- 
manding the First Division of the Army 
of Arkansas. 

CIIAXC.E OF COMMAKUEKS. 

The most modest, best, quiet, tasteful 
residence of old Gov. Rector, is now head- 
quarters of Gen. Carr Commanding the 
Second Division of this Army, lately oc- 
cupied by Gen. Kimball, who since I 
came here has taken his departure to an- 
other field of action in the army of the 
Cumberland. Gen. Kimball was a noble 
type of the Union soldiers ; he was a 
radical in politics, and believed in hang- 
ing traitors, and so he told the people of 
Little Rock, in a public speech the day 
before he left. His successor Gen. Carr, 
M a West Point aristocrat, and of course 



poet, lawyer and politician Alhert Pike. 

AI-ISEUT riKE. 

He is now a refugee m the 
mountains of Southern Arkansas, and is 
said to be occupying his hisure time in 
the composition of two works — one on 
the "-tVrt of War" and another on "Civil 
Govcrnmen'." which it is said he pro- 
poses to pubii.jj. SuiJiers who saw hiiu 
in the batth: of "lea Ridge," where he 
led the Cherokee Indians, whom he had 
seduced from their allegiance to the Gov- 
ernment of the LTnited States, describe 
him as a noble looking, white-haired man 
pf very imposing appearance. Cili/ens 
here tell luc that he proved an utter fail- 
ure as a military leader, and his irienils 
here did not deny that he ran like a cow- 
ard before the veterans of Curti<« and 
Sigel on that bloody day. Gen. Gantt, 
(of whom a word presently) said in my 
hearing that, "Pike*' was a man of e.x- 
traordinary genius, that he had seen hiiu 
durinji a term of Court, meet his brother 
lawers for an evening carousal — drink 
with them until the stoutest was "laid 
out" under the table, and then seat him- 
self and in the midst of their singing and 
reading, draw tip a nio?t intricate bill in 
chancery without an erasure or interlinea- 
tion. He would do the same thing in 
court, apparently undisturbed by the 
noise of a trial in progress ; but with all 
his genius and won.lerfal vcrsality of tal- 
ent, he was utterly wayward and disso- 
lute in his habits, and had spent half a 
dozen fortunes in reckless and prodigal 
excesses. 1 was told by citizens that 
Gen. Pike had pocketed a hundred thou- 
sand dollars, th<; fees ofa single law-suit. 
His wife, who is now here, occupying a 
part of their old resident c, has long lived 
retired from society, and is, as, I have 
been told by a lady who resides in the 
city, h:>ll-insane — a mild maniac, who 
"jr(f»(/c/tf" in her talk whenever the con- 
versations turns upon '■'■ Alhert,'''' as she 
still fondly calls him. To a friend of her 
husband who called upon her a few days 
since, anxious to aid her; she insisted 
that Gen. Steele had promised the day 
before to send her (o her husband, "Xo"" 
said the gentleman, Gen. Steele will per- 
mit you to go to your husband, but he 
has not the transportation that he can't 
spare to send you. "15 ut the Vi^n. prom- 
ised to send nie." She insisted, ami 
could not seem to understand the dis- 
tinction. "Oh ! well." bhe finally said, 
"Albert will conic back if they will let him 
publish his book, which abuses both sides, 
but si'les with neither" AH this inter- 
ested me deeply; and my imagination 
ran backward over the path of a life 
whose heart-sorrows malce up one of 
those tragic histories, which God alor.e 
has read. I recall my school-boy en- 
thusiasm for the young poet who wrote 
the "Hymn's to the God's" while a stu- 
dent at College; and which have beeti 
pronounced by an eminent scholar to be 
the most remarkable literary creations, 
considering the age of the writer, this 
country has produced. 

Oine young, highly educated, graced 
with personal accomplishments which en- 
tiled hiin to be called the "handsomest 
man in the Southwest," his magic touch 
liad swept the lyre of the gods, compell- 
ing abusy, dim-resouiuling nation to stop 
and listen in enraptured silence. Noic, an 
exile from his home, a traitor to his 
country, the pusilaniinous leader of red- 
handed savages against the valiant de- 
fenders of the Union and the old flag ; 
and, to cap the climax of his infinte dis- 
grace, deserting the savage victims of 
his own silver-tongued, satanic eloquence, 
and running like a coward in the day of 
battle : 

".So fallen ! so lost! the light withdrawn 

Which once he wore; 
The glory from his gray hairs gone ' 
Forevermore!" 

"Then pay the glory of old days 

To his (lead iramc ; 
Walk ba( kward with averted gaze 

And hide the shame .'" 

"PADDY PKICE." 

The room which the Colonel and my- 
self now occupy was occupied by G?n 
Price in person for some weeks before he 
left Little Rock. Poor Price! Poor 
**Daddy Price,'''' as his soldiers used to 
love to call him. Leaving this spacious 
carpeted room with its round, marble- 
topped table, upon which I am now wri- 
ting, its spacious fire-place, its antique 
French bedstead and its broad windows 
looking in three directions — up and down 
the rFver, and towards the blulFs beyond 
it — where the artillery of Gen. Steele 
thundered on the heels of his flying col- 
umns — poor Sterling's, quitting these 
comfortable ipiarters was, so far as heard 
from his last evacuation. His first was 
made at Boouville in the summerof ISGl. 
A terrible disease cling i to him. The 
Mississippi "quick step" must be chronic 
with him by this time, and must soon 
quite carry him off. 

THE ItlCBEI. CAUSE IIOPJ£LEf*S. 

This house was the residence and prop- 
erty of Judge Ringo, a Supreme Judge 
in the Confederate Courts of the State. 
He, as well as many others whom I have 
mentioned, left with Price. The same 
Judge R. said to a Union citizen ten days 
before the Union army came, "Price will 
abandon this city. The Federal army 
will occupy it. Our cause is lost. The 
Confederacy is a failure. I Lave a plan- 
tation on the Mississippi, yet, for all my 
property and my negroes, which my son 
has succeeded in hiding in the swamps, 
I would stay here and abandon a hopeless 
struggle were it not for one thing. I 



of the citizens of Arkansas who were for 
the Union, plunged the State into the 
abyss of disHuion and revolution. 

liUNNIXa TO TEXAS. 

Since Gen. Curtis took Helena they 
have been running their slaves off to 
Texas. In most cases they have taken 
their families with them. In some in- 
stances their families still remain here. 
Mrs. W., the wile of the gentleman with 
whom we are boarding, mentioned to me 
a few days since having called upon the 
wife of one of these refugee traitors. 
She found the lady plunged in bitter 
grief. Before the war she had e\ey 
luxury that wealth could furnish ; house 
servants to ilo her every bidding and 
ample leisure for all the demands of so- 
cial life. Now she was alone in her large 
and elegant but lon«'ly house, without a 
servant (all gone to Texas) with a young 
child two months old, and trying to do 
her own work. Mrs. W. asiured me 
that, secessionist as the lady was, she 
could not help pitying her from the bot- 
tom of her heart. Probably three-fourths 
of all the .*laves in Arkansas are now in 
Texas. Abandoned plantations abound 
on every hand. Best estates will fall 
into ruin and negleirt unless rescued by 
Xorthern enterprise and industry from 
this condition. Verily the punishment of 
the traitors has already begun. "The 
mills of the gods grind slowly, but thei/ 
i/ri/id.'''' 

.ll'DOE MIRPIIY. 

I cannot tell you with what interest I 
looked ui)ontlie one prominent Union man 
of Little Bock — old Judge IVlurphy — who 
clung fast to his integrity against the 
wildest blasts of the blending sirocco 
that swept over Arkansas, as well as the 
whole South. He was a member of the 
State Convention that passed the ordi- 
nance of secession. Alore than one third 
of its members were at lirst opposed to 
the ordinance, but the oulsido j)ressure 
became so strong and the threats of the 
majority so fierce and bloody when the 
tiiial vote was taken, the opposition was 
cowed. An overwhelming majority voted 
aye. A few on the same sido voted 
under a public protest. One man stood 
up, venerable for yea^s and virtues, and 
amid shouts from the mob that surround- 
ed the capitol, "i)ut him out I" "hang 
him !"' df flared with emphasis — "I vote 
no !" lie says that at the time he cast 
his vote he had no expectation of ever 
leaving the capitol square alive, but so 
lielp him God he could not do otherwise. 
He has lived in Little Rock ever since, 
and as tiie war progressed became the 
head of a secret Union organization 
throughout the State. He is now daily 
consulted by Gen. Steele as to who are 
or are not true L'nion men, when they 
apply to him for "protection papers." 
The Judge is also currently spoken of as 
Provisional Governor of the State, until 
the re-admission of the State into the 
Union. 

UXION CONVENTION. 
Looking to this a convention of uncon- 
ditional Union men has been called by 
leadinii Union citizens of the northwest- 
ern part of the State, to meet at Little 
Rock on the eighth day of January. 18'JL 

CIIAXdE OF SENTIMENT. 

The Mien foremost in this move are 
Radical Union anti-slavery men, more 
radical and violent in their hatred of 
Slavery than the masses of the North lo- 
day. As a C aptain in the 3d Arkansas 
Cavalry, and who had been a refugee in 
the mountains for 18 months, said to me, 
" Before the war, we had heard but one 
side of the Slavery question. The poli- 
ticians and stump orators all talked in 
favor of it. Now we sec the thing in a 
diflerent light. Now we know that Sla- 
very made the war, which has cost the 
most of us all we are worth. We have 
felt Slavery now, and are" bound to kill it. 
It has got to be put out of our State 
Constitution ; and the vile Secessionists 
that are sneaking back to Little Rock, 
and professing to be Union men, had 
better find a home further ofl". They 
can't stay there. Their day of reckoning 
is coming, and is closer by than many of 
them think for." 

Another Captain in the same regiment 
said to me, "Once let us get our men 
armed and drilled a little, and then if 
Marmakike will give us a fight, we'll 
show him how Union men can fight. My 
men have old scores to settle with him, 
and I fear to think what they will do to 
him." 

This man, who was a plain, tough 
fisted farmer, told me that the first seces- 
sion speech he ever heard, was by an old 
Methodist preacher, and when his neigh- 
bors asked him what he thought of it, 
said he, " I told them if they got seces^ 
sion, they'd get it Hell-wards. From 
that day I was a hunted man ; they con- 
scripted me into the army. I left it. Ihe 
Provost ^Marshal arrested me. I escaped 
and took to the Mountains, where 07ie 
man who knows the passes can defend 
himself against ten. I collected a com- 
pany of 74 refugees like myself, and 
joined Col. Cloud, when he came down 
with his regiment from Missouri, and at 
Dordasville 400 of us drove 800 of Mar- 
niaduke's men into, and across the Ar- 
kansas River." 

THE THIRD ARKANSAS CAVALRY. 

I visited the Headquarters of the 3rd 
Arkansas Cavalry, and found them a fine 
body of men. They are mostly from the 
mountain counties of the State, where the 



directly by the War Department, upon 
the recommendation of Gen. Steele, from 
the rank and file of the volunteer service 
in his army, and afttr a thorough exam- 
ination as to character, fitness and ability. 
Under such oflicers as the 3rd Arkansas 
Cavalry has, and whom I am jiroud to 
know, Arkansans will go gladly to vic- 
tory or death, and will I believe, within 
a year's time, sweep from their fair State 
every armed traitor. 

While visiting the 3rd Cavalry, I heard 
a crowd of them singing, near the ]SI;ijor's 
quarters. The men were singing with 
great earnestness a patriotic song to an 
old religious tune. I went out to listen 
but only caught this line of the last verse, 

" To e.ise our consciences, 
We'll tight for Lil)erty." 

It stirred my heart with deep emotion 
to hear a libertv song in the heart of Ar- 
kansas — sung, too, with high onthusiasm 
by men of ilv.i South, on the soil of their 
native State. 

The Major told me the song was com- 
posed by a Sergeant of the Regiment 
while he was a L'nion refugee iu the moun- 
tains, where he had lived secreted for 
more than a year. A Union Song, in- 
spired 

" The mountain air of I,il«rty !" 
and sung by citizens of Arkansis, in 
camp, on one of the oldest slave planta- 
tions of this region. Verily, verily tiiis 
Star cannot be lost from the Federal 
galaxy. I thought it at the moment — I 
believe it now — Arkansas will come hark 
of its OMVJ accord. AVillingnvss to enlist 
in the army, to fight for country, home 
and property, as against traitors, is the 
best test of loyalty. 

C'OI.OUEl* SOLDIERS. 

I am surprised at wh.at I see and hear. 
While on my w.iy here, at Helena, 1 saw 
negro soMiers drilling, and, for raw re- 
cruits, making a good appearance. The 
squad of .soldiers that escorted the train 
this morning from this city to Duval's 
Blufl". were blacks, of th.e blackest dye — 

"God's image cut in ebony" — 
fine athletic fellows, in bright new uni- 
forms. 

T have just met the Lieut. Col. of the 
4th Arkansas Infairtry, Co. I), (African 
descent.) He was an oilicer of intelli- 
gence, antl highly elated with the succcs.-; 
they hjid met with in raising their regi 
ment. He told me that after getting 
permission from Gen. Steele to go to 
work, which was granted with some hesi- 
tation, he and some brother oflicers es- 
tablished their camp on the Benton Road, 
a few miles from Litile Rock, and in four 
weeks recruited 80') men — said they had 
one negro who was fit for Regimental 
Adjutant, and several who would make 
first rate Company Sergeants. Many of 
the men he described as being finely 
formed, athletic fellows, who would make 
the finest soldiers in the world. 

This Regiment is now at work upon the 
fortifications going up around this city, 
and Gen. S. is delighted at this accession 
to his army. 

Very soon there will be six or seven 
thousand Arkansas troops in the field on 
our side, and more to join. 

THE THIRD REGIMENT. 

The Third Minnesota Regiment is the 
crack Regiment of this army. It is 
quartered, men as well as oflicers, in the 
State Capitol. In conjunction with an 
Illinois Regiment, it does guard duty for 
the whole city. It holds drills and dress 
parades in the Capitol Square. Its dress- 
parades attract a great many visitors. It 
is the best drilled Regiment in this army 
corps. Its Regimental band, consisting 
of fifteen, made up of fifers, drummers 
and buglers, in ccpial numbers, a creation 
of Col. Lester's, is the finest I have ever 
heard. I go as often as every other day 
to listen to their blood-stirring music, and 
look on their brilliant parades. 

I am proud to say here, "I am from 
Minnesota." I left St. Louis, guarded by 
Minnesota boys. Here I have come over 
iiOO miles from St. Louis to find the Capi- 
tol of this' mighty bowie-knile and alli- 
gator State, guarded and patrolled by 
Minnesota boys. Their Col. (Andrews) 
is commandant of the Post. One of its 
captains (Rice) is Judge Advocate of 
a general Court Martial in session hero. 
Another of its captains (Hodges) has 
charge of the Penitentiary and the rebels 
incarcerated there. A private (William 
Alvah) Co. H, is Assistant Telegraph 
Operator at this post, and is earning $30 
per month. 

Lieut. Col. Mattson, now in command 
of the regiment, is a gallant and popular 
oflicer, of whom Minnesota will do well 
to be proud and to honor. 

One day whde I stood admiring the 
regiment on parade, I glanced at the 
flag-stall on the capitol, and seeing no 
"stars and stripes'' floating there, said, 
"You ought to have your regimental flag 
run up there." A sli;,ht flush over his 
face reluked my stupidity, as he replied, 
" We lost our flag at Murfreesboro." 
"But," saitfl, "it is a shame that the la- 
dies of Minnesota have never sent the 
'Third' another flag." Another who was 
standing by remarked, smiling, "I sup- 
pose the Third Regiment is not in very 
good odor at home." I guessed what he 
meant, and said, with some earnestness, 
"The 'Third' has redeemed the past ; it 
ought to have a new flag." The first sol- 
dier to whom I had spoken, added quiet- 
ly, "Many of the boys say they never 
will accept a flag until they win one, — 



' friends at homo as any other regiment 
from our noble State. 



6wcttlfaf s fiioUtttttt. 



HOLIDAY GOODS 



AT 



I find my old friend Dr. Wedge, sur- 
geon of the regiment, is beloved by every 
man in it. And see what a truly intelli- 
gent and faithful surgeon can accomplish- 

From the day the regiment left Saint 
Paul in January List, until it landed at 
Helena in August, it lost but one man by 
sickness. I venture to assert there is no 
other regiment in the South can show 
such a record. Consiiler too that the 
regiment spent the early summer lying on 
the banks of that River of Death— the 
Yazoo. The2."Jth Wisconsin lay beside it 
and had to have a detail from the "Third" 
to bury its dead ! This regiment also 
went to Helena, and when Gen. Steele's 
expedition started, could report but 10 
men fit for duty, wliile the " Third" re- 
ported 400. True, the 2oth was a new 
reciment, V>ut when it went South last 
Spring, it h.ad twice as many men as the 
" Third." 

Said a high Medical oflu'cr in Little 
Rock to me, "Dr. Wedge stands A No. 
1 , as a Surgeon in the army." And a 
private of the " Third" said that if a man 
of the regiment was sick, tliere was a 
" I'lg fuss" until he was well again. 

If every S'.irgeon in the army had been 
thus faithful to the high behests of duty, 
they might have saved tens of thousands 
of noL>le lives. 

WINTER QUARTERS. 

This whole arinv Iving about Little 
Rock, nearly 2< 1,000 men, is in log houses, 
with board roofs, many of them the very 
pink of neatness, and all built by the 
men and ofli -ors within the last month or 
two, all of them with board fire-places 
and fine chimneys, built of unburnt brick, 
made by the soldiers and dried in the 
sun. It is an astonishing sight, this city 
without a city. If Frank Leslie's .special 
artist wants a field for his genius let him 
go to the soldiers log city that girdles 
Little Rock. 

I have a thousand things more to tell 
you, must stop short ofl", or 1 shall not 
get b:\ck to St, Louis to welcome Santa 
Claus. It is only a littl' journey of 850 
miles. 

A Happy New Year to you, dear old 
Pres.s, and to all your little Presslings. 
Yours, 

NORWOOD. 




GREENLEAF'S. 



/^ A R D . 

We will offer [forCOdajsJ our entire stock of 

MILLINERY, 

at from 20 to 25 por cent, reduction ; • 

SHAWLS, CLOAKS, CLOAKINGS 

AND FANCY ARTICLES, 

10 to 15 per cent. 

DKESS AND HOUSEKEEPIXG GOODS, 

at Eastern prices. 

Those Goods \\ ere delayed until too late, and 
now must be s'aiighttn-d to raise nion y. It 
would pay any lady to keep llifni o\or. The' Bon- 
net or Hat that cost $'0 yesterday, nad cheap at 
that, will bo $7.5) to $8 to dav. This Is worth 
saving. You can pay your dollar with 75 or sOc. 
We most respectluily Nolicit from oor former 
custom->rs and ladi-^stliroiipliout ihe .^'tatc. Our 
stcre is below Day & J-^nkN l>rug Store, Third 
street, St. raul, Miunssota, wlier^ the ^^ ax Fig- 
ure is in tlie Window. 

d c54 Mks. J. J. DUGAN. 



FOK 90 DAYS! 

BARB BARGAINS 



IX 



Union fires have burned brightly since j Col. Griggs tried to get us a show at 
the outbreak of the war. Mixed with ' Vicksburg, but could not. We were 



May bo made at 

r»^o. 13« Thircl Street, 

SAIISTT PAUti. 

We offer at reduced prices to close out the stock : 
%iO pcjs. rreneh Mleirinos, 

At $1.00to $1.50, worth $1.13to;|1.75. 

lO pes. IPlaid I^epps, 

At 75o, worth 00c. 

100 pes. MOHAIR 

DRESS GOODS 

At 36 to COc, worth 40 to 75c. 

lOO pes. I^K^IIVTS, 

At 20c, worth 25c. 

50 PIECES 

COTTON FLANNELS, 

At 35 to 55c, with 40 to 00c. 

SO pes. detvim:^. 

At 30 to 50c, worth 40 to 05c. 

500 POIJISrDS 

WOOLLEN YARN, 

At $1.25, worth i>1.50. 

IjOOO I^oixncls 

WOOLLEN YAE]^, 

At $1.50, worth $1.75. 
A FULL LINE OK ALL OTHER 

DOMESTIC GOODS, 

At F*roportionate Price??. 

In hosiery, 

GLOVES, 

WHITE GOODS, 

AND 

EMBROIDERIES OR NOTIONS, 
We -will not be Undersold. 

Kemenibcr the rule, 
ALL GOODS GLAUAXTEED AS REPRE 

SENTEO, OR NO SALE, 
And the place. 

No. 132 Third-St., St. Paul. 
0-A.TKICA.I^T & CO. 

di'clf Im 



"DENJAMIN S. BULL, 

WHOLKSALE AND RETAIL DEALER IN 

CROCKERY, CHINA AND GLASS WARE, 

narrison's Stone Block, Minneapolis, Min., 

Keeps constantly on hand a large assortment of 
the above named goods, eltlier at 

^Vholesale or Retail. 

Orders solicited. nollfimd^w 



SOLXO SILVJEXft W ARE 

Warranted Equal to Coin. 

Talkie Spoons, 

DESERT SPOONS, TEA SPOONS, 

Solid Stiver Table and Tea 
liLlVIVES^, 

,TABLE FOBKS, DESERl FORES, 

PICKLE FORKS, 

SARDINE rOKKS, 

CHEESE FORKS, 

PIE KNIVES. 

CAKE KNIVES, 

BUTTER KNIVES, 

CIIKESE KNIVES, 

SOUP LADIES, 

SUGAR SPOONS, 
SUGAR SIFTERS, 

12 doz. Silver Napkin Rings, 

JELLY SPOONS, 

BEHItY .SPOONS, 

OYSTER LADLES, 

MUSTARD SPOONS, 
SALT .SPOONS, 
I 'JE CREAM SPOONS, 

EGG SPOONS. GOLD LfNED, 

PRESERVE SPOONS, 

SILVER CUP AND GOBLETS, 
TEA STRAINERS, 
TOBACCO DO.X'ES, 
CARD CASES, 

SPECTACLE CASES, 
PORTE MOSXIES, 
SILVER SPECTACLES, 
SALT CELLAIi:^^, 
FRUIT KNIVES, 

Child's Knives, Forks & Spoons, 

ALL PURE SILVER, 

A.t Crreeiileaf s. 

A largo assortment of 

SILVER PLATED WARE, 
At GS-reenleaf *s. 

THE AMERICAN WATCHES, 

A large lot, in Gold and Silver casts, adjusted to 
heat and cold. Warranted good Time- 
keepers. Sold cheap at 

lOO Cases 

Setlx Thomas' C^loclis 

AT GREENLEAFS. 

50 kinds of otlier Mialcer s' Clocks 

AT GREENLEAFS. 

150 VARIETIES OF POCKEl CUTLERY 
AT GREENLEAF'S. 

A full| line of IVORY TABLE CUTLERY, 

AT GllEEN LEAF'S. 

COME AND SEE THE DIAMOND GOODS 

At Greenleafs. 

The largest assortment of 

Gold and Silver Watches in 
the State, 

AT GREENLEAF'S. 

DIAMOND, OPAL, PEARL, RUBY, 
EMERALD, RINGS & PINS, 

A-t Oreenl ear's 
ONYX JEWELRY, 

AT GREENLEAF'S. 

SOLID GOLD BRACELETS 

GOLD THIMBLES, 

GOLD NECKLACES, 

GOLD CHAINS, o targe lot, 

At Grreenles^r's. 

SOLID GOLD RINGS, BUCKLES, SLEEVE 

BUTTONS, STUDS, KEYS, SEALS, &c., 

AT SVHOLESALE OR RETAIL, 

AT OREENILEAF'S. 

Any pattern of 

MADE Al GREENLEAFS. 

Any pattern of Gold Jewelry ma lufactured or 
re-8ct,at GREi;NLEAF'd. 

EverythiMg to be found In a first class Jewelry 
Store, can bu found at GREENLEAF'S. 

GREENLEAF'S Goods were purchased for 
cash, the reason why, you all know . 

All Goods warranted precisely at represented, 
AT GREIiNLEAF'S. 

as- Cash paid for old Gold and Silver, at 

GREENLEAF'S. 

Watches and Jewelry repaired in he best man- 
nei,at GREINLEAF'S. 

Store in Greenleaf 's Block, 

Opposite Concert Hall, near the ]»08t-0ffice. 



fl. 



THII^D STITEET, 



HOODS, SONTAGS & NIBIAS, 



BALl^lOR^r. 



AND 



HOOF^ SKIRTS, 



JUST RECEIVED BY 



L. C. 



BURT, 
4 6 




THIRD STREET. 

oc20-ty 

POLLOCK, 

DONALDSON AND 

O G D E N , 

DBALBR8 IH 

CTliina, Grlass Sc Eaj-tlien 
"Ware, 

WITH AH ES1JLE8S VARrSTT OF 

Housekeeping Articles. 

It Is the design of this House to supply HOUSE 

KEEPERS with every possible want. 
UNION BLOCK, No. 115 Third-st.. 

COR. THIRD AND ROBERT-STS., MIN. 

]e5-d&w 



r>. C 0»EE]V]L.EAF. 

dec4-lm _^____^ 

THRESH FRUITS. 

Peaches, Strawberries, and Bhckberries. in 
cans. For sale by, J, I. BI AUMONT. 



s 



TEAM ENGINES AND BOILERS, 



New and second hand, for sale extremely low, 
at the Pioneer Foundry. __ 

aull OILMAN 4 CO. 



L BEACH & CO., 
• Manufacturers of superior 

SOAJP AlXr> CAIVDLE8, 

Eagle- St., near Upper Levee. 

HIGHEST MARKET PRICE PAID FOR 

Lard, Tallo^v*^ and Greas© 

L. BUACH. [Setve-lyd&wl A. W. PHARSOW 

TJNITED STATES 
PENSION AOENCnr 

AT 

ST. PAUL, - - - MINNESOTA. 

Office in Rogers' Block, 3d-8t., near the Bridge. 
Office hours from 8 to 10 a. m. 
All letters to the olBco mu*t inclose stamps to 
pay return postage. ROBERT P. LEWIS, 
nol-dtw»wly Pension Agent. 

T3IAN0S AND MELODEONS. 
F. O. WTLr>ER, & CO., 

Deal<»rs in Piano-Fortes, Mclodoons, Harmoni- 
ums, Cabinet Organs, Sliect Music, Music Books, 
&c., &c.. No. ZW I hird-st.,cornerof St. Peter-Pt., 
St. Paul, Minnesota. Agents for the celebrated 
A. M. McPhail & Co.'s Star and Grand Scale Pi- 
anos, Al?o, the Prrlor Gem, 

Mr. Wilder is a Piano Maker, and has been in 
the business over 20 years, and will sell nothing 
but flrst-class instruments. Every instrument 
will be warranted, and all Pianos sold by the lirm 
will be kept in tune one year free of charge, if 
within a reasonable distance. 

49- Pianos and Melodeons tuned and repaired.. 

Lesson given on the Piano and Melodeon. 
no20-<fikwly 



O. CURTIS, 

Geieral Insurance Agent, 

OFFICE IN 

Tliompson's Bloclc. 

decl8-tf 

pRINCE & GO'S. 

IMPROVED 

MELOD^EON SI 

■WARRANTED FOR FIVE YEARS. 



The oldest establishment in the United States, 
employing 200 men, and finishing eighty instrn- 
ments per woek. 

MANUFACTOKY CORNER Of MARYLAKD A»D 
NIAGARA STREETS, 

BXJEFAJL.O, IV. Y. 

WHOLF.SALE DEPOTS. 

47 Fulton street New York 

83 Lake street Chicago 

WHOLESALE AGENTS. 

Henry Tollman fc Co Boston, Mats 

W. F. Colburn Cincinnati.C 

Balmer & Weber St. Louis, M( 

James Bellak Philadelphii 

A. Couse Detroit, Mid 

Ph. P. Werlein New Orleam 

A. &S. Nordheimer Toronto C. ^ 



Persons unacquainted with the Melodeon ftni • 

„8 history, will — , . - ,. 

neers and leading manufacturers, not only in tn( ' 



ar in mind that we are the pl« 



ents are now in use not only in the Uni 
es and Canada, but also in Europe, Asi*. 
South America and the West ludi***, an«i 



United States, but in the world. We commence* 
the manufacture of Melodeons in the fall of th( 
year 1S47, and t^ince that time have finished an< 
sold TWENTY-SEVEN THOUSAND. Thesi 
instrumo 
ted States 

Africa, South America — .. . — 

from all these quarters we have the most flatter 
tag testimonials of the high estimation In whicJ 
ihey are held. 

AT ALL INDUSTRIAL EXHIBITIONS THE>I 
HAVE INVARIABLY BEEN AWARDED 
THE HIGHEST PREMIUM WHKN- 
■VER EXHIBITED IN COMPE- 
TITION WITH OTHERS. 

We shall take pleasure in forwarding by midl, . 
(at our own expense), our Illustrated Catalogue, 
in which every Instrument we manufacture is 
fully describ«<l and illustrated by elegant engra- • 
vings. 

All] 



Melodeons of our manufacture, either sold 
by us or dealers in any part of the United States 



part otl lie Li 
or Ca.;ada, are warronted to be perfect in every 



respect, and should any repairs be necessary be- 
fore the exuiration ot five years from date of 
sale, wc hold ourselves ready and willingto make 
ihfi same free of charge, provided the iajury is 
not caused by accident or ot>sign. 

Agents for the sale of our ift.loJeons may be 
found in all the principal towns of the United - 
States and Canada. 

Address either 
GEO. A. PRINCEfcCO,, BnflklcN. Y. „ 
GEO. A. PRINCE t CO., 87 Fniton-st.. N. Y. 
GEO..A. PRINCE k CO., 4:< Lake-st., Chicago. 

Or either of the above Wholesale Agents. 

jia- For sale by MUNGER BROS., Agi-nts. ^ ■ 
Paul, Minnesota. apr-jy-dAwlyw 

T30B SLED SHOES, $3.00 per sett. 

Don't pay t4.00 a sett for them, when 
you can get them for $3.00 a sett at the 

Pioneer Foundry. ^tt m a T«r * r<i 

no29-dfcwlmo OILMAN fcUO. 



"PRESERVED FRUITS. 
°F^?S?by.'^' '^PP'"j.^°ffiu&NT"• 



- 



(V^>»>'«^>*"^ 



'«.- 



rrawafsftr-T-jr-srl 



41. 



Wm ii^iifc. 



. .. . I r, .» j »- 



t5sr 



•4^^ 



41 



• JLt..M - 



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■ I ill II 



\ THE 



SAINT PAUL 




DAILY PRESS. 



VOLUME IV. 



RATTsTT I>A.UIL., SUNDj^Y. JA-NXJ^RY 3, 1864. 



NUMBER 2. 



^U faint f aul ^xt$^ 



SAINT PAUL. SUNDAY, JAN. 3. 



Our dispatches are so light as to ren- 
der a summary almosit unnecessary. Our 
cxchuiigL's show that no events of import- 
ance ai-e transpiring in any section ol the 
country. 

Tjik Wilmington blockade, which has 
beim reported so inellicient, seems to 
have become invigorated. In addition 
to tlie testimony of the rebel correspond- 
ence, published a day or two since, we 
have the announcement of the return to 
Bermuda of steamers which have been 
unsuccessful in reaching that port. The 
last outlet of the Confederacy is thus 
cut ofl". 

Wuii-K we have been experiencing se- 
vere cold weather, the'people below have 
been suirering from a tremendous snow 
storm, which elTectually blockades com- 
munication. 

Gold 51 1-8. 

. » « # » ♦ 

With characteristic unfairness, tie 

English pap J rd regard President Lincoln's 

Message, and amnesty proclamation as 

impracticable, while they consider JelF. 

Davis' Kmtnt as " showing no signs of 

yielding on the part of the South." 

Tiif London limes looks upon the 

nies.sage as warlike, and says tleelTectof 

t!ie whole document resembles that of the 

last battle : 

The ofRr of peace is on terms that cannot be 
aci-eptcd. The whole question still ilependson 
the fortunes of war. It may be gratifying to 
tlie North Id be assured that the Government 
isstDujjand sueces-fiil enough to otfcr au 
uuui'jstv, but it is evident tliat Lincoln autiei- 
pate? no paciric result, nor does the Secretary 
of tlie Treasury, who looks forward to two 
vc.irs' war expenditures. Commercial circles 
in New York appear to share his misj,'iving, 
the premium on gold having risen nnder the 
proclamation. 

Win is "the offer of peace on terms 
that caimot be accepted?' From the 
limes'' stand-point to renounce treason is 
considered degrading. To ask rebels to 
return to their allegiance is exacting too 
nmoh. They should be asked to take 
command of the government, lionized and 
crouched to in the most approved stj le ol 
the art, if we desire to suit the Times. 

Fortunately t!ie fact of England's ap- 
proval or disapproval of any of our meas- 
ures has come to be of little significance 
in this country, and the course of the 
Times is of no consequence whatever. At 
the commencement of the war, sympathy 
with the North was withheld because no 
evidence of an intention to free the slaves 
was given, but the mouieut the Emanci- 
pation rroclaniation was issued, the hor- 
rors of a servile insurrection arose, and 
tears of sj nipathy were shed for the bo- 
gus Confederacy. 

The next move was a standing lamen- 
tation because they could see no "begin- 
ning of the end," but as soon as the oti'er 
of a pardon comes, it is impracticable, 
and cannot be accepted. We can at 
least give England the credit for consis- 
tency in aiding, with marked uniformity, 
the rebel cause, and next to JelT. Davis 
and his leading minions, no person would 
be so deeply grieved by the ultimate tri- 
umph of the Union arms, as our "neu- 
tral" friends (?) "over the sea." 



THS liBlCr HIlirMESOTA i.Beis- 
I^ATURE- 

As this is the last issue of the Press prior 
to the holding of the eaucusses of the mem- 
bers of th« Legislature for the purposes of or- 
ganization, which will probably be held to. 
morrow evening, we re-publish for their con- 
venience, the following list of members, with 
their political classification. 

Republicans and Union men are designated 
in roman; Democrats or Copperheads in 
talics. Members of the Senate holding over 
arc indicated by a *; members of either 
[louse who have been members of any former 
legislature are indicated by af. 

SENATE. 

First District — Part of Kamscy county- 
Edmund Rice.f 

Second Distict — Washington, Chisago &c 
— John McKusick.* 

Thiud District— Steams, Morrison, St. 
Louis, &c — /. P. Wilson. 

Fourth District— St. Anthony, Benton, 
Anoka, &c— J. S. Pillsbury, [to lill the vacan- 
cy occasioned by the resignation of David 
Hcaton.] 

Fifth District— Henepin West— Dorilus 
Morrison. 

Sixth District^— Carver, Wright, &c— 
Charles A. Wanner.* 

Seventh District— Dakota county— D. F. 
Langley. 

Eighth District— Rico county— John 
Berry.* 

Ninth District — Goodhne county — J. A. 

Thaeher.t 

Tenth District — Wabashaw county — R. 
Ottman.* 

Eleventh District — Winona county — D. 
S. NoRTON.t [Independent personal.] 

Twelfth DisxRiCT^Olmstcd county — J. 
V. Daniels.* 

Thirteenth District- Houston county- 
Daniel Cameron. 

Foiuteentu Distict— Fillmore county- 
Luke Miller.* 

Fifteenth District— Mower and Dodge— 
B. D. Sprague.t 

Sixteenth District— Steele, Waseca and 
Freeborn— F. S. Stevens, [vice M. A. Dailey, 
resigned.] 

Seventeenth District— Blue Barth and 
Le Sueur — /. J. Porter.f 

Eighteenth District. — Scott County — 
Isaac Lincoln.* 

Nineteenth District. — Nicollet, Sibley, 
&c.,— H. A. Swift.t 

Twentieth District.— Faribault, Brown, 
&c.— D. G. Shillock.* 

Twenty-First District. — Part of Ramsey 
county — John Nicols. 



M. 



THE TEXAS EXPEDITION, 



Gen. Dana in Command. 



ENTHUSIASTIC RECHPTION OF GOV. 
HAMILTON. 



» ♦ ♦ » ♦ 



The general impression has prevailed 
that the draft would be postponed because 
Congress failed to amend the Conscrip- 
tion Act, before the holidays. "What- 
ever the final result may be no such post- 
ponjment has yet been ordered, and if 
it should not reach Captain Saunders to- 
morrow, the wheel will commence its 
revolutions Tuesday morning. 

It IS now too laie for a notification of 
postponement to reach Capt See, before 
the fatal day, so that the Southern Dis- 
trict will be drafted for the second, 
time though this latter operation may 
prove final. 

. »■»♦>♦ 



HOUSE OF REPRESENTATI'VES. 

I. J. P. Kidder.t R. H. Fitz. 

II. AnscU Smith.t Jesse H. Soule, R. R. 
Henry. 

III. R. M. Richardson,f C. A. Ruffee, W. 
T. Rifjby. 

IV. Jared Benson,t Jonathan Ferrln. 

V. W. H. H. Graham, John A. Cole- 
man. 

VI. W. G. Butler.t J. S. Letford.f Henry 
Hill. 

VIL K. xV. Guiteau, P. Van Auktn. 

VIII. A. N. Nonrse, A. H. BuUis. 

IX. S. S. Grannis, J. M. Gates. 

X. J. J. McKay. 

KI. E. S. Youinans.t Thos. P. Dixon. 

XII. J. P. Moulton,t Thomas II. Arm- 
strong. 

XIII. Thos. H. ConifT. 

XIV. S. A. Hunt, M. J. Foster.t B- 
Whittemore. 

XV. Royal Crane, Augustus Barlow. 

XVI. Philo Woodruflf,t J. L. Gibbs. 

XVII. /. A. Wisv>ell,\ R. BuUers,\ John 
L. Meagh/sr. 

XVIII. Hugh Johnson. — 

XIX. Wm. nuey,f Samt^l Coffin, 

XX. J. A. LaUmer. 

XXI. A. R. Kiefer. 

B EC APIT ITLATION . 

Senate — Republicans and Unionists, 16; 
Democrats, 4; Independent Personal, 1. 

Republican Union majority in the Senate, 12. 

House of Representatives — Republicans and 
Unionists, 31 ; Democrats, 11. 

Republican Union majority in the House, 30. 
Whole Republican Union strength in joint 

Convention, . • - 47 

Whole Democratic strength, do - 15 

Republican Union majority on joint ballot, 32 

Wc may classify the political elements 

of the next Legislature more accurately as fol- 

lows * 

Repub- Dem- Indp't 

lican. Union, ocrat. Personal. 
14 2 4 1 

30 1 11 

44 3 15 1 



Correspondence of the New Orleans Era. 

Brown8Vili.k, December 8. — With 
the appearance ol the troops here, confi- 
dence returns to all loyal Americans and 
and to the Mexican authorities and peo- 
ple. Order is restored, honesty appreci- 
ated, and villainy banished. 

The houses abandoned, which include 
nearly all in the town, are occupied. The 
country for one hunndred miles back and 
to above Roma, about two hundred miles 
u{) the river, is visited by our scouts, and 
rebel property, wherever found, taken 
into our possession . Three steamers be- 
longing to rebel owners, but covered by 
a sham sale to a Mexican citizen, were 
secured by negotiation, and are now in 
(lovernment employ, where it is hoped 
they will remain. 

COL. DAVIS TAKKS A SHORT TRIP INTO 
TUE INTERIOR. 

Col. Davis, of the First Texas Cavalry, 
returned from up the river two days 
since. A large number of mules, horses 
and beeves returned with him, having en- 
tered the United States service at vari- 
ous rebel ranches on the route. These 
patriotic animals came in laden with for- 
age for "future usefulness." A lar/e lot 
of cloth, ol significent gray color, and 
also considerable cotton, were taken. 
This is merely a "forced loan" from the 
unsettled estate of the "C. S. A." "King 
Cotton," when liberated, is as proud as 
ever, but he is "sadly out at the elbows." 

DEPARTURE OF GKX. BANKS. 

The departure of Gen. Banks was 
much regretted, but it is not much felt, 
as the command is efficiently controlled 
by his able representative, Maj. Gen. 
Dana, who is, "in all good word and 
work dilligent in season and out of sea- 
son." 

WHY THE REBELS DISLIKE GEN. DANA. 

He is not at all liked by some of our 
"deluded Southern brethren," who call 
him another "Beast Butler." 

It is true the General has made war on 
women and children, by requiring a too 
flippant rebel lady to take the oath. He 
has refused to discuss the rights of a vio 
lent rebel, who desires to live here in the 
prosecution of his business without swear- 
ing allegiance. He has returned a present, 
with the caustic reply that, coming from 
a traitor, the bribe lor favor was too small 
to purchase a general officer of the United 
States ; and he has fined an officious med- 
dler of " itinerant politics" — for what 
ofiTense is not known, as on the same day 
the man advised a party to refuse the na- 
tional currency, got drunk, insulted our 
courteous Provost Maisbal, Capt. At- 
man, was kicked out of doors by Capt. 
Speed of the Fiist Texas cavalry. It is 
presumed he was fined for getting kicked 
— while retreating. 

GOV. HAMILTON. 

The arrival of Gen. A. J. Hamilton, 
Mditary Governor of Texas, gives joy 
and spirit to the army and enthtisiam to 
every Texan. He is not merely popular ; 
he IS viewed with enthusiasm and attach- 
ment by the people of this State who are 
loyal. 

COURTESIES TO GOV. 8ERNA. 

Gov. Hamilton and his staff oflScers 
visited Got. Serna, of Tamaulipas, at 
Matamoras. three days since, upon invi- 
tation, as Gens. Banks and Dana had 
done a few days before, and were received 
as they were, with a salute of fifty guns 
and handsomely entertained by the Gov- 
ernor at his house. Got. Serna wel- 
comed Got. Hamilton in a speech, to 
which Gov. Hamilton repped. 

Interesting Insight into Rebeldonx 

EXTRACTS FROM SOUTHERN LETTERS 
AND PAPERS. 



sights I witness daily in consequence of this 
cruel war; not a family here but is suffering 
the very depths of bitterness, save the Adger 
family; they ha.ve not yet been called upon 
to bury their nearest and dearest in this terri- 
ble strife. Pray that peace may once more 
dawn upon this once beautiful 1 ind." 

fKOM A LADY IN GEOKOIA TO HEH BROTHEK 
IN CALIFOUNIA. 

"Our poor country is in a sad state of an- 
archy and confusion ; distress and appreheri^ 
sion are in every family, and we all sigh for 
the good old times when law and order and 
good-will prevailed." 

FROM A SISTER IN AUOl'STA TO HER BROTH- 
ER IN NEW YORK. 

"There seems now little hope ©f difficulties 
Ijeing settled for many years, which is most 
lamentable, and being only a woman, I think 
it right ana proper for me to cross the ocean. 
God grant we may all meet in that spirit 
world where we shall find a better land." 

FROM A SISTER IN AVOUSTA TO HEU BROTHER 
IN IRELAND. 

"Coldcn Kctchum has grown to be a good 
lK)y, ho is now in the army — was drill-master 
of a battalion for a short time ; the battalion 
was formed principally of elderly men." 

FROM A LADY .\T UARHAMVILLE, NEAR CO- 
LVMBIA, S. C., TO HER COISIN IN NEW VOUK. 

"Our life here is inexpressibly dreary and 
monotonous. If it were possible to return to 
Cliarleston. we would do so; but even there 
all is so changed ; our friends arc so dispersed 
it would be very sad. I wish very much to 
go North. These long Autumn evenings re- 
call to us the happy days of yore, the glad- 
some memories of the "LaPierie," "lirc- 
voort." 

FROM A LADY IN SAVANNAH TO A FRIEND 
NORTH. 

"The expenses of living here are tremend- 
ous. Everything costs so much — it is painful 
to eat an egg, a chicken, or anything else, and 
it gets worse and worse. All the pieachiug, 
lecturing, writing against extortion does i.o 
good. C. Grant had on a common, heavy 
homespun— it cost her J$-55 ; a crape bonnet 
is ^76. I am heartily sick of it, and wish our 
enemies could come to a better mind. Wc 
hold out here so far — it is said wc ii;^ay have 
an attack very soon. Charleston holds out 
bravely; dear old Sumter stands it no- 
bly — I compare it to Sampson of old. Have 
you seen a letter from O. B. L. to Fer- 
nando Wood ? C. B. L. ackowledges it to be 
genuine, and there is a aewspaper war going 
on about it. I am very sorry for it. We have 
the same old talk of getting married, getling 
rich, traveling, wishing for ice cream, porter, 
champagne, &c., &.C.. with a plentiful abuse 

of the V s. I am going out to order a 

pair of boots, which I canuot do without for 
$40. Homespun is $4 a yard; shilling culli- 
cocs $S a yard; silk $30 a yard; eggs $2 a 
dozen. 1 don't know what I shall do for 
gloves — there are none to be had, except a 
few spotted kids at $19 a pair. 



» ♦ « ♦ 



The IVewa of C^niBCa 
land. 



Victory In Kng'* 



To-morrow is the last day for the 
heavy bounties, whether the draft takes 
place or not. Those who want to es- 
cape the draft and be paid three or four 
hundred dollars for doing so, must act 
immediately. 

One hundred and two dollars bounty 
is all the government will pay after to- 
morrow. 

» » ♦ » ♦ 

If we can rely upon the statement of 
the Liverpool Post, which was received 
by the last foreign arrivals. Lord Lyons 
has commenced to open his eyes and im- 
mediately forwards a description of his 
vision to Earl Russell. The Post says : 

We consider ourselves in a position to 
state that Lord Lyons, jn a dispatch to Earl 
Russell, from Washington, announces that 
the war will be terminated in the next three 
months, the Confederates being in the great- 
est extremities, aud will have to propose an 
armistice. In our information wc have the 
fullest possible coniidcnce. It is possible that 
Lincoln's I'ruelamatiou has reference to the 
facts ou which Lord Lyons founded his con- 
clusions. 



♦ « ♦ « ♦ 



Messrs. Martin & Brown, of St. 
Anthony, have taken the contract for the 
entire bridging of the Minneapolis and 
Cedar Valley Koad, north of Faribault. 
They expect to commence the bridge 
across the Mississippi, at this point, as 
ioon as the water will permit next season. 

The stages due last evening had not 
arrived at the hour of going to press, so 
that scarcely any of the members of the 
Legislature are in the city. The severe 
weather has probably detained a number, 
who will arrive this evening. 



Senate, - 
H. ot Repre- 
sentatives, - 

Total, - 

Republican majority _ - - 

Republican and Union majority, 

Republican and Union and Independent 
I'ersonal majority, - - - 29 

The Legislature of 1863 compares, in its 

political complexion, with that of 1862, as fol- 

loM'S : 

SENATE. 

Eepub- Dem- Indp't 

lican. Union, ocrat. Personal. 

1862, - # 16 6 

1863, f f 14 2 4 1 

HOUSB. 

1862, - • 29 I la 

1863, - - 30 1 11 

JOINT BAU.OT. 

1862, . - 45 1 17 

1863, - - 44 S li 1 

A Repul>liMin Union fain 2 over last yMUr. 
♦ • ♦ » ♦ 

The following commissions were issued 
yesterday : 

Jacob Nix, Brown county. Captain; 
Henry W. Bingham, Rice, county. First 
Lieutenant ; Geo. B. Tomlinson, Nicolet, 
Second Lieutenant ; Isaac Bonham, Wi- 
nona, Captain ; Wm. L. Therman, Wi- 
nona, First Lieutenant ; Henry F. Philr 
lips, Prcicott, Wisconsin, Second Lieu- 
tenant ; Jonathan Darrow, Dodge coun- 
ty, Fir«t Lieutenant. 

» t ♦ » ♦ 

We regret to learn that Mrs. Whipple 
was taken with congestive chills on the 30th 
of December, and is dangeously ill, and 
Bishop Whipple has been compelled to sus- 
pend his visitation in consequence of his wife's 
alarming condition. The best medical advice 
has been called in, and it is devoutly hoped 
that her life may be prolonged. 

— ♦ » » « ♦ 

A Nkwberne North Carolina dispatch 

of tlie 28th contains the following : 

The plan of leasing out the abandoned plan- 
tations in Eastern Carolina, as adopted by the 
Hon. David N. Heaton, supervising agent of 
the Treasury Department, is proving a great 
success to the Treasury Department, and is 
also a great benefit to the laboring classes of 
both colors, who are soon to present Mr. 
Heaton with a beautiful testimonial. 



Correspondenoa N. Y. Tribuna. 

Hilton Hk.vd, Dec. 20.— Tha following ex- 
tracts are from persons in the South to friends 
aud relatives at the North and elsewhere. 
TheyMnere smuggled through the rebel lines, 
and it was thought by the writers of them 
that they would reach their destination with- 
out coming under the censorship of the mili- 
tary authorities here. Several are from well 
kdown persons in the Confederacy. The first 
is from the widow of the late Com. Tatnall. 
The second is from the principal of a fashion- 
able seminary, formerly and for many years 
located in Charleston, to a chemist doing busi- 
ness on Broadway. It will be seen that they 
all coiTOborate each other as to the condition 
of things in the rebellious States. I am in- 
debted to Brig. Gen. Seymour for the privil- 
ege of making these extracts. N. G. S. 

FROM MRS. TATNALL. 

I hope you have received my letters, in 
which I begged you to have some under gar- 
ments made for Mary, and if you have, and 
you are able to come out to us, please stock 
your trunk well, for we all need our war- 
drol)es replenished. H. F. TATNALL." 

FROM A SCHOOLMASTER IN COLUMBIA. 

I have removed my school for safety's sake 
from Charleston to or near Columbia. I have 
been doing the most prosperous business, but 
the expense of living is such that I can barely 
make two ends meet, and have lost all my 
hard-earned resources. If I could only carry 
the opinion my patrons have with me I would 
be sure to do in New York as I have done here. 
Expenses are so fabulous that I have given up 
my carriage and horses, tea, sugar, coll'ee, and 
I wear homespun, and make my own gloves 
—these latter cost $75 a pair ; meat is $2 per 
pound, and flour $50 a barrel ; corn $7 a bush- 
el. So you oan fancy with servants' wages 
$2.5 to $40 a month, how my income can sup- 
port a family. My friend. Gov. Aiken, a 
thricc-millionaire three years ago, is as poor 
as I am now, and we are certainly in good 
company — but as my sole motive for remain- 
ing was Ellen, and it has pleased God to take 
her home to Him, I will not remain to witness 
the last miseries of this dear country. My 
all is gone, and I am willing to begin again. 
People hold on to Charleston as if it were the 
heart of the body of the Confederacy, and fall 
it will. I dare not express my belief, but it is 
grounded on more than fears." 

FROM A GENTLEMAN IN SAVANNAH TO A FRIEND 
IN NEW YORK. 

"I Sincerely hope that the Revolution will 
not continue much longer, for I feel like one 
in prisf.n, and I am getting old and rusty. 
May God, in his infinite mercy, send relief to 
ui soon, and show us a way of escape. Savan- 
nah is dull — very little business here. Rice is 
22 cents, flour $120 per barrel, soap $2 50 per 
pound, candles $4, whisky $65 to $120 for 
common to fair, buttcr$5 per pound, meat $1 
per pound, turkeys $20 per pair, broadcloth 
coat and pantaloons $500. My sons indulge 
now and then in boots at $130, but I cannot. 
These are realities now; what it will end in 
we shal see. It you anticipated such a state 
of things, you were wiser than I. I dared 
never realize that such madness conld exist 
en eartbi n this Christian age. We must wait 
patiently for the end ; but we both can regret 
the patriotic and innocent blood that is being 
shed on both sides for our country." 

FROM A DAUGHTER IN SOUTH OAROLIirA TO 
HBB MOTHER IN CANADA. 

"Ah I mother! yoQ little Imow wlut lad 



The news of General Grant's victory 
has reached England, and is made the 
subject of various comments in the Lon- 
don journals. The Morning Star calls 
the battle "the Waterloo of the South," 
and adds : 

It is very doubtful whether the discomfittcd 
forces of that unlucky and unpopular com- 
mander Bragg, can be induced to make an- 
other stand. An ofliofr who does not know 
what to do with a victory when, by chance, 
he has won it — who loses by inaction those 
days and weeks which his adversary employs 
in gaining strength — who is obliged to re- 
nounce a most advantageous position, and 
yet is unable to retire from it without incur- 
ring total defeat — an officer whose whole ca- 
reer seems to have been one rather of tenor 
to his own soldiers than to the enemy — is not 
the man to retrieve so terrible a disaster as 
that just sustained. 

The Times styles Gen. Grant "the 
most active and successful commander 
whom the federals posess whose presence 
has turned the fortunes of the campaign," 
but comforts its secessionist friends with 
some explanations of thecauseof Bragg's 
defeat : 

If the Southern army has suffered by the 
continuance in command of an inefficient gen- 
eral, tiie confederate government will have 
supported its nominee at very great cost. 
The Southern soldiers are described as de- 
moralized, and possessed by a perfect panic, 
and, though this may be only the exaggerated 
style current in the country, it is not likely to 
have been conducted with the good order 
which allows defeat to be remedied. But, 
whatever may be said of the confederate com- 
mander, or whatever explanation may be given 
of the details of this battle, we think the true 
explanation of ihc campaign is to be found in 
the weakness of the .Southern anuy. This 
has been the latal disadvantage of the confed- 
erates all through the war, and they probably 
sutler I'rom it now more than ever. 

The Times, however, remarks in ad- 
dition to these explanations : 

"We have little doubt that the main cause 
of the retreat of General Bragg from the 
point where he had done so much, and was 
expected to do more, has been the belief that 
at present he is not in a condition to oppose 
the powerful levies which have been placed 
under the command of General Graut." 

The Morning Herald, the bitter enemy 
of our government, is "not without hope 
that the disaster to Bragg may not prove 
irretrievable," but adds : 

"Friendly as wc are to the Confederate 
cause, we arc still prepared to look the very 
worst in the face, and that worst something 
far beyond anything that has yet befallen." 

The Examiner, which has been strong- 
ly soeessionist, says that the defeat of 
Bragg is not decisive, but nearer to the 
decisive than any reverse of the iortune 
of war that has yet occurred. 

» « ♦ « ♦ 

Soutbern Slews. 

Fortress Monroe, December 29. — 
The Richmond Enquirer of the 25th con- 
tains the following : 

Bristol, Dec. 23. — Our forces are 
still around Rutledge and Morristown. 
Cannonading was heard at the latter 
place on Sunday. 

Gen. Longstreet is unable to follow up 
his advantage, inconsequence ol the large 
number of bare-footed men in his com- 
mand. 

The weather is cold and the mountains 
covered with snow. 

G.'n. Morgan passe4 through Colum- 
bia, 8. C, on the 21th. 

There are 300 cases of small-pox 
among the Yankee prisoners at Dan- 
ville. 

The Confederate army in East Ten- 
nessee has gone into winter quarters. 
♦ » ♦ « ♦ 

— A letter from Morris Island since 
the late storm says : 

"For the last" tweuty-fpur hours these 
shores have been ghastly with the number- 
less rebel dead, some ot them in boxes, but 
mostly uncortined. They were washed out 
from the beach near forts Putnam and Strong 
(formerly Gregg and Wagqer.) Skulls, arms, 
and entire skeletons bobbed around on the 
beach, a literal "dance of death." 

— A correspondent of a western pa- 
per reports that Senator Jim Lane was se- 
riously exercised at the failure of the House 
to re-elect Mr. Stockton. Ho was a good old 
man he said — a pure, saintly old man, " and 
besides, sir, he repeats the Lord's prayer every 
morning, and before the end of this Coiigrcss 
he would have kept it up till some of these 
members would have learned it !" 

— A thorough investigation of the circum- 
stances of Morgan's escape from the Ohio Pen- 
itentiary is in progress, and promises to im- 
plicate completely some people high in posi- 
tion in Columbus politics and society. 

— Robert Heller, the well-known pres- 
tidigitator and accomplished pianist, a report 
of whose death by a railroad accident was one 
of the recent sensations, is alive and well, hav- 
ing suffered but shghtly from the accident al- 
luded to. 



President Unioln'a Proclamation in 
the Rebel Cong-rena. 

In the proceedings of the Rebel Con- 
gress Mr. Foote presented the following 
preamble and resolution; 

Whereas, A copy of the truly characteris- 
tic proclamation of'amnesty, recently issued 
by the imbecile and unprincipled usurper who 
now sits enthroned upon the rnius of constitu- 
tional liberty in Washington city, has been 
received and read ]>y the members of the 
House ; now, in token of what is solemnly 
believed to be the almo^t undivided sentiment 
of the people of the Confederate States, 

Be it resolved. That there has never been a 
day or an hour when the people of the Con- 
federate States wer« mere iniiexibly resolved 
than they are at the present time never to re- 
linquish the struggle of arms in which they 
are engaged, until that liberty and independ- 
ence for which they have been so earnestly 
contending shall have been at last achived, 
and made sure and steadfast, beyond even the 
probability of a future danger ; and th.tt in 
spite of the reverses which have lately befall- 
en our armies in several quarters, and cold 
selfish indifference to our sull'erings thus f.ir, 
for the most part, eviuced in the actions of 
foreign powers, the eleven millions of enlight- 
ened freemen now battling heroically for all 
that can make existence desirable, are fully 
preparcil. alike in spirits and resources, to en- 
counter dangers far greater than those which 
they have heretorore bravely met, aud to sub- 
mit to far greater sacrifices than those which 
they have heretofore so cheerfully encoun- 
tered, in preference to holding any further 
political connection with a government aud 
people who have notoriously proven them- 
selves contciuptously regardless of all the 
rights and privileges which belong to a state of 
civil freedom, as well as of all the most fiacred 
usages of civilized war. 

Mr. Miles regretted that the'gentleman 
from Tennesses had introduced such a 
resolution. The true and only treatment 
which that miserable and cuntemptibk- 
despot (Lincoln) should receive at the 
hands of this House was silent and un- 
mitigated contempt. This resolution 
would appear to dignify a paper emanat- 
ing from that wretched and detestable 
abortion, whose contemptible emptiness 
and folly would only receive the ridicule 
of the civilized world. He moved to lay 
the subject on the table. 

Mr. Foote was willing that the preaiR: 
ble and resolution should be tabled, 
with the understanding that it would in- 
dicate the unqualified contempt of the 
House for Abraham Lincoln and his Mes- 
sage and Proclamation alluded to. 

Mr. Miles said there would be no mis- 
understanding about that. 

The motion was unanimously adopted. 

Similar resolutions offered by Mr. Mil- 
ler of Virginia went the same way. 

King- and Ueenau in I^ondon aflK^r 
tbe "Jlill"— Uet-uan Cbulleng^ed ^y 
Mace. 

From the London Sporting Life, Dec. 19. 

Tom King called at our oilice yester- 
day afternoon, after paying a few private 
visits. Xo sooner was "Handsome 
Tom's" hansom seen in front of our oflice 
than Fleet street presented an appear- 
ance forcibly reminding us of Lord 
Mayor's Day. The longer he stayed, the 
denser grew tbe crowd, and when he 
took his departure, had almost as much 
difliculty in forcing his way, in company 
with Jem Mace, as in meeting the hugs 
of his opponent on the previous day. As 
he stepped into the cab, followed by Bos 
Tyler, he was greeted with a volley of 
cheers which only British throats can pro- 
duce. King, when at our office, was in 
company with his principal backers, who 
were delighted with the reception he met 
with. 

Jem Mace, who was one of those who 
accompanied Tom King, expressed to 
us his great dissatisfaction at the treat- 
ment he received at the hands of lleenan 
previous to the fight, and stated that, al- 
though he would be the last man to chal- 
lenge a loser, he would not put up with 
threats or intimidation from any one. 
Mace, therefore, now cballengos lleenan 
(if he wants to fight) to make a match on 
the usual terms for the belt, or to increase 
the amount, if the friends of the Ameri- 
can wish, to £1,000 a side. 

Tom King expressed himself in very 
strong terms resj)ecting the discourteous 
behavior of Heei Ml both previous to en- 
tering, and when m the ring before con- 
clusions were tried. 

During the afternoon, our reporter vis- 
ited Heenat!, at Mr. J. Fercival's, >.'o. o 
Panton street, and had an interview with 
the gallant American, who was in appear- 
ance wonderfully well, considering the 
punishment he had received. He said 
that he could not understand nor believe 
in the sudden manner in Avhich he was 
punished, and could only attribute it to 
having overreached himself in the fall ol 
which he had the best in the nineteenth 
round, whereby he also nearly stunned 
himself by pitching on his head. lleenan 
was naturally much chop-fallen about his 
defeat, although his two brothers and 
Jack McDonald did all that was possible 
to console him. A party of gentlemen 
having invited him to dinner, caused him 
to remain in private, and expressed his 
mtention of not going anywliere yester- 
day. 

We are happy to state that lleenan is 
hearty and well, and, with the exception 
ofap^irof black eyes, a cut lip, and 
swollen cheek, is none the worse for his 
encounter. 

»»■♦»♦ 



LATEST NEWS, 

By TeleiErrai^li. 

Colorefl Sub«titut*»-Arre»t 'it Seces- 
sionists — :fIoveiuent on M'l ncbester 
—An Ari»y Order— The Mexican 
4tuestion. 

Wasiiingto:«', Jan. 2. 

A number of colored men belonging to this 
District on their way to New York, to be 
used as substitutes there, were taken olf the 
steamer Baltimore at Georgetown yesterday 
by one of the detectives. Amonj; the first 
l)ersous to pay their respects to the President 
yesterday were Secretary Sewarii and the 
riench .Alinister. 

The gunboat Commander arrivcc. ycstcrdny 
at Alexandria, bringing two Lieut'jnants and 
.J privates of the rei)cl army, and several la- 
dii s among whom was Mrs. Davis, wife of the 
rebel Col. Davis who was captured while at- 
tempting to cross the I'otomac. 

There arc indioaticns that Gen. Early con- 
templates a movement or raid tovards Win- 
chester and perhaps beyond that town. An 
order has been isstied from the ai my of the 
Potomac prohibiting all newspaper corres- 
l)ondidts from publishing or causing to be 
i)ublislied the number or designations of regi- 
ments re-enlisting in the army or caving the 
same or the numtxT of men lurloughed. 
Another from Provost Martial Patr: ck requires 
correct enrollments made of all oiviliaus or 
army followers, excepting actua. residents 
within the limit of their respective corps. 
This is also designed to reaili thos.' who have 
sought refuge in the army to avoid the draft. 
Filty prisoners and deserters rea<hed Wash- 
ington to-day. 

The St itement said to be quoted from Eu- 
ropean papers that a dispatch had been rc- 
(eived bv the French government Irom the 
United States declaring that the U. S. Gov- 
ernment woidd never tolerate, mu :;h less rec- 
ogn.ze a monarchy at tiieir very do^rs, is inac- 
curate. The true position of tl c question 
will be learned from the diplomatic corres- 
pondence which was submitted to Congress 
witli the President's message, ant. is n<nv in 
press. In the meantime, it is safe to say that 
the question has not reached th«. stage de- 
scriljcd iu the foregoing account. 

Gen. Meade has been iu Washington for 
several days past. 



GRAND t^TEm)PTlCON 

Dissolving View 

EXHIBITION, 

j^t Ing-ersoll'ss Ha.ll, 

MONDAY EVE SING, JANUARY ith. 
i»- Tickets 25c— Children 15c. 



janl-^t 



K. EGGLESTOX. 



Jltfvements of Blockade Itunners— 
A Cufiture. 

Washington, Dec. 31. 

Official informatiin has been received at the 
Navy Department from Bermuda that the 
ste.uner Coquette returned on th j 19th, hav- 
higbeen among the blockading ll^etoif Wil- 
miugton but could not get in. 

The steamer Bangor left on the 14th with a 
full cargo and returned here to-day, not hav- 
ing been in port. 

The rcp(jrt of the Florj», having lieen run on 
to a reef and a hole knocked uito lier Iwttoin, 
having been frightened by a Brtiish mail 
steamer is conlirmed. 

The following information has b( en received 
of the capture of the steamer Charm off Dobuy 
Sound on the IGth, by the gunboat Huron. 

On the inorniigofthc 16th she vasobserved 
l>ound out to sen, and chase wasji nmediately 
given and after a few shots she hove to. She 
was from Dsrien Georgia, bound lor Nassan. 
The Captain said he had had papers but had 
throAvn them overfjojird. By hit. statement 
her cargo consisted of 290 bales ol" cotton be- 
sides tobacco and rosin. 



31!. I»- IVICHOLS, 

Gener«»l Insurance Agent, 

THIRO-ST., 
St. Paul, IVlinnesota. 

rolicies issued inthefoUowiugNew YorkCo» 
panies : 

Lorillard, Metropolitan, 
Niagara, l^lienix. 

AND MUTUAL BKNEKIT TdFE INS. CO., OF 
NKW JEKSLY. 

49- Combined cashaeseti over $«,»00.000 

decll-t novlu'oi 

T K C T U R E S . 

Prof*. O. S. POWEKS, 

Will commence a short course ol Lectures on 
various Scientiflc and Social Questions, at 

INaERSOLL'S HALL. 

In Wni city, on 
SATURDAY EVENING, January 9<A, 18C4 
M^ See posters and circulare. 
dec27-td A. TOWNSON, Agent. 



FOR SALE.— A yoke of Oxen suit- 
able for the Pinorips. Enqidrc of 
BEMAN 



d«o3t 



G. N BEMAN & CO., 
Cornor Uobsrts and 5t}i-sts. 



T 



llE ANNUAL MELTING O* THE 



A Celebration- 

FoHTUEss Monro E, Jan. 1. 

The colored inhabitants of Norfolk and vi- 
cinity celebrated to-uay the first mniversary 
of their freedom as given them under the 
President's proclamation of one year ago. 

Four regiments of colored troops under 
command of r>rigadicr General F. A. Wild, 
took part in the exercises. There were pres- 
ent as invited guests. Major General Butler 
and staff, Bri?radier Generals Bai nes, Letty, 
Lodie aud llickmau, and theii' respective 
stalfs. 

The procession marched throi gh all the 
principal streets of Norfolk, and u Jon arriving 
on the square fronting the cemeteiy, formed a 
hollow sipiars, and speaking, and music by 
the bauds were the order of the d;.y. 



Heavy Snow Htomi. 

CiiicAfio, Dec. 31. 

The heaviest snow storm knowr, for several 
years conmunced last night. Dispatches rep- 
resent it us very severe as far west and bc- 
vond the Mississippi, souih to Springficld,and 
along and north to Green Bay. 'Ihe snow is 
drilling terribly Several of the I ailroads are 
completely blocked up. The stoim in Iowa 
is reported as even more violent tiiui east of 
Ihc river. 



Stockliolders of the St. Paul Bridge Company, 
for the choice of Dir'^cturs, will be hold at the 
office of the Conipai^ ou Monday, January 4tb, 
1804, at 2 o'clock i>. M. 
sun dec2C-3t W. II. KELLEY, Spcrelajy. 

Do You Want a Sleigh Ride? 

If 80, you will need 

SLEiaH BELLS AND 
Hor*se Blankets. 

The largest assortment of which in the city of 
Saint Paul may bo found at the Harness Store of 

S. B. LOYE, 

Who is selling them as low as the lowest. 
tS" Store next door to Edgertoa's Bank, Third 
street. decSI-tf 

A COMFORTABLE SLEIGH 

RIDE 

Can I>e had by using tha 

IVew Foot Stove. 

LAMPS CHEAPER THAN EVER, 

Some as low as 

THIRTY-FIVE CENTS. 

Those usually sold for $1.50, wo now sell for 
$1.25. 



E. & H. Y. 



St. Paul, Dec. 29, 1863. 



BELL. 
dec30 



— A rebel dispatch dated Dalton, 
Georgia, December 27th, says : 

"Gen. Joseph E. Johnston assumes com- 
mand of the army of Tennessee to-day." 



M: -A. R li I E ID . 

On Thursday evening, the 31st ult., by Rev. J. 
D. Pope, W. S. WILSON, Esq., and Miss ADDIE 
ELLISON, both of Saint Paul. 



^m '^ixtti\»tmxA9> 



ANl 



ANTED, 

UHSEGfKL. Apply at this oilice. jan3 



A UCTION SALE 

OF FIKST CLASS FDRNITURE. 

FAIRCHILD & CO., sell on Saturday next, 
January Uih, at 10 o'clock, at the residence ol 

G^. R. MA^ROH, 

Dayton's Avenne, next door to J. W. Selby's, 

Two full and nearly new Chamber Sets, embrat* 
ing handsome KosewAod Kedsteadii, liurcaiia 
(Marble Top), Wash Stands, Chair.'', (Juarlotts 
and Uocker*: 1 plain Chaiijbcr So^, Oval Mimr, 
Marble Top Centre Table*, Chairs, Itockerit and 
Easy Chairs, (some very tiiiecano seats), Etageres, 
Oarpeis, 4 Sheet Iron Stoves, Parlor Cook, .and 
Cook Stoves, Writing Desk, Oak Extension Ta- 
ble, Ufirriago, Uarucss, Saddle, Ac, fcc. 
jan»3t FAIRCIIILD & CO. 

QRIENTAL POWDER CO., 

Offer for sale a superior quality of 

OXJIVI»0 WOER, 

RIFLK SIZE TO COARSE DUCKING, 
In kegs and cannister. Also the famous Diamond 
Grain Powder. G. NEWHALL, Jk , 

Wholesale Agent, JO River strt-et, Oiicjgo. 
ENOCH WOODS, 180 Lake-st., 
dec20-3in Agent for Cfiicago. 

\ 



y ADIES LOOK FOR YOUI;SELVES. 
SO I?er Cent. 

BELOW COST! 

LARGE REDU-TION JN 
From this date till the Ist of Fabruary. 

MRS. J, B. LYGO, 

Proposes sell ng 

WINTER IkHLLINERY GOODS, 

At the following low prices, viz: 

Velvet Bonnets at $6.01 worth $8.00 

Silk Bonnets $40o " $5.i 

■Velvet Flowers :)Occach " 60c 

Felt Hats $1.25 " $1.75 

do $1.0i " $1.50 

Beaver Hats $t.5) " t'3.00 

Muslin Flowers 15c each . 

O L O .A. K 8 , 

And all articles usually soM in a 

Including a very large assortment af Ribbons at 
a proportionate reduction. Callan<l see for your- 
kclves I 

NO HUMBUG ! 

MRS. jr. St. i.Yc;o. 

p. S.— llrs. LYGO having imported one of the 
largest 3Mlinery ntock of Goods ev ?r brought to 
tho West, and paid cash prices for the same, is 
thus enabled to offer to the Pub Ic the above 
Goods at the largely reduced prices to her Patrons 
and the Public in general. 

N. B.— Having such a largo stocic of Goods on 
hand, I am obliged to sacrifice my (ioods to make 
room for uy Spring Importations. 

MR». jr. n. J.YOO, 

Third street, two dtors below 
dec30-2w Thompson's Bank. 



/^ A R D . 

We wUl offer [for CO dajsj our entire stock of 

MILLINERY, 

at from 20 to 25 per cent, reduction ; 

SHAWLS, CLOAKS, CLOAKINGS 
AND FANCY ARTICLES, 

10 to 15 per cent. 
DRESS AND HOUSEKEEPING GOODS, 

at Eastern pi ices. 

Those Goods were delayed until too late, and 
now must be slauglitHr«-d to raise mon y. It 
would pay any lady to kerp them over. The Bon- 
net or Hat that cost $10 \«stcrday, and cheap at 
that, will be $7.50 to $l^ to day. This is worth 
saviuf;. You can pay your dollar with 75 or bOc. 
We most regpectfully solicit from our former 
custom-rs and ladies throughout The State. Our 
stc re is below Dnv & Jpnk's Drug Store, Third 
street, St. Paul, Minnesota, where ihe W ux Fig- 
ure is in tho Window. 

d c54 Mr s. J. J. DU G AN. 

pOOD NEWS. 

Just received by express, another lot of 

Iterosene Oi-aters, 

Will warm food for the Baby, mako teas and hot 
drinks for the sick, will cook a few eggs, kc, for 
the " Hearty," adiustab'e to any Lamp, and only 
25c each — worth a trial. 
Also, received a fresh supply of 

Grla.&ss Oones, 

Will fit any Lamp, saves half the Oi), and Is fre« 
from that unpleasant oder eaused by the brass 
Cones. Costs but 15c. 

A GOOD THING JUST OUT, 

XHo No diimney Bmrner, 

The best ever before offered to the public, frea 

from smoke, will flt any I.rf»mp, and only 3S cents 

each. 

500 DOZEN EXTRA ANNEALED CHIMNEYS 

in store and for sale at Eastern prices. 

All other Goods pertaining to the trade In end 
less variety, for sale low, at TUti ST. PAUL 
LAMP SfOBE, Third street, opposita the Pio- 
near Offica. dac29-lw 



B 



ENJAMIN S. BULL, 



BOOK AND JOB PilfNTINB. 

Tho I?ress Printi.nar Oo. 

In order to keep pace with their lapidlylncrear 
ing business are constantly exteitding their fa- 
cilities for Book and Job Printin?. They have 
recently introduced Steam Into their establish 
met t , and put up another of 

HOE'S LARGE CYLINDER PRESSES, 

We are prepared to Print all kinds of 

BOOKS, PAMPHLETS, BRIEFS, 

POSTERS, PROGRAMMES, BILLHEADS 

BLANKS, BILLS OF LADING, 

CIRCULARS, 

▲adeyery other descrlptioii of 

PLAIN AND ORNAMENTAL PRINTING 

▲t modf««te r*tas and at short notiovb 



WHOLESALE AUD EKTAIL DBALEH IS 

CROCKERY, CHINA AND GLASS WARE, 

Harrison* s Stone Block, Minneapolis, Min., 

Keeps constantly on hand a larg<> assortment of 
the above named goods, either at 

'Wholesale or Retail. 

Orders solicited. noll-6mdi.w 

^OO VOLUNTEERS WANTED 

For the 6th Regiment Minnesota 
Infantry Volunteera. 



^403 Bounty will be paid to veterant. 

$30!t " to new rucrxilts, rations, dotbinf , 

and $13 per month. 
ApDly to Lieut. Col. WILLIAM B. GEUF.. at 

recruhiog rendexvou«, MiKubin's block. Third 
street, St. Paul; (.apt. E. A. KICK, Karibault, or 
Capt. T. J.SUEltaAN, Albert Lea, Recruiting 
Officers. no%-jau6 

TJNITED STATES 
PENSION AG^ENCY 

ST. PAUL, - -*^- MINNESOTA. 

Office in Rogers' Bloek, 3d-it., near the Brt^v. 
Otficc hours from 8 to 10 A. M. 
All Jotters to the olftc© mu^t inclose stamps to 
pay return postage. ROBEKT P. LEWIS, 
noM tw&wly rciuioii Agent. 



c 




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I 



I 



■i^n^*** Hip'w w I 



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1 




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1. 





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la^M 


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THE SAINT PAUL PRESS, SUNDAY, JAJ^TUARY 3, 1864. ^ r upri?r* A 



TTT 



— w 



"1 



p 



I 



PUBLISHKO DAILY, TRI-WEKKLT AND WKEKLT. 

Office— A<l.ioirunLg the Br idge._ 

"rrwiTM:— DAILY FKK8S— By mall, $8.00 per 
ftnnum.or 70c pvr month invaruMy in advance. 

TKI-WKKKI.V rUKSS— i5 por annum ; $2.50 
tor -tix months ; $ 1.2a for three mouths ; live cop- 
ies, to on.- a.ldrfss, $4.50 1'ach; ten do., $4 each. 

\VF:K1vLY rKKSS— One copy, one year, $2; 
Ave or more, $1.75 each ; ten or more, to one ad- 
dress, $l.Aoeach; twenty or more, toone address, 
$1.60 each. 



OUR iRMY CORRESPONDENCE 



Letter from the Second Minnesota. 



A VISIT TO THE SEFrEMBER BATTLE 
FIELD. 



Correif ondence Saint I'aul Press. 

Camp 2(1 MixNKsoTA Vol. Inf. ? 
Chattaxooga. Tcnn., Dec. ITtli, 18C3. ) 

About (en days ago Gens. Grant and 
Thomas took the 9th and 3r)th Okio regi- 
m-'nts as an escort to the old battle fiild 
of Chickamausa, and left us sulky and 
pouting m camp. 

A few days after our regiment was or- 
dered to take two days rations and be 
ready to march for the same ground at 
7 1-2 a. m. After waiting in line a half 
an hour we were dismissed, as the weather 
was very cloudy, and threatened a storm. 
On the eveninji of the l.)th inst. we weie 
notified that a volunteer party of fifty pri- 
vates and non-commissioned officers, and 
any number of the "commish,"wjth shov- 
els and a.xes, guns, &c., would be allow- 
ed from every regiment in the division to 
go out the next morning. About nine 
o'clock the next morning the sun's bright 
rays might have been seen glancing on a 
gay and festive throng, including Col. 
Vandeveer, Gens. Branson and Baird, 
auil their stafl's, wending their way tow- 
ards that field of terrible strife. 

Passing through the Gap of Mission 
Kidge at liossvillo, we took the route 
pursued by (Jordon Granger with the 
Reserve Corps to rL'-inforee (Jen. Tliomas 
on the afUrnoon of that day, and arrived 
at Kelly's house, where we turned in to 
the right, and formed on the extreme 
l.ft of the line on Saturday moniing 
Sept. ll>th, tlion halted and took dinner 
and then took our search over the field 
from right to left, looking carefully over 
the whole ground for the forms of our 
dear cO npanions who fell nobly fighting 
for freedom and our country's holy 
canse. AVe had been burning with an 
irrepressible desire to visit that gory field 
once more, and perform the last rites to 
the bodies of those who had fought their 
last battle and slept their last sleep, as 
it was a new and very disagreeable sen- 
sation to us to be forced to leave our 
killed and wounded in the bands of the 
enemy. 

Now after having driven them away in 
ignominious flight far beyond the field, we 
return to find the bodies of our believed 
comrades in shockingly exposed condi- 
tions. Some with the earth thrown over 
them, now partly washed away, and their 
bony hands and feet and fleshless skulls 
Ivin" above the surface. Others not bur- 
ied at all but lying as they fell, without 
pants, shoos or hats, the skins of their 
bodies about the color and appearance of 
parchment. This much I saw, hut others 
told me that beyond where we fought 
them on Sunday evening, on the Ridge, 
Bomo of our men %verc partially buried in 
a sitting posture, and some heads were 
on poles. 

The native3 living on the field told me 
in this town several da-ys ago, that they 
had seen the Yankee skulls kicking about 
the houses of some of their rabel neigh- 
bors. 

There are plenty of skulls and arms and 
leg bones scattered near the roads that I 
■aw. 

To the glory of our wounded boy's who 
fell into the rebel hands and to our own 
infinite relief, we found that the Minne- 
sota men were buried and the interments 
were the best I saw, excepting where the 
rebels had taken extra pains with their 
own m-^n. They had piled rails upon 
and burned the bodies of many of our 
men, and some wells and cisterns of 
houses used as ho?pitals,5were filled with 
bodies. 

In traversing that long extended bat- 
tle line, the lorestand field rent and torn 
by missiles of war, as I viewed the stern 
evidence, in the number of slain on both 
sides, of the fierce struggle of those brave 
hosts for those two days, of the field so 
nobly contested by us and so nearly won, 
I could not help but regret that, since 
war is yet an arbiter in deciding the af- 
fairs of the world, men could not always 
remember that it is almost always safest 
to jiyht it out, -while fujhting, and not 
budge, without proper orders, as it is so 
much safer to keep up an organization 
and keep on fighting than to 
rise and break to the rear, as a general 
tliini'. if the results are taken 
in detail or in the aggregate. So, had 
the centre and lefl held the ground, or 
retired and rallied and made a stand 
■within two miles of where they first gave 
way, ample distance surely for veterans, 
the day would have been ours past all 
conjecture, and the late fierce battle of 
Chattanooga, with its wonderful losses, 
would not have hail to have been fought. 
It may interest yon to know what ac- 
compainments we had to our excursion 
in the way of weather and so forth, in 
order to be with the burying party to its 
end. Well, I think I mentioned that it 
was a clear morning, and so it was, with 
every prospect at sunrise of a fine spell 
of weather after the storm just over and 
during the infancy of the new moon, and 
so we went forth in all 



to the marked eye, and in one hour, 

Ihe heaven was overcast with clouds with 
every indication of a storm that •' heart 
could wish." When we reached Kelly's 
house completely tired out by our ten 
miles jaunt, we were glad to rest for lunch, 
and then started for those portions of the 
field most interesting to us as the scene 
of conflicts with the rebels, the wind sigh- 
ing through the pine trees a mournful ac- 
companiment to our thoughts and the 
sights around us. It was remarked that 
wherever our Brigade had fought them 
there they had started a flourishing cem- 
etery. 

A graveyard of Texans is opposite 
where we ljug!.i lueiu om Saturday morn- 
ing, situatcil where \\.c Regulars left their 
battery to " call on us, to stay with us, 
to sleep with us," or words to that effect, 
spoken just after we had repulsed the for- 
mer which routed them before the flank 
attack came. A detachment of Louisiani- 
ans made a potter's field of the cornfield 
where we fought and defeated them on 
Sunday morning, and a host of Georgians, 
Floridians, Slississippians and South 
Carolinans thrown against us by Long- 
street on the same afternoon are deposited 
along the slope of the Ridge in squads, 
platoons and companies, swept down in 
those repeated attacks in close column, in 
their desperate attempt to take that 
ground. 

One man is laid near the crest, and on 
his hjad-piece is written that he '"fell 
where the Federal flag was planted," — to 
the left of our regiment. We had just 
got to our bivouac firus and eaten sup- 
per, when it commenced to rain, keeping 
it up steadily and fast, while the wind 
blew a gale and the thunders rolled all 
around the sky. It took but just this to 
recall all the infernal sounds and noises 
that filled the air in that scli-same place 



put to it, for he won a race on 
St. Patrick's l)av at FalmoHth; and 
and so fct us liave a l)it of a race and test liim." 
Tfic party then brofic into a pretty smart gal- 
lop, Generai Corcoran licading tliem, fiis 
liorse evidentfy getting tfie better of him, so 
much so that, fiavinfi passed considerably 
ahead of the party, lie waved his hand to 
tlicm to fall back, which tlicy instantly tlid. 
Imediately after a sli;,'fit dip or fitllow in the 
road sliut hiiu out iVom tlicir view, before 
rcaciiinj,' wliicfi, htnvcvcr, tlie party were sat- 
islied that he had mastered his horse, or that 
at all events the horse, having become excited 
by racing, had become perfectly quiet. But 
on coming up to the ridge of the hollow the 
party were shocked to find Goncral Corcoran 
lying on the outside slope of the hollow, and 
fiis horse quietly walking off towards a 
druiuuicr Ik>v, who iunncdiatcly mounted 
him and rode back to the party. The General 
was found in a state of violent convulsions, 
was quite discolored ami breathed heavily. 
No fracture whatever, not even a scratcfi — was 
discovered on or about tlie head or face, 
and the inference at once come to was that he 
had been seized with some fit resembling ap- 
<)plcxy, and that the exertions in reining in 
his horse ami bringing him in subjection had 
brought on the crisis'. He fell within the lines 
of his own camp, lie was immediately con- 
vcved to his own quarters, and lived two hours 
and a half after the fall, but was perfectly in- 
seiisil)lc the whole time, the deep and licavy 
breathing continuing till he died. Tlio news 
of his death, as can easily be imagined, caus- 
ed the greatest excitement and the deepest 
grief throughout liis entire command. The 
strongest and roughest soldiers were to be 
seen weeping like children, and a cloud seem- 
ed to have settled ovr the whole camp which 
nothing could relieve. 

♦ » ♦ « ♦ 

THE CHESAPEAKE. 



SPECIAL NOTICES. 



PARTICULARS OF THE PURSUIT AND 
CAPTURE— THE RESCUE AT HALI- 
FAX. 



Brown's Bugnchul Troches, for 

CJouoHs AND Colds. — A neglected Cough, Cold 
an Irritated or Sore Throat If allowed to progress 
results In serious Pulmonary Bronchial and Asth- 
matic DUeases oftentimes incurable. Bi,own'8 
BitoNCiiiAL Tkochks reach directly the affected 
parts, and give almost immediate relief. For 
Broncliitid, Asthma, Catarrh, and Consujiptivb 
Coughs the Troches are useful. Public Speakers 
and Singers should have the Troches to clear and 
strengthen the voice. Military OiRcors and Sol- 
diers who overtax the voice, and are exposed to 
sudden changes should use them. Obtain only 
the genuine. '• Brown's Bronchial Troches" hav- 
ingprored their efficacy by a test of many jenrs, 
are higldy recommended and prescribed by Phy- 
icians and Surgeons in the Army, and have re- 
ceived tctitiiaonials from many eminent men. 

Sold by all Druggists aud Dualers in Medicine 
in the United States aud most Foreign countries 
at 25 cts., per box. dec;! imd&w 

IIoMK Life Insurance Company, 

New YoKK.oirers the most liberal advantages to 
parties desiring to effect inf urance. 

REV. EDW'D. EGCi LESION, 

STATJ AuffaT FOB MINXK90TA, 

th nol9-t se pt 2 'C4 St. Paul. 

ABeautifulComplexion, free from 

Tan, Pimples and Freckles, may easily be pro- 
cured by usiogtlic "Balm of Thousand Flowerf." 
For shaving it is unsurpassed. It is composed of 
pal!:j oil, honey, and other valuable articles, high- 
ly perfumed by its own ingredient?, and when 
used for washing, night and morning, renders 
the skin soft aud white, and free from blemish 
Price 50 cents. For sale by 

DAY & JFMfS, St. Paul, and 
septlO-eowly N. II. HEMIUP, St. Anthony. 



^xmVkmtm^. 



JOSEPH I. BEAUMONT, 



HEALER IM 



TEAS, COFFEES, SPICES, 
SiTg-ars, Syrups, 

AND ALL goods PERTAINING TO TUE 
GttOCEltY BUSINESS, INCLUDING 

TOBACX^OS, CIGAHS, 

Wines, Liquors, and. 

Pure Old Rje and Bourbon 
^^^H:ISKIE8- 

Cumer 3d dc Jackson iit'a. iio29-d&w8w 

WESTES A]^D LIQTJOES, 

FOE 

Medicinal and Private Use* 



FOR 90 DAYS I 

BABE BABGAINS 



IN 



— the ziz, thug, whir-r-r, whiz-z-z, whang 
of bullet and ball, grape and caunister, 
shot and shell, while the put, put, pr-r-r-t 
pr-r-r-r-rt of skirmish lines and volleys 
of the musketry of the line, and banging 
of batteries and crashing of trees, fills uj) 
the sounds of that day and night, except- 
ing the shouting of the captains and the 
groans and cries of the wounded during 
tfie iulls of strife. Crouched behind the 
bivouac fires, that at last became extin- 
guished by the raining torrents, while the 
wind played all manner of pranks with 
the smoke and my eyes, I think I enjoyed 
one of the most miserable nights that I 
ever enjoyed in my life. Aly visits to 
that part of the State of Georgia will not 
be recalled by nic as the "most sweetest" 
da^s of my life, and the memories of 
them will not be regiirded as the "oasis 
in the desert'' of my recollections, by a 
jug-full. 

There was nearly a wagon load of ar- 
ticles ia variously damaged conditions 
taken from difVerent parts of the field, to 
be sent as mementos of the battle Held of 
Chickamauga, to the Western Sanitary 
Commission Fair, soon to be held at 
Cincinnati, I think. I got something to 
remember the place by. I had it all 
night, and brought it away, and have it 
yet I find, although I tried to dispose of 
it. May be you are curious to know 
what it is. Well, never mind about my 
telling you this time ; most any old sol- 
dier could guess. A great many people 
have it in the army. 

Gen. Thomas has ordered all corres- 
pondents of newspapers to sign their 
name in full to all communications to be 
published^ This order knocks all the 
little mystery and romance there might 
be hid behind the non deplume of those 
who post the public on events military, 
as practical, "Old Pap" wants to know 
exactly where to put his finger on the 
man who steps beyond his limits in writ- 
ing of the doings of the "Dogs of War." 
The most of the members of companies 
I and K have enrolled themselves for en- 
listment in the veteran volunteers ; others 
talk of being mustered in. I shall not be 
surprised if half of the regiment or more 
would re-enlist, as they are promised 
thirty days furlough within the State, be- 
sides the additional bounties. Consider- 
ing what they now suffer and have suffer- 
ed from insufficient food and clothing, I 
consider this new act of self-sacrifice 
much greater than the first enlistment, 
with its low bounties. The bovs sav 
thev "mean to see this thing through." I 
hope they mav live to do so. 
Respectfully yours, 

GEORGE A. J. OVERTON. 



The manner 



» » ♦ « ♦ 

of Cienral 
Death. 



Corcorn'a 






The following account of the death of 

General Corcoran is gleaned from a re- 

lialle source: 

General Meagher had been spending some 
days with General Corcoran at Fairfax Court 
House, when on the morning of the 22d of De- 
cember he proceeded to Fairfax Station en 
route for Washington, where he was to meet 
Gen. Corcorau's mother-in-law, Mrs. Meagher 
and other ladies, whom thcGcnerai had invit- 
ed to spend the Christmas holidays with him. 
General Corcoran accompanied Gen. Meagher 
to Fairfax with a cavalry escort, Mr. Edward 
Connolly, of New York, and several officers 
of the Irish Legion. General Corcoran ap- 
jiearcd to be as bright and hearty as he ever 
was, and on affectionately taking leave of his 
wife at headquarters desired her to have din- 
ner ready at two o'clock, as he would not fail 
to be back at that liour. On reaching the sta- 
tii m General Corcora:i shook hands with Gen- 
eral Meagher, and begged of him not to fail 
to be at the station at Alexandria punctually 
at 11 o'clock next morning, as he himself 
would l)e there to meet the party from Wash- 
ington and accompany them to Fairfax Court 
House. 

He then rode off to designate a new line of 
pickets, for the better pi-otection of the rail- 
road against raids from the Ocoquan, on 
which line a Pennsylvania battallion, which 
had arrived two or tlirec days before, was to 
be posted. This done, the General set out 
with his escort for the Court House. Shortly 
after leaving Fairfax Station Mr. Connolly 
remarked to the General that his (the Gen- 
eral's) horse had cast a shoe, upon which the 
the majesty of; General said that he would try General 
, r tu i • -I Meagher's liorse, which was being led back 

men free from many ot the trappings of y,y yug of the cavalrymen of the escort. Hav- 

the warrior, especially those that shelter I inS mounted it and ridden a few j-ards, Gen- 
, . ., . ^ . ■ cral Corcoran turned to Mr. Connolly and 

him trom the pitiless storm. Jubt as we spoke wjtl the greatest delight of the gracc- 
aallied forth jrom the line of forts, a large fullness of the animal, and what a perfect 
, „ _ • < II , „ ladies' horse lie would make. "But, added 
size ' "" ' 



The steamship Ella and Anna has amvcd 
at Bostou from Halifax. Her officers furnish 
the Traveller the following account of her 
pursuit of the Chesapeake, and the success 
that culminated in the recapture of the pirate 
craft : 

The Ella and Anna left the Navy Yard on 
the 10th instant, m command of Lieutenant 
Commanding John F. Nichols, with seventy- 
five otliccrs and nu n ou Jjoard. ."^bc had lor 
an armament two twelve pjund howizers and 
two twentv-four pound howitzers. 

On the I'Jth they arrived at Ear tport and 
took two pilots on board. Here they ascer- 
tained that the pirates were at Margaret's 
ISay, Nova Scotia, iweuty-live injles from Hal- 
ifax. They at once started for that place, but 
on arrival they were prevented by heavy 
winds from entering. 

Captain Nichols then went into Halifax .ind 
coaleil. There he learned from the American 
consul that the ChcsapeaUe was in La Have 
river. He left Halifax at eleven o'clock at 
night on the loth ; arrived at La Have and 
was informed that .she had left the evening 
before for Lunenbcrg. He proceeded to that 
port, where he karned that ihc Chcs^apeakc 
was then in Mud Cove, Sainbro's ILirbor. 
Arrived oil Mud Cove at three o'clock in the 
morning ; at daybreak perceived the Chesa- 
peake at anchor and saw a boat leave for the 
shore. 

The American flag was then run up on the 
Chcs.ipeake with the Inion down. They ran 
aUnigsidf her ami found three men on board, 
two of whom had been prisoners onboard. 
One was the first engineer and the otheralirc- 
iiian. 

The chief engineer said that he had received 
very harsh treatment. He was not allowed to 
leave the engine room, ami a man stood be- 
side him constantly with a revolver pointed at 
his head. 

B[No arms were lonnd on the Chesapeake ex- 
cept two old six-iKjuiulers, used for liring sa- 
latiics. When the Ella and Anna first saw 
the Chesapeake a schooner was seen alongside 
supplying her with coal, w hich hauled off as 
soon as she fcaw the new comer. 

Captain Nichols sent a Itoat's crew on board 
of her, and found cosily stowed away one of 
the original i>irates, whom one of the crew, 
formerly a member of the Boston l\)lice, rec- 
ognized as a well-known New York thief who 
had been in our lock-up time and again, aud 
wlio has passed several terms in Sing Sing, in 
blissful ignorance of the world beyond. 

Of the three men found on board the Ches- 
apeake, one was a pilot, who had arrived in 
company with an engineer the night before, 
from Halifax. He said he was engaged to pi- 
lot the vessel to Nassau. 

When the Ella and Anna discovered the 
Chesapeake, the pirates were all in bed, and 
it was not until the lookout watch saw the 
steamer that they were aware that an enemy 
was hovering near them. 

Tfiey at once took their boat, and pushed 
for the shore, leaving on the cibin table a 
warm breakfast ready to be partaken of. 
They had previously sold to the schooner five 
or six thousand dollars worth of the cargo, 
for one-sixth of the value, and the chief engi- 
neer said they had goods stt^ired ashore. 

The next step of Capt. Nichols was to direct 
his course for 13ost jn, and after provisioning 
his prize and placing a prize crew on board 
he to.)k the Chesajjcakc in tow. 

He arrived at Halifax at 4 v. m., delivered 
the Chesapeake up to the British Government. 
The whart was crowded with people, as it had 
been from the hour of their arrival. Ensign 
Coghlan took the prisoner captured from the 
schooner ashore, and was abuUt to surrender 
him to the Provincial Marshal, when he 
jumped from the wharf into a boat in which 
were two men, who pulled off w;th him. 

This was the last seen of the prisoner, tho* 
the officers have good reason for believing that 
all the pirates were prowling around Halifax 
when they arrived there. When the Ella and 
Anna entered the Halifiix harbor with the 
Chesapeake in tow the report was circulated 
that the order of things was reverse, and that 
the Yankee was the prisoner, a consummation 
most devoutly to be wished, but happily not 
executed for their detcctation. 

The officers also believe that Captain Braine, 
the chief of the pirates, visited the Ella and 
Anna while she was at Halifax, for a man 
was pointed out to them as him, who had been 
on board of tiieir vessel. 

Some of the officers who went on shore 
were accosted with salutations more energetic 
thau polite, and with the appellation of Yan- 
kee were coupled epithets less en ertaining. 
At other times again they were in no way mo- 
lested. 

HAt the instigation of some American citi- 
zens Captain Rraine, the pira c commander, 
was arrested and held in custody three liours, 
but Ijefore they could obtain legal authority 
he escaped. 

It is generally believed that the British 
government will deliver the Chesapeake up, 
as the citizens of Halifax and the press seem 
to consider her seizure a piratical act. 

■ ♦ > ♦ » ♦ • 

Itcttor from IVeal Dow. 
LiuBY Pkisox, RicnMoxn, Va., December 
7, 1853,— 7>ar *»'<> : This afternoon I had the 
pleasure of receiving your kind note of the 
2;3d of November. 

I hope the people will not make contribu- 
tions for Libby Ihrison. By so doing, they 
will be likely to send here far more supplies 
than will be" needed. Whatever the people 
may choose to give let it be to the United 
States Sanitary Commission, which will send 
to us everything that we shall require, and 
nothing will be lost or wasted. The Sanitary 
Commission will distribute its benefactions 
intelligently, at the points where they will be 
most wanted. 

Will you plea.«c have the above published in 
Boston, New York and Portland. 

I am very well and in excellent spirts. Re- 
member me to all my temperance friends. 
I am more earnest in the good cause than 
ever, if possible, and when the war is over, 
which will not Ix; far oil", I shall go to work 
as earnestly as ever. 
Trulv yours, 

NEAL DOW, Brig-Gcn. U. S. A. 
H. K. MoKRELL, Esq., Gardiner, Me. 



The Mutual Life Insurance Com- 
pany OF Wisconsin, ia the best Company for 
Western men to insure In. 

It is made up of and managed by Western men, 
and Is thus having Its risks all reside in this the 
healthiest part of the Union. It is believed that 
its rate of mortality will be lower than tliat of 
the Eastern Companies, in the future as it ha 

been in the past. 

'Ihe Company ia now In its fifth year of busi- 
ness, and has proven an entire success, having 
Issued over four thousand policies, and accumu- 
lated In reserve premiums two hundred thousand 
dollars. It started without guarantee capital, and 
experience has proven that none was necessary. 

'Ihe business ot tho Company is conducted upon 
the (same general basis as that of the most suc- 
cessful Eastern Companies, with the advantage of 
having tlie experience of the older ones as its 
guide. 

i here are now a largo number of members of 

the Company in St. Paul and vicinity, among 
whom are some of our best business men. 
NURTHWIISTERN AGENCY, 
Thompson's Block, Third street, St. Paul. 
O. CURTIS, Manager. 
S. P. SNYDER, Agent, Minneapolis. 
Either of the above named gentlemeu will be 
happy to ;;ive information to members or others 
desiriHL-, in •••■gani to the Company, and assist in 
making apj lications for Policies. uo8-3m 



PURE OLD RYE WHISKY, 

PURE OLD BOURBON WHISKY, 
FINE OLD FRENCH BRANDY, 
FINE SCOTCH WHISKY, 
PALE SHERRY WINE. 
PURE JUICE PORT AVINE, 
OLD BURGUNDY PORT WINE, 
WOLFE'S SCHIEDAM SCHNAPPS, 

OLD JAMAICA RUM, 

IMUMMS' CABINET CHAMPAGNE, 

CURACOA. 



^imVis^ntmfi. 



COME ONE, COME ALL, 



FOR SALE BY 
no29d&wSw J. I. 



DKAlJ^ffOlVr. 



TVr HOLES ALE LAM I STORE, 

next door to 
]MCa,x:*viii's Croclcery Itn- 
tortiiijy IIouso. 

LAMPS SHADES. CHIM- 
NEYS, OIL, 

AND ALL THE ARTICLES BE- 
LONGING TO THE TRADE, 

Can be found at the Store ac^oining Marvin's 
Crockery Importing House. 

An exclusive Lamp and Oil Store to meet the 
demands of ttie Wholesale aud Retail trade, has 
long been desirable in tit. Paul, ('ounf ry Mer 
chants can now be suptjlied at Eastern prices 
(trausportation added.) Call at the Carbon Oil 
aud Lamp Store at^oining Marvin's Crockery 
House. 

tsT" Country Merchants are especially lnvlt<>d. 
Call and see. septW 



The American Express Company, 
would respectfully announce to the Merchants of 
this city aud vicinity that they ara now prepared 
to bring forward from La Crosse, Wis., and de- 
liver to points of destination all "Jlerchants' 
Dispatch" and ordinary Railroad freight. 

Merchants and others who may wish to avail 
themselves of this means of transportation, will 
please mark their goods to our care at La Crosse, 
at the same time giving us notice so that we may 
see that such goods are delivered to us at La 
Crosse, without any unnecessary delay. 

For tariff rates call at their office, 219 Third-st., 
opposite Stage Office. 

decD E. F. WARNER, Agent. 



'S— T— 18G0— X. 
DRAKE'S PLANTATION BITTERS. 

They purify, strengthen and invigorate. 

They create a healthy appetite, 
rhey are an antidote to change of water and diet. 
They overcome effects of dissipation and late hours 
I'hey strengthen the system ind enliven the mind. 
They prevent miasmatic and intermittent fevers. 
They purify the breath and acidity of the stomach. 
They cure Dyspepsia and Constipation. 
They cure Diarrhu-a, Cholera and Cholera Morbus. 
Ihey cure LiverComplaiut and Nervous Headache 

They are the best Bitters In the world. They 

make the weak man strong, and are exhausted 

nature's great restorer. They are made of pure 

St. Croix Kum, the celebrated Calisaya Bark 

roots and he'rbs, and are taken with the pleasure 

of a beverage, without regard to age or time of 

day. Particularly recommended to delicate per 

sons requiring a gentle stimulant. Sold by all 

Grocers, Druggists, Hotels and Saloons. P. H. 
Drake & Co , M'Z Broadway, N. Y. au»-eowly 



TTO! FOR 

Capt- A. 



THE CAVALRY! 

Having received authority from the Governor 
proporii.>s to raise a Company for tho 

2d Minnesota Cavalrj'-. 

All wlio wish to avoid the Dkakt which is rosi- 
TtVKLV to take place on the 5th of Jan., 18(H- 
have a chance to enlist in a regiment that will 
1'Ositivi;l\ never leave tlie State in any case as 
long as forces are needed on our frontier. The 
BOUNTY is the .same as in any other re^ment, 
old or new. Subsistence and transportation fur- 
iilshed to everv recr. ii . Persons desiring to en- 
liit in Capt. Russell's Company, can see him be- 
tween the hours of y A.M. and 4 r. M. at the 
Union Hotel, corner of Itli and Wabashaw-sts., 
St. Paul. CAPT. A. U. JtUSSELL. 

dccO-lm Recruiting Officer. 



Hay be made at 

No. 13S Tliird Street, 

SAINT PAUL. 

We offer at reduced prices to close jut the stock : 

J30 pes. yrenelx Merinos, 

At $1.00 to #1.50, worth $1.13 to #1.75. 

lO pes. Inlaid prepps. 

At 75c, worth 90c. • 

100 pes. MOHAIR 

DRESS GC^ODS 

At 30 to COo, worth 40 to 75c. 

lOO pes. I^ItllVTS, 

At 20c, worth 25c. 

50 PIEOKS 

COTTON FLANNELS, 

At 35 to 55c, with 40 to 60c. 

SO pes. DEIVIIVtS, 

At 30 to 50c, worth 40 t(' 65c. 

500 FOUNIDS 

WOOLLEN TARN, 

At $1.25, worth $1.50. 

IjOOO IPoirrids 

WOOLLEN TAKN, 

At $1.50, worth $1.:5. 
A FULL LINE OF ALL OTHER 

DOMESTIC tlOODS, 

At I*ropoi'tionat€> IPrices?. 
IN HOSIERY, 

GLOVES, 

wnirE GOODS, 



AND BUY YOUR 



AND 



J. 



H. MURPHY, M. D. 



PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON. 

Office on .Jackson street. In the office formerly 
occupied by Drs. Morton fit Wharton, (opposit« 
the Temperance House.) 

Especial attention paid to Surgery. dec23 Om 

EW BOOK OF CHURCH MUSIC. 



N 



WYNKOOP'S ICELAND PECTORAL. 

Diseases ot the Throat, Chest and Pulmonary 
organs are ever prevalent, insidious and danger- 
ous. The properties of a medicine to alleviate, 
cure and uproot these complaints, must be Ex- 
pectorant. Anodyne and Invigorating, looBening 
the mucus of the throat, and imparting tone to 
the entire system. No discovery in medical sci- 
ence ever mastered this class of diseases like Dr. 
Wynkoop's Iceland Pectoral. It is used with the 
most astvnifhingresults in all cases of Bronchitis, 
Influenza, Whooping Cough, Diptheria or Putrid 
Sore Throat, Asthma, Croup, Coughs, Colds, 
Nervous Irritability, &c. 

The Rev. J. J. Potter certlQes, "that I have 
used Dr. Wynkoop's Pectoral for several years, 
myself and in my family, for severe Pulmonary 
Complaints, and have rvcoramended it to many 
others, and have never seen Its equal." 

Rev. J. J. POTTER, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Hundreds and thousands of important testi- 
monials contd be produced, showing its remarka- 
ble cures aud that it never fails. 

It is composed of pure Iceland Moss, Balm of 
Gllead. Peruvian Balsam, Elecampane, Comfrey. 
Burdock, and otljer invaluable expectorant and 
tonic ingredients. It Is harmless, prompt and 
lasting. Invalids and sufferers cannot afford to 
ut'glect atrial. Every family should have it. It 
is remarkable for Croup. Full descriptions, re- 
commeudations and directions accompany each 
bottle. 

Sold by all principal Druggists. 

Prepared by Ur. R. D. Wynkoop, and sold by 
D. S. Barnes & Co., New York. aul5-eowdtwfcw 



THE IIAUP OF JUDAII; A Collection of 
Sacred and Secular Music for Choirs, Schools, 
Musical Conventions, Soch'tics and the Home 
Circle; By I.,. O. Emerson, Author of the " Gold- 
en Wreath." " Sabbath Harmony," &c. 

A book embracing every variety of choice mu- 
sic adopted to tho capacities of all grades of sing- 
ers. Tliough published bui a few months since 
it has alrea<iy been used by twelve Musical Con- 
ventions, and nearly all the leading conventions 
in the United .States are effecting arrangements 
to do so the coming season. Choirs and 1 each- 
ers are rai)idly ado])ting it because they can find 
no book equal ;o it in every requirement desira- 
ble in such a work. Specimen pages (20 tunes) 
will be sent free to any one on application. 

Price of the " Harp of Judah " $1 per copy, 
OLIVER DIT80N & CO., 



$9 per dozen. 
deo23-lyd&w 



Publishers, Boston. 



rpo 



HAGAN'S MAGNOLIA BALM 
This is the most delightful aud extraordinary 
article ever discovered. It changes the eun burnt 
face and hands to a pearly satin texture of ravi 
ishing beauty. Imparting the marble purity ol 
youth, and the </Js«7ii7t/« appearance so inviting 
in the elty belle of fashion. It removes tan, 
freckles, pimples and roughness from the skin, 
l3aving the complexion ttenh, transparent and 
smooth. It contains no material ii^Jurious to the 
ikln. Patronlied by Actresses and Opera Sing 
era. It is what every lady should have. Sold 

everywhere. 

DEHAS S. BARNES fc CO., 
General Agents, 
MS dtw&w ly 202 Broadway, N. Y. 



PROMOTE GOOD HEALTH 

USK THE 
AND 

TVild Cherry Bitters. 

In Pint Bottles, prlceSOc; In Quart Bottles, 75; 

These Bitters arc composed of the best Itoots, 

Barks and Herbs known, and peculiarly adapted 

to the immediate cure of all diseases produced by 

an inactive liver. 

Dandelion and Wild Cherry Bitters 

CUKE SICK HEADACHE. 
Dandelion and Wild Cherry Bitters 
CURE JAUNDICE, 
Dandelion and Wild Cherry Bitters 

CUKE INDIGESTION, 
Dandelion and Wild Cherry Bitters 

CURE COSTIVENESS. 
Dandelion and Wild Cherry Bitters 

CITRE HEART BURN. 
Dandelion and Wild Cherry Bitters 

CURE WEAIiNESS. 
Dandelion and Wild Cherry Bitters 

CUKE LOST APPETITE, 
Dandelion and Wild Cherry Bitters 
CUKE AGUE, 
In its worst forms. They perform these cures 
simply, by one office, regulating the liver. 
For sale by dealers in Medicines, everywhert 
S. HUN riNGTON, IToprietor, 
Farmersburg, Clayton County, Iowa 
For sale by E. II. Biggs, 11. W. Robinson, Pam 
Reiger, St. Paul; S. N. Wickersham, Charles Ben- 
son, L. Weinand & COy and S. Ed • ards, Whole- 
sale Agent, Winona; Charles Hawley, Chatfleld; 
D. B. Stout, Preston; S, Y. Hyde, Fillmore: 
Charles Morrill, Marion ; Capt. Mills and J. D. 
Bance, I'leasant Grove; S. B. Robinson, General 
^Hioletale Agent, address Chatfleld, Min. 

Also— Huntington's Writing Fluid; Howe & 
Stevens' Family Dye Colors ; Van Duson's Worm 
Confections; Van Dusen's Magical Blueing; Al- 
den's Condition Powders; Talman & Collins 
Concentrated Extract ot Lemon; Talman & Col 
lins' Leather Preservative ; Dutcher's Dead Shot 
for Bed Bugs ; Sleeper's Lightning Fly Killer. 
DAY A JTEUKS. St. Paul, 
my27-l7 Wholesale and Retail Agents. 



EMBROIDERIES OR MOTIONS, 
We will not be Undersold. 

Remember the rul i, 
ALL GOODS GUARANTEED AS BEPKE 

SENTED, OR NO SALE, 
And the place. 

No. 132 Third-st., St. Paul. 

decll Im 

S. IL.. B^klLEY Sc CO , 

Aro not the Agents for Cooper's Cabinet Photo- 
graphs, but they have ot hand the 
largest stock of 

Cabinet and. Cliair 

TO BE FOUND IN ST. PAUL. 

Oval Frames, Gilt and Roscacooi' Mouldings, <fc. 
Also, a few Photographs which they will sell 
(not at cost) but at (Caliill & C< .'a) the Agents' 
prices. dec8-lm 

XpOR THE HOLIDAYS! 
AT COMBSbBOOi: STORE, 

CA» BE KOCXD A LARGE STOCK OF 

Ohilclrens' Booths, 

Girt Booliw, 
Pliotoerropli. A.ll>un&i?, 

Sil>les, Prayer "Boolcs, 

&c., suitable for presents. Call in and examine. 

DIA-RIES for 1S64, all Styles, 
decl-tf AT COMBS' BOOK STORE. 

ST. PAUL LAMI» STORE, 

(Branch of the great .Aladdin,) 

Oppoisite I*ioii.e<5r Office. 



CHRISTMAS 

PRESENTS 

AT 

THE CHEAP CASH STORE, 

For that is the place you can get yonr 

MONEY'S ^VOIiTH. 

We have a splendid assortment of 

IVlEIMISrOES 

AND 

EMPRESS CLOTHS, 

Which we will cell 

A^m UtOTT as tl&o IL<oTrest. 

IF YOU WANT 

Sontags, Nubias or Hoods, 

Go to the Cheap Cash Store. 

IF YOU WANT 

'BAJUMiOTLAJL, SKIRTS, 

OB 

HOOP SKIRTS. 

GO TO THE CHEAP CASH STORE. 
We have a fine assortment of 

iL.A.i>iES» cloa.k:s 

Which we are soiling low t« 

CLOSE OUT THE STOCK. 

IF YOU WANT 

HOSIERY OR GLOVES, 

For the cold weather, go to 

FOR THE GENTLEMEN WE HAVE 

Cloths, Beavers, Cassimeres, Satlnetts, Neck 
Tics and Collars, which we will sell 

CHEAP FOR CASH. 
Tlie Olieap Oajsli Store 

Is the i)lace to buy any kind of Domestic Goods, 
cither Cotton or Woollen. 

Remember the place, 

And that we will sell goods as cheap as the 
choapest. 

H. KNOX TAYLOR, 

No. 218 Third Street, St. Paul, 
l^innesota. 

dec20-tl 

AT COST! AT COST! 



OILS, 

L.VMPS, 

SHADES. 

GLOBES, 

LANTERNS 


CHIMNEYS 

BURNERS. 

CANS, 

&€., &C. 


The Largest Stock, 

The 3reatest Variety, 
and ;tho 


Cheapest 


CirOOdS 


EVER EXHIBITED 


IN THIS CITY. 


«3- Wholesale Buyers 


supilied at Eastern 


oash prices. 


■ -I'decS-tf 



m:onkta.ry 



•'aim dog'' 



was paiulully clear j,e, "I uudcrstand that he is a fast hors'c when 



COIN AND EXCHANGE QUOTATIONS OF 

rFlioixipson. Sro's.9 

Saint Paul, December 28, 18C3. 
Bankersand licensed Dealersin Land Warrants, 
Revolutionary and Adult Half Breed Scrip, i^c 

KXCHANOE RATES, 

Selli ng f or , Premlnin 

BankableFunas H perot.prem 

American Gold 46>^ per ot. 

Orders for United States Land Warrants, Stat 
warrants, &n., promptly executed. 

State and United States Coupons paid at oai 
counter. 

Passage Certificates via Liverpool and Han 
burg ; Drafts on England, Ireland and Scotland 
France, Germany and Switzerland, Sweden and 
Norway, for sale at our oflice. 



[Communicated.] 

Pdlmonaby Consumption a Cukable 
Disease III— A Card.— To Consumptives.— 
The undersigned tiaving been restored to health 
in a few weeks, by a very simple remedy, after 
haTing suffered several years with a severe lung 
affection, andthatdread disease Consumption— Is 
anxious to make known to his fellow-sufFerers 
the means of cure. 

To all who desire it, he will send a copy of the 
prescription used (free of charge), with the di- 
rectioni for preparing and using the same, which 
they win find a sure cure for Consumption, 
Asthma, Bronchitis, Couoiis, Colds, &c. 
The only object of the advertiser In sending the 
Proscription is to benefit the atnicted, and spread 
information which he conceives to be invaluable ; 
and he hopes every sufferer will try his remedy, as 
it will cost them nothing, and may prove a bless- 
ing. Parties wishingthe prescription will please 
address REV. EPWARD A. WILSON, 

Williamsburgh, Kings County, 
oo8-3md Jtw New York. 



s 



BRING TRADE.TO THE MER- 



We respectfully invite you to examine our une- 
qualled MLsoellaueous stock of 

STAPLE AND FANCY DItY GOODS, YAN- 
KEE NOTIONS, WOOLEN GOODS, 
HOSIERY, CKOCKERYj CHINA, 
GLASS, CUTLEKY, PLATED 
GOODS, ETC., ETC. 
No house in the country offers better induce- 
ments in goods and prices. We have every facil- 
ity and are prepared to sell the Best Cash Trade 
at a protti below Ka«tern figures. 

«^Si>ecial attention paid to all orders aocom- 
nied with money or references. 

jiou'JBsr nnOTKKmi, 

Xniportera and JTobbers. 

Nos. 72, 74 and 7C Lake St., Chicago. 
m8My. 

TTORSE BLANKETS, 

S K -A. T E S 

AND 

SLEIGm BELLS. 

Large assortment lust received and for sale low 
at the Saddlery Warehou6e of 



oe29 



C. PROAL. 
Comer of Third and Robert-4ta, 



JUST RECEIVED 

A.1ST> FOR SALE, 

lOO Sarrels 

CAJRBOIV OIL. 

CHAS. A. UPHAM & CO., 

Ifo.A, PrlBC«'a Block. JTtickaoa Street, 

St. Paul, aUiiB. 

nolO-ly 

AC% BUSUEI>S CHOICE RIPE 
r±:\J o^jioivi. 



Just received b^ 
nov5 



A.M. WIMBISH, 

Jackson Street. 



T 



AX DEEDS 



THE PRESS PRINTING COMPANY 

Hav^ now on hand the latest unA best form o 
tax deeds. It is suitable for sales under the sev 
eralacts of the T/egislature. and in conformity 
with all their requisitions, and is prepared by lot 
State authorities 
Price so cents per dosen, or • I per handnd. 



w 



A ,,N TED, 



TOBACCO, CIGARS, PIPES, 
SNUFF, Ac. 

F. W. TTJCHELT, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in Tobacco, Cigars, 
fcc. FittO Imported Cigars, S^noklng and Chew- 
ing Tobacco. Fiae Cut Chewing, superior to any 
IntlwJCity. .Sweet Briar Root Pli>i>s. a large as- 
sort meiitv ■ F. W. TUCHELT, 

Third-st., near Edgerton's Bank, ^ 
my«-ly St. P.iul. ^ deeU-tf 



Sptkers a&d Lalwrers on the c onstmction work 
of the St. Paul and Paciflo ItaUroai. Liberal 
wag«8 will be paid. Paymerts made weekly. 
Apply to F. R. Delano, Assistant Superintendent, 
at Freight Depot, St. Paul, cr John Murphy, 
Foreman, Mauomln. 

o«ao-tf W. B. LITCI [FIELD h CO. 



4-00 BARRELS 

GOOD WINTER APPLES, 

FOR SALE BY 
G^eo. E. Sclma.'bely 



FOR THE NEXT FOUR WEEKS WE WILL 

SELL JSJT COST 

Our stock of 

CLOTHING, 

Shirts, Drawers, Hats 

AND 

Fu.rnisliiiig' GS-oods* 

As at the end of that time we intend leaving for 
the East to purdiase our 

SPI^IIVG^ STOCIC 

Those who want BARGAINS IN CLOTHING, 
will find this a rare chance. 

BLOOMIXGDALE & RHINE, 

213 THIRD-ST., ADJOINING THE AMEB 
ICAN EXPRESS OFFICE. 

decl5-lmd&w 

A. BLAKEMAN'S, 




Cor, Jack son and ith-ita. 



THE NEW JEWELRY STORE, 

Four doors below THOMPSON & BROTHER'S 

Bank, and next door below SHAW'S 

Fashionable Hat Store, 

On Third Street* 

Can t>e seen splendid 
SILVER TEA SETS, CAKE BASKETS, ICB 

PITCHERS, CASTORS, 

Solid Silver Spoons — Pure as Coin, 

Diamond, Opal and Ruby Rings, SoUd Gold Ear- 
Rings and Pins in sets, 

From #1S to 0SO. 

flO.OOO worth of SETH THOMAS CLOCKS 
JUST RECEIVED. 

Those wlahing to supply themselves with a per- 
fect Clock, will buy the SETH THOMAS 
CLOCK of 

A.. bjl.^kem;^iv. 

N. B.— The Cheap American Gothic Clock, al 
Factory prices. All warranted to run well. 



A FiNR assortmknt of the American 
manufactured Watch adjusted to heat and oold, 
and the most perfect timer made, A. BLAKE- 
MAN sells them at manufactory prices. Dont 
mistake the place. Be sure that you call in at 
THE NEW JEWELRIT STORE. apl8-l7 

"pOSTER & HARDENBURGH, 

SHIP CHANDLERS AND 
SAIL MAKERS, 

Se. •!* S^ath lV»ter Street, Chlca««t 

Have constantly on hand a large assortment ot 

Mlanilla. Sc rranred JBope, 
Ditohini; Ropes, 

Old Canvass, Oakum, Tar, Pitch, 

CHAINS, TACKLE BLOCKS, TENTB, AWW 

ING&, WAGON COVERS, COTTON 

AND RUSSIA DUCKS, 

TT-iA-GlS, Sec* Ao. 

Common and Patent H«lat WHAwla.for i 

ings, constantly on band. 

OBO. W, F08TKR. Qolilj) O. M. HA»»«WV»»» 



> 

: 



1 



WW-? i 



immmmti^t 



I «■ I ^ ■ f Wl 



n 



!»« 



i25 



\ 




:=» 



It 



11 



■Jk 



SIMS, VAWTEB & BOSE. 

DRUGS, DRUGS, DRUGS, 

▲T 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

(UNION BLOCK,) 

IVo.lll Third Street. 

Our aim is to keep In store a well selected and 

COMPLETE ASSOUTMEXT OF GOODS. 

We feel that thus f ir our efTorts have been duly 

ajiprceiated, and trustinit a continuance 

of patronage, we renew our 

cndeavora. 

OILS, PAINTS AND GLASS. 

Our BURXIXG OILS we notice especially, and 

ask a trial of its merits. The Oil that is 

most DUK ABLE, giving the same 

light, is of course 

The Oil to Buy. 

TILDEN'S FLUID EXTRACTS, 

Pills and Granules, at card prices. 

Hilton's Insoluble Cement, 

For mending Furniture and wood in all shapes; 

Ivory, Bone, Crockery, Glass, Karthen- 

Ware, Leather, Paper, &c., &c., 

SUPEUCEDES ALL OTHERS. 
Tl»€> A-morican M^ngrnetic 

Geo. II. Dadd, Veterinary Surgeon, says " I hurt 

examined and pronounce them, the best 

CONDITION POWDER, now in 

WK HOLD 2 HE AGENCY. 

Our stock of PERFUMKRIK"? and Fancy Goods 
will uijual any in the city. 

C.VLL. EXAMINE, PRICE AND PURCHASE. 

SIMS, jrA.innwwL * rose, 

St. Paul. 



§yg 600d5e 



(&xutm^ 



G 



o 



T O 




SAINT PAUL PRESS, SUKDAT, JAJN^UART 8, 1864 



OUR SPECIALTIES. 



niE CELEBRATED FAMILY DYE 
COLORS. 



In cases, 
retail. 



Jy2{5-tf 



assorted to suit dealers, and also at 

SIMS, VAWTER ft ROSE, 

No. Ill Tliird street. 



DRESS GOODS.— A large line, con- 
sisting of French Merinos, All Wool and 
Union Plaids, Empress Cloths, Plaid Valencias, 
Muslin de Laines, &c.,&c. at very low figures, at 

HOGTAN &. CA]V1P*S. 



SHAWLS, — We Lave now on hand a 
selection of Long and Square Shawls, 
which the most fastidious can select from. As 
our prices are always as low as the lowest, we 
invite inspection on them, at 

Hofiran Sc Camp's. 



I»tJT]VAM:»S 



FOB 

FRESH OANNKD 

RASPBERRIES, 

BLACKBERRIES,'^ 
STRAWBERRIES, 
PEACHES, 

PINE APPLES, 

TOMATOES, 

CHERRIEB 

NEW DRIED 

BLACKBERRIES, 

RASPBERRIES, 
CHERRIES, 

PEACHES, 

APPLES, 

RAISINS, 

CITRON, 
CURRANTS, SAGO, FARINA, 

TAPIOCA AND HOMONT. 

Stuart's White Drip, Extra Honey, Golden, Am- 
ber and Sugar lloase Syrups. 

New Sugar Cured Dried Beef, and Pine Apple 

Cheese, aod a complete and desirable 

stock of Fresh 

&, Pro-vlMiona. 

S. K. PUTNAil, 
near the Post Offlo*. 



COOLEY, CARVER & CO., 
WHOLESALE GROCERS. 

IMPORTERS AND DEALERS EST 

FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC LIQUORS, WINES, 

CIGARS, &C., &C. 

JTackson Street, between Levee and. Tliird, 



Janl-tf 



SAJNrC FA.TJJL,. 



Crroceirlefii 



CIDER. 

100 bbU. pure Juice of the Apple, at PUTNAM'S. 
2S boxes liabeUas and Catawbas, at PUTNAM'S 



CLOAKS AND CLOAKINGS.— Our 
stocic of these goods is very extensive. We 
have Seal Skin Beavers, Frosted Bearers, Esqui- 
roeaux Beavers, Castor Beavers, Doeskins and 
¥e\ta. Broadcloths iu all colors, at the lowest 
market prices, at 

nOGAN & CAMP'S. 



»o 



IKKLING'S AMBROSIA. 



nr.lM^TliEKT'S ISIMITABLK HAIR 
COLOniSO FOR THE HAIR. 



Jy25-tf 



SIMS, VAWTER fc BOSE'S, 

No. Ill Third street. 



II 



AGAN'S 15ALM, 

FOR THE COMPLEXION. 



Jy25-tf 



SIMS, VAWTER ft ROSE, 

Union Block. 



§UJrb4nb'jt ^tAwm. 



1864:. 



1864:. 



1864:. 



Winter AjTranuonctettt. 

MINNESOTA STAGE CXjMPANT. 
PASSENGER LINX 



BALMORAL SKIRTS.— Having up- 
wards of 500 assorted styles of English, 
French, and American manufacture for Ladies, 
Misses and children. We can sell them at a little 
under the market price, by the single Skirt, or 
dozen, at 

HOGAIV &, CAJMP'S. 



LL 

. SPECIALITIES, 
and we feel that we can 



ments on them that 
la can. 



HOUSES HAVE THEIR 

The above are our's, 
at present offer induce- 



APPLES. 

400 barrels Winter, at PUTNAM'S. 



no4 



BRADFORD BROTHERS, 

WHOLESALE DEALERS, 
JVos. XSry and. ISO East ^Water Street, 

Are now opening an immense Stock of Domes- 
tic, Staple and Fancy Dry Goods to which they 
call the attention of the Merchants of the North 
west—among which we offer the following : 



G 



EO. E. SCHNABEL 



GENERAL DEALBB IH 



no other llouso iuMiuucso- 



dec2 



The roaas are well stocked with »rit olaas 
horses, Concord Coaches, with careful and expe. 
rlenced diivers, all under the control of oompe* 

tdnt agents. 

8CHKUULE Of DEPARTFRE3 FROM SAIlfT PAUL*. 

For Hastings, Red Wing, lAke City, Reed'i 
Wabashaw, Miuneiska, Winona, and La Crosse 
at f,', o'clock A. M. 

For Still water— Daily , at 8 A. M. 

For Shakopee, Joi-dan, St. Lawrence, Bellt 
Plain, Henderson, Le Sueur, Ottawa, Traverse de 
Sioux, St. Peter and Maukato— Daily at 4 o'clock 

A.M. 

For Rosemonnt, Castle Rock, Northfleld, Can 
non City, Faribault, Medford, CUnton F^ls and 
Owatonna, connecting at Owatonna, for WiltOE, 
St. Mary's, Winnebago Agency and Mankato 
Also for Rice Lake, Claremont, Wasioja, Man 
torviile, Rochester, Chaifield,and Winona— Daily 

»t4 A.M. ^ ^ , ;, 

For Industrlana, Anoka, Orono, Orland<\ 
Monticello, Clearwater, St. Augusta and St 
Cloud— Daily, at 7 A. M. , ^ 

For Sauk Rapids, BeUe Prairie, Fort Ripley and 
Crow Wing— Mondays, Wednesdays and FiL 
day^ at 7 o'clock A. M. ^^ 

For P.ichmond, Sauk Centre, Alexandria, 
Chippewa. Pomme de Terre, Breckinridge, Fort 
Abercrombie, Mondays and Thursdays at 7 
o'clock A. M. . „, 

For Little Canada, Columbus, Sunrise City- 
Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, at 7 o'clock 

A M. 

For further particulars inquire at the General 
Omce on Third Street. „ . „^ 

J. C. BURBANK k CO. 
ap21-dly Proprietors 



THI3EM> STR-EET, 



Eamily GS-roceriea, 
GRAIN AND PROVISIONS. 

In Moffet'i Castle, corner Jackson and Fonrt 
street. 

Goods delivered to all parts of the City fk-ee ol 
charge. no20-tl 

P P L E S . 

200 bbls. selected 
Fall and Wintex* A.ppleM 

AT PUTNAM'S. 
Choice White 

Winter ^Vlleat Flour, 

AT PUTNAM'S. 

CHEESE— ONE THOUSAND LBS. 

Oc9-tt AT PUTNAM'S. 

/^ W. WOOLLET, 

LOWER LEVEE, SAINT PAUL, 

A2fD 

Oommission 9iIeirolxaat« 

DKALKR IN OROCERIXS 
.GRAIN, PROVISIONS, LIME, &C., *C., hO, 

AITD 
AGKNT FOR THB 

PENNSYLVANIA RAILROAD AND 

CONNECTIONS. 

Contracts for transportation between St. Paul 

Boston, New England, Montreal, New York and 

all points East, made upon the lowest and most 

favorable terms. 

Mark packages, "C. W. WOOLLEY, 

St. Paul, 
Janl-dly For 



25 Cases M. De Laines, 
25 Bales Twilled Flannels, 
20 " Plain colored do.j 
100 Cases Denims, 

75 

30 

50 

20 



Stripes, 

Ticking, 

Cotton Flannels, 

Linsevs, 
3000 lbs. Wool tarn, 
1000 doz. Wool Socks, 
200 Bales assorted Batting, 






250 Cases Prints, 
200 Bales ShirtiDgs, 
50 Bales Fine Shining, 
24 Bales Satinets, all grades, 
10 " Grey Cassimeres, 
10 Cases Fancy Cassimeres, 
100 Pieces Alpaccas, 
2000 " Cobergs, 
Twine, Wicking, 
Wadding, Cotton Yarn, 
&c., &c., &c., &c. 



J. 



p. HUTCHINSON & CO. 



F 



OR THE CARS 



Our Omnibnsses will run to and from the prin 
dpal Hotels and Boats in connection with the 
trains of the 

ST. PAUL AND PACIFIC RAILROAD. 

Passengers and baggage will be called for in 
an wer to orders leit at the American, Interna 
tional and Merchants, or at our office. 

Jy8 J. C. BURBANK fc CO. 

VTERCHANTS' DISPATCH 
Fast Freifirlit I^ne. 

OWNED AND MASAOBD BT 

AJVtKRlCA.N KXPRK88 CO 

All overcharges settled by J. C. fc BU C* Bar 

bank & Co., A ents. 
New York office, 1^ Murray street. 
Boston office, 69 Washington streett 
mar gS-dly 

BBLS. STUART'S BEST HON. 

ey Syrup, a choice article, for table use at 
J. C. * H. C. BURBANK fc Co.'s. 



HOODS, SONTAGS & NUBIAS, 



-BJ^l^lMOTtJLI^ 



ANP 



HOOI> SKIHTS, 



JUST RECEIVED BT 



L. C. BURT, 
14 6 

THIRD STREET. 

oc20-ljr 



Oommifiiisiion ]M[ eirdiantfli 

AND 

FBODUCE DEAIiERS, 

SIBLEY STREET, NEAR LEVEE 

♦ «16-ly gt. Paul, Minnesota. 

TJEAUPRE & KELLY, 
FORWARDINO AND COMMISSION 

AND 

Wholesale Grocers, 

Prince's Block, Jackson-st., St. Paul. 



ALSO, 

A FULL LINE OF YANKEE NOTIONS, 

WHITE GOODS, RIBBONS, HOODS, 

SHIRTS and DRAWERS, RIBBED JACKETS, 
BLANKETS, SAXONY PLAIDS, HOSIERY, 
GLOVES, BUCK GLOVES and MITTS ; 

AND 

Innumerable other goods pertaining to the Jobbing 
Dry G-oods Business, making an Immense Stock 
which for EXTENT, ASSORTMENT and CHEAP 
NESS is unrivalled in the West. 

To those wishing to buy at New- York Prices 
and less, we would solicit an examination of our 
Stock and Prices. Respectfully, 



In the matter ot the application of the Minne- 
apolis, Faribault and Cedar Valley Railroad Com- 
pany for the appointment of thiee Commissioners 
to examine and assess the dams ges which may bo 
sustained by the several ownes or claimants ot 
the lands through which tlie road of said Compa- 
ny (the St. Paul branch) is located within the 
county of Ramsey in the Stat* of Minnejota, by 
reason of the appropriation t.f such lands for 
Railroad purposes V said Comiwny: 

To the several owners and claimants of tne 
lands in this notice mentioned, or of any part 
thereof, and to all and every person or persons 
having or claiming any estate, -ight or interest in 
any portion of such lands : Yc u and each of you 
are hereby notified that an spplication will be 
made by and in behalf of the Hinneapolis, ian- 
bault and Cedar Valley RaUroa i Company , to the 
Hon. Edward C. Palmer, «'"dre of the District 
court, of the Second Judicial District, of the 
State of Slinnesota, at the Ccmrt House, in the 
City of Saint Paul, in said Rimsey County, on 
the thirteenth day of January, a. d. lh<H, at 
eleven o'clock in the forenoon of that day, for 
the appointment of three Commissioners to ex- 
amine and assess the damages which may be sus- 
taiuea by the several owners and claimants ( 1 tlie 
<iveral pieces, parcels, lots ar tracts of land, 
through or upon wiiich the roa i of said Company, 
to wit : the St. Paul branch th >reof, is located in 
said county of Ramsey, by reason of the appro- 
priation and taking thereof by said Company, for 
kaiiroad purposes, to wit : foi the right of way 
for their said road, the necess ary turnouts, sites 
for water buildings, conduits, tiinks, depots, st»re- 
houses, nachine and otlier ihops, and extra 
tracks uece8^ary therefor, and to ascertain and 
fix the compensaiion to be ps id therefor by said 

Company. , . . - ... , j 

The following is a descripuon of the lanas 
within the said county of Rimsey, through or 
upon which said road is locited, and which is 
sought to be taken and appropriated for the pur- 
poses aforesaid : 

In Rice tf Irvine^s Addition to St. Paul. 
Partof lots 5, 6, 7 and 8, In block 30. 
Part of lots (•>. 7, 8, 9, 10, 11 ind 12, In block 37. 
The whole of block 38. 
1 he wholo of block 39. 
The whole of block 40. 
Part of lots 5, , 7, 8 and 9, in block 41. 
The whole of block 43. . „ , v, , . . 

Part of lots 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 3 and 9, in block 44. 
Part of lots 1. 2, 3, 4, 5 and : l, in block 45. 
The whole of lots 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 6 and 7, in block 46. 
The whole of block 47. 

The whole of block 48. ^ » . u. i A,^ 

The whole of lots 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 0, in block 49. 

In Irvine's Enlargement. 

Part of lots 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 and 13, and the whole 
of lots 17 to 25, inclusive, in block 68. Also, the 
strip of land lying between lots 8 and 9, in said 
block 08, and the whole of blocks 09 and 70. 

In Leach's Addition t > St. Paul. 

Part of lot 7, in block 7. 

In Winalow's Addition to St. Paul. 
Part of lots 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5, in block 14. 
I'art of lots 4, 5 and 0, in bl )ck 15. 
Part of block 17. 
In Stinsin, Brown cf Rami ey's Addition to St. 
Paul. 

Part of the south half of b ock 15. 

I'art of lot 11, in the north iialf of block 15. 

Part of block 16. „. ,„ ^. j 

Part ol lots 11. 12, 28, 29, 30, 69,60, 01, 63, 64 and 
G5, in the siifj-dicisUyn of block 28, 

Part of lots 2, 3, 4 and 5, in the sub-diviston ol 
block 29. 

ALSO, Part of the s e ,'«' of the s e Ji of sec. 1, 
of township is, range 23, ani part of the n w >« 
of the n e >4 of sec. 12, of the same township and 

llimge. , ,. 

n. R. BIGELOW, A.ttorney for the 
M., F. at C. V. R. R. Cc, St. Paul, Minn. 
Dated December mil. A. 1' IWa . d««l«-td 



Milwaukee, Sept. 28, 1863. 



BRADFORD BROTHERS.^,^ 



latrtji. 






TEMPERANCE HOUSE. 



]VIILAV.A.XJKEE. 



CASH BUYERS OF DRY GOODS 



ARK OFFERED TUB 



MOST MANIFEST INDUCEMENTS, 



JOHN BURNHAM.Propiietor, would respect 
fully announce to the traveli ig public that he hac 
opened the new and commodious building on the 
comer of Jackson and Fourth streets, for the ac 
oommodatioi) of travelers, where he will be hap 
py to see his old friends, and all otiiers who maj 
favor him with their patronage. The house is 
only two blocks from the stf amboat landing and 
railroad depot. Baggage wi il be carried from and 
to the boats/ree of charge. Table supplied with 



Are now eoelvlag an azteMlTe stock of 



Fall and ^^inter 

DBYGOODS, 



from 



Late Cash Sales in New York 



Consisting in part of 

MUSLIN„ DE. LAINES, 

LUPIN'S TRENCH MERmOES. 
EMPRESS CLOTHS, 

FRENCH REPS, 
PARIS Sn.K STRffES, 
PARAMATTAS, 

Alpaccas, Mohairs, &c., &o. 
Mionrning Q-oocis. 

LADIES' LONG AND SQUARE 

In cTery yarlety. 

iCloakings, Balmoral Skirts, 

Kid Padded Hoop Skirts, 

Hoods, Scarfw, Sonta«rei. 

Consisting of English and German Cotton, Wool- 
len and Worsted Ilose. 

LADIES * CHILDREN'S BALMORAL HOSE. 

White and mixed 

WRAPPERS & DRAWERS. 

CLOTHS andCASSIMEIlES. 

White, red and ndxed] 



} 




1 

\ 









I II 



Bagga 

of chi ^ .. ^ 

the bi'st the market afford 3. Good stabling at- 
tached to the premises. 
St. Paul, April 9.1863. 



wii-iy 



^HITCHER'S HOTEL, 

between Re hert and Jackson 



BY THE NEW HOUSE, 



^HER^VIIV, IVOAVELL & JPI1.A.TT, 



172 and 174 East Water Street. 



ftn20-d twfcw 



FREIGHT AGENTS FOR 

Milwaukee & Prairie du Chien B.B 



LAFLIN, SMITH & CO.'S 

G-TJ1VI*0"WI>EK. 

St Paul, October 13, 18«3. ool3-flin 



§>a);tlwm. 



W 

FouHh-St 

ST. PAUL, MINNESOTA. 

E. B. WHITCHER, Proprietor 

The above house having recently been opened 
and thoroughly renovated md refurnished, the 
Proprietor would respectfully solicit a share of 
the public patronage. t(3r Good Stabling and 
careful Hostlers in attendance. |ylO-tf 



Sheetings, Sliirlings, Tickings, 

Denims, Blanlzets. 

ALL COUNTRY MERCHANTS who pnrchaae 

FOR CASH. 

Should examine our stock before purchasing. 
W* will not be undersold in this market. 
X>. IIF. In^ersoll Sc Oo., 



■Mi.^ 



Sept. 1:1T 



•T. PAIJli, M.Km. 



^(wing pa«bit»is. 



Wheeler & Wilson's 



20 



^ 



.#^^2,^®%^ 



150 



BOXES W. R. CHEESE; A 

prime article, at low figures, at 
J. C. k. H. C. BURBANK & Co.'s 



A LARGE STOCK OF ClOARS, 
which we offer at prices that will Insure 
Quick Hales, at 
J.C.tt H. C. BURBANK ft Co.'s 

K PACKAGES ASSORTED 



Fruits, consisting of Plunis, Prunes, 



125 

Currants and Citron, all new crop, for sale at 
prices to suit the times. 
J. C. & H. C. BURBANK t Co.'s 

\ro\] WILL FIND ONE OF THE 

A largest am', best selected stocks of Grocer 
les in the West, at the warehouse of 
dec 18 J. C.fc H.C. BURBANK fc Co. 

BOXES ASSORTED TO- 
bacco, comprising all the favorite 




J. B, B»A.r>E]V, 

Has now received from the Eastern Manufacturers 
a f\ill and complete assortment of 

IRON, 

Hardivare, JVails, 

steel of all kinds. Springs, Axles, Bolts, Nuts, 

Axes, Horse Shoes, Horse Nails, Sleigh 

Shoes, Thimbu Skeins, Carriage 

Trimmings, 

Wagon and Buggy \Vood, 

Iron Kettles, Coal, Window Glass and Sash, 
and all other Goods in our line, sold Wholesale 
and ReUil. „ . 

Warehouse 154 llilrd street, St. Paul. 

apl7-ly 

-piONEER FOUNDRY AND 
AGRICULTURAL WORKS, 

ST. PAUL, - - - MINNESOTA, 

ManuAietnres all kinds of Machinery, Steam 
Engines, Horse Powers, Mill and Machine Cast- 
ings of all descriptions. Having the largest as- 
sortment of Patterns of any establishment in 
this State, we are prepared to do all kinds ot Iron 
and Brass Casting, of finishing, promptly, at the 
lowest Eastern rates. Particular attention fiT< B 
to Threshing Machine, Steam Engine and ltoi:«r 

^Kn°g' OILMAN t CO. 

rpHRESHING MACHINES, 

1, 2, 3, 4, fl, 8 and 10 Horse Power, for sale very 
low, at the Pioneer Foundry and Agricultural 
Works. (aull) GILMAN & CO. 



CUTTER, SECOMBE & CO., 

HAVE ESTABLISHED A 

WHOLESALE PAPER WAREHOUSE 

In this city, In connection with their 

F.AJPER IWLILL, ITV ST. ATVTHOISY, 

▲nd desire to call tho attention of buyers to their 

IiTiTnense Stock of 

LETTER, NOTE AND CAP PAPER, ENVELOPES, BOOK AND NEWS PRINT, FLAT AND 

ALL KINDS OF WRAPPING PAPERS, PRINTERS' AND WRITING INKS 

AND FLUIDS, PENS, PENCILS, &C., 4C. 

Afeats for 

GREENLEAF & TAYLOR'S MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

We will sell as low as Eastern Jobbers with Freight added. 

THE HIGHEST MARKET PRICE IN CASH PAID FOR 

PAPER RAGS, ROPE, GUNNIES & OLD NEWSPAPERS. 



OC22-tf 



Office No. 220 Tliird-St., St. Paul. Tallin. 



T^ ST A li LI SHED 17 60. 

I^eter X^orillard, 

Snuff and Tobacco Manufacturer, 

lO and \>i Cliaiub«ra>8t., 

(Formerly 42 Chambers Street, New York,) 
Would call the attention of Dealers to the articles 
of his manufacture, viz : 

BROWN SNUFF. 

tfacaboy, Den igros. 

Fine Kappee, I'ure \irg h'ia. 

Coarse Rappee, ^achltoche8, 

American Gentleman, Copenhagen 

YELLOW tNUFF. 

Scotch, Honey Dew Scotch, High Toast Scotch, 

Fresh Honey Dew ?(otch, Irish High 

Toast, or Lundj foot. Fresh 

Scotct . 

4®- Attention Is called to the large reduction 

in prices of Fine-Cut Chewing and Smoking 'lo- 

bacco, which will be found ol a superior quality. 

TOBACCO. 

FINE CUT CHEWING.— P. A. L., or plain; 
Cavendish, or Sweet; Sweet Scented Oronoco ; 
Tin Foil Cavendish. 

SMOKING.-Long; No. 1; No. 2; Nos. 1 and 2 
Mixed; Granulated; S. Jiigo; Spanish; Canas- 
ter; Turkish. .„ ^ 

N. B.— A circular of pri jes will be sent on ap 
plication. marl5^v_ 

O T S AND SHOES, 



B" 



/CLOTHING AND 

Gent's Furnishing Goods, 

AT THE STORE OF 

THIRD ABOVE MINNESOTA ST. 

Overcoats. 

FINE B EAVER $14, $18 and $25. 

BLACK DOESKIN, CASSIMKUE 

AND CLOTH $14 to $20. 

PETEKbHAM, PILOT 4 SATINET. .$8 to $18. 

Business Coats, Froclcs & Sacks 

A large assortment, $6 to $20. 

Pantaloons for the Million. 

From a coarse Satinet to a fine Doeskin, all new 
goods, and made up in style. 

VESTS. 

Black Doeskin, Cb th. Figured Casslmere, Silk 
and Silk Velvet, of diflerent grades. 

Shix-ts and. Dravrers, 

Winter Caps, Hats, Gloves, Socks, Ties, 
FINE WHITE AND FANCY WOOL SHIRTS. 

We have now in store one of the largest stocks 
of Clothing ill the State Our goods have been 
bought so that we can give bargains. Those in 
want of any article In our line would do well to 
give us a call. 

my30-tf IV. H. TEMPI.B. 



AT 



ST. PAUL & PACIFIC RAILROAD— WINTER ARRANGEMENT, 



On and after JANUARY Ist, 1864, the Passenger Trains wUl run as foUows: 

EVENING. 



V 



420 

brauas,at 



300 



J. C. fc H. C. BURBANK ft Co.'s 

WHOLE, HALF AND QUAR- 

ter boxeti Raisins, crop of 186., at 
J. C. ft U .C. BURBANK ft Co.'s 



rpo MY FRIENDS & PATRONS. 

' Having engaged my services to the Messrs. J. 
C. ft H. C. Burbauk ft Co.. corner Levee and Sib- 
ley streets, 1 may be found in the Wholesale Gro" 
oery Department, where it will afford me pleasor* 
to see my old customers once more. 

W« shall have a large and well selected stock 
of good!*, usually kept In our lino, on hand, which 
I respectfully ask you to examine before purchas 
In^eWwhere. I hope to merit for the house a 
portion at least of that patronage you have here- 
tofore so UbendlT bestowed upon me 

mars A, L, LARPENTKUK. 



1 15,000 

Of them in use in this country 
and Europe. 

These are the only machines making 
th« Lock stitch with (he Rotating 
Hook. 

Are profitable and available a life 
time. 

Equal to ten seamstresses. 

An annual dividend of 100 to BOO 
per cent, ^on their cost) may be obtained in 
use — by tneir possessor. 

The Class Cloth-Presser, (so popu* 
lar,) can only be had with these Machineo. 
W. H. XOHMSOM, Afir«at, 

jyl4 264 Third street, St. Paul. 

pLANOS AND MELODEONS^ 

F. O. WT:iL.r>EIl, £c CO., 

Dealers in Piano-Fortes, Melodeons, Harmoni- 
ums, Cabinet Organs, Sheet Music, Music Books, 
fco., ftc. No. 230 Thlrd-st., corner of St. Peter-st., 
St. Paul. Minnesota. Agents for the celebrated 
A. M. McPhaU ft Co.'s Star and Grand Soale Pi- 
anos, Also, the Prrlor Gem. 

Mr. Wilder is a Piano-Maker, and has been in 
the business over 20 years, and will sell nothing 
but arst-class instruments. Every instrument 
will be warranted, and all Pianos sold by the Arm 
will be kept in tune one year f^ee of charge, if 
within a reasonable distance. 

4^ Pianos and Melodeons toned and repairvd. 

Lesson given on the Piano and Meloileen. 
ao26-(fkwl7 



/-X)RDAGE, 

FANNING 



SLEIGH SHOES AND 
MILLS. 



MORNING. 

^Leaves St.Panl V^,*"^' 

Leaves St. Anthony..... ......7:45 a.m. 

Leaves Manomin ^ '-^^ a. M. 

Arrive at Anoka 8:40 a. m. 



I.eaves Anoka ,,,....••........••" :o5 a.m. 

Leaves Manomin 9:30 A. m. 

Leaves f,t. Anthony 9:i5 A.M. 

Arrive at St. Paul 10:35 a, M. 



Leaves St. Paul 2:15 p.m. 

Leaves St. Anthony 3 :.30 p. m. 

Leaves Manomin 3 :oO P.M. 

Arrive at Anoka 4 :25 p. M. 

liSaves Anoka •.... • 4.40 p. M 

Leaves Manomin • 5:15P. M. 

Leaves St. Anthony 5:40 P.M. 

Arrive at St. Paul 6:20 p.m. 



A.S»ista,]it Superintendent. 



For tale by 
Jel4-tf 



mCOLS, DEAN h 00. 



C 



A R B O N 



OIL 



Oajr1>on Oil l>y tlieBajnrel. 



Je5-tf 



For sale low. 

NICOLS, DEAN ft CO. 



«pl8tf 



THE GALENIC INSTITUTE. 

FOR THE TREATMENT OF 

VENEREi^X. DISEASES, 




NEW YORK PRICES. 

20 per Cent. Saved 

By 
BUYING YOUR SHOES 

AT 

B R O ^V N ' S. 

NE^\^ STORE?, 
113 Third Street, 

One blook above the Merchant's Hotel. 
Je5-y 

u 



ESIRABLE LANDS FOR SALE. 



D 



COF- 



OHEET IRON, TIN PLATE, 
PER BOTTOMS, 
ZINC AND TINNERS' STOCK, 



>!^;/'Cl(!i*' 



AND 



ap24 1y 



For sale by 
NICOLS. 



DEAV ft CO. 



►ATENT AMALGAM BELL, 



SUITABLE FOR A SCHOOL HOUSB 
SMALL CHURCH. 



OR 



T9t sale low by 
dec2tr 



NICOLS, DEAN ft CO. 



F 



OR SALE CHEAP. 



stoves, nn Ware, Hardware, Hollow Ware, 
Steel Traps and Shingles. Highest price paid in 
cash for Wheat, Wool, Old Copper, Iron, Lead 
and Rags. Bobert-st., ftrst store from Third-st. 

marltt/ WEST ft CO. 

DOZEN DUBOIS BEST CAST 

steel Axes. Also 30 doaen Red River 
Axes: also 25 Boxes assorted Blued Tacks, first 
Qoalltyi at 

J. C. * H. C. BURBANK k Co.»l 



'All AffectioDS of the Urinary and. Generative 

Organs, &c., &c. 

3v*r PiTBLisHEn— A MamcAt Report, 30th edition, containing 80 large pagers, and «0 line 
tJaS« and enVravines trice only 15 cents, on the Improved Treatment of Spermatorrhea or Seminal 
^eSuess, Sffvous*^aLd sfxual DebiUty, "and the effects of Masturbation or Self Abuse on the Body 
and lUnd, including a Treatise on 

vetsteh-eaIj diseases. 

Gonorrhea, Gleet. Strictures, Sj-phUlis, and affections of the Testicles. B|f"»,«|". »°^ KW^^^^^^^ ^"^ 
observations on tKe diseasks of females. Marriage, Reproduction, *"d t»'« P^„«^^""°° ®*^ ^«"- 
centlon &c Sent to anv addre ss in a sealed wrapper on receipt of 15 cents or btanips, 

Cs InsUtution was S?giXd under a special charter in 1850 The method of treatment ado; 
Is the same as that employed \n the best French Knglish and American hospitals 
physician is a reguUr graduate of the ColUgiiMedicx Ohtoensis. ^ it/>out degTading 
&8m,as is practfced bv advertising quacks, " former sufferers .» and ''benevolent a 
likeRicord,Civiale,V.\dal,Bua.stead, ftc has made this bjanch of Surgery a soec 
pugt te- ""-— -"-' «- — "^-^ »" t^^- natifinta as irood treatment as they could obtain in Eastern 
Cities. 



NITED STATES NAVY. 



Lands In Qk> valley of the Upper Mississippi, 
and acbacent Cu the line of the St. Paul and Paci- 
tlc Itailroad. 

The St. Paul and Pacific Railroad Company 
now oflfrr in tract* of 40, 80, 120 and 160 acres and 
upwards— 120 sections, or 76,800 acres of land, in 
the following townships, viz : 

Town. 32, Range 22. 

" 22. 

•• 23. 

" 2S. 

" 24. 

" 24. 

•• 24. 

» 24. 

" 25. 

" 25. 

" 25. 

" 26, 

" 26, 

ited In th 
Anoka, Isanti ^1k1 Sherburne, and comprise some 
of the most valuablo lauds in tlie townships 
named. 

Thny vlll be sold for cash, the bonds ef 
Company at par. or On lon^ credit. 
For pricey anu terms of payment apply to 
laSP commissioner, 

St. Paul and Pacilic Railroad Company, 
ec27-dftw6m St. Paul, Minnesota. 



These lands 



it 


33, 


II 


22. 


<t 


32 


II 


23. 


u 


8.3, 


II 


28. 


II 


32, 


fi 


24. 


II 


83, 


II 


24. 


II 


24, 


II 


24. 


<l 


86, 


II 


24. 


l< 


3.3 


II 


25. 


II 


84 


II 


25. 


II 


85 


II 


25. 


tl 


34, 


i( 


26. 


II 


36, 


II 


26. 


are 


situated In 


tho counties 



of 



N 



O T I C E 



W A N T E I> 

THE UNITED STATES NAVY, TO 
SERVE IN THE MISSISSIPPI 
SQUADRON. 



MEN 

FOR 



Good pay and prize maney given. 
Recruits will be shipped foi 



op 
The attendin 



ted 
Ing 
f'ri- 



i, or 
Also. 



50 



t ten years, and is prepared 10 give patients as good treatment as they coul 
Thos* afflicted with any of the above diseases, should let no fiilse deUcacy deter them, but apply 

**FEMALE*'^8EA^s._Partlcnla.- attention given to all Fem^e »«•''"". «-}?^"»"PPrf ««.'', 
unhealthy Menstruation. Leuchorrhea, Chlorosis, Diseases ol the Womb and Os U.eri, Ac 
Agent for Deieee's Fei.iaU Pills,fo r obstructed Menstruation, pr\ce »1 per Dox 

Patients AT A Dis "" -•"--- „_,.-,..,«-=. ,. ,,™ 

Chart containing a 
any part of the country to cure any c»»<- "i in^.... , •••,^~ """• --— -n- -- -.-'•.V._'j_^„«,jo«u«i rtm,.^ 

lar OmoB in Concer t Hall Block, n. ear the Post Office Cousuitations private and wnfldentiaLC^^^ 
hours fyom » A. m. to r f. m. aflerj lOons, from 8 to I. Sundays » to 10 a. m. All letters should b« 

**^*^ ^ THE GALENIC INSTITUTE 

jyg |l«x im Satat Paul, HtawMotft 



Fei lale Pills fo r obstructed Menstruation, price f 1 per oox. 
DiSTAHOK— Bv sending a brief statement of their 8ymploms,wlll receive a Blank 
list of questions, our terms for the course of treatment, *c. Medicines sent to 
intr y to cure any case at home, free from damage or cur iosity. 



or one, two, or three 
years, or during the war. 

The fact that men may enlist for one year with 
good quarters on eliip board, good pay and prize 
Uioney, which has thus far amounted to more 
than tho bounty paid for the army recruits. 

Each recruit for one year will receive the fol- 
lowing articles of clothl 3g. 

One pea jacket. 

One pair blue cloth troasers. 

One blue flannel overs! lirt. 

Two under flannel shirts. 

Two pairs of llanncl diawers. 

One mattrass. 

Two blankets. 

One seamless cap. 

One black silk handkei chief. 

All of navy pattern. 

Apply at the United Slates Naval Rende2«y)ns, 
over LANGLEY ft TEMPLE'S AUCTION 
STORE, Third street, S;. Paul. 

A. W LLARD CREED, 

no25-2m Recruit! ng Agent U. S. Navy. 

PRINTER S ' INKS. 

All sorts, kinds, and o dors, from the celebrated 
nanufactory of J . E. W a^le, New York, for sale 
at manufacturer's prioes , by 

deol2 J , C. ft B . C, BUSBANK h CO. 



MADAME ANDREWS, 
Clair-voyant, 

Has returned and taken the two story frame hons* 
on Tenth-st., two doors west of St. Peter-st., on 
right baud side, where she can be oonsulted for a 
short time only. 

Clairvoyant Examinations fl. Past, Present 
and future, 50c. 

Persons wishing to consalt her, are reqae«te<l 
to walk up stairs without knocking. Hour* from 
9 a. M. to 9 P.M. dec^-'im 



T 



HIRD STREET PROPERTY. 



FOR s.A.rjX:, 

Lot 2, Block 22, Rice A Irvine's Addition— comer 
lot, 72 feet front on Third street and 160 feet on 
Hill street, adjoining Hope Engine House. Will 
be sold low. 
TERMS— Part cash and part credit. 
Apply to D. COOPER, 

ftplOif Irvine'* Bioefc 




DR. DkMONTREVILLE. 



D K N T I S 

(OfBoeln French's Blo<^,) 
Third Mre«t, BMkr tlM 9—t ^a-w* 

SAINT PAUL MINKLSOTA, 

)an3»-lr 



-*v*- 



'*yr' If t ' v - i 



I 




I 



'r 





r 




1 




































.■ i 




1 



!»■■ I^« 



» o ii »i fcii «jj m 



1 



I 



■ r 



tt^Stimi^^t 



r»«i*^— •"^■^ 



mimmmm'fmmt 



r I « I I ■■! I 



*««»• 



If 



THE SAIKT 



■tm^Q 




3, 1864. 



T H E O I ':r Y . 



Tbermometrical Uccord. 



KftPT BT PAT Si JKNKS, nKLGOISTS,COF.:TERO» 
THIRD ASDCKnARSTBESTS. 



jAXt'Ar.Y. 



7:30 A.M. IP. M. « P. M 



1 Fridav 30 » '-•••• X\* 

i Saturd y 30* Vi* 16* 

*iielow Zero. 



*rHK Cold SxAV— rXPUKCEDEXTED 

Cold Wkatueu. — The old year died, and the 
new year was horn in a **ccld sna]>" niiprocc- 
denti'd in the memory of the oldest settler. 
On Thursday the nurcitrj- fell to 33" hciow 
zcio, and remained at that point most of the 
day. The streets were almost deserted. The 
mercurj' was not t^o low as it has sometimes 
been, but an icy north wind swept ovt r the 
snow, and intensified its bitterness. It was 
almost inipofsible to face the pitiless blast, 
and several persons Ifad their cars and spots 
on their faces frozen by caralcss exposure. 

The snow drittcd Iwdly in places. Aloni? 
the railroul, in gulches, the track wa^ snowed 
np, so that trains could not rim. The morn- 
ing train got engulfed in a drifl, and was 
brought to a stand still. A train was dispatch- 
ed irum this end to aid it, which, also, was 
snowed iu. Cars and engines were scattered 
all along the ro.nd. Several of the workmen 
who were plying the shovel in the drifts had 
th?:r hands, cars, or feet fronted, and had to 
fall to work rubbing the member briskly with 
snow. After a rar had been stopped Ibrawhilo 
the grease in the axle lH>xes froze so iiurd, 
that when started again, the wheel would not 
;aro. 

Thursday night wa'* an intensely cold one. 
Th« oldest settlers declare that it exceeded 
anything that has ever been felt in Saint 
I'aul. "NVo betide the poor wretch abroad 
that uight, whose wits had been stolen by an 
enemy put into his nuuth. Seveial buch 
casts were picked up by the police. One, a 
Frenchman from Kapcsia, was Ibund almost 
stupttied on the Levee, having started for 
home. He was brought to whh dilliculty. 
Another was found on . Seventh street, nearly 
gone. He was found to be a countryra;in who 
had got drunk, lost his team, and finally sat 
dnvn bcr.nmbed with cold. A little more, 
«:id he wouhl havo waked up in another 
country. 

There were various rumors on foot Fiiday 
of a woman and child being frozen to death 
on the Little Cinada n ad— of a negro having 
sutTcred a sin.ilar fate in upper town— of a iit 
tie girl benig frozm badly on the upper Icvce. 
^\'e traced these rnmors diligently, but could 
not learn anything definite concerning them, 
and Leiicve them, one and all, to be untrue. 

\Ve have a reliablo account of a negro being 
picked up by n teamster on the Point Douglas 
road about a njile below the Poor Farm, with 
both legs frozen. He was left in a house near 
by. 

On Thursday morning the mercury marked 
— ^0" in sheltered situations, and the icy 
wind continod to blow aM day. Those in 
stone or briek houses could keep comforta- 
ble, but iTi balloon frames it was nip and tuck. 
With A rojriug lire in fiout, one's btek would 
actually be cold. I3ut few calls were made, 
and the streets were nnusually quiet for New 
Year's day. Cnc lady who generally has 
twenty or thirty calls, en Friday had only 
three. The mercury even -at midday, with 
the sun shining brightly, marlccd — 20^^. 

Yesterday was more moderate, although, 
by referring to our thermometrical record 
elsewhere, it will be seen that at 7 o'clock the 
mercury was as low as it has iMJcn since 
Thursday, rising during the day. 

This may be recorded in history as a mcmo- 
rabla cold spiil, to be referred to in alter 
years. AVe believe this cold snap has ex- 
tended over a great portion of the West. 

Those who have to ride much while this 
ejld spell lasts, should wrap up well. Those 
new patent feet war ners at E. & H. Y. Bell's 
arc the greatest invention out for keeping the 
feet warm as toast. 



Attem V r atBckol \ i:y. — Some thieves 
made an entry on New Years' night into the 
•hop in the rear of Z. E. B. Nash's Stove and 
Tin Store on 3d street. What their object 
primarily was it is not known, but seeing a 
fine stove there, they seem to have concUided 
to tote it ofl', although it weighed several hun- 
dred pounds. In the operation they let it fall, 
breaking it, and made such a clatter that :Mr. 
Lamed, who was s'eeping in the store, hurried 
on his clotlies and seizing a hatch§t, rnshed 
out to sec what was the matter. Cfatching a 
glimpge of one of the burglars, Mr. L. blazed 
away with his tomahawk, true Indian style. 
Luckily for the burglar, it missed him, and 
stuck m the door alongside of his head, giving 
them time to escape. 

Stealing stfjves is a new item in the burglar 

business, r--'; ■ •'. ■ • v .ils had a keen 

sense of the cold weather, and wished to warm 

up their shanty . 

«•* 

Prei^kxtatiox of a Testimoxlvl. — 

Quite an interesting in«idont occurred at the 
house of the Pioneer Ilook and lindder Com- 
p.iny on New Year's morning. Mr. J. II. 
Mathews, who has been Foreman for the two 
ycu-s past, was invited by a friend to ttcp 
Oicr to the house for some purpose. On 
entering, Mr. M:'thews was sTirprised to find 
the whole company assembled. J. I. Beau- 
mont, ll.-fi., then stepped forward, and, with a 
few appropriate remarks, presented Mr. 
Mathews with an elegant silver tobacco box, 
wort'.i $23, as a testimonial of esteem from 
the company. 5Ir. Mathews was quite fcikcn 
abr.ck, but made a neat response. The whole 
alTitir was nicely managed, and highly enjoy- 
ed by all present. 

The box is neatly eugraved with the coat of 
arms of the company on the inside of the lid, 
and on the outside with the words — "Present- 
ed to J. H. ;Mathews. by the members of the 
Pioneer lI(>ok and Ladder Co." 



CoF.ORKD Baptist Cnt-i'.cir. — We 
spoke sometime since of the organization of 
a colored Baptist church, which had rented 
a IIa!l for w)rship in Conceit ILdl Block. 
The ehiireh is now lully organized and in suc- 
ce^s^ul operation. The congi-egation num- 
tx;rs about 100, most of which are couimmii- 
cants. The church is under the pastoral care 
of Thomas Scott and Kobert Hickman, Ijoth 
of whom arc zoilous and intelligent men, and 
go )d preachers. Quite a re^ ival is in pro- 
gress at the little church now, and a number 
ar.:" forward to i*e prayed r>r every night. 

This is a worthy Society, and should meet 
with encouragement. Our colored citizens 
hu> e certainly shown a cpkit of enterprise and 
^cal that flcicrvcs well, and other churches 
may not liud it beneath them to extend them 

a helping hand. 

••• 

A Card. — Cards ot thanks are geiTc- 
rally stcrcot>-pcd adiiirs, and very easily writ- 
ten. It is much more diil'.cult, however, to 
express in words those feelings of the heart, 
that were called forth by the kind attentions, 
and tl'c bounteous supply of provisions fur- 
nished by the Indies and gentlemen of Minne- 
apolis, to the sick iu the ho.-pital at this Post. 
On their behalf, T tcndermy grateful acknowl- 
cdgcuienti for the the kindness displayed to 
the poor soldiers on Christmas day, exhibited 
ia t.ibles supplied with ail that could bo de- 
sired, and for them, to express my warmest 
thanks to all those whose hearts warm towards 
t!ic sick soldiers. 

TIIOS.R. POTTS, 
Snrgeon in charge of Hospital. 

Fort Snelling, Jan. 1, 18:U. 



1) 



AXNIVEKS.VRY FESTIVAL OF THE EjI- 
PLOTEr.51 OF THE Prkss Office. — ^Ncv,' Year's 
Day .which was the third Anniversarj- of the es- 
tablishment of the Daily Press, was celebrat- 
ed by a supper giveu by the publishers to the 
employees of the oflice, at the Merchant's 
Ho.el. 

At nine g'clock in the evening the entire 
• >rp3 of attaches— reporters, typos, press- 
men, carriers, bookbinders, &c., to the num- 
ber cf thirty-three, set down to a well furn- 
ished table, sat in Col. Shaw's best style. F. 
Driscoll, Esq.. manager of the office, took the 
po3ition of host, end invited the company to 
make welcome, which was done in hearty 
style. 

The inner man having been satisfied, a pleas- 
ant and cordial iaterchange of sentiments en- 
sued. Mr. Driscoll was toasted, and respond- 
ed in an appropriate speech. lie was gratified, 
he said, . ; '.'ic cordiality of feeling which ex- 
isted between thu employers ttud tt^ c^ntle- 
men connected wiiu i..v uCiee — a il1.il.uu he 
hoped would 1 i;g be maintained. The Sul 
anniversary of the Press finds it on a solid 
basis, successful, and with bright prospects. 
To the young men of the company he gave 
some excellent ;..Uvice as to tlicir aims and 
condnct in life, and closed by wishing to each 
and all a pleasant and prosperous year, and 
hoped to meet them around the board at our 
Dext anniversary. 

Several other gentlemen were called out on 

toasts, and made felicitous .ind appropriate 

responses. Two or three songs, were sung. 

At a seasonable hour the party broke up with 

the song — 

"We'll rally round the fiag," 

and three rousing cheers for th'j Vnion. Al- 

tog«ther it was one of the most pleasant and 

appropriate festivals ever got up here, and 

evinces the tntente cordiale that exists be- 

tw-'en the managers of the Press and the 

employees. 

••• 

The Stereopticox. — Among the e.x- 
quisito things that Mr. Eggleston proposes to 
•xhibit with his Stereopticon to-morrow evcn- 
ning at IngersoU's Hall on his large canvass 
(225 square feet,) the following may bo men- 
tioned: Windsor Castle, Buckingham Pal- 
ace, Melrose Abbey, exterior and interior, and 
other be.iutiful English scenes. Then t^ere 
are German views, Stahrenfels, the Pfatz, 
Suspension Bridge at Fribourg. Among the 
Swiss views that he has are the celebrated Mer 
da Glace, the grandest of Alpine glaciers, a view 
of Zurich, an exquisite scene on Lake Zurich. 
And then among the Spanish and Italian views 
the Royal Palace at Marid, the finest royal 
residence in the world, the Bridge of Sighs in 
Venice, the Learning Tower of Pisa may be 
mentioned. But finest of all is the Statiiary, 
Therwaldson's Night and Morning, the Birth 
of th« Ros-:', the Gladiator and others. Let 
every one who believes that a "thing of beauty 
Is a joy forever" go to-morrow evening to In- 
gersoU's Hall. 

_ •%»• ' 

The Executive Committee of the M'n- 
nesoto Bible Society will meet to-morrow 
(Monday) evening at 9 o'clock, at the Library 
rooBos in lugcrsoH's Block. 

J. O. RIHELD-\FFER, Secretary. 



SUPEKD PnOTOGKAPUS — Tultlo h'.S 
some of the finest Photoj^r.nnhs of Minnc8'>ta 
Scenery on sale we ever saw — both large size 
and Stereoscopic. They embraee all the most 
promiuenr and celebrated points of Minnesota 
views, and make an appropriate port-folio to 
keep on your own centre ta'jie, or to send to 
your friends in the cast who imagine that 
Minnesota is all plains and pr.iiries. Tuttle 
is turning out some ex luisite photographs and 
carte (U risites now, as well as those life size 
portraits. He guarantees satisfaction to all 
siUers. If the person, or friends, arc not 
pleased with the picture, he will take another 
v.ithout extra charge. 



Do'xos OF THE N. W. Packet Com- 
pany. — The Dubuque Times Ftiya: The half 
dozen packets lying in the V.'aplcs cut, arc 
Itcing repaired. The machinery of nearly all 
of them has been taken out, and is already 
being either altered or mended. In some 
casrs, new pieces will have to be supplied. 

The Company are about to get out lumber 
to build two or three new boats, with a saw 
miil of their own, up on the Wisconsin river. 
It is probable that a new boat will be built 
h( re, cither this winter or in the spring. 



Fire Departmext As^■ocIATIOX. — 

.'vunual meeting of the Board of Representa- 
tives will be held on Monday evening, January 
4tl), at the House of Hope Engine Company 
at 7 1-2 o'clock. The mem her i of the Asso- 
ciation are particularly requestad to be pre- 
sent. By order of 

L. H. EDDY, President, 
J. H. MATTHEWS, Sec'y. 



First Baptist CntTRcn Services. — 
Tl'.is moni'ng at 10 1-2 o'clock the Pastor will 
deliver the Anniversary Sermon of tho socie- 
ty, which is just entering it? fourteenth year. 

Lord's supper at the nsnal hour. 

The weeks concert of prayer will commence 
this evening at six o'clock, and through the 
week at seven o'clock each evening. 



Persoxal. — Our thanks are due to 
Chas. A. F. Morris, Esq., Engineer of the St. 
Paul and Pacific Railroad, who arrived home 
from the Ea-;t on Fridiy night, f>r eastern 
papers in advance of the mail. 

Capt. Robert F. Slaughter, of the 2d Regi- 
ment Cavalry, is at the Merchants. 



The St. Paul & Pacific Railro.\». 
— We csdl attention to the revised Time Tftblc 
of this road, which went into effect on Friday 
Jj'.nuary 1, but owing to the terrible storm of 
thu and the day preceding, the trains were 
unable to run. The track is now cleared off, 
and the c.irs will run to Anoka on and after 
to-day, January 4. 

m^». 

Ttif. funeral of the late Thomas Mar- 
tin has been postponed till to-day at 2 o'clock 
in conscqaence of the extreme cold weather. 



Dr. a. G. Brisbine is the City and 

County Physician for this month. 

•«• 

The January meeting of the Board of 
Education will be held to-morrow evening. 



The Public Schools. — The winter 
term commences to-monow morning. 

The Best Tree is Clubbed. — The 

venders of worthless Saleratus mnko a point 
against Do Land & Co.'s Chemical Sa'eratus, and 
have gone so far as to put out a Fpnrions article, 
hoping thereby to destri y its reputalien. It is 
th" best troe in the orchard that U most clubbed. 
Bay only tha Chetnical Saleratus, Wg have 
tri«d it. 



Course of I/ectarvs In IHiiuiv^iioHs. 

Correspondcuco of the 1st. PidTlPress. 

Minneapolis, Jan. 1, 18G4. 

The ciizens of Minneapolis are enjoying the 
benefit of. an interesting and instructive course 
of lectures this wiuter through the kindness 
of several of .your literary and intellectual 
citizens. A course of eight lectures are being 
delivered, one every Tuesday evening, in 
Harrison's HaU. The proceeds over and 
a1x)vc the expenses connected with it, are for 
a very worthy object, to defray the expense 
of putting iH a furn.ico in St. Marks Free 
Chapel. Already Dr. McMasters and P.ev. 
G. W. Dulkdihave delivered very interesting 
and instructive lectures. Rev. J. Mattocks, 
D. D., delivers; the third on Tuesday ewning 
Jan. .'jth. His subject is the Physical History 
of Minneapolis. Col. Robertson will follow him 
on the succeeding Tuesday evening. His sulw 
jcct will be "Ihe induencc of climate on the 
character and institutions of the Norman 
race." Dr.- Patterson will follow. His sub- 
ject "The Phenomena of Light as related to 
the attiibules of God." 

The citizen, of Minneapolis should encour- 
age this effoit t) promote their intellectual 
entertainment by a generous attendance at 
those lectures. Tickets for the remaining six 
lectures wil' be .«old for seventy-five cents for 
the course or twenty-five cents for the single 
lecture. 

Xltunk*. 

On the evening of last Christmsis my friends 
gathered in the Public Hall, in this town, for 
a social visit. After enjoying themselves much 
in this way, and partaldng of rich and ample 
refreshments, and being cnterlained with the 
fie.^.'! of music, they departed, leaving for the 
benefit and encouragement of the subseribcr, 
their unworthy Minister. ^-jT, mostly in 
cash. Fcr this timely and noble donation I 
desire to return sineerc thanks and most dc- 
routlj- pray that God's blessing may rest upon 
the kind donors. E. T. SEDWICK, 

Pastor of Baptist Church. 

Zumbrota, Minn., Dec. ."')th, lf-'';3. 

EMVX^ AiOTtCJES. 



WIK£S A]SrD LIQUOES 

suitable for 

Medicinal and Family Uset 



Pr.ESi* Boi>iv EiXDKRV. — Wo take oc- 

oadon to inform our frIond» and the public tlii'j 
wo have in connect ion with t>ii-! offce one of the 
bist 150OK HI.NbKRIK.S audBLA^SJK BtlOK 
WAXUFACTOItTf'^SiB thU eiiy, and aro prepared 
to do liLLiNii and bin: isc, as dC;.irod. ilAGA- 
ZI ^ES, PERIODICALS, Ac, b<jund in any stylo 
roquired, ar>d OLD BOOKS rebound at short 
notifc. I.cd^ort!, .Journals and JUank Books, for 
Railroads, Mi'aiubonts, Thnkiug liousee', &c. 
mauufaclured on a? roasonable term* at any oth- 
er ostjiblL-'lmicat. Merehnnfs 2nd others will do 
well to give us a cill. 



Another ftock ofWheelor & Wilson's 
splendid .Sewing Jlaohines received by express 
to-day at aCl Thini tt. 

F. M. .JOHN SON, Agent. 

December 'JAi\\, \>^C>Z. deC'iMw 



GoldPexs Re-pointed Equal 

TO Xkw, on the receipt of ."J conts. 
Circulars for the John«on Pen, sent on ■ 
applicatio'^, by Mail or otherwise. 
1^, S. .JOIIN.sON, Mninifuctory and Oflico, 
15 MAIDKy LAXK, New York City. 

drcZr-Ira 



Mrs. Leonard, Isite from Mt. Auburn 

Seminary, ^lississippi, vislies to inform tho pub- 
lic thit .'he will give le.ssom in Vocsl or loBtru- 
mcntal Music, I'Lino, etc. l'cr.<on9 not having 
an iii.itrunicnt of th^ir o-vn, can practice on Mrs. 
L.'.^ Piano. For terms apply to her nioms, at Pr 
Crary'J, Kobcrt-st., cr Dr.C. D. \Villiamsi, Oth-sti 
TlRFURK cr.s. — Rev. Dr. McMasters, Munger 
Brother-', A. T. C. IMerson, Rev. Dr. Crary.Fred- 
Drl coil, Dr. C. D. Williiims. decv;0-Gm 



(t. B. Salmon, Agent, Madison Mu- 
tual Insurance Company, for the counties of 
liaui-'ey, Wushingtou, Dakota, and Scott. Oincc 
u Parker Paiae's Hank, St. PauL no25 janSd&w 



Enlist and Avoid the Draft. — 

Uecrults will be permitted to eiiHst in any of the 
organized llogiincntsor liattfrios thoj* may select 
and will receive iJ.'JO,' bounty and premium. Per 
sons desiring to enli.st can got any pirtioular.-?, by 
applying to MARK HENDRICICS, Iloenihlii.at 
Agent, at the Nortiiweslern Express Oflico, No. 
2lt> ThirJ-.st., St. Paul. Office hours from 9 A. ii 
to p. M. 

We will do it. — In order to sell off 

and rednco our extensive stock of Clothino 

anoGknt's Fiji;msu no Goons, we oflorftur 

whole Btcik at from 10 to "25 per cent. lean than 

onrrogulir price. We tlink it s.ir- to say t'^nt 

t'losa purchasing of us will get Goods about the 

wholesale price. We offer theie inducemnnt j to 

the people rathe, than to i\rerchants. Our low- 
est pkick will hk ^^TA^^:» AT OTVCK A Call 
from those in v.aut of any article In our line is 
raspectfully soliclled. 

no2l-tf W. H. TEMi^LE, Thlrd-st. 



Diseases of thk Nervous, Skminal, 
Urixat;y .vkt. Sexual Systems— Xcw and re- 
liablo treatment— in Ileport.i of the HOWARD 
ASSOCIATION— Sent by mail in sealed letter 
envelopes, free of charge, /.dilreas, Dn. J. 
SEILLiN IIUUGIITON, Howard Association, 
Ho. 2 Sonth Ninth street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
doc2 d&w3m 



Paurtavg & ^ommmial 



MONETARY. 



FByTelpgrapb.J 
]Ve«r York lV«ney IVfarkc>t.] 

Nkv,' YoiiK, January 2—1 p. y. 
Gold 51.;^. 

» » » « * 

COMMERCIAL. 



[TSy TelPgraph.! 
Mew York murbAt. 

Nkw York, Jan. 2—1 P. M. 
Fioar qulot. 
AVlioat quiet. 



BOOIi: IBIIVOEI^Y 



AXl) 



Blank Book Manufactory. 

Tlio I*x*ess I*i*i tit i Ills' Co, 

Have In succe8?ful oporationth'^larpe.^tanrt most 
complete Bindery in Minnesota, erobraeingthe 
atost.^admo«f Improved machinery. Employing 
only competent Ri)d careful worknion, and using 
the best material , they hope to continue to give 
satisfaction to all. 



PAPER RULED TO ORDER, 

AND TO ASTT PATTKUX, 

LEDGERS, DAY BOOKS, .TOURNALS, COM 
MliRCIAL AND COUNTY BOOKS, AND 

BUNK BOOKS OF EVERY KLND, 

MAPK IN TIIK RK8T MANNF.U. 

Old I3ool£s I^e-]3oii.i:icl 

MAGAZryES, PERIODICALS, 

jMTJSIC, &;o., &CO,, 

Bound in Any Style Desired, 

From the lowest priced work to the highest style 
of the art. 



s 



TRAY MARE FOUND. 



Taken up by the subscribor, a bay Mare CoU, 
about thr#e jcarB old, wltti black mane and tail ; 
pastorn joint.s dark brown. The owner can liave 
her bv proving property, najing chargo-s, and «p- 
SAil'I^CARBLCliEL. 



plying to 
dec2?-3tw 



OLD BOURBON AXD RYE WHISKY, 

OLD QUEEN'S PORT WINE, 

OLD MADEIRA WINE, 

FINE OLD PALE SHERRY, 

FINE OLD COGNAC BRANDY, 

CHOICE OLD HOLLAND GIN, 

JAMAICA AND ST. CROIX RUM, 

CHAaU'AGNE WINES, 

SPARKLING CATAWBA, 

And all other Articles in our liuo of busIncM 

J. irATso:x irSBB, jr., 

Suooesaor to WALTEB W. WEBB, 
myl9 Sibley Block. 



■JITICHIGAN 



CENTRAL RAIL 

ROAD. 

Griroat Central R.oiito 



To New York, New England and the 

Canadas. 

OnandaHer SUNDAY, Nov. 16th, 1863, trains 

iHHve the Groat Central Union Depot, foot of Lake 

street, as follows: 

0.3A a. ni.— (Sundays excepted ) arrives at 
Detroit at 6..10 p. m. ; Toronto 4.05 
A. 31.; Suspension Bridge 4.05 A. 
M.; Buffalo, 4.30 A.M.; Albany, 
3.45 P. M. ; New York, 9..30 p. m.; 
Bo.ston, 12 50 .V. M. 

5.-ftO p. «M.— (Saturdays excepted ) arrives at 
DolroH at (>.<>0 a. .m.; loronto, 
4.45 P. m.; Suspension Bridge, 
4.45 P. -M.; Bulliilo, 5.00 p. M.: Al- 
bany. 5.'«5 A. M.; New York, 11.50 
A.M.; Boston, 4.00 1". M. 

lO.OOfi. ut. — [Saturdays andSundass excnpt- 
c.l,^ arrives at Detroit io.Oi) .\. m. ; 
Torouto, 9.05 p.m.; Suspoueion . 
Bridge, ».10 p.m.; Albany, 8.40 
A. M. ; Sow Vork, 2 45 p. m'.; Bos- 
ton 5.(-K1 p. M. 
Cincinnati traint, via M. C. Railroad, leave 

Chicago at 0..30A.M., Mail Train; 10 p. m. Fast 

b".:;pres(4. 

The 10 p.M.tralnleaviTigChicngo tunsthrough 
to Cinoinuati witliout ohungo of cars or baggage. 

IIUTTAN'S P<TKNT VKNTILATIMi AND 
WARMING API'ARATITS on »U Cars of ihis 
Company. An cle;nint Smokor.-.' Car, wi'li Kuchre 
Tat)Ks, has i:it*ly b>en added to our Day 1 rains. 

Patent Sleeping Cars oh Night Trains. 

BainritirA Cii«cKe4l Tbron^h. 

j*^ Through tickoti! fi)r sale at all Principal 
Railroad ( )fttce.'» in the West, at thctJeneral Odk-e, 
conior Lake and Di-arborn streets, (undor the 
freniont House,) Chicago, and at the Depot. 

R. N. RICK, Gi'noral Sup'Tinteiident. 
H.C. WENTWOiilH, 
ray5-tf Gen'l Western Pass. Ag't, Chicago' 



MANUFxlOTiJPJNG COMFANY, 




Pi 

- ■» -_T:il-^ - • ;r^-- v+— r;v< ^w. -.-^.vt- -"• ^i-** 
DO YOU WAXT 

STEAi^I ENGJXJCS OR BOILEKi 

PATENT FIRE EVAPORATORS. 

^ATE^^^ sitgab cakk mills, 

PATENT STEAM COIL EVAPORATORS, 

PATENT STAMP MILLS 

FOR 

PIKE'S PEAK OR LAKE SUPERIOR 

Sond for Circulars, with cuts and doseriptione, 
prices, tc. ; also, 

SAW MILLS, FLOURING MILLS, 

AND MVCHINEItY OK AM. nE<^CRIPTIO>'3, 

T<io numerous to mention. 

CUICAGO, • - Illinois. 

P. W. GATES, Prasident. 
N. B. Agon wan'ed everywhere. mrr-d&wy 



N 



O. 1 CARBON OIL, 



For sale low, wholesale and retail to close con- 
signmeut, at 

TTlic St. I?a«.l ILiamp Stoi-e, 

dec-3tf Opposite Pioneer Office. 

ITURRl' UP! HURRY UP! 



H 



moisr and ste:e:]u 

HEA^Y HABDW.AIIE 
O H D EH 

SHEET IDROIV, 

NORWAY NAIL BODS, 
BURDEN'S HORSE SHOES 

INTails and Spikes, 
SLEIGH SHOES, 

OUTTKR SHOES. 

Sleig-b SLYid. Ontter 

R, XJ IV IV E I^ S , 

Bent Cutter "StnfF, 
ov 

HALL, KIMBARK & CO., 

C H I C A & O . 

auM-d&wt ff-b 29 



HOLIDAY GOODS 



AT 




T 



HE TRIBUNE FOR 1864. 

I>R03I»ECTUS. 



b 



GREEI^EAF'S. 



All you Mechanics, that want TOOLS, come 
right along, and fill up your chests, while you can 
do it at low pricei. 

noS2-.?m JOHN McCLOUD, Brown's Block. 

O. CURXIS, 

Geieral Insuranca Agent, 

OFFICE IN 

Tlioixipsoni's Block. 

decl8-tf 

/CARPETS. 

STRONG'S CARPET HALL, 

225 Third-St., Rogers' Block, 

wliPre will be foun-l a large aFsortmont of 

Carpets,Oil Cloths, Mattings, 

CURTAIN AND SHADE MATERIALS, 

MATTnKSSKS, rKATUKRS, WAI.I. PAPER, &C. 

New Goods constantly arriving and sold ai 
low as the lowest. 

UPnOLSTERLVG DONE TO ORDER, 
miirKty M. O. ftT«OirC 

l^EW PHOTOGRAPH GALLERY, 

Third St., between Cedar and Wabashaic, 

m:. c. tuttlxc. 

Has just opened a New Gallery on the ground 
floor, where he will be pleased to pee his old 
friends and customers. His stock and apparntu* 
an; new, and have all the latest improvements. 

fl3- ESPKCIAT, ATTENTION GIVEN TO TAKING 
ClllLDKEN'ii PiCTCliES 

llcturesfrom Loclcet Size to Life Size, in UiQ 
Finest^ Style. 

JSy' Phntograph Albxims _furnUhed (IS cheap at 
any other House, and a Carte tie Visile taken 
ifraiis I no'..!4-tt 



Warranted Equal to Coin. 
Table Spoonss, 

DESERT SPOONS, TEA SPOONS, 

Solid Silver Table anii Tea 
IiIVI\^ES, 

TABLE FORKS, DESERl JTORES, 

PICKLE FORKS, 

SARDINE FORKS, 

CHEESE FORKS, 

PIE KNIVES. 

CAKE KNIVES, 

BUTTER KNIVES, 

CHEESE KNIVES, 

SOUP LADLES, 

SUGAR SPOONS, 
SUGAR SIFTERS, 

12 doz. Silver Napkin Rings, 



i 

MERCHANTS IN THE 
COUNTRY 



CAN FIND AT OUR STORE A 
LARGE STOCK OF 

MEN'S BUFFALO SHOES, 

AKD 

Women's Buffalo Shoes, 



JELLY SPOONS, 

BEHKY SPOONS, 

OYSTER LADLES, 

BIUSTAKD SPOO> S, 
SALT SPOOJ S, 
ICE CREA*[ SPOONS, 



A 



PPLEi— APPLES— APPLES. 



A very choice lot of splected Wluti^r Fruit, for 
sale by the single bbl. or quantity, by 

- J. P. HUTCHINSON k, CO., 
Bo20 SIbley-st, l)etween Third and Levee. 

L BEACH & CO., 
• Manufacturers of superior 

SOAP AJST> CAIVr>LE8, 

Eagle- St., near Upper Levee. 

HIGHEST MARKET PRICE PAID FOR 

Lai*<i, Tnlloiv nn<l Grease 

t.. BK.VCII. fiet-^O-lyd&wl A.W. PKAR80S 



s 



TEAM ENGINES AND BOILERS, 



New and second hand, for sale extremely low, 
at tlie Pioneer Foundry. 
BuU GILKIAN & CO. 

ECEIVED ON CONSIGNMENT, 

1,000 Poi.NDS Urikh Pkac^hk.s, and 7,00C 
PotTNOS Dkieu Apri.KS, \o be sold low for cash. 
Je8 J. C. & H. C. BURBANK t CO. 



100 



BARRELS CIDER, 



Just received on oonsignment and tor -ale low, 
ocw.Vtf J.C.&H.C. BURBANK CO. 



100 



KEGS SUGAR HOUSE, GULr 

deji and Ambre, a choice artlde, at 
J. C. t n. C. BURBAKN & Co.'a 



N 



O T I C E 



West St. Paul. 



Whereas, mv wife LIVANA BEDBURY hav- 
ing lelt my bed and board, I caution all persons 
harboring or truxting heron my account, as I will 
nay no debts of her contracting. 

JOHN BEDBURY, 

Bella Plaine, Dec. 2«, 18C3. <)cc31-6tw 



Being fortunate in the purchase of these, we are 

selling them for much less than they 

bring inChioago. 

W« hare also a full supply of 



liiijp m:occjasiivs. 



OIL TAN MOCCASINS, 



MITTS AND GLOYEfe- 



Please call on us and we guarantee to sliow you a 

Oompleto StocU; 
L <X >v ^i <rM. .< i 

AT 

LOW PRICES. 

\VM. J. SMIXH &; CO., 



ST. PAUL. 



.('/ 



■yx 



de«16-3m 



EGG SPOONS, GOLD LINED, 

PRESERVE SPOONS, 

SILVER CUP AND GOBLETS, 
TEA STRAINERS, 
TOBACCO BOXES, 
CARD CASES, 

SPECTACLE CASES, 
PORTE MO^NIES, 
SILVEU SPIiOTACLES, 
' SALT CELLARS, . ? » 

PRUIT KNIVES, 

Child's Knives, Forks & Spoons, 

\ ALL PURE SILVEI:, 

Ajt Oreenlcjafs. 



A large assortment of 

SILVER PLATED T^TARE, 
Ajt Grreeiileai"*s. 

THE iMERICAN WAICHES, 

A large lot. In Gold and Silver cases adjusted to 
heat and oold. Warranted good Time- 
keepers. Sold cheap at 

GUtEEIVLEAF'S 

; ^'i \ lOO Oasea i ^ri I II' . 

g^etli ThLomas' ClocUs 

. AT GREENLEAF'S. 
flO kinds of other IMakers' Clocks 
; .AT GREENLEAFS. . | 

160 VARIETIES OF POCKET CUTLERY 
AT GREENLEAFS. 

A fbllj line of IVORY TABLE CUTLERY, 

i . 

AT GREENLEAF'S. 
GOME AND SEE THE DIAMOND GOODS 



The New- Vork TRiBr.xE, first issued April 
10, 1841, ha.« to-day a larger aggrrgatc circulation 
than any otiier newspapor pubiislicd in Amt- rica, 
or (we believe) in the world. Corapt'lled a year 
sinco to increase tlio prlco of its several issues, 
or .submit to the j.eeuidary ruin of it.t proprietors 
from the very r. agnitudc of its circulation, it has 
proUably sin';o parted withsomepatrous to whom 
Its remarkable chfapnes^.s was a conTroUing rec- 
omm» iid:itiou ; but other.> have taken tludr places, 
and it has uow.more than Two Hundred Tboa- 
sand subscribr'r.-> and ropular purcha-^ers — an ex- 
cess of at least Fifty Tbonsar.d over those of any 
rival. And this uuprecedeuted currency it hat 
aclueved by very liberal expondttnros in procur* 
inp early and authoiitic intolligiucc, by tin." fear- 
ie.-s expression of convictions, by the free enjoy- 
mi«Qt 0} ability and industry wherever it might 
contribute to excellence in anv dopiirtment of our 
enterprise, and by unslirinking lidolity to the uic- 
tates of Justice, Humauity, and Freedom. 

B^- very largo outhivs f.^r ■ arly and authenti' 
advices by Iclegmpii and utbcrv^iso from its «t>"a 
correspondents with the various armies of tha 
Union, and by special eil'orts to furnish such ii - 
formation respecting Markets, Crop:', new dis- 
coveries or improvements in Agriculture, &c., aa 
must specially interest lariners, wc have ai-sidn- 
ously luboj cd to make a ji.'arnal calcubited to meet 
the wants and subserve the infere.sis of the pro- 
du'ing Classes. 'Jliat end we have rt bast me;'s- 
urcahij attuiued; lor no oilier ne'.\ .--paper exists 
in Americaor £uropc which is habitually read by 
neady so many farmers and their fnmilies as is 
TiiK Tniuf NK to-day. \\c sliall labor to iiicrcasa 
botli the numljer and the satisfaction of tliis by 
far the most numerous claims of its patrons. 

During ihe cxieterce of th'? N\ hig party, this 
pai)pr sufported that ptul-, thotgii always sym- 
pailiizir.g with the more liberal, pro^jressivc, An- 
ti-Slavery "wing" tlicroof. When new i$^:ues 
dis.solved or tiansfornud old organizatio'§ 
tiirough the spontaneous uprising ol the peoplo 
of the FrrW States against tho repndiation of the 
31is;<ouri Kestriction,Tni: Tuiui_:;' heartily par- 
acipati'd in that movement, and was known aa 
Republican. When the long smouldering con- 
spiracy to divide and d.-^.stroy ourcount'y or re- 
duce it entiio to complete abasement to the Slave 
Pcwer culmln lied in overt treason and rebellion, 
it naturallj , necessarily rc^-atd.'d resistance to 
this conspiracy as paramount to ail oilier consid- 
erations, and devoted all its energies and elTorta 
to theinuiutcnance of oui I'niou. In every grfat 
controversy which has divided our country, it baa ■ 
b( en found on that ^ide which natuially com- 
mands the sympathy and support of the large ma- 
jority of school liouses and the decided minority 
of grog-sliop.--, and so doubtless w ill be to the last. 
A rdentl V desiring and st riving lor the early and 
enduring adjustment of our National distractions, 
TiiK Tkikvnk leaves the fme. the nature and 
the conditions of that adjuftinent implicitly to 
tho.se lawfully in authurlty, conliding in their 
»-i-doia and patrlotisiii, anxious to aid them to 
the utiDO.st in their arduous respon.s hilities and 
not to eiiii^arrass them even by possibility. Firm- 
ly believing in the Apostolic "rule—" First pure, 
tiien n'SiCA'able" — holdicg tlvit the total and final 
extirpation of Slavery is the true and only abso- 
lute euro for cur Xat!onalil!.-"—tha» any expedient 
tliat stops shoit of this can have but a tranrient 
and illusory succe,-s— we yet propound no theory 
of "reconstruction" and indorse none that has 
been propounded by annthcr— neither .'^umner'i 
nor Whiting'.x, nor any of the Tariou« Coppei head 
devices for achieving " I'euee" liy suriendering 
the Uepulilic into the power ol its traitorous foes 
— but, exhoiiing the Aineiiati I'l-ople to havo 
fiiih in their tioveniment, to relalorce their ar« 
mie.s audiepl(?:iisht^uirti;':i''ury, we believe that, 
if they but do their «h.fy, a benign F'rovidence 
will in due time biing this fearful struggle to suoh 
a c ObO as will best subserve th-* true greatness of 
our country and the permau'.'Ut well-being of 
mankind. 

The present session of Congress v. ill he an ex- 
ceedingly important one, and wo have made am« 
pie arrangements to lay belore our readers what 
18 going on in Washington, both in Congress and 
in tlio Departments. 

We re.spectfully solicit the subscriptions and ac- 
tive exertions of oar friend-:, and of all whose 
views and convictions accord substantially with 
ours. 
Aeir- Tori; Sept. lo, ISfiS. 



.$.? 00 
.. 5 00 
..12 00 
..22 50 



I ' / iA.t OreenJear's. 



J 

The largest assortment o f 



, Torin.s : 

I DAILY TRIBUNE. 

Single Copy 3 cents. 

Mail subscribers, one year (nil issues). $8 

SEMI-WEEKLY TRIBUNE. 

One Copy, one year, (101 issues) .... 

T*o (Copies, one tear 

Five Copies, one year 

Ten Copies, one year....; 

An extra copy will l»e sent to any i>erson who 
semis us a club of twentv and over. 

TiiK Sk-mi- Weekly TiUBUSK is senttoCler- 
g^muu for $2.'-lS. 

WEEKLY TRIBU.XE. 

One Copy, one year, (52 issues) $2 00 

Three Copies, one year, 6 00 

Five Copies, one year, 8 00 

Ten Copies, one year,. 16 00 

Any larger number, addressed to names of suh 
scribers, $1.50 oa ;h. An extra copy will be sent 
to every club of ten. 

Tvveaty Copies, to one itddnss, one year, $25, 
and any larger number nt same price. An extra 
copy will be sent to clubs of twenty. Any person 
who sends us a club of thirty or over shall receive 
THE SEMI-WEEKLY THIBUXE gratis. 

To any person who i^end.'! us a e| .b of fifty or 
over'illE DALLY TRlBUiSE will be sent with- 
out charge. 

Thk wiiKKLY Tkiuune is scut to Clergymen 
for $1.25. 

The Postonices where full Chibs cannot be 
formed either for Tin; SKMl Wekki.t or Wkek- 
i.y TiiBtiN'' , subscribers to the tw > editions can 
unite at Club prices, t-hould the total numt>cr of 
subscrib 'rs come within our rule. 

THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC, for 3864, will bo 
ready about Christmas. Price 15 cents ; 10 copies 
IKjst paid, $1; 100 copies, sent by express, $8. 
Cash orders solicited. Address. 

THE TBIBUNE, 
deol3-oaw3td&w Tribune Buiidiugs, New-York, 



o 



Y S T E R S— O Y S T E R S 



The undersigned are now and have been for tlie 
paskTKM YEJLR8, tho Only Agents In Minnesota 
for 

MALTBY'S CELEBRATED 
BALTIMORE 

OYSTERS. 

We GUARANTEE to the public that these 
Oy ters are superior to any others bronght to -his 
market. The cans are larger, and are filled with 
Oysters. 

4^ A largo supply constantly on band. 

Orders from any part of the Stat« promptly at- 
tended to. 

X>ei>ot «10 THlra Street, 
St. PauI. 

no50-tf J. C. BURBANK * CO. 




^ POLLOCK, 

DONALDSON AND 
O G D E N , 

DKALBBS nr 
OHina., GrlafsiB &» XSartlien 

Ware* 

WITM AK E9DLB88 TARIKTT OF 

Housekeeping^ Articles. 

It is the design of this Houue to supply HOUSE 

KEEPERS with every possible want. 
UNION BLOCK, No. 115 Third-et., 

COR. THIRD AND ROBERT-STS., MIN. 



J Mc CLOUD, JR. 

Oommerola.1 Broker, 

No. iC3 Third Street, (CathoHo Bleek.) 
Will buy and sell 
REAL ESTATE, ANDj MERCHANDISE 
Of all kinds on Commission, ^ 

LOAN MONEY, MAKE COLLECTIONS, PAT 
TAXES, &C., &C. 
49~ ComalMloas aoUated and prompt lv at- 
tended to. no 20-3m 



Gold and Silver Watches in 
the State, , 

AT GREENLEAF'S. 

DIAMOND, Ol'AL, PEARI, RUBY, 
EMERALD, RINGS & TINS, 

'' A.t Oreenlcsaf's 

ONYX JEWEIjRT, 

I AT GREENLEAF'S. 

SOLID GOLD BRACELETS 

GOLD THIMBLES, 

GOLD NECKLACES, 

OOLD CHAINS, ii Uirge lot, 

Ajt Gr-reenleaf 's. 

SOLID GOLt) RIKGS, BUCKLES, SLEEVE 

BUTTONS. 8TUOS, KEYS, SEALS, Ac, 

AT WHOLESALE OR RETAIL, 

AT GUiEElSriLiEAF'S. 

Any pattern of 

H .A. 1 1^ %v cut^ k: 

MADE AT OREENLEArS. 

Any pattern of Gold Jewelry mar nfactured or 
_n-eet,%t GREENLBAJj'B. 

Ererythiig to be found In » firsK lass Jewdry 
Store, can be found at GREENLEAF'S. 

GHEENLKAF'a Goods were pttrcliased for 
cash, the reason why, you all know 

AU Goods warranted prscUdy « represented 
AT GREESLEAF'rf. 

49- Cash paid for old Gold and 811 fer, at 

*^ GREENLEAFS. 

Watches and Jewelry repaired in t ie beat man- 
n«,,at GREENLEAF'S: 

Store in Greenleaf *s Block, 

Opposite Concert Hall, near tlie P ost-Offlce. \ 

dec4-lm ... ,^, 

FAIRS ANK'S 
BTANDAEtD 

SCALES 

OF ALL KEfDS. 

AIM, WarehottseTittokfl, Letter 
Presses, JM.,fcc. 
FAIRBANKS, OBBEKLEAF lb CO., 
172 I>alce Street, C&icago. Torsal< > ia St, Paul, 
byJ. C. & H. C. Burbank &Co, 
Be careM to buy only tbe genolno, Jal4-dwl7 




ORINCE & CO'S. 

IMPROVED 

MELO^EOISI SI 

WARRiUKTED FOR FIVE TEAKS. 

The oldest establishment in the United States, 
emplo}'lng 200 men, and flnishing eighty instm. 
ments per week, 

MAKUFACTOEY COESER OF MAKTUIHD AlTD 
NIAGARA STBEET8, 

BXJFFAI-.0, 3V. Y. 



WHOLF.SALE DEPOTS. 

47 Fulton street Jfew York 

h3 Lake street- Chicago 

WHOLESALE AGENTS. 

Henry Tollman &Co Boston, Maai 

W. F. Coiburn CincinnatLC 

(lalmer & Weber St. Louis, M< 

James BclUk Philadelphii 

A. Couse Detroit, Mid 

Ph. P. Werlein New Orleam 

A. &S. Nordheimer ......Toronto C. \l 



Persons unacquainted with tbe Melodeon MM 
its bisiorv, will Dear in miudtbat we are the pit 
neers and leading manufacturers, not only in th« 
United States, but in tbe world. Wecoinmence< 
the manufacture of Mclodeons in the f»\\ of ttK 
year 1W7, and since that time liave finished ant 
sold TVVENTY-.SEVEN THOUSAND. The«l 
inf truments are now in use not only in the Uni' 
ted States and Cannda, but also in Europe, Asia. 
Africa, South America and tbe West Indies, an4 
from all these quarters we have the most flatter 
tag testimonies of the high estimation in whici 
they are held. 

AT ALL INDUSTRIAL EXinn'TIOKS THEl 
HAVE INVARIABLY BEKN AWARDED 
THE niGIlKST PBBAUUM WHKN- 
K\TtR EXHIBITED IK COMPE- 
TITION WITH OTHERS. 

We shall take pleasure in forwarding by mall, 
(at our own expense), our Illustrated Catalogue, 
in which every iastrumen* we manufacture is 
fully described and illustrated by elegant eDfr*. 

vings. 

All Melodeons of our manufacture, either sold 
by us or dealers In any part of Ihe l nlted States 
or Ca.-.ada, are warranted to l>e perfect in erery 
respect, and shouia any repairs be necessary be- 
fore the expiration oX live years from date of 
sale, we hold ourselves ready and willing to make 
tlie same free of dmrgo, provided the injury U 
not caused by accident or r.esign. 

Agents for tlie sal<' of our MeljdeonB may DC 
found in all the principal towns of the United 
States and Canada. 

Address either ^ 

GEO. A. PRINCE & CO., BuiTalo, N. T. 
GEO. A. PRINCE & CO , S7 Fuiton-st., N. T. 
GEO.,A. PRINCE & CO., « Lakest., Chicago. 

Or either of tbe above Wholesale Agents. 

j^ For sale by MUNGER BROS., Agents, St. 
Patt l.Minnosota. apr29-dAwly'M 

/CHICAGO BREWERY. 



Il.rL.IL. & T.)1VERSY 

BREWERS OF 

LXXiL'S SXOCK 

ADD 

Oreaxn I*ale -A.le, 

PORTER AND BROWN STOUT 

FOB SALE BT 

WM. CONSTANS, 



\ 



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^fifiiiv.-*. 







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).. 



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pFPFCTIVE PAGE "T 



i*tmm \ I U. ' 



1 .". ' .;. ..J.'ji.-JL ' .A a- ' jmiJg ' auuM ' J! 



' LitiiSMmi 



- »f aw^ 



I 



1 

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•■■rtk 



















































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I 



THE 




SAINT PAUL DAILY PRESS. 



VOLUME IV. 



Sj^lIISTT I^A.UL. TUESDAY, JAyXJAHY 5, 1864.. 



NUMBER 3. 



SAINT PAUL. TIK!<UAY, JAN. 5. 

Wf have been requested to state tliat, 
a fam-us of the luu-onditional Union 
iiiemliers ol the Sixth T.ef^islatnri' of 
.Minnesota will be hehJ at th.; Hull of the 
llonso oi iUpresentatives, this (Tuesday) 
inoi-niiij; at 10 o\-lock, for the purpose of 
luakiiK-- necessary nominations. 

THE -liKW.«*. 

Cirni.sTMA"* day was celebrated at 
Charleston, by a few iires. kindly lor- 
wardetl l.y (ien. tJillmore. As a recoia- 
^n■n^e the rebels attacked the gunboat 
Marblchead in Stjno Inlot^and were re- 
warded for their temerity by having the 
attacking battery captured. 

Ar.i n liisnor lIuiiUKs is seriously ill, 
and said to be beyond all hopes of recov- 
ery. 

A ii.WL of Confederate bonds, amount- 
ing to .S7,()0<),0<X), was made in New 
York ye.-.terd.iy. 

The inten-ity and extent of the great 
storm last week is noted elsewhere. 

(lOl.D t")l 7-><. 



■ « ♦ 



MEVEUK WEATHER. 

Those who have supposed that Minne- 
sota was the only locality in the United 
.Stat«s favored with cold weather will be 
undi-< lived by reading the telegraphic au- 
eouiit whith we publish this morning of 
the severe storm which swept over the 
eountry last week. From Saint Paul to 
Hoston, m section of the eountry escaped, 
and instead of our being the most unior- 
ttmate, the Ea>t and South were the 
greatest sullerers. 

In Louisville the mercury fell sixtif-six 
deijrees in eiijhtten hours, and In BufTalo 
it fell tif'ty-ont iler/iees in the same length 
of time. 

At St. I-.ouis the river was frozen over 
in one night so that teams could cross, 
tha thermometer falling to twenty four 
decrees b dow ziro. 

Me 1 and animals were frozen to death 
in various localities, while in this 
State not a single death h.is occuiTed 
from exposure, so far as we are 
at present informed. In fact, the 
only senous casis of freezing m this 
locality have been cf persons under the 
inriuence of li(pior, who would have been 
as likely to peri>h elsewhere as heie. 

Hut in addition to the tribulations of 
our Irieiuls below, tl.ey were deuged 
with snow, rail ami other roads being 
rompletely blockaded. In fact, on many 
important roads nu trains were run for 
sevi-ral «lays. The ellVcts of this snow 
blockade, is manifested by the non-arri- 
v.il of our raai's, Friday evening's mail 
being the last received, and at least two 
more days will elapse before another 
reaches us. 

The farther the comparison is extended, 
the more favorable it appears for Minne- 
sota. The mercury reached a lower de- 
gree here, probably, than in most other 
localities, but the change was not so great 
and we venture to assert that the people 
of no State visited by this terrible " cold 
snap" sufiered as little as we did. While 
the mercury was falling from four degrees 
above zero to thirty degrees below, it fell 
Irom forty-seven above to nineteen below, 
zero at Louisville, and in Buffalo from 
ibrty-two above to nine below, a change 
ot thirty-tour degrees in the tbrmer in- 
stance and sixty-six and fifty-one in the 
two latter eases. 

It la time that the false notions of the 
seventy of our climate were correcied. 
and we are inclined to think that a few 
more extensive storms like this, would 
place us right upon the record. 



THE :ifr!f KESOTA I.B«ISI.ATi;nE 

The following :s the list of Menil>ersof the 
Lc^rislature which meets to-day. 

UepuMicans and Union men are designated 
;n iDinan; Democrats or Copperheads in 
talics. Members of the Senate holding over 
.nc indicated by a * ; members of either 
llou>e who have been members of any former 
Le^'iilature arc indicated by af. 

SENATE. 

FikstPistkkt— Partof riamscy county— 

Edmund Uice.t 

Skcond Distict— ^Vasllington, Chisago &c 
— John McKusick.* 

TuiKi) DrsruicT— Steani«, Morrison, St. 
Louis, &c — J. P. IVibon. 

FuiuTU DisTKicT— St. Anthony, Benton, 
Anoka, &c— J. S. Pillsbury, [to (ill the vman- 
cy oc&isioned by the resi;,'niition of David 
llcaton.] 

FiKTU Disnucr— llcnepin West— Doriius 
Morrison. 

Sixth District— Carver, Wright, Ac- 
Charles \. Warner.* 

Skventh DisTitK r— Dakota county— Z>. F. 

IxincjUy. 
EioHTU DuTUKT— Uice county— John M. 

Berry." 

Ninth Disthict — Goodhue eonnty— J. A. 
Thacher.f 

Tkntu DuTUicr— Waba-havr county— K. 
Uttraan.» 

Ei-i.vKXTii District- Winona county— D. 
S. NoKTox.t [Independent personal.] 

TwELi-TU DisTiucT— Olmsted county— J. 

V. Daniels.* 

TniUTKEXTii Disruiir— Houston county- 
Daniel Cameron. 

l-'oi uTi:iarTH Distict— Fillmore county- 
Luke Miller.* 

FiFTKKXTH District— Mower and Dodge— 

D. 1). Sprague.f 

Sixteenth Dutkict— Steele, Waseca and 
Frcel»om— F. S. Stevens, [vice M. A. Dailey, 
resigned:] 

SKvr.NTKKNTH DisTitic 1- Bluc Earth and 

Le Sueur— J. J. Porttr.f 

KtoiiTKENTH DisTUiCT. — Scott County — 
hmtc Linroln.* 

NiNETKKNTH DisTKicT.— NicoHct, Siblcy, 

&c.,— IL A. Swift.t 
TwEMiKiH DisTuicT.— Faribault, Brown, 

&c.— D. U. Sliillock.* 
TwEXTV-FiiisT DisTKic 1.— Part of Rams* y 

county — John Nicols. 



SOUTHERN NEWS. 



HOUSE OF UEPRESENTATIVE.S. 

I. J. r. Kidder.t K. H. Fita. 

II. Anstll Smith.t Jcise IL Soule, R. U. 
Hinry. 

111! li. M. R!chardiO)u\ C. A. Rufee, W. 
T. lUghy. 

IV. Jared Bensou.t Jonathan FciTiu. 

V. W. II. II. Graham, John A. Cole- 
man. 

VI. W. G. Bntler.t J. S. Letford.f Henry 
Hill. 

VII. K. -V. Gitlteau, -7— Ackley. 

VIII. A. N. Noursc, A. H. Bullis. 

IX. S. S. Graunis, J. M. (Jates. 

X. J. J. McKay. 
KI. E. S. Youman9,+ Thos. V. Dixon. 

XII. J. I'. Moidton,t Thomas H. .Arm- 
strong. 

XIII. Thus. H. CouifT. 

XIV. S. \. Hunt, M. J. Foster.t R. 
Wliittemore. .^ 

XV. Royal Crane, Augustus B.irlow. 

XVI. riulo Woodrutf.t J. L. Gibbs. 

XVII. J. A. UV»ec<?«,t R. Butters,\ John 
L. Meagher. 

XVIII. Hugh Johnson. 

XIX. \y>n.Hu''y,f Samuel Cojin. 

XX. J. A. Latimer. 

XXI. A. R. Kiefer. 

KKC.VPlTri.VTIOX. 

.sv«(//»i— Republicans and Uuiouists, IG; 
Democrats, 4 ; Independent Periional, 1. 

Republican Union majority in the Senate, 12. 

House of RepresentativeM—llc^vMhcam and 
Unionists, SI ; Democrats, 11. 

Rcpulilican Union majority in the House, 30. 

Whole Republican Union strength in joint 

Convention, - ' * f'. 

Whole Democratic strength, do - 1-) 

Republican Union majority on joint ballot, 32 
We may classify the political elements 
of the next Legislature more accurately as fol- 
lows : _ T 1 •♦ 
Repul)- Dem- Indp t 
lican. Union, ocrat. Personal. 



Senate, - 
H. ot Repre- 
sentatives, - 



14 
.-JO 
41 



1 
3 



4 

11 
1.5 



1 



- 2-> 

28 



\mi. 



I8r,2, 

IS(J3, 



THE DRAFT. 

No orders relative to the draft have 
been received fiom Washington up to this 
time. According to the President's Pro- 
clamation, this is the day fixed for the 
draft to eommenee, but Captain Keith isr,-2, 
informed us last evening that he had not 1 1**''"- 
received the quotas from Washington, 
which would render it impossible to pro- 
ceed, as the enlistments have materially 
altered the original figures. 

Besides this, a large number have en- 
listed whose names have not yet reached 
Washington, and conseciuently if the 
draft should take place to-day, we 
would not receive our proper credit. 
Thirty men escaped the draft by enlisting 
at Capt. Keith's oflice yesterday, and re- 
ceiving the large bounties. Most of 
them joined the First or Third Battery. 
As the final figuring has to be done at 
Washington, these could not be passed 
to our creilit, and without doubt if the 
draft should n»)t be postponed to enable 
Congress to amend the law, it will be 
temporarily suspended until the (quotas 
of the several towns can be accurately 
ascertaineil. 



Total. 
Republican nuijority 
Republican ami Union majority, 
Republican and Union ami Independent 
Personal majority, - - - -9 

The Legislature of 18r.3 compares, in its 
political compicxiou, with that of 1S62, as fol- 
lows : 

SEXATK. 

Uepub- Dein- Indp't 

lican. Union, ocrat. Personal. 



IG 

- 14 2 

IIOCSE, 

2U 1 

. 30 1 



4 

12 
11 



JOINT BALLOT. 
- 45 1 17 

. - 44 a 15 1 
A Rcpubliean Union gain 2 over last year. 
♦■»♦»» — 

ARRIVAK.Or THE MEMRERM 



AVERILLS GREAT RAID. 
Lyxciihlh*;, Saturday, December 19. 
— We have but little additional with ref- 
erence to the Salem raiders. On Tues- 
day night they surprised and fired into 
the camp of Captain Wliite on Catawba 
Creek, and captured seventeen men and 
about one hundred horses, which were 
being recuperated. Fanners, who ar- 
rived at Bonsack's this evening, say that 
the enemy were on this side of Craig's 
ereek, eighteen miles from Salem, at noon 
yesterday. Their camp was visible from 
the mountains. Craig's creek was rising 
rapidly yesterday, and impcssible to 
f rd, which prevents the enemy's further 
retreat on the Newcastle road. 

SKCON I> UISPATC 11 . 

LvN< iir.ntG, Saturday, Dec.lO— I'as- 
sengers this evening report that the ene- 
mv, finding Craig's creek pa^t fording, 
charged their course up the Catawba, 
and camped on Thursday night ten miles 
below Montgomery, White Sulphur 
Springs. Their object in taking this 
route is to strike the Salt Pond road 
leading towards the Kanawha Valley. 
Their capture is confidently expected. 
Reported skirmishing yesterday at 
Blacksburg. 

THIRD UKSPATC'II. 

Lyxciibub<;, Sunday, Dec. 20.— -A 
special correspondent of the Virginian, 
dated Salem Dec. 18, says that on 
Wednesday morning the enemy's advance 
guard charged up Main street, the main 
body following soon after, with pistols 
drawn, rea<ly to open fire upon the citi- 
zens who crowded the street. They 
broke open the Post-oilice, cut the tele- 
graph wires, and then proceeded to the 
depot, which was crowded with ladies and 
gentlemen awaiting the tnin. They 
broke open trunks, destroyed their con- 
tents, and set fire to the building. They 
formed a line of battle, and planted a bat- 
tery of eight pieces of artillery on a hill, 
to bear on the expected train. When the 
train came in sight they fired eight shots 
at it, but it retired without damage. 
They opened many stores, burned sev- 
eralbarns, one containing a large lot of 
lallow and oil, and destroyed a quantity 
of grain. 

They were piloted by a man named 
Hall, who was ordnance officer at this 
post for CJen. Jenkins last spring, but 
deserted soon after and went over to the 
enemy. The enemy remained there till 
five o'clock this evening. Hearing that 
Fit/hugh Lee and Imboden were in pur- 
suit, thev left, camping about six miles 
from town that nigiit. They shot about 
fifty horses before they left camp, as they 
liad more than they could get along with. 
Supposing they could not cross Craig's 
Creek, the way they came, they changed 
their course, going in the direction ol 
Fincastle. The enemy represented that 
they had twelve thousand men, but that 
their force had been divided, and a por- 
tion gone in another direction. Among 
the prisoners captured was Capt. Por- 
teaux, Assistant Quartermaster of the 
post. Many servants went oil" with them. 

TlIK VANKr.K UAin. 
Kroni t!ic Ulchmond Kxaniincr, D<'C. !'.». 

.Vverill's raid in Southwestern \ irginia 
is likely to prove an interesting affair. 
Our latest from him is, that he retreated 
trom Salem on Thursday evening, Imt 
re-appeared there yesterday morning un- 
der circumstances that led to the belief 
that his route to Kanawha had been stop- 
ped by our forces. We are in possession 
of some facts relative to the movements 
of our men, which is thought not advisa- 
ble to publish just now. It is believed 
that Averill will attempt to get to Dan- 
ville and liberate the Yankee pris )ners 

confined there. 

Kroin the Kicliniond Kxamiiier, Dec. 2-J. 

If Averill is allowed to escape, the 
cavalry of Virginia had better be reor- 
ganized without loss of time. Our mib- 
Tary authorities had abundant notice ol 
this raid to have perfected the most 
elaborate plans. They were informed 
by Gen. Sara Jones that Averill was ad- 
vancing on Lewisburg, with the design, 
he thought, of tapping the Virginia and 
Tennessee Railroad. This w sa week 
before he reached Salem, in the neigh- 
borhood of which town he remained sev- 
eral davs. We say nothing of the natu- 
ral obstacles against which three thou- 
sand men would have to contend in mak- 
ing a raid of three hundred miles through 
a mountainous and thinly settled coun- 
try. It would be impc sible for them to 
carry their subsistence with them, and it 
would appear equally unpossible for them 
to draw it from such a country, which, 
too, has been very eflectually gleaned by 
Confederate Commissaries and Quarter- 
masters. 

It is proper to mention, in this con- 
nection, that it has, for several days, 
been known here that another body of 
Yankee cavalry, three thousand strong 
were advancing up the valley toward 
Stanton, with a design, it was supposed, 
of creating a diversion which might facili- 
tate Averill's escape. We have no fears 
but that this party will be well met and 
taken care of. 

During their stay at Salem, they de- 
stroved three ear loads of commissary 
and' a large quantity of (luartermaster 



LATEST NEWS, 

By Teleerra-p li. 

TERRIBLE STORM EAST 
AND SOUTH. 



Raich of the Pawnee. They are two » 

inch sea coast howitzers. 

The rebels had one killed and five 

wounded. 

Washington-, Jan. 4. 

The Navy Department has received 
official information in relation to the at- 
tack upon the gunboat Marblehead in 
Stono Inlet, on Christmas morning, by 
which Robert Brown, Lorenzo D. bhaw 



ControTersjr RecMed. 

IIiiJstjN, N. Y. Jan. 4. 
Judge Ilogeboom has decided the con- 
troversy bet^jeen the Delaware and Hud- 
son Canal Company and the Penr.sylvania 
Oil Company in favor of the forn er. 

Pichvt* Rrlven In. 

Ni:w YoKK Jan. .3. 

Advices from Cumberland, Maryland, 

had 



RAILROADS COMPLETELY 
BLOCKADED. 



SOLDIERS FROZEN 
DEATH. 



TO 



Niueteeu Degree>i Below Zero 
at Louisville. 



wnica ixoocri U1UYV41, j^uitu^.w ^^. ....... . ^..^...^^ 

and Joseph Phillips were killed, and ( of the 1st, states that our pickets 
Charles Moore, Alex. Hendersons, John been driven in near Manches:er. V ir 



§m gidverti^mente. 



THE WHOLE COXJIV- 

TRY FROSX- 

BITTE3V. 



Hackett, and Charles Semmes wounded 
Commander Balch, of Pawnee, says at 
6 :2o on the morning of the 25th ol De- 
cember, the enemy opened on the Mar- 
blehead which was replied to vigorously. 
At G :4.j the Pawnee opened fire on the 
enemy's batteries from her H)U-pound 
rifle gun. 

At» o'clock the C. P. Williamson, 
hearing firing, shipped cable and came 
down Folly river under sail, and opened 
fire handsomely. The rapid firing from 
the three vessels soon caused the enemy 
to retreat. 

At 7 :;)0 the rebels had retreated in dis- 
order, leaving two of his guns in the 
battle. The Pawnee then proceeded oil' 
Sigersville. Soon after this General 
Gordon, commanding troops on the 
south end of Folly Island came up. 



ginia. 

Ker Hill. 



Thev had been driven into Bun- 



aite»nt«r« Parcli»«v«1 

New Yokk, Jan. 4. 

It is said that the Stonington steamers 
have been purchased by merchants cf 
New York and Boston. 



M:. T»- IVICHOLS, 

General Insurance Agent, 

TIIIRD-ST., 
{St. Paul, IMinnesota. 

Policies Issued In the following Xew York Con^ 
panies : 

Lorillard, Metropolitan, 
Niagara, Vhenix. 

AND MUTUAL BENEFIT LIFE INS. CO., OF 
NK>V JEKSEY. 

JM- Combined cash agsets over f 0,»00.000 

decU-t novlo 04 



The Gunhoal Marblehead At- 

lacked by Rebels in 

Stono lolet. 



Cclehratlon. 

BosTo> , Jan. '2. 
The first anniversary of the President's 
Emancipation Proclamation was celebrat- 
ed yesterday by a salute of lUO guns and 
by a public meeting in the Tren ont Tem- 
ple, at which speeches were made. 



mon M'At}Hi:v«i)TO^. 



ll«t% Vf>ar« 



House — 



THE ATTACKING BATTERY 
CAPTURED. 



Arch Bishop Hughes 111 Be- 
yond Recovery. 



The Japanese Proposes to Pay 



Dnmasces. 



at the H'hfie 
'f a \ at ion. 

^VA.s^I^GTo^•, Jan. 2. 
The attendance of the diplomatic body 
upon the President on new years day was 
with felicitations which were evidently as 
social as they were demonstrative. It 
was among the cheering auspices with 
which the country begins the year. The 
entire corps was present with the excep- 
tion of the estimable Minister from Nic- 
aragua, who being detained bv illness, 
sent to the Secretary of State a respectful 
and mostly fiiendly apology. 

AVashixotox, Jan. 2. 

Secretary Chase strenuously insists on 
limiting the appropriation to means to 
provide by taxation, every dollar appro- 
priated beyond the amount which can b(! 
certainly obtained by loans and that 
without'foo largely increasing the present 
debt. 



TiiECiitK.^T Nrou.n. 



,...,, , f 11 .1 I stores inciudinir a considerable amount 

We publish below the names of all the ^^^ , e^ "d a^'^reat cniantity of produce 



THE HlXril LECildliATl'RE. 

To-day is the time prescribed by law 
for the assembling of the Legislature. 
From personal observation we have come 
to the conclusion that the interests of the 
State are safely intrusttd to this body, 
composed as it is of good, sound citizens, 
amonf whom are some of the ablest men 
in the State. Many important matters 
will claim their attention which we will 
leave the Governor to indicate in his 
forthcoming message. 1 



— The number of Yankt e prisoners|in 
llichmontl yesterday was 10,52(5. For several 
davs the arrivals have been verv meagre. 
Yo.-,terday »ix Yankees (including one officer) 
were received; one was sent to the small pox 
hospital, and eleven die*!.— Richmond En^ui- 
r4r.Dec.\9. ___^^j ^.-«. 



members ot the Legislature who had 
reached the city up to the hour of going 
to press. The latest stages will probably 

bring some others : 

Sknators.— John McKusick, Washington 
County, J. S. Pillsbury, Anoka County, Dor- 
iius Morrison, Hennepin County, Charles A. 
Warner, Carver County ; D. F. Langley, Da- 
kota County ; J. A. Thatcher, Goodhue Coun- 
ty; K. Ottman, Walwishaw County; 
Daniel S. Norton, Winona County; 
Daniel Cameron, Houston county; F. S. 
Stevens, Steele county; J. J. Porter, Blue 
Earth county ; Isajic Lincoln, Scott county ; 
John Nicols, Ramsey ; John M. Berry, Rice ; 
B. D. Spraguc, Mower, and J. T. Wilson, 
Steams. 

Rkhukskxtativks.— J. P. Kidder, R. H. 
Fitz, Ramsey county ; Ansel Smith, Chisago : 
R. R. Henry, Washington; Jesse IL Soule, 
Jared Benson, Anoka; John A. Coleman, 
Hennepin ; J. S. Ix'tford, Carver ; A. H. Bul- 
lis, Rice ; J. M. Gates, Goodhue ; J. J. McKay, 
Wababhaw ; E. S. Youmans, Winona ; Hugh 
Johnson, Scott; Samnel Coffin, Nicollet; J. 
A. I^timcr, Faribault ; \. R. Kiefer, Ramsey ; 
W. G. Butlei, Wright; R. M. RichunJson, 
Stearns; Jonathan rerrin, Benton ; A. N. 
Nonrse, Rice ; Royal Craner and A. Barlow, 
Dodge ; J. A. Wiswell, Blue Earth ; Rcu»)en 
Butters and John C. Meagher, Le Sueur. 



♦ ■ ♦ » ♦ 



— It is a noticeable circumstance that of 
all the tivc ships sent in pursuit of the stolen 
steamer Chesapeake, the Ella and Annie, a 
vessel lately added to our Navy by capture, is 
the successful one. 



of leather and a great quantity of produce 
belonging to merchants of Lynchburg, 
stored in the depot, which was also de- 
s roved. 

Pitzer's large flour mill, McClanaban s 
store, and three small buildings were 
burned; also seventy-five Government 
wagons. Thomas Chapman, a citizen 
was killed ; the prisoners in the jail libe- 
rated, among whom were a ftw Yankee 
prisoners. 

A number of citizens and some fur- 
loughed and wounded soldiers, were ta- 
ken prisoners, bat the citizens returned. 
It is said the enemy's force did not ex- 
ceed fifteen hundred. Keports of their 
returning to Salem are contlicting. 

EAST TKXNE.S.SEK. 

BuisroL, Dec. 21.— Ollicers from the 
front state that our forces are moving 
forward in the direction of Knoxville. 
The country between Bean's Station and 
Morrstown has been cleared of the ene- 
:nv. ( )nly three hundred prisoners were 
captured at Bean's Station, as the men 
stopped to pillage the wagon train, which 
was loaded with eoti'ee, sugar, canvassed 
ham, and shoes. But for this, many men 
might have been captured. 

Reports from below state that Imboden 
and Kchols have surrounded the Salem 
raiders, and that the empire party, will 
probably be captured. The enemy have 
burned their wagons and destroyed their 
artillery to prevent their falling into our 

hands. 

The railroad between this point and 
Lynchburg will be in running order by 
Saturday. 



Louisville Froien Vi»— M«'rcHr.r Fall* 
«« «l«'KT«»e« in \** hour*— *t. E.oai* 
Col«l— lluiiro;t«i« ■BlotkaHed— CaOle 
ami lloya Fro#.««n— The Iliv«>r <!••- 
c>4l-Mtorni iu nostoii— BiiflTttlo ■■- 
tenaviy Coia— Citifinuati »iitr«Ting— 
Ikoldiera Frozen To »4*atU. 

Loi isvii.i.K, Jan. 2. 
Meterotogical barometer at Thursday 
noon was •J'.>:2il. Soon afterwards it 
commen.-ed rapidly falling and at eight 
oVlock a violent snow storm from the 
Northwest set in. Thursday noon the 
thermometer was 47 degrees above zero, 
and at 10 o'clock had fallen to one de- 
cree above zero. Friday morning at 7 
the thermometer was VJ.\ below zero, 
continued below zero all tlay. 

The Journal statement this morning 
respecting the freezing of live Conlcde- 
rate prisoners at .Teflersonvill^is entirely 
incorrect. The i»risoners were well cared 
lor, and neither death or sulVering occur- 

ed amongst them. 

St. Louis, Jan. 2. 

But very little business was transacted 
here to-day on account of the weather. 
Since the "heavy snow storm Thursday 
the weather has been intensely cold, the 
mercury having fallen 24 degrees below 
'.ero. This is unparahlled in this region. 
All the Railroads leading out of the city 
are blocked with snow ; no trains have 
arrived .and departed for two davs. 

The river closed this morning. Teams 
and pedestrians crossed on the ice all the 
afternoon. A large number of cattle 
and hogs were frozen to death on a 
weather-bound train on the North ^lis- 
souri Railroad. 

Quite a number of frost-bitten cases are 
reported, some ol them of a serious char- 
acter. 

r.osTON', Jan. 2. 

A severe ^now storm has been raging 
here since Thursday, the wind blowing a 
gale from the west. 

The water in the lower part of the city 
is the highest that has been knoAvn for a 

year. 

Buffalo, Jan. 2. 

Two hundred feet of the Niagara Falls 
road near this city had been washed away. 
No cars have left the depot here since 
Thursday. Trains, however, are running 
Irom Black Rock to Suspension Bridge. 
Business in the city is almost entirely 
suspended. 

1 he most of the storm is now over, al- 
though it is still snowing this evening. 

The weather is intensely cold. Ther- 
mometer at midnight of the 31st of De- 
cember stood at 42^ above zero; last 
evening it was ;"» ° below, and this morn- 
ing it is at 9 ° below. 

Telegraphic communication with the 
West is interrupted. 

Evan's Bridge, in the lower part of the 
city, has been carried away. 

CixciNXATi, Jan, 4, 
Two soldiers were frozen to death at 
Camp Chase, on Saturday. The soldiers 
in camp at Indianapolis sufTered consid- 
erable, a number had their ears and feet 
frozen. On Thursday four rebel prison- 
ers were frozen to death while asleep in 
the cars at Jeffersonville. 

The trains on all Railroads leading to 
Cincinnati have been much delayed by 
the recent cold weather. There has been 
a great deal of suffering among Railroad 
men and passengers. 

MlLWAlKKt, J*U. 4, 1 1". M. 

Clear wind N. W. Thermometer 2 ^ 
above zero. 



luaug-uratlon of Muyor CSuntlier. 

Ni.w YoKK, .Ian. 4. 
Mayor Gunther has assumed the duties 
of his 'office to-day. delivering a long mes- 
sage on the retiring of ex-Mayor Opdyke. 
He was escorted by a committee of prom- 
inent citizens with a band of mut^ic to a 
neighboring hotel, where an a idress was 
delivered and festivities indulged in. It 
appears bv Mayor (runther's address, 
that the «i"ly «lebt .*20,U(tO,()00, probably 
arising fron'i the fact as stated hi h's ad- 
dress that the system of local government 
ig not acting in that simplicity so neces- 
sar>^ to economy and cfficiemy, and that 
^he «ibdivisioii'of functions and the want 
of responsibility has led to the extrava- 
gance aud multiplication of oflicers. 

lllAcl<a4l«* nnnntTM ArreMed. 

Ni:\v Yokk, .Inn. 3. 
Two brother named Anson and George 
AH, and Me«»srs. Benjamin and Knos 
Iloirman have bt^u arrested and eonfin- 
in Foit Lalavette lor being concerned in 
blockade running business. They ship- 
ped goods to Nassau per Brig (Joodhue, 
which were subsefjucntly found on the 
captured .steamer Margaret. Jesse Y'oung 
and J. C. Budd, have also been sent to 
Fort Lafayette as shippers of contrabands. 
Other parties, also visitants of the Poles, 
are known at Headqu.-irters as those of 
secession proclivities, have been arrested. 
The blockade business here is almost 
dried up. 

A^M«*naatiun JDispatcli. 

Nr-w YoBK, Jan. U. 
A sensation dispatch from Albany says 
that the new police commissioners will 
probably appoint Xelsen Waterbury po- 
lice Superintendent, and that two thirds 
of the police iajftains will report to hmi 
and that the Governor will order out the 
entire militii of the city to support claims 
of the new board. 



Two men were arrested at La Crosse, 
a days since, on suspicion of having been 
engaged in the robbery of the iitage near 
Lake City, last week.' Their lames, as 
given by themselves, are Williams and 
Skinner respectively — doubtlesn assumed. 
Deputy U. S. Marshal Cleveland took 
these parties in charge at La Crosse, and 
on Wednesday evening was in Winona 
with them, on "his way up the river. It is 
not positively known that these uien were 
engaged in the robbery, but their actions 
had been such, for a few days previous to 
their arrest, as to fasten suspic on strong- 
ly upon them. One of them attempted 
to escape from the Sherill" of La Crosse 
county, but upon being threai.ened with 
the contents of a revolver he ibandoned 
the elVort. — Winona Jieimblican. :\lst. 

— At midnight on Ihursda.', the telc- 
firaph opcratorsat P.^rtland, Maine, ami Chat- 
tonooga, Tenn., were having frienlly converse 
over the wires through an iminten-upted cir- 
cuit. Portland s.ivs: "12;1.)— I wish you a 
Merrv Christmas." Chattanooga replies : " 1 
give V*>» « I'l^^^ greeting, but it is not quite 
Chri.stnias with us ; it is but 11 :1( ." The dit- 
fcrcmc of time between the two jxiints was one 
hour and livcminutes. Louisvilli , Cincinnati, 
and IMiisburuli occasionally spoke a few words 
to Porthmd, coniitaring weaihcr, exchanging 
coinplmuMits, -'cards," etc. Th; jokes and 
funny sayings which Hashed ov -r this long 
circtit were quite interesting. 

— Commodore and Mrs. Vandcrbilt 
celebrated their golden wediling on Saturday 
eveninir, at their residence iu New \ork. 
There was a profusion of golden presents. 
Till' Commodoiv's gift to his mation bride was 
a niini;iturc inopcller of pure gold, fashioned 
alter the Roanoke, twenty ind es l«ng and 
tivc wide, with revolving towers, which tilled 
tlie room with music whencvei the delicate 
machinery was set in motim. 

—Dr. Holmes says in the Atlantic: 
"Mr. Beeclicr is a strong healthy man in mind 
and biidv. H's nerves havcno\er been cor- 
rugatedwith alcohol ; his thinki ig niarnm- is 
not brown with tobacco fumes, ike a meer- 
^chaum, as are the brains of so many unfor- 
tunate Americans ; he is the sam : lusty, warm 
hearted, strong-til)red, bravc-heirted, bri>iht- 
souled, elear-eved creature that he was when 
the college bovs at Amherst acknowledged 
him iis the chicfc.st among :hcir football 
kickers." 

Among the Christmas g fts mention- 
ed in the Hartford papers arc co!lins ! Cheer- 
ful thought. 



Do You Want a Sleigh Ride? 

If 80, you will need 

SLEICm BELLS AND 
Horse Blankets. 

The largest assortment of which in the city of 
Saint raul may be found at the Harness Store of 

S. B. LOYE, 

Who is selling them as low as the lowest. 
^ Store next door to Edgerton'i Bank.Tlilrd 
street. d^«3'-*' 



COMFORTABLE SLEIGH 
RIDE 

Can bo had by using tho 

IVew Foot Stove. 

LAMPS CHEAPER THAN EVER. 

Some as low as 

THIRTY-FIVECEiSTTS. 

Tliose usually sold for $1.50, we now sell for 
i\:zi. 

E. & H. Y. BELL. 

St. Paul, Dec. 29, 1803. d«s» 



D I K JJ . 

In Mlniif«iii.li.s, .Jauuury 1th. l-frl, .STRPHKN 
T., iiifinit son ofStei'ben and Sara 1 E.Comstock, 
ag'-d two iiioiiiln. 

The fi lends of tho boreaved faniily are respect- 
fully invited to attend tho funeral it the residence 
of the )>arent.s, January 6th, 1864, lit 1 o'clock e.M. 



/->« A R D . 

We will offer Lforf.Oda>«J our entire atock ol 

MILLINERY, 

at from ','0 to "•"> iwr cent, reduction ; 

SHAWLS, CLOAKS, CLOAKTXGS 
AND FANCY ARTICLES. 

10 to 15 percent. 
DRESS AND HOUSEKEEriXG GOODS. 

at Eastern prices. 

Those Goods were delayed until too late, and 
now must bo slaughtered to raise mon y. It 
would pay anv lady to keep thoni over. Tho Bon- 
net or Hat that cost i?10 )esterday, and cheap at 
tliftt, will bo $r.5o to *Stoilay. This is worth 
saving. You can pav vour dollar with 75 or fOc. 
We most rospoctfullv solicit from our former 
customers and ladies I hroiigliout ihe State. Our 
stcro is b«dow Dav & Jonk's Drug Store, Third 
street, St. Paul, Minnesota, whore tho V. ax Fig- 
ure is In the Window. rW.T,.A«T 

,1 C.54 Mbs. J. J. D UUAN. 

p O O D N E W S . 

Jii>t receivfd by express, another lot of 

lieroseiie Ci-aters, 

Will warm food for tho Itaby, make tea* and hot 
drinks for the sick, will cook a few eggs, 4c., for 
tho " Hearty," adiustable to any I^mp, and onlf 
•J5c each — worth a trial. 
Al.<o, received a fresh supply of 

Grla-ss Oones, 

Will tit any Lamp, saves half tho Oil, and Is fnw 
from that unpleasant odor caused by the brwa 
Cones. Costs but 15c. 

A GOOD TIIIXG JUST Ol'T, 

Xlio No diimney Biir-ner, 

Tho best ever before offered to tho public, freu 

from smoke, will fit any Lamp, and only 3* Cent* 

each. 

.',00 DOZEN E.VTK\ ANNEALED CHIMNEYS 

in store and for sale at Eastern prices. 

All other Goods pertaining to the trade In end 
less variety, for sale low, at THtl ST. PAUL 
LAMP srORE, Third ttr^et, opposite the Pio- 
neer Ollico, dw29-lw 



A GOOD COOK 



T E D 

. Apply at thit oflice. 



janS 



w 



ANTED 



Snpprrsnion of Can^-iderate Currc'nc.r. 

NlwYouk, Jan. 4. 
A very important seizure of Confede- 
rate bonds and Treasury notes to the 
amount of .•^^7,000,000 was made in tliis 
city by United States Marshal I\[urray's 
detectives. A large quantity of plates, 
dies, too's, machinery «S:c., was also 
seized and the parties concerned arrested. 

Ciuvrrillu Cttiiip AnrprUeil. 

WASinxfiTox, Jan. 4. 

Col. Lowell, Second [Massachusetts 
Cavalry, while on a scouting expedition 
near Havmarket on Friday, suddenly 
came upon a guerrilla encampment. He 
surrounded it, dashing in upon the vil- 
lains, killed and wounded many, and took 
35 prisoners, one a captain. 

Mosby's videttcs were dressed in U. S. 
uniforms. 



To buy a good second hand Mo odeon, of mod. 
eru make, and at lea -t live octaves, Emjuirc at 
THE ST. PAUL LAMP STOHK. 
jan.5-lw Third-st,, :'.d door below Cedar. 



F 



O U N D 



l,ii.-t evening, on Third-st., roar Mackubin's 
Blocf , a Pocket Book contaiuii g some money, 
supposed to belongto JOHN IlOKNll.EU. The 
owner can have it by ajjplying at this olBce. 

janS-lt* 



LOST.— .\ Certificate of Defxosit of 
of Williti- Bros. & Dunb?r, No. 1,711. for 
forty-two bO-loo dollars, dated November U'Oth, 
l.SOJ, and payable on or after Nov 'mbor ','5th, \tiGS, 
to the order of the undersigno(,, was lost near 
Crow Wing. Tlie Under is n'<|U(sted to forward 
the same to this office, or Willius Bros. & Dunbar. 
It will be of no value to Inm as pivment has been 
stop[)ed. OanVlw) PETElt CLABK. 



B 



UCKWHFAT FLOIIR, 



Graham Flour, New Corn M al. Fresh Eggs, 
Choice Butter, Fro.sh Lard, ( rjnl>orrios. Beans 
and Peas, Hon^y, and cverythin < usually kept by 
Family I. roceri«'s, can be found at the Grocery 
Store of ... 

jan5 A. U. WIMBISU, Jackson st. 



l^ORTH 



WESTERN 



FUOH CHA1II.EATOX. 



Fires In tlie City— AttacU on the yfur- 
bleheiad— Rebel 0atcery Cuptared. 

Nuw Yi>«K, Jan. 3. 

Advices from Folly Island received 
pei Arago, state that our guns at Cuui- 
inings' Point, opened on Charleston on 
Chnstmaat morning, lasting from o»e to 
three o'clock. Several fires were kindled 
in the city, which burned a considerable 
amount of property. The rebel batteries 
replied without doing damage to us. 
The gun boat Marblehead was fired into 
by the rebel battery on Stono Inlet, and 
two men killed and live wounded. Assis- 
ted by the Pawnee she compeUed the 
rebels to leave their works. 

Gen. Gorden, with a detachment of 
men, landed later in the day and took 1 

possession of the works. The guns weres | _. ^ 

1 subsequently brought off by commaader \ moroing. 



Foreig-u Tra«le of Doaton. 

Boston, Jan. 2. 
The duties on imports received at the 
Port of Boston for the year ending Dec. 
;]lst, will .amount to .90,96:1,674. The 
number of foreign arrivals for the year 
amount to .3,-2l9, being 70 more than 
previous years. 

Cieaeral Butler's Movements. 

FouTiir.ss MoNROK, Januaiy 3. 

General Butler has left here for Wash- 
ington on the steamer City of Hudson. 

The steamer Western Metropolis from 
Newport for New Orleans has put into 
Hampton Roads for repairs. 

Fatal Illness of Arcli Bishoi* Uug^lies. 

New Youk, Jan. 2.— Midnight.^ I 
Arch Bishop Hughes still cont nues to 
live, but is in a very low condition ; a 
few more hours may be added to his 
life, and he may die there at any moment. 
He is beyond recovery. 

Favorable Vews From Japan. 

Washington', Jan. 4. 
Dispatches from Mr. Pruyn. American 
Minister in Japan, announces that the 
Japanese have agreed to pass the claim 
for damage, ($10,000.) for intercepting 
the Am»'rican steamer Pembroke last 
year. This augurs a good understand- 
ing with Japan. 



Ale 



and Porter Brewery, 

,ST. PAUL, MINNE-sOTA. 

DUE'WRY Sc SC!OTTEIV 

Brewers of 

Stock and Greai].i. Ale and 
l^ortei*. 

Delivered to any part of the cit.- In Barrels, Half 
and (juarttr Bairids. 

ALSO 

Bottled Ale &:r»orter 

EXPRESSLY FOR HOTEL AND 
FAMILY USE. 

Ma- Orders from the country solicited. 

^ janO-ly 



J ADIES LOOK FOR YOURSELVES. 
30 Pev Cent. 

BELOAV COST! 

LARGE KEDUCTIOX IN 

MILLINERY GOOr>8. 

From this date till the l!<t of February. 

MRS. J. 15. LYGO, 

I'rsposcs 8fll ng 

WINTER MILLINERY GOODS, 

At thi- following low i)rlcee, viz : 

Velvet Bonnets at *<"'.00 worth tH.OO 

Silk Bonnet* »< W " *^-'*^ 

Vidvet Flowers :J0ce3ch " 60c 

Fill HBts •'•'^ " •^•'^ 

do »»«W " »L50 

Beaver Hat. ^^-^ " •'-^•^^ 

MuMln Flowers 15c escli. 

CLOCKS, 

And all articles usually sold In a 

MILLINERY STORE, 

Including a very large assortment of Ribbons at 
a proportionate reduction. Calland see for your- 
selves ! 

NO HUMBUG ! 

MRM. .r. B. LYCSO. 

p. s.— Mrs. LYfiO having iini)ortod one of ih« 
largest M llinory ►tock of Goods ever brought to 
the West, and paid cash prices for the same, U 
thus enabled to offer to the Public the a»>ove 
Goods at the largely reduced pricoH to her Patrons 
and the Public in general. 

j{. li.— Having such a large stock of Goods on 
hand, I am obliged to sacrifice my Goods to mak« 
room for my Spring Importations. 

Ttinn. jr. B. 1.YC0. 

Third street, two doors l)elow 
dcc30-2«r Thompson's Bank. 



Ij.vltimore, Jan. 4. 
Snow has been falling here since 10 
o'clock this morning. 

W.VSH1N0T0X, Jan. 4. 
It commenced snowing at 9 1 :2 this 



AUCTION SALE 

OF FIKST CLA.SS FORNITURE. 
FAIRCUILI) ."t CO., sell en .Saturday next, 
January '.>!h, at lu o'clock, at tt e residence ol 

Gr. Id. MAIIOH, 

Dayton's Avenne, next door to .1. W. Selby'.^, 
Two full and nearly new Chand)er S<'ts, embrac" 
in" han<lsome Rosewood BinUteads, Bureaus 
(Jiarble Top), Wash .Stands, Chairs, Quartetts 
andRockcri.; 1 plain Chamber Set, OvHlMnr.T, 
JIarble Top Centre Tiibh's, CI airs. Rockers and 
Fasy Chairs, (some very Hue cane seats), Etagere.*, 
Carpc'!',4 Sheet Iron Stoves Parlor Cook, and 
Coot Stoves. Writing De.^k, oak Extension Ta- 
ble.grrlage,Harne...Saddh^^^^^ 

T^VRIENTAL POWDER CO., 

Offer for sale a superUr quality of 

RIFLE SIZE TO COARSE DUCKING, 
In kegs and cannister. Also the famous Diamond 
Grain Powder. «. NEWHALL,,lK., 

Wholesale Agent, n» River street, Chicago. 
ENOCU WOODS, ISO Lake-Bt., 
I d«c2U-3m i.gentfoi Chic»go. 



XJENJAMIN S. BULL, 

WHOLE8ALK AMP BKTAIL DKALKR IN 

CROCKERY. CHINA AND GLASSWARE, 

Harrison's Stone Block, Minneapolis, 3Iin., 

Keeps constantly on hand a large assortment ot 
the above named goods, either at 

AVholesale or Ketail. 

Orders solicited. noil Omdiw 

TTNITED STATES 
PENSIOIV AGEIVCY 



ST. PAUL, 



AT 



MINNESOTA. 



Office In Rogers' Block, .'Ui-at., near the Brldff^ 
Office hours from » to 10 A.M. 
All letters to the ottice mu't Incloae tUmpa to 
pay return postage. ROBERT P. LEWIS, 
nol-d twswir Penalon AgwmU 



HNMiVi t ^M- i 



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THE SAINT PAUL PRESS, SUI^DAY, JANUARY 3, 18G4. 



( 



Sb^ Mwt faul |ntss.5S. f"';"^"^^^ 

^ 5 Co tol, for tlie present Congress— Robert F. j 

FUBLISnKD DAIKY.TKI-WEEKLT AN D WKEKLT. ^''^k, of St. Taul, Dowin Clark ot St. 

I Aniliony. Burrett, of Stillwater, and 
- j AVillianis of Mankato, having eaeh rc- 



Offlcc*— j\.d.ioinins the Bridge. 



-Bv mail, »s.oo per ceivcd an appointment. 
nubhi tn advance. ., ■' 



Term*:— DAILY rUK.SS 
annum, or roc per month i.'irar»<iW>/ i> t.- i i 

Tltl-WKKKLY ri:KSS— fss por annum ; ♦2.;-i0 ' * ooi" 1* is<k ! how suddenly his spirit was 
^^:::::r:^l;j::^^oS-'^'^:, V^'J^^X : «»nnno.u.d into the presence of his lieav- 

WKKKLY I'UK.ss— (ino copy, one yoar, $2; enly lather — a loving wife bereft of a 

five or inoiv, ♦l.r.n^aoh: ton or more, to ojieatl- i !• 'i i i i i r i. • i i. ♦ i 

' •• 'kind husband, and five bright lovely 



1»e*traction of Cieorg-etowH. ». C. I Q P 17 ^ T A T W A T 1 P 17 ^ 

Corr?spu»J<?nc.> X. Y. Tribune. VJ l Lt \j V A. U llUllvlj>Ji 

Hilton IIkad. S. C. December 14tb, 



18G3. — Authentic news has reached this 



Brown's Bronchial Troches, for 



place of the destruction of (ieorgetown, j Coughs ano Colds.— Anoglected Cough, Cold 
SouMi Carolina. 

When the intelligence of Brake's dis 
comfit ure reached this place, a panic 



an Irritated or Sorp Throat if allowed to progroM 
results in serious Pulmonary Bronchial and Asth- 
matic Di.-^easos oftontimcs incurable. Btows's 



dres.j, ^!.i"w«>ach ; twouty or mori',toonf address, 

1^.50 each. children made fatherless. 

OUR WASniNG^N "SoKRE^- ,^" W^>»''»'-l.\v evening last, Mr. Fisk. 

'nr\-KT~r\i3-KT r^Ti \ wlulc accompauving Mrs. Senator Kam- 
PONDENCE. ' • "? . , 
sey out to spend the evening, was sud- 

COXfiRESS— THE COXSCUIITION ACT— tlpn'v taken ill in the street, and going 



seized the inhabitants, and it was rejolvid j Bronchi At. Troches reach (i*>ec% the affected 



HOUSE OFFTCKUs — COMMI'lTKKS — 
MINNi:SOlAKKf'KKSKM"ATrX— SKX- 
ATOK llAMSEY TALKIXG RUSSIAN— 
STAXTOX ••CATCHIXG IT'— 1)E.\T1I 
Ol' MR. FISK— MIXXESOTIAXS IX 
WASIIIXGTOX. 



into a store to rest, sank down and died 
in ten minntis, ; I I'.i. i :; e of the heart. 
He had been in nsi:.! boalth previous to 
the attack. Mr. 1 isk, your readers will 
recollect, was several ye.irs privjite Sec- 
retary to Gov. Ramsey, and State Libra- 
rian ; ami also, Chairman of Ilepublican 
State Central Committee. 

There are quite a sprinkling of Minne- 
sotians in Washington. Messrs. Cooper, 
Dalrymple and OiKillan of Saint Paul are 
here to look out for the Sioux claims held 
by them. Attorney (Jeneral Cole has 
been here for a few days for the purpo.>-c 
of submitting a case before the United 
Stales Supreme Court. Sutler Shelly of 
the Seventh Minnesota Begiment, Bich- 
ard Chute of Saint Anthony, and Mr. 
Lindsay of Kochestcr, have been here 
during the week. In fact 1 rarely call at 
the " National" without meetingresidents 
of Minnesota. 

Jly letter is already too long, so I will 
close by wish'ng your readers a " Merry 
Christinas'" and a " Happy New Year." 
After the holidays I will resume, if agree- 
able to you Messrs. Editors, my scrib- 
bling for the ri!Ks.s. Until then I re- 
main. 

Yours, 



STAR. 



» « • « » 



Corrcspondinoi^ of the St. I'aul I'ross, 

Washixotox, D. C , Pec. 19, 18<y. 
Congress has been in session for two 
weeks, but as yet very little has betn 
done, asiiic <rom the organization of the 
House, the appointment of the Commit- 
tees, the introduction ol bills, and the 
passage of a few resolutions. It is not 
liki'Iy now that any important measures 
will be pas.sed until alter the holidays, 
although (piite .an effort will be maue 
next week to modify the Conscription 
Aft, by striking out the three hundred 
dollar exemption clause, and also to put 
the two tl.isses into one. There will be 
consi<lerablc discussion on these points, 
.ind it is not unlikely that the coming 
draft will be postponed until It is known 
what action Congress will take in the 
mat.'ir. 

For nomination of officers of the House 
there was about the same strife manifest- 
ed among the friends olthe dilleient can- 
didats as is usually witnessed in St. Paul 
on the opening of the State Legislature. 
The nomination of some of the ollicers 
was brought about by successful "com- 
binations"' rather th.qn by any personal 
popularity, or particular fituess of tie 
iiOnilnees. For Speaker, Schuyler Col- 
fax was the first choice of at least thive- 
Iburtlis of the Republican and Union 
inembcrs of the House, and his nomina- 
tion was made in caucus by acclamation, 
not a voice dissenting. That he will 
inahe (he ablest and most popular presi- 
ding officer the House has had for many 
years, I have not the least doubt. In 
the appointment of the Committees he 
has given the Democrats no occasion 
to complain of unfairness, while at 
the same time he has not jeopardized 
the interests of thecountry by giving them 
the control of any important committee. 
Minnesota is well represented in the com- 
mittee rooms. Hon. Wm. Windom is 
Chairman of the Committee on Indian Af- 
. fiirs, which is a very important one for 
your State. Hon. Ignatius Donnelly has 
been placed on several important com- 
mittees — an unusual comj)iiinciit to a new 
member. He is a-mendjcr of the Stand- 
ing Committee on Post O/lices and Post 
Roads, one cf the most important com- 
mittees in the House, and especially im- 
portant to the Northwest. He is also a 
lucinber of the Standing Committee on 
Kxpenditures of the Department of the 
lutirior, .in important one. He is ali^o 
one of the special committee to whom all 
bills, mer.iorlals, and rcsolutiors are to 
be referred in refer nee to the Pacitij 
Railroad. This Is the most important 
committee of all, so far as ^Unnesota and 
her great railroad interests are concern- 
ed. Before the committee the fjuestion.< 
involving the northern branch of the Pa- 
cific Railroad will naturally come. Nor- 
thern Minnesota may consider herself for- 
tunate in having her able Congressman in 
a position where he can guard her inter- 
v>ts so well. 

Senator Ramsey i.^ on the Senate Coin- 
mlltee on Post OtHces antl Post Roads, 
and Senator Wilkinson is Chairman of 
the Committee on Revolutionary Claims. 
The Rus.sian iL-et has been at anchor 
down tlie river opposite Alexandria for 
the pn^f two weeks, and the officers have 
visited the city and btcn linnizcil of 
course, and in turn proposed to do the 
right thing by the President,. Cabinet oiH- 
cers and Congressmen, inviting them to a 
banquet on board. The banrpiet was 
quite general!y attended. .Senator Ram- 
sey surprised the other Senators and 
Congressmen present by "talking Rus- 
sian,"'' a feat which others could not ac- 
conqilish until they learned the secret. 
As the Senator was engaged in conversa- 
tion with the Russians, [through the me- 
dium of what is known in AL'nncsola as 
"Pennsylvania Dutch,"' (wiiich singular- 
larly, the Russians understood. Senator 
Pomeroy remarked to Cov. Ramsey, — 
"Senator, I was not aware that you talked 
Russian." Cov. Ramsey replieil, — ''cer- 
tainly ! I have talked it from my you'h." 
It soon leaked out how it was done, and 
a good laugh was enjoyed at Senator P.'s 
expense. 

The above reminds me, as the I^rcsi- 
dent has been known to observe, of a 
remark made by the eldest son of Presi- 
dent Lincoln a week or two since. 
The Presi<lent, at the time of his 
late sicknesss with varioloid, gave 
notice in the dallv papers that visi- . ~Gen. Asher, Gen. Jones, two Cap 
,, ., ',-./,. , ,,., • i^;"^?"" *'"*'<="''''^"' I'ri-'oners on Johnson's 
tors would not be admitted to the U hite Island, attempted to escape from the Island, 

House, owing lo his time bein'' occupied " '^^'^^ nights since, l.y bribing the guard. The 

. °. o c ^ Propos'tion was made to two of the guard and 

in preparing his message. A:c. Secretary communicated to tlie otlicer of the day in ad- 

Staton was about the first to call after or- I Y-*^^^' ^'^ ^^^}}^^^ ^^^^ matter was anything 

' but tragic. 1 he guard permitted the men to 



E.\clians-«* of Priauuers— ITo Qiiitrtrr 
to "XifgrovM. 

From Richmond Kn:iuirer, Dec. 17. 

In the matter of the exchange of pris- 
oners, the United States Commissioner 
has been driven by Mr. Ould from point 
to point, from position to position, until 
linaliy Generals Meredith and Hitchcock 
have abandoned every point in dispute 
except the treatment of negro prisoners. 
The " message" of President J avis, ol 
January 12, is now made the reason of 
suspending excliange, notwithstanding 
that from January to July, the "xMessa"-e 
liad been in force, and was never once 
reterred to as sufhcient cau«e for stopping 
the operations of the cartel. The enemy 
now rest their case upon this " Messao-e." 
We have already shown that the law of 
Congress for delivering all negroes and 
their white ollicers, captured in arms to 
State authorities for trial under State 
laws was too wide in its language, and 
covered matter that is not wiihin the 
province ol one nation to dictatt; to an- 
other. No nation has the right to sav 
that its enemy shall not employ in its 
armies a certain class of its ' people. 
The composition of armies is a mat- 
ter belonging exclusively to the authori- 
ties ol the nation it elf. If the Yankees 
like negro troops they have the right to 
employ the fiee negroes of the United 
States in their armi.s, and they have the 
right to demand for them the proper treat- 
ment ol prisoner.-* of war. if a nation 
employs savages in its armies, retaliation 
is proper and justiliable, not because of 
the employment of the savages, but for 
any acts committed by the soldiery not in 
ac.ordance with the laws of war. ' So, it 
thij negroes employed by the United 
States compose a part of the people o( 
tLo;ie States, and are regularly mustered 
into the service ; if, after capture, they 
can be proved guilty of acts not recog- 
nized as wiihin the rules of civilizad war- 
tare, they are not entitled to the rights of 
prisoners of war, but may be punished as 
bandits and robbers. And so of the white 
troops — color has nothing to do white sol- 
diers. 

Rut the case is dilTerent as to the 
slaves and free negroes of these States 
captured in the ranks of the enemy. 
Their detention is justified by the laws "of 
war : their punishment we can j)rovide lor, 
though we should not like to sec any en- 
forced, for the poor wretches have no will 
of their own, and being forced into the 
rinks are not responsible for theii con- 
duct. 

Congress, then, should so modify the 
law as to apply only to the slaves and 
free negroes of these States captured in 
the ranks of the enemy. Let us place 
ourselves right under the laws of war, 
and leave the conse(piences to take care 
of themselves. 

If the enemy think proper to leave 
their soldiers here in prison, because we 
will not give up our right, under the laws 
of war; to continue their soldiers in pris- 
on for our slaves and free negroes, we can 
do nothing but accept the issue and 
nieet the responsibility. The law as 
it now stands is not within the spirit of 
the laws of war, and since it is made the 
last and only cause for susjx ndip.g the ex- 
chan<;e, we hope that it will be amended, 
and its provisions confined to the case of 
slaves and free negroes of those States 
captured in arms. Indeed, we see no ne- 
cessity for any law on the subject. The 
Yankees are now going to Send their ne- 
gro troops in the field— they know as well 
as we do that no reliance can be placed 
upon them ; but as depot guards, prison 
guards, »fcc., they will relieve their white 
troops. 1 his is the use that will be madt; 
of them. Should they be sent to the lie Id 
and be put in battle, 7tone tcill be taken 
prisoners — our troops understand what 
to do in such cases. If any negroes have 
been captured during the war, as soldiers 
in the enemy's ranks, we have not heard 
of them. We do not think that such a 
case has been reported. The law is, 
therefore, useless. 



to lire the town and all the merchandise 
it contained. 

Georgetown was a depot for naval 
stores, such as turpentine, pitch, tar, ros- 
in, etc. Three highly combustible ma- 
terials added greatly to the fierceness of 
the llames. 

On Saturday night last. December iith, 
the incendiary lires were lighted, and the 
greater part of the town was consumed. 

Tlie " Conli'derati;" usurpation (some- 
times miscalled a (Jovernment) had laid 
an embargo on all the naval stores in 
(ieorgetown, and it was generally under- 
stood that the turpentine was seized to 
become a material in thclicpiid " Greek 
Fire," now being prepared by order of 
Jefferson Davis. 

Specimens of this compound were not 
long ago found Iniried in a magazine in 
Fort Strong (Ibrmerly Wagner), on 
Morris Island. It burned with a fierce 
fiame, unquenchable by water. Torpe- 
does were unearthed, in which were thin 
glass bottles filled with this inllamable 
article. The bottles were imbedded in 
cotton. A bursting charge of powder 
was added, to be ignited by a percussion 
caj). The "plunger" was adjusted so as 
to produce the explosion when the tor- 
pedo was lifted or when any direct pres- 
sure was applied to it. The cotton, sat- 
urated by the burning lluid by tic burst- 
ing of the infernal machine, was to scat- 
ter death and destruction all around. 
Had they answered the purpose of their 
inventor, it is possible that the abandon- 
ed rebel magazines would have exploded, 
and destroyed the fort and its garrison. 
Great care and much skill were exercised 
in exhuming the torpedoes, and no dan- 
ger resulted. 

Georgetown, South C'arolina, was a 
st.ation for blockade runners Among 
the property destroyed were 2(X) bales of 
cotton, in one parcel, about to be ship- 
ped on account of the "Confederate Gov- 
ernmcr.t" to Nassau, to be there con- 
verted into the "sinews of war." 

— * « ♦ « ♦ 

luimcdiiitp Kuiancipufiun tn JTIary 
laud. 

The march of emancipation astonishes 
the most radical. Slave-ridden old Mary- 
land, too, is taking the lead. At the late 
Slate election the Unconditional Union 
and Emancipation party carried Mary- 
land by 20,1)0 » majority. Since then the 
Union State Central Committee, an Anti- 
jEmancipation organization, has come 
right over to the immediate Emancipa- 
tionists. On the iSth of December the 
Committee met, and were addressed by 
their Chairman, the Hon. Thomas Swann, 
wiio with commendable frankness con- 
fessed the blunder they had committed in 
not standing upon the ]>latform of imme- 
diate Emancipation. He showed that 
slavery was virtually dead in Maryland, 
that it is nothing but a burden to both the 
State and slaveholder, and oU'ered resolu- 
tions calling a Convention for the adop- 
tion of some plan for immediate Emanci- 
pation. The resolutions were warmly 
seconded by the Hon. J. P. Kennedy and 
other speakers, and adopted by a unani- 
mous vote. 

The Maryland Legislature stands nine- 
teen Unionists to three Democrats in the 
Senate, and seventy-five Unionists in the 
House to twenty-one Democrats. It is 
thought the action of the Union State 
Committee will rally all tlie Unionists in 
the Legislature in favor of a State Con- 
vention a' d immediate Emancipation. 

— » » ♦ » ♦ 

Hani on the <'Mi>i>«rhea«Ia. 

The Philadelphia Inquirer has the fol- 
lov/Ing : 

"While the bill appropriating 'f*:2{),- 
000,OUO to j)aying bounties, &c., to re- 
cruit our armies, was under discussion, 
Mr. Harding, of Kentucky, offered a 
resolution that no part should be used to 
raise, arm, eijuip or pay negro soldiers. 
Mr. Cox. of Ohio, in his eagerness to 
place the Democratic party right on the 
records, demanded the yeas and nays, 
which was just what the Union men 
wanted. 

An effort was promptly made by some 
of the Democrats to stop it, but it was 
too late. Roll was called, and mjinv 
who would have voted against raising 
colored troops on a viva voce vote, voted 
right when they found they had to go on 
the record. Fernando Wood, English, 
Stebbins, Perry, Odell and others voted 
with Owen Lovejoy and Thaddeus Ste- 
vens. Samuel S. Randall voted for the 
resolution with C'ox and most of the 
Pennsylvania and Western Democrats. 

No little abuse has been heaped upon 
Cox by his friends, who allege that this 
step has done more to divide and destroy 
»heir party than all the action of the 
Union men for months, and that about 
one more such a call would annihilate 
them." 



parts, and give almost immediate relief. For 
Broncliitis, Asthma, Catarrh, and Consumptive 
Cc>uons the Troches are useftil. Public Speakers 
and Singers should have the IVoches to clear and 
strengthen the voice. Military Officers and Sol- 
diers who overtax the voice, and are exposed lo 
sudden changes should use them. Obtain on'y 
the genuine. *' Brown's Bronchial Troches" liav- 
ingprortd their ellicacy by a test of many j eirs, 
are bighly recommended and prescribed by Phy- 
ician 8 and Surgeons in the Army, and have re- 
ceived testimonials from many eminent men. 

Sold by all Druggists and Daalers in Jledicine 
in the United States and most Foreign countries 
at -^5 cts., per box^ dec^-lindiw 

IIoMK Life Insurance Co.mpany, 

Nkw Y<)KK,o!rers the rnostlibor.il advantages to 
parties deiiiringto effect insurance. 

KKV. EDWD. EGGLKSTOX', 

SrATa A<ibAT FOB MlNNKXOTi, 

th nolO-t8ept' ,"M St. Paul. 

ABeautikulComplexion, frek from 

Tan, Pimples and i'reckles, may easily be pro- 
curod by using the " Balm of Thousand Flowers." 
F'lr bhaving it is unsurpassed. It is composed cf 
palm oil, honey, and other valuable articles, high- 
ly perfumed by its own ingredients, and when 
used for washing, night and moniin;;, renders 
tlio skin soft and white, and free from blemish 
Price 5l» cents. For sale by 

DAY & .lEXKS, St. Paul, and 
septlO oowlr N.II.HEMIUP , St. Anthony. 

Tut Mutual Like Ixsuraxce Com- 
pany OF Wisconsin, is the best Company for 
Western men to insure in. 

It is made up of and uianaged by VTeatem men, 
and is thus having its risks all reside in this the 
healthiest part of the Union. It is believed that 
its rate of mortality will be lower than that of 
the Kasfern Companies, in the lutur.j as it ha 
been in the past. 

The Company is now in its fifth year of busi. 
ness, and has proven an entire success, having 
issued over four thousand policies, and accumu- 
lated in reserve premiums two hundred thousand 
dollars. Itstartedwithout guarantee capital, and 
experience has proven that none was neceoary. 

The business ot theCompany is conducted upon 
the same general basis r.s that of the most suc- 
cessful Kiistern Companies, with the.idvantage of 
having the experience of the older ones as its 
guide. 

There are now a large number of members of 
tho Company in St. Paul and vicinity, among 
whom are some of our best busine.-ig men. 
NOIITIIWESTEUN AGENCY, 
Thompson's Block, Third street, St. Paul. 
O. CURTIS, Manager. 
S. P. SNYDEK, Agent, :Minneai)o;is. 

Either of the above nam-d gentlemen will be 
happv to piveinfoimation to members or others 
desinni', in -' gar i to thot^ompany, and assist in 
making apj lications for Polici(.'s. noS-Sra 



Tub American Express Company, 
would respectfully announce to tho Merchants of 
this city and vicinity that they aro now prepared 
to bring forward from La Crosse, Wis., and de- 
liver to points of destination all ".Merchants' 
Dispatch" ami ordinary Railroad fr.-ight. 

Merchants and others who may wish to avail 
themselves of this moans of transportation, w ill 
please mark their goods to our care at La Crosse, 
at the same time giving us notice so that we m9y 
see that such goods are diliverrd to us at La 
Crosse, without any unnecessary d-lay. 

For tariir rates call at their olRco, -iW Thirdst., 
opposite Stage Office. 

JPC'J E. F. WAUNKP., Agent. 

S— 1—1860— X. 
DRAIvE'S PLANTATION BITTERS. 

They purify, .-itrengtlK'n and invigorate. 

They create a heafthy appetite. 
They are an antidote to change of water and diet. 
They overcome effects of dissipation and late hours 
They strengthen the system ind enliven the mind. 
They prevent miasmatic and intermittent fevers. 
They purify the breath andaculityof f he stomach. 
They cure Dyspepsia and Constipation. 
They cure Diarrhoea, Choleraand Cholera Slorbus, 
1 hey cure LiverComplaint and Nervous Headache 

They are the best Bitters in the worlJ. They 
ma'ico the wi'ak man strong, and are exhausted 
nature't: great restorer. They are made of puro 
St. Croix Rum, tho celebrated Calisaya Bark 
roots and herbs, and are taken with the pleasure 
of a beverage, without regard to age or time ol 
day. Particularly recommended to delicate per 
sons requiring a geutlo stimulant Sold by all 
Grocers, Druggists, Hotels and Saloons, p. II 
Drake & Co , •z<j-i Broadway, N. Y. aus-eowly 



__Pfe'dlani0U5. 



JOSEPH I. BEAUMONT. 

DKALEn IX 

TEAS, COFFEES, SPICES, 

AND ALL GOODS PERTAINING TO THE 
GROCERY BUSINESS, INCLUDING 

TOBACCOS, CIGARS, 

AVines, Liciuoi'ss, and 

Pure Old Rye and Bourbon 

AV II I SKIES- 

CJoriic^r »<1 4V JTuckson St'«. noC0-d&w8w 



WiKE^ A]S"D LIQUORS, 



FOR 



Medicinal and Private U.se. 



PURE OLD RYE WHISKY, 
PURE OLD BOURBON WHISKY, 
FINE OLD FRENCH BRxlNDY, 
FJNE SCOTCH WHISKY, 
PALE SHERRY WINE. 
PURE JUICE PORT WINE, 
OLD BURGUNDY PORT WJNE, 
WOLFE'S SCHIEDAM SCHNAPPS, 

OLD JAMAICA RUM, 

MUMMS' CABINET CHAMPAGNE. 

CURACOA. 

FOU SALE BY 

no'-'0d&w8w J. t. nEAi':n[o:vT. 



WHOLESALE LA.^U STORE, 

next door to 
IMarvin's Croelcevy Iin- 
tortingr Xloitse. 

LAMP5? SHADES. CHIM- 
NEYS, OIL, 

AND ALL THE ARTICLES BE- 
LONGING TO THE TRADE, 

Can bo found at t!!« Store atljoiiiing JIarvin'a 
Crockery Importing House. 

An exclusive Lamp and Oil Ston; to meet the 
deman<Js of the Whol.'sale and Retail trade, has 
li)iig b'jen desirable in St. Paul. Country Mer 
chants can now l>e supplied at Eastern prices 
(tmnsportation added.) Call at tho Carbon Oil 
and Lamp Store adjoining Marvin's Crockery 
Houf-n. 

Kff- Country Morchanta are especially invited. 
Call and see. sepf.;? 



TXO! FOR 

Capt. 



THE CAVALRY! 



Having received authority from the Governor 
proposes to raise a Company for the 

2cl Minnesota Cavalry. 

All who wish to avoid the Dkakt which is i-osi- 
TiVKiA to take place on the 5th of Jan., 1S()4- 
have a chance to enlist in a regiment that w ill 
posrriVKi.Y never leavo the Mate in any case as 
long «s forces are needed on our frontier. Tho 
BOUN TY is tho s.ime as in any other regiment, 
old or new. Subsistence and transportation fur- 
nished to evert recr- i(. I'orsons dt'siring toon 
list in (apt. Russell's Company, can see him be- 
tween tho hours of i) A. M. and 4 i*. M. at the 
Union Hotel, corner of 4th and Wutwishaw-sts., 
St. Paul. CAPT. A. R. RUSSELL. 

dccl)-lm Recruiting Offlci r. 

J H. MURPHY, M. D., '^ 

PHYSICIAN AND SUR(JEON. 

Olfioe on Jackson street, in tho offlco formerly 
occupied by Drs. Morton & Wharton, (opposite 
the Temperance House.) 

Especial attention jiaid to Surgery. dec23 Cm 

^ £ W BOOlToFcHURCH MUSTC. 

THE HARP OF JUDAII; A Collection of 
Saciod and Secular Music for Choirs, Schools, 
Musical Conventions, Societies and the Home 
Circle; By L. O. Fiiiorstm, Author of the " Gold- 
en Wreath."' "Sabbath Harnionv," &c. 

A book embracing every varietV of choice mu- 
sic adopted to tho capacities of aft grades of sing- 
ers. Thoiifrli nubli.>*hed but a few months since 
it has already boon used by twelve Musical Con- 
ventions, and nearly all tho loading conventions 
in the United States are eflecting iirranKonieuts 
to do so the coming season. Choirs and Teach 
ors are rapidlv adopting it because they can lin.i 
no book oijual :o it in every reijuiremont desira- 
ble in such a work. Specimen pages (_'0 tunes; 
will be srnt free to any om' on application. 

Priw of the "Harp of Judah" ^\ per copy, 
$1> per dozen. OLIVER D1T80N & CO., 

docJ3-lyd&w Publishers, Boston. 



■♦»■♦»♦ 



If EVr* ITE.HtSJ. 



-•-♦-♦-•-•- 



tiers bad been issued to the door-koeper 
not to admit any person. The Secretary 
was holding a spirited controversy with 



—A ^ Washington letter says : The bills 
introduced into the Scn.itc by Scnutcns Wii- 
s;"n and Wade, proliibitinj? jucinbcrs of Con- 
gress f.om acting as attorneys or ai^cnts in 
any ca.«c in which the UnitedStatos is'directlv 
or in<lirectly interested, have created quite a 
.seiisaliiin here. A score orsoof Congrc;ismen 
enjoy a lucnitive practice in the 'siiprcnie 
Court and in the Court of Claims— some also 
practice in the courts of this district— and it 
is said that some receive retainers from those 
arrested by marti il authority, or who are in 
trouble at the departments. It may be hard 
for those gentlemen to be dcj)rivcd of their 
professional emoluments, but there arc indi- 
cations that they will have to yield them." 

— The impression at Washington is 
that the Democratic National Convention will 
nut be held until July, and that Chicago will 
be the place. 

—Mr. Nile.s, C. S. A., has introduced 
a bill into the Confederate Congress, proviiV- 
ing for retaining in the confederate armies all 
the soldiers now in the service until the close 
of the war. This looks very much like a gi-ab 
game. 

— A -writer in the Washington Chroni- 
cle says that the greatest jwwer of endurance 
of such liardships as belong to a soldier's life 
belongs to men over thirty-live years of age; 
that men from eighteen to thirty are ten times 
on the sick list where those (ddcr arc only 
once; that the records of the hospitals around 
V.'ashington develop the fact that, aside from 
surgical cases, the patients there under thirty- 
five arc as forty to one over that age; conse- 
•inently a soundman of forty, and of tempe- 
rate habitif, will endure more fatigue and hard 
treatment than one equally sound at tlie age 
of twenty. 

— Mr. X. M. Perry one of the most 
worthy and successful business men of Cleve- 
land, Ohio, committed suicide la.-t Tuesday 
afternoon by cutting his throat witli a pen- 
knife. He was about town as usual during 
the forenoon, went home, locked himself into 



escape from the enclosure, and to reach a cer- 
tain distance away, where they paid over the 
agreed sum, ;g2('K)to each of the guard. Gretn- 
j backs iKing .short, the amount was eked out 

the door-keeper, who reiused to admit ' '*'"'*?.?^';^''' 'V'^'*-"''*^,^ <^>n^' of the guard re- 
,' ' .J , , ,,""'", ciivcd)|j.l.->0 and a gold watch, .and the other 
him, when the President s hopelu!, over- i about the same. As soon as the (juid pro quo 

lK.ari,.« .l,e oonvc-r.^ation, opened .1,0 \ S-e'^^alir,! ^lISrSTc^^i^^JJa" E r.# "' '":". "■» "™" '""=. "' '"» '-'i.' 
door and remarked to the obstinate door- : back to their quarters, minus the expenses. 
keeper as follows : ".Messenger, let the ! _ W. H. Ru.ssell, formerly American 
old fellow in — let him catch it if he wants correspondent of the London Times, has late- 
ly ri I ^y prepared for publication a volume entitled 

" {"Canada, its defenses, condition and rc- 

The Minnesota Congressmen have been sources." His sympathies are known to be so 

very .,u.ces,r„l m obtaining „lea.aot CltiK.'K.c'S?:""''"""'' "'"""""■""' 



the wash-room, and i)crp. tratcd the fatal act. 
ri-.io,. I I ^^ struck ..t first the upper bide of his head, 
oruereu | bm on the second attempt, made a hon-iblc 
gash in the side of his neck, severing the jug- 
ular vein. His groans alarmed his son, who, 
throngii the w indow, discovered the father, 
and, bie.iking the door gave the alarm, but 
human aid was powerless, and death soon fol- 
lowed. 

— The Russian fleet have gone to 
Fortress Monroe, and will winter in tlie Ro.ids. 



WYXIiOOP'S ICELAND PECTORAL. 

Diseases ot the Throat, Che.-t and Pulmonary 
organs are ever prevalent, insidious and danger- 
ous. Tho properties of a medicine to alleviate, 
euro and uproot those complaints, must be Ex- 
pectorant, Anodyne and Invigorating, loosening 
the mucus ol the throat, and impartiisg tone to 
the entire system. No discovery in medical sci- 
ence ever mastered this class of diseases like Dr. 
Wynkoop's Iceland Pectoral. It is used with the 
most a-tsnishing results in allca.ses of Bronchhis, 
Influenza, Whoojiing Cough, Diptheria or Putrid 
Sore Throat, Asthma, Croup, Coughs, Colds, 
Nervous Irritability, &c. 

Th« Rev. J, J.Potter certifies, "that I have 
nsed Dr. Wynkoop's Pectoral for several years, 
myself and in my family, for severe Pulmonary 
Complaints, andhavc recommended it to many 
others, and have never seen its equal." 

Rev. J. J. POTTER, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Hundreds and thousands of important testi- 
monials cou'd be produced, showing its remarka- 
ble cures and that it never fails. 

It is composed of pure Iceland BIoss, Balm of 
Gileafl, Peruvian Balsam, Elocampano, Comfrey, 
Burdock, and other invaluable expectorant and 
tonic ingredients. It is harmless, prompt and 
lasting. Invalids and sutForers cannot aftord to 
neglect a trial. Every family shoul J have it. It 
is remarkable for Croup. Full descriptions, ro- 
coramendations and directions accompany each 
bottle. 

Sold by all principal Druggists. 

Prepared by Dr. R. D. Wyukoop, and sold by 
D. 8. Barnes & Co., New Vork. aul5-eowdtw&w 



HAGAN'S MAGNOLIA BALM 
This is the most delightful and extraordinary 
article over discovered. It changes the sun burnt 
face Rnd hands to a pearly satin texture of ravi 
ishing beauty, imparting the marble purity ol 
youth, and the disfiH^/e appeamuce so inviting 
in the city belle of fashion. It removes tan, 
freckles, pimples and roughness from the skin, 
leaving the complexion fresh, transparent and 
smooth. It contains no material injurious to the 
skin. Patronized by Actresses and Opera Sing 
crs. It is what every lady should have. Sold 
everywhere. 

DEMAS 8. BARNES k CO., 
General Agents, 
ftuS dtw&w ly 202 Broadway, N. Y. 

[Communicated.] 
Pulmonary Consumption a Curable 
Disease 1 1 1— A Card.— To Consu-mptives.— 
The undersigned haviDg been restored to health 
in a few weeks, by a very simple remedy, after 
having suffered several years with a severe lung 
affection, and thatdread diseat' Consumption— is 
anxious to make known to his fellow-sufferers 
the means of cure. , 

To all who desire It, he will send a copy ol the 
prescription used (free of charge), with the di- 
rections for preparing and using the same, which 
they win find a sure cure for Consumption, 
AsTUMA, Bronchitis, Coughs, Colds, &o. 
The only object of the edvertisrr in sending the 
Prescription is to benefit the aillicted, and spread 
information which he conceives to be invaluable ; 
and he hopes everysufferer will try his remedy, as 
it will cost them nothing, and may prove a bless- 
ing. Parties wishing the prescription will please 
address REV. EDWARD A. WILSON, 

Willlamsburgh, Klngg County, 
0«8-amd*w New York. 



T" 



PROMOTE GOOD HEALTH 

USE THK 
AND 

TVild Clierry Bitters. 

In PintBRttlop, priccuOc; in Quart Bottles, 75, 

These Bitters aro composed of the best Roots, 

Barks and Herbs known, and peculiarly adapted 

to tlio immediate cure of all diseases produced by 

an inactive iiver. 

Dandelion and Wild Cherry Bitters 

CURE SICK UEADACHE. 
Dandelion and Wild Cherry Bitters 
CURE JAUNI»1CE. 
Dandelion and Wild Cherry Bitters 

CURE IND1GE.STI0N. 
Dandelion and Wild Cherry Bitters 

CURE COSTIVENBS8. 
Dandelion and Wild ("herry Bitters 

CURE HEART BURN. 
Dandelion and Wild Ciierry Bitters 

CUKE WEAKNESS. 
Dandelion and Wild Cherry Bitters 

CURE LOST APPETITE. 
Dandelion and V.'ild Cherry Bitter* 
CURE AGUE, 
In it» worst forms. They p.-rfomi these cure- 
simply, by one office, regulating the liver. 
For sale by dealers In Jlodioines, evorywhert 
S. HUNTINGTON, Proprietor, 
Farmorsburg, Clayton County, Iowa 
For sale by E. II. Biggs, H. W. Robinson, Pau. 
Reiger, St. Paul;S N.Wickersham, Charles Ben- 
son, {j. Weinand & COy and S. Ed 'ards, Wliolf- 
sale Agent, Winona; Charles Hawley, Chatfleld; 
D. B. Stout, Preston; S. Y. Hvde, Fillmore' 
Charles Morrill, Marion: Capt. Alllls andJ. D. 
Bunce, Pl«-usant Grove; S. B. Robin°on, General 
Wholesiile Agent, address Chatiield, Min. 




FOR 90 DAYS! 

BARE BARGAINS 



cr 



May be made at 

ISO. 13« Thira Street, 

SAINT F»AUL,. 

We offer at reduced prices to close out the stock : 
«0 pes. Freneli ]>reriiios. 

At $1.00 to J; 1.50, worth f 1.13 lo $1.75. 

lO pes. I»laicl Repps, 

At 76c, worth 90c. 

100 po?. MoriiaR 

DRESS GOODS 

At no to r.Oc, worth 40 to ; 5c. 

lOO pes. FIMrti^TS, 

At 20c, worth 25c. 

5 P I E c i: s 

COTTON FLANNELS, 

At 35 to .5i5c, with 40 to (Oc. 

r>0 pes. DEIVIMiS, 

At 30 to 50c, worth 40 to 'J5c. 

500 POUNDS 

WOOLLEN YARN, 

At $1.25, worth $1.50. 

I5OOO IPoixmds 

WOOLLE]^ YAKN, 

At $1.50, worth $1.75. 
A FULL LINE OF ALL C TilER 

DOMESTIC GOODS, 

At Proportionate Prices. 
IN HOSIERY, 

GLOVES, 

whit;s goods, 

AND 

E.^[P.ROIDERIES OR NOTIONS, 
We Will not be Uniersold. 

Remember the rule, 
ALL GOODS GUARANTEED AS REPRE 

SENTED, OR NO SALE, 
And the place. 

No. 132 Third-St., St. Paul. 
CA.TIIC.^\jaT .fe CO. 

decll Im 



COME ONE, COME ALL, 



AND BUY YOUR 



CHRISTMAS 



AT 



S. lu. BAILEir iic CO , 

Are not the Agents for Cooper's Cabinet Photo- 
graphs, but they have on hind the 
largest stock cf 

Cabinet atid. Chair 

TO BE FOUND IN ST. PAUL. 

Oral Frames, Gilt and Jiosetcood M mldings, <fc. 
Also, a fiiVf Photographs which they will sell 
(not at cost) but at (Cahill & Co.'s] the Agents' 
prices. dec«-lm 






F 



OR THE HOLIDAYS! 



AT COMBS' BOOK STORE, 

CAX BK FOt ND X LARCi: STOCK OF 

Cliilclreiis' Books, 

Oirt IBoalnH, 
I*liotoe:imi>li ^Vll>mngr, 

Bi1>les(, Prayer 13oolcs, 

&c., suitable for presents. Call in and examine. 



DIARIES Cor 186<t, all Styles, 
decltf AT COMBS' BOOv STORE. 



ST. PAUL LAMP STORE, 

(Branch of the great Atadc In,) 

Opposite Pioneer Office. 



THE CHEAP CASH STORE, 

For that Is the place you can get your 

MONEY'S WORTH. 

We have a splendid assortment of 
AND 

EMPRESS CLOTHS, 

Which wo will sell 

As Lo^' as tlio ILiOTvcst. 

IF YOU WANT 

Sontags, Nubias or Hoods, 

Go to llie Cheap Cash Store. 

IF YOU WANT 

bax.]m:orail. skirxs, 

OR 

HOOP SKIRTS. 

CH3 TO THE CHEAP CASH STORE. 
We have a fine assortment of 

Which we are gelling low to 

CLOSE OUT THE STOCK. 

IF YOU WANT 

HOSIERY OR GLOVES, 

For the cold weather, go to 

FOR THE GENTLEMEN WE HAVE 

Cloths, Beavers, Casslmeres, Satlnetts, Neck 
Ties and Collirs, which we will sell 

CHEAP FOR CASH. 

Tlie ObieAp Oasli Sttore 

Is the place to buy a«y kind of Domestic Goods, 
either Cotton or Woollen. 

Remember the plaoe, 

And that we will sell goods as cheap as tho 
cheapest. 

H. KNOX TAYLOR, 

No. 218 Third Street, St. Paxil, 
• IVfinnesota. 

dec20-t« 

AT COST ! AT COST ! 



FOR THE NEXT FOUR WEEKS WE WILL 

SELIL. AT COST 

Our stock of 

CLOTHING, 

Shirts, Drawers, Hats 



AND 



OT 

o 



OT 
1-1 





* 


OT 


OT 












JZ 


>* 


OT 






OT 


OT 


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W 


(^ 






y 


W 


w 


^ 


A 










P3 


H 




» 


OT 


«a 


< 




h-5 


§ 




^ 


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OT 





>-A 





w 


Q 


«« 



The Largest Slock, 

The Greatest Variety, 
and ,th9 

Cheapest Groods 

EVER EXHIBITED IN THIS CITY. 
i»S- Wholesale Buyers supplied at Eastern 
cash prices. dec3-tf 



Concentrated Extract ol Lemon; Talman & Col- 
lins' Leather Pre jenntive: Dutcher's Dead Shot 
for Bed Bugs; Sleeper's LijjthMiiiig Fly Killer. 
I>AY *; JTEXKS, St. Paul, 
my27-ly Whole.sale and Retail Agents. 

SPRING TRADE.TO THE MER- 
CHANTS of THE NORTH-WEST. 

We respectfully invite you to examine our une- 
qualled Miscellaneous stock of 
STAPLE AND FANCY DRY GOODS, YAN- 
KEE NOTIONS, Wt>OLEN GOODS. 
HOSIERY, CROCKERY, CHINA. 
GLASS, CUTLERY, PLATED 
GOODS, ETC., ETC. 
No house in the country offers better induce- 
ments in goods and prices. We have every facil- 
ity and are prepared to sell the Best Cash Trade 
at a profit below Eastern figures. 

*^Special attention jtaid to all orders accom- 
nled with money or rcU'rences, 



JUST RECEIVED 

100 Bmrrcls 

C^ILJRBOIV OIL. 

CHAS. A. UPHAM & CO., 

IV0.4, Prince's Illock, JTackaoa Street, 
lit. Paul, iflinn. 

nolO-ly 



Furnisliing- Groods, 

As at the end of that time we intend leaving for 
the East to purchase our 

SI^IMTVO STOCIC. 

Those who want BARGAINS TN CIX)THING, 
will find this a rare chance. 

BLOOMINGDALE & RHINE, 

«ia THIRD-ST., ADJOINING THE AMER 
ICAN EXPRESS OFFICE. 

declo-lmdftw 



AT A. BLAKE MAN'S, 




Af\ BUSHELS CHOICJS RIPE 

Just received by A. H. WIIIBISII, 

oo'^S Jackson iitreet. 



m3t-ly. 



l*OV« EST UMOTHEnS, 

Importers and JTobbers, 

N08. 72, 74 and 70 Lake St., Chicago, 



prORSE BLANKETS, 

S K A. T E S 

SLEIOH BELLS. 

Large assortment Just received and for sale low 
at the Saddlery Warehouse of 



0020 



C. PROAL, 

Corner of Third and Robert-ats. 



TOBACCO, CIGARS, PIPES. 
SNDFF, &c. 

F. W. TXJCMELX, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in Tobacco, Cigars, 
X -,,1°'' Imported Cigars, Smoking and Chew- 
ing Tobacco. Fine Cut Chewing, superior to any 
In tlie city. Sweet Briar Root Pipes, a large as- 
sorlraent. F. W. TUCUELT, 

Third-8t., near Edgorton's Bank, 
myG-ly St. Paul. 



pAX DEEDS. 

THE PRESS PRINTING COM CANT 
Have now on hand the latest and b<'Ht form o 
tax deeds. It is suitable for sales under tho sev 
eral acts of the Legislature, and In conformity 
with all their requlBitions.and Is prepared l»» ;;ie 
State authorities ' 

PrioA SO oonts pnr dozen, or %X per Inndred. 

^Y ANTED, " 

Spikers and Laborers on the construction work 
of the St Paul and Pacific Rallroai Liberal 
wages Will be paid. Payments made weeklj. 
AppTy to I- . R. Delano, AssisUnt Supei intendent, 
at >reightJ>,.pot St. Paul, or Johi. Murphy 
Foreman, Manomin. *^ " 

oCJO tf W. B. LITCHFIELD fe CO. 



THE NEW JEWELRY STORE, 

Poor doors below THOMPSON & BROTHER'S 

Bank, and next door below SHAW'S 

Fashionable Hat Store, 

On Xliix-d Stxreet, 

Can be seen splendid 

SILVER TEA SETS, CAKE BASKETS, ICB 

PITCHERS, CASTORS, 

Solid Silver Spoons — Fiu>eas Coin, 

Diamond, Opal and Ruby Rings, Solid Gold Ear- 
Rings and Pins In seta, 

SVoin #145 to #SO. . 

$10,000 worth of SETH THO MAS CLOCKS 

JUST RECEIVED. 

Those wlahlng to supply themselvea with a ner- 

fect Clock, will buy the SETH THOMAS 

CLOCK of 

N. B.— The Cheap American Gothic CTock, at 
Factory priceg. All warranted to run well. 

A riNB ASSORTMENT of the American 
manufactured Watch atyusfed to heat and cold, 
and the most perfect timer made. A. BLAKE- 
MAN sells them at manufactory prices. Dont 
mistake the place. Be sure that you call In at 
THE NEW JEWELRY STORE. aplS-Iy 



^(QQ BARRELS 

GOOD WINTER AP]>LES, 

FOR SALE BY 

Oeo. E. Sclmabel, 

d«ol2-tf Cor, JaoksoQ ami 4th-stt. 



P'OSTEE & HARDENBURGH, 

SHIP CHANDLERS AND 
SAIL MAKERS, 

n*. «1V S*a<h W»««r Streea, Cliic«c«f 

HaT«-oonstaBtl7 on hand a large aasortment of 

]MLanilla Ac Xajrrecl £l9pe« 
. I>itol]lii|s- Ropes, 

Old Canvass, Oakom, Tar, Fitch, 

CHAINS, TACKLE BLOCKS, TKNTC, AWN 

1NG8, WAGON COVERS, COTTON 

AND RUSSLA DUCKS, 

Common and Patent H«IM Wheels, for baUd* 
ings, constantly on hand. 

oBo. F. F08TEB. (Jei3-i7) o. M. HAABawanMa 






% -r-iir'n 



- 



II m 



i 







V— \ 






1 ^ — * 






k 






^ 


A 





i"~Hfa ■ ■ ^aarfMfc **^ -ii r - 



•^ 



1 



!i 







SAINT PAUL PRESS, TUESDAY, JAKUART 5, 1864. 



^xixp and pcWrnr^. 



§t^ ^00&^ 




SIMS, VAWTE%& KOSE. 

MUGS, DRUGS. DRUGS, 

AT 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

(UNION BLOCK,) 

TVo. Ill Third Street. 

Our nim U to k-op in store a well aelectoil ami 

COMPLETE ASSORTMENT OF GOODS. 

We f.'cl that tliui far our offorts have been duly 

opprt'ciatiHl, and Irustiiig a continuanca 

of palronagp, wo n-new our 

cuicavori'. 

OILS, PAINTS AND GLASS. 

Our RIRMNG OILS wo notice especially, and 

a!?k a trial of its morits. The Oil that is 

most Dfc.viu.E, Riving the same 

light, is of course 

Tlio Oil to J3\\y» 

TILUEN'S FLUID EXTRACTS, 
Pills and Granules, at card prices. 

Hilton's Insoluble Cement, 

For mendinK Furniture and wood in all shapes; 

ivory. Bone, Crockery, Class, F::irthen- 

Waro, Loathor, Paper, &c., &c., 

SUPEKCEUES ALL OTHERS. 

Tlio >Vm«-riciwi M:asrnetic 
l<::<|iLiuc I?o>^-€lors. 

Geo. II. Dadd, Veterinary Snrpoon.says " I have 

cxanuned and pronounce them, the best 

CONUITION POWl>KR, now iu 

WE HOLD IIIK AGENCY. 

Our Btcck of PKKFl MKRIKS and Fancy Goods 
will o.jual any in the city. 

CALL, FA-AMIXK,P1JICE AND PUHCIiVSE. 

smns, VAWXKJR & i»o»e, 

St. Paul. 



^XWV^ii, 



G 



O 



T O 



OUR SPECIALTIES. 



D 



RESS GOODS.— A large line, con- 

8l<tinz of French Merinos, All Wool and 
Union Plaids, Empress Cloths, Plaid Valencias, 
Musliu do Laines, &c., &c. at very low figures, at 

HOG^AlSr & CAMP'S. 



s 



HAWLS.— We have now on 
selection of Long and Square 



hand a 

quare Shawls, 
which the most fastidious can select from. As 
our prices are always as low as the lowest, we 
Invite inspection on them, at 

IXofiran & Canap's. 



I»tJTlV.ALlM:'S 



FOB 

FRESH CAISTNED 

RASPBERRIES, 

BLACKBERRIES,^ 
STRA W BERRIES, 
PEACHES, 

PINE APPLES. 

TOMATOES, 

CHERRIES 

NEW DXIIED 

BLACKBERRIES, 

RASPBERRIES, 
CHERRIES, 

PEACHES, 

APPLES, 

lUISIXS, 

CITRON, 
CURRANTS, SAGO, FARINA, 

TAPIOCA AND HOMONT. 

Stuart's White Drip, Extra Honey, Golden, Am- 
ber and Sugar House Syrups. 
New Sugar Cured Dried get-f, and Pino Apple 
Cheese, acd a complete and desirable 
stock of Fresh 

Orooorles & Proviwioii*. 

S. K. rUTNAM, 
near the Post Office. 



ise4. 



isa4.. 



COOLEY, CARVER & CO., 
WHOLESALE GROCERS. 

IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 

FOREIGI^ AKD DOMESTIC LIQUORS, WmES, 

CIGARS, &C., &0. 

JTackson Street, between Levee and Third, 



f ^gal iotiws. 



N 



O T I C E 



Janl-tf 



SAKSTT T'JLIJI^. 



ftg ^C0&$. 



^raa 



mim.^^ 



CIDER. 

100 bbls. pure Juice of the Apple, at PUTNAM'S. 

O R. A I* E S . 

25 boxes Isabellas and Catawbas, at PUTNAM'S 



CLOAKS 



AND CLOAKLNTtS.— Our 

stock of these goods is very extensive. We 
have Seal Skin Beavers, Frosted Beavers, Esqui- 
moaux Beavers, Castor Beavers, Doeskins and 
Felts, Broadcloths in all colors, at the lowest 
market prices, at 

HOGAN & CAMP'S. 



rpiIE CELEBRATED FAMILY DYE 
COLORS, 

In cases, assorted to suit dealers, and also at 

retail. 

SIMS, VAWTER & 



Jy25tf 

I'ERLING'S 



ROSE, 
No. Ill Third street. 



^ APPLES. 

400 barrels Winter, at PUTNAM'S. 



no4 



G 



EO. E. SCHNABEL 



GENERAL DEALBB 19 



B 



AMBROSL\. 



IIKLMSTRKET'S INIMITABLE HAIR 
COLOniXO FOB THE HA in. 

SIMS, VAWTER fc ROSE'S, 
jy.23.tf No. Ill Third street. 



TJAGAN'S BALM, 

FOR THE COMPLEXION. 

SIMS, VAWTER & ROSE, 

ly25-tf Union Block. 



ALMORAL SKIRTS.— Having up- 
wards of 500 assorted styles of English, 
French, and American manufacture for Ladies, 
Misses and children. We can sell them at a little 
under the market price, by the single Skirt, or 
dozen, at 

HOGAIV & CAMiP'S. 



ALL HOUSES HAVE THEIR 
SPECIALITIES. The above are our's, 
and we feel that we can at present offer induce- 
ments on them that no other Hoiue iuMlnneso- 
la can. 



Family Oroceries, 
GRAIN AND PROVISIONS. 

In MofTet'a Castle, corner Jackson and Fourt* 
street, 

Goods delivered to all parts of the City f^ec ol 
charge. no20-tf 

"T P P L E S . 

200 bbls. selected 
Fall and "Winter Apples 

AT PUTNAM'S, 
Choice White 

Winter ^V-heat Flour, 

AT PUTNAM'S. 

CHEESE— ONE THOUSAND LBS. 
Extra Hanil>nrerli, 

ocQ-tt AT PUTNAM'S. 



BRADFORD BROTHERS, 

WHOLESALE DEALERS, 
IVos. XSV and ISO East ^Water Street, 

Are now opening an immense Stock of Domes- 
tic, Staple and Fancy Dry Goods to which they 
call the attention of the Merchants of the North 
west—among which we offer the following : 

25 Cases M- De Laines, 250 Cases Prints, 
25 Bales Twilled Flannels, 200 Bales Shirtings, 
20 " Plain colored do., 50 Bales Fine Shirting, 



100 Cases Denims, 
75 " Stripes, 
30 
50 
20 






5.' 



Cotton Flannels, 

Linseys, 
3000 lbs. Wool Yarn, 
1000 doz. Wool Socks, 
200 Bales assorted Batting, 



§ttvbattb'tf ^tAmxL 



1864. 



1864r. 



1864. 



Winter Ajrrangfenckeat. 

MINNESOTA STAGE OOMPANT. 
PASSENGER LIN^ 



dec2 



r^ W. WOOLLEY, 

*LOWBB LEVEE, SAINT PAUL, 
FORWA-RDINQ- 

AKD 

Oomntission 3£ercliant, 

DKAUER IN GROCKRIXS 

GRAIN, PROVISIONS, LIME, fcC, »C., *C, 

ASD 

AOKNT FOR THK 

PENNSYLVANLA RAILROAD AND 

CONNECT IONS. 
Contracts for transportation between St. Paul 
Boston, New England, Montreal, New York and 
all points East, made upon the lowest and most 

favorable terms. ,„^«,»^^ 

Mark packages, "C. W. WOOLLEY, 

St. Paul, 
janldly For 



24 Bales Satinets, all grades, 
10 '' Grey Cassinieres, 
10 Cases Fancy Cassiraeres, 
100 Pieces Alpaccas, 
2000 '' Cobergs, 
Twine, AVicking, 
Wadding, Cotton Yarn, 
&c., &c^, &c., &c. 

ALSO, 

A FULL LINE OF YANKEE NOTIONS 

WHITE GOODS, RIBBONS, HOODS, 

SHIRTS and DRAWERS. RIBBED JACKETS, 
BLANKETS, SAXONY PLAIDS, HOSIERY, 
GLOVES, BUCK GLOVES and MITTS; 

AND 

Inmimerable other goods pertaining to the Jobbing 
Dry Goods Business, making an Immense ^ock 
which for EXTENT, ASSORTMENT and CHEAP 
NESS is unrivalled in the West. 

To those wishing to buy at New-York Prices 
and less, we would solicit an examination of our 
Stock and Prices. Respectfully, 

BRADFORD BROTH ERS.^^^ 



In the matter ol the application of he Minne- 
apolis, Faribault and Cedar Valley Railroad Com- 
pany for the appointment of three Com nis^ioner.^ 
lo examine and assess the damages wh ch may be 
sustained bv the several owutTs or cli imants ol 
the lands tlirough wliicli tlio road of se id Compa- 
ny (the St. Paul branch) is located ^mhin the 
county of Ramsey in the State of Miiineaota, by 
reason of tht' appropriation of such lands lor 
Railroad purposes by said Company: 

To the several owners and claimaits of tue 
lands in this notice mentioned, or <.f any part 
thereof, and to all and every person or persons 
having or claiming any esUte, right or interest in 
anv portion of sucli lands : You and eich of you 
arc- hereby notified that an application will be 
made by and iu bPlialf of tUo Minnpai>olis, Fari- 
bault and CeiUr Valley Railroad Compiny, to tbe 
lion. Edward C. Palmer, .ludge of the District 
t.ourt, of the Second Judicial District, of the 
State of Minnesota, at the Court IXouse, in the 
city of Saint Paul, in sai<l Ramsey bounty, on 
the thirteenth day of January, A. >. ifH, at 
eleven o'clock iu the forenoon of thit da>,JLr 
the appoinlment of three Commissioners to ex- 
amine and Hi-sess the damages which laay be sns- 
taine.. by the several owners and claimauts 1 1 tlie 
several pieces, parcels, lots or trac s ot laud, 
throHjfh or upon which the road of sale Comj>any, 
to wit : tht St. Paul brancli thereof, u located m 
said county of Ramsey, by reason of the appro- 
priation and taking tliereof by said Company, for 
Kailroad purposes, to wit : for the rlj;ht ol way 
for their iTaid rond, the necessary turnouts, sites 
for water buildings, conduits, tanks, depots, stt re- 
liouses, machine and other shops, and extra 
tracks necessary therefor, and to as :ertain and 
fix the compensaiion to bo paid therefor by said 

The^lbUowing i? a dcFcrlptlon of the lands 
within the said countv of Ramsey, througli or 
uiwn which said road is located, and whicli is 
sought to be taken and appropriated for the pur- 
poses aforesoid : 

In Rice <j- Irvine's Addition to St Pan}. 

Partof lots5, r., 7and8, inblock;W. 

Part of lots f., 7, 8, «, 10, U and 1-', m block .\. . 

The whole of block :w. 

The whol» of block 3'.». 

The whole of block 40. 

Part of lots 6, C , 7, 8 and 0, in block 41. 

The whole of block 4!. 

Part of lots 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 0, 7, 8 and 9 in block 44. 

Part of lots 1,2, A, 4, 5 and 11, in block 45. 

The whole of lots 1, 2, a, 4, 5, and 7 in block 40. 

The whole of block 47. 

The whole of block 48, ^ „ , v, , .« 

The whole of lots 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 0, in block 49. 

In Irvine's Enlargement. 

Part of lots 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 and 1.3, ard the whole 
of lots 17 to 25, inclusive, iu block 0(.. Also, the 
•^trip of land Iving between lots 8 aad 0, in said 
block (.t<, an<l the whole of blocks 69 t.nd 70. 

In Lark's AddUlon fo St. Pint, 

Part of lot 7, in block 7. 

In mnslotr's AdiUiion to St. Paul. 
Part of lots 1, 2, :!, 4 and 5, in block 14. 
Part of lots 4, .5 and 0, in block 15. 
Part of block 17. 

Droicn if- Itamfetfs A>. diiimi to St. 
Paul, 



D. W. INGERSOLL & CO , 

Are now eeelrlng an extensive itcck of 

F'all and IPViiiter 

DRYGOODS, 

from 

Late Cash Sales in New York 

Consisting In part of 

MUSLIN DE LAINES, 

LUPIN'S FRENCH MERINOES. 
EMPRESS CLOTHS, 

FRENCH REPS, 

PARIS SU.K STRIPES, 
PARAMATTAS, 

Alpaccas, Mohairs, &c., &c 
Mionnilng Ooods. 

LADIES' LONG AND SQUARE 

In every variety. 

^Cloakings, Balmoral Skirts, 

Kid Padded^ Hoop Skirts, 



In atinsm, 



J. 



P. HUTCHINSON & CO. 



th:itm> sti^eet. 



The roaas are well stocked with test olaat 
horses, Concord Coaches, with carefHil andexpe- 
rlence^ drivers, all under the control of oompe* 

tent agents. 

SCHKDULEOIf DKPARTHRK3 FROM SAKIT PAU1-*. 

For Hastings, Red Wing, Lake City, need's 
AVabashaw, Minneiska, Winona, and La Crosse 
at '"'i o'clock -v. M. 

JiVr Stillwater— Dailv , at 8 A. M. 

For Shakopee, Joiiian, St. Lawrence, Bellt 
Plain, llendeMon, Le Sueur, Ottawa, Traverse de 
Sioux, St. Peter and ilankato-Daily at 4 o'clock 

A. M. 

For Rosemonnt, Cvstle Rock, Northfield, Can 
non City, FaribauU, Medford, Clinton Fa^l? ami 
Owatoan.1, connecting at Owatonna, for V\ uto^ 
St. Mary's, Wiuneb.vo Agency and Mankato 
Also for Kice Lake, Claremont, ^asioja, Man 
torviUe, Rochester, Chat tield, and Winona— Dail) 

**For" Industriana, Anoka, Orono, Orland^ 
BTonticello, Clearwater, St. Augusta and St. 
Cloud— Daily, at 7 A.M. xt>, i«,.„m 

For Sauk Kapids, Belle Prairie, Fort Ripley and 
Crow Wing— Mondays, Wednesdays and bit. 
days at 7 o'clock A. M. ... j_j. 

For Richmond, Sauk Centre, Alexandria, 
Chippewa, Pomiue de Terre, Breckinridge, tort 
Abercrombie, Mondays and Thursdays at . 

o'clock \. M. . „ , « 1-11. „ 

For Little Canada, Columbus, Sunrise City— 
Jlondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, at 7 o clock 

AM 1 

For further particulars inquire at the General 
OiBce on Third Street. 

J. C. BURBANK * CO. 
»p21-dly Proprietore 



HOODS, SONTAGS & NUBIAS, 



i3Jll.m:oi^ail. 



AND 



HOOP^ aKIKTS, 



JUST RKCEIVED BY 



L. C. BURT, 
14 6 

THIRD STREET. 



Oommission Morcliaiita 

Airo 

PRODUCE DEALERS, 

SIBL£Y STREET NEAR LEVEE 

ocl6-ly St. Paul, Minnesota. 

T3EAUPRE & KELLY, 
FORWARDING AND COMMISSION 

ASD 

Wholesale Grocers, 

Prince's Block, Jackson-st., St. Paul. 



Milwaukee, Sept. 28, 186S. 



MILV^UKEE. 



CASH BUYERS OF DRY GOODS 



AKK OFFERED THK 



MOST MANIFEST INDUCEMENTS, 



BY THE NEW HOUSE, 



FREIGHT AGENTS FOR 

Milwaukee & Prairie du Chien B.B 



LAFLIN, SMITH * CO.'S 
St Paul. October 13, 1863. ocl3-6m 



SHERTVIIV, 3VO>VELT^ 

172 and 174 East Water Street. 



& I»R-A.TT, 



Part of the south half of block 15. 

Part of lot 11, in the north half of block lo. 

Part of block Ui. ,. ^„ ^. , 

Part ol lots 11. Vi, 28, 29, 30 59, 00, 51. 63, 64 and 
C5. in the .fM'y-rfjc/.fiortof block2«, , ,. . . , 

Part of lots 2, 3, 4 and 5, in the nu'jduuswn of 
block 2i>. 

ALSO, Part of the 8 e '4 of the s c J^ of sec. 1, 
of township 2H, range Zi, and part af the n w U 
of the n e U of sec. 1.*, of the same (ownship and 

^"^^' II. R. BTGEi.OW, Attorn >y for the 
M., F. & C. V. R. R. Co., St. i'aul, Minn. 
Dated December 12th, a. i.<. iwtt . -dealj-td 

OALE OF REAL ESTAT3 BY AD- 

►>5 MINISTRATOR. . ^ k ♦! „ !»,« 

License having been duly grant( d by the Pro- 
bate Court in and for the county of Ramsey, and 
State of MiunesoU, to sell the lands hereinafter 
^escribed, belonging to the estate of Seth 1 . 
Spcncei. deceased, to satisfy the debts against 
the said estate : ... x- .» »* 

Now, tlierefore, I do hereby gi^e notice that 
under and pursuanttothe order of the said Court, 
I will offer for sale and will sell at public auction 
to the highest bidder for cash, at 1 he front door 
of the Court House, in the city )f St. Paul, in 
the said countv of Ramsey, at ten o'clock m tli« 
forenoon, ou Wednesday, the th;rtieth day of 
December, A. d. lNi3, in the ord.-r named the 
following described pieces and parcels of laud 
situate in said county of Ramsey, to wit: 

The south-east quarter of the north-west quar- 
ter, containing forty-acres; also, he north-east 
nuarter of the south-west quaruT, containing 
fortv acres; also, the north-we^t quarter of 1 he 
south-east quarter, containing foity acres; also, 
the north east quarter of the sout i-east quarter, 
containing forty acres; all of said ;racts being m 
section numbered eiBhteon,in town^hlp number- 
ed thirty, of lange numbered twenty-three; with 
the tenements, herediUments and apputtenanc^s 
belonging or in anywise appertaining to the said 

*™Dat;.d Saint Paul, De^cember rMi ^8.^,^^^ 

Administrator ol tl e estate ot ». 
tu deoS-3w Seth P. Spencer, deceased. 



Hoods, ScarfiS, SoiitafiT*. 
HOSTER."5r, 

Consisting of English and German Cotton, Wool- 
len and Worsted Hose. 

LADIES k CHILDREN'S BALMORAL HOSE. 
White and mixed 

WRAPPERS & DRAWERS. 

CLOTHS andCASSDttERES. 

White, red end mixed] 
FLAlVrCELS. 

Sheetings, Shlrllngs, Tickings, 

I>eiiims5 BlanUjets- 

ALL COUNTRY MERCHANTS who purchase 

FOR CASH, 

Should examine our stock before purchasing . 
We will not be undersold in this market. 

I>. W. Iniffersoll &, Co.» 
ST. PAtTi., •sua. 

Sept. 1:1T 



an20-d tw&w 



iatdwm. 



po 



R THE CARS 



Oar Omnibusses will run to and from the prln 
dpal Hotels and Boats in connection with the 
trains of th» 

ST. PAUL AND PACIFIC RAILROAD. 

Passengers and baggage will be called for in 
an wer to orders left at the American, Interna 
tionil and Merchants, or at our office^ 

jy3 J-C '"" 



CUTTER, SECOMBE & CO., 

HAVE ESTABLISHED A 

WHOLESALE PAPER WAREHOUSE 



oc20-ly 



^wing pa^hmeisi. 



BURBANK & CO. 



\/rERCHANTS' DISPATCH 

OWWKDAHD MAWAOKDBT 

AMKRICAlSr EXPRESS CO 

All overcharges settled by J. C. k H. C5. Bnr 
bonk t Co.. A ents. 
Newr York office, Hi Morttiy street. 
Boston office, 69 Washington street, 
maftiS -dly . 

BBLS. STUART'S BEST HON- 

" for table use at 

'8. 



Wheeler & Wilsc.n's 



J. B. BR^ABETS^, 

Has now received from the Eastern Manufacturers 
a full and complete assortment of 

IRON, 

Hardware, IVails, 

steel of all kinds, Springs, Axles, Bolts, NuU, 

Axes, Horse Shoes, Horse Nails, Sleigb 

Shoes, Thimblf Skeins, Carriage 

Trimmings, 

Wagon and Buggy Wood, 

Iron Kettles, Coal, Window Glass and Sash, 
and all other Goods in our line, sold Wholesalt 
and Retail. . „. ■« , 

Warehouse 154 ITiird street, St. Paul, 

apl7-ly 

-piONEER FOUNDRY AND 

AGRICULTURAL WORKS, 



In this city. In connection with tlieir 

P^PER MIL.X.5 IIV ST. ATVXHOTVY, 

And desire to call the attention of buyers to their 

Iminense Stoclr of 

-ROOK. AND NEWS PRINT, FLAT AND 
ALL KINDS OF 



rpEM-PERANCE HOUSE. 

JOHN BURNHAM, Proprietor would respect 
fully announce to the traveling public that he has 
ooened tlie new and commodious building on the 
corner of Jackson and Fourth streets, for the ac 



corner 

commodatioii of travelers 



where he will be hap 




railroad depot. Baggage 



r FTTFR NOTE AND CAP PAPER, ENVELOPES, 

LETTER, NOTE AND ^^^^^^^^^^'^ PAPERS, PRINTERS' AND WlUriKG INKS 

AND FLUIDS, PENS, PENCILS, &c., &C. 



20 



ey Syrup, a choice article, for table ni 
J. (). & H. C. BURBANK & Co. 



150 



BOXES W. R. CHEESE; A 

prime article, at low flares, at 

^ J. C. & H. C. BURBANK & Co.'a 



LARGE STOCK OF CKiARS, 

which we offer at prices that will insure 



quick sales, at 



J. C. * H. C. BURBANK k. Co.'S 



lO'*' PACKAGES ASSORTED 

\^/U<ty Fruits, consisting of Plums, Prunes, 
Currants and t.ltron, all new crop, tor sale at 




ST. PAUL, 



- MINNESOTA, 



Agents for 

GREENLEAF & TAYLOR'S MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

We will seU as low as Eastern Jobbers with Freight added. 

THE HIGHEST MARKET PRICE IN CASH PAID FOR 

PAPER RA.GS, ROPE, GUNNIES & OLD NEWSPAPERS. 

oc22-tf Office J ^o. aao Third-St.. St. Faiil, Miin. 

ST. PAUL & PACIFIC RAILROAD— WINTER ARRANGEMENT. 



to the boats free of charge. Tabl e supplied wit 1. 
tho best the market afiTords. Good stabUng at- 
tached to the premises. 
Jt^aul^ADr£iU8(W^ ?EH:1L_ 

SnyHITCIIER'S HOTIL, 

Fourih-St., between Robert and Jackson 

ST. PAUL, MINNESOTA. 

E. B. WHITCHER, Proprietor 

The above house having recei;tly been opened 
and thoroughly renovated and refurnished, the 
Proprietor would respectfully f ohcit a share of 
«liP iiublic Dalronase, i»"Good Stabling and 



the public patron . 

careful Hostlers in attendance. 



jylO-tf 



Manufactures all kinds of Machinery, Steam 
Engines, Horse Powers, Mill and Machine Cast- 
ings of all descriptions. Having the largest as- 
sortment of Patterns of any establishment In 
this State, we are prepared to do all kinds of Iron 
and Brass Casting, of finishing, promptly, at the 
lowest Eastern rates. Particular attention given 
to Threshing Machine, Steam Engine and Boiler 

'^PSlV"'^' gILMAN fc CO. 



On and after JANUARY 1st, 1164, the Passenger Trains will run as foUows : 

EVENING. 



T 



HRESHING MACHINES, 



1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8 and 10 Horse Power^ for sale very 



low, at the 
Works. 



Pioneer Foundry 
(aull) 



and Agricultural 
"OILMAN fc CO. 



/CORDAGE, SLEIGH SHOES AND 
FANNING MILLS. 



MORNING. 

Loaves St. Paul 

Leaves St. Anthony 

Leaves Manomin. «• 

Arrive at Anoka ••• 

Leaves Anoka .•..•••..••*...•....•' 

Leaves Manomin 

Leaves St. Anthony 

Arrive at St. Paul 



aplStf 



.7:00 A. 


M. 


.7:45 a. 


M. 


.8 :05 A. 


M. 


.8 .40 A. 


M. 


.8 :S5 A. 


M. 


,9:30 A. 


M. 


.0:55 A. 


M. 


10:3« A 


M. 



Leaves St. Paul 

Leaves St. Anthony. 
Leaves Manomin . . . . 
Arrive at Anoka 



.2:45 p. M. 

.:i:.HOP. M. 
..3:50 P.M. 
..4:25 P.M. 



Leaves Anoka 

Leaves Manomin 

Leaves St. Anthony.. 
Arriveat St. Paul.... 



..4.40P. M 
..5:15 P.M. 
..5:40 p. M. 
..6:20 P.M. 



E. I^. X>ELAIVO, 

Assistant Super inteiideiit. 



oricei to suit the times. 
^ .I.e. &H.C. 



BURBANK fc Co.'s 



XTOU WILL FIND C^NE OF THE 

i largest anc'. best selected stocks of Grocer- 
ies in the West, at the warehouse of 
dec 19 J. C. & H.C. BURBANK & Co. 



\- 



420 



rauus,at 



BOXES ASSORTED TO- 

b&cco, comprising all the favorite 

J. C. fc H. C. BURBANK fc Co.'s 



I 15,000 

Of them in use in this country 
and Europe. 

These are the only machines making 
th« Lock stitch with the Rotating 

Hook. .. ^. 

Are profitable and available a life 

time. 

Equal to ten seamstresses. 

An annual dividend of 100 to 600. 
per cent, (on their cost) may be obtained iu 
use — by their possessor. 

The Class Cloth- Pressor, (so popu- 
lar.) can only be had with these Macbineg. 
W. M. J003r»0]f , Agrent, 

jyl4 264 Third street, St. Paul. 



For sale bj 
jel4-tf 



NICOLS.DEAN fc CO. 



C 



ARBON OIL 



Oarl>oii Oil by the Barrel . 



Jc5-tf 



For sale low. 

NICOLS, DEAN fc CO. 



300 



rpo 



WHOLE, HALF AND QUAR- 

ter boxes Raisins, crop of 186., at 
J. C. fc H.C. BURBANK fc Co.'s 

MY FRIENDS & PATRONS. 



Having engaged 

. C. Burbank & Co. 



aiy services to the Messrs. J. 
corner Levee and Sib- 



£V*tIeVVs\1"i^rbefounarnVhVwhol^le"Gr8^ 
^ry Depw'tmeat, where it will afford me pleasure 



to see mv old customers once more, , ^ , . . 

*^W e s"Ll have a large a°d ,,^'^11 »«i«^f i*^^ 
M <Trin<i* uKuallv kept in our line, on hand, which 
1 r^suertfulTy as^ yo" to examine before purchas 
iVreWhere Vhope to ™"" f**' „t^^ »i°Cril 
Bortiou at least of that patrona-e you have here- 
Lt^e^so Uberally bestowed^n^onm^e^^^^ 



"piANOS AND MELODEONS. 

F. O. TTILIJEI^, & CO., 

Dealers in Piano-Fortes, Melodeons, Harmoni- 
ums, Cabinet Organs, Sheet Music, Music Books, 
fcc, fcc. No. 2:J0Third-st., corner of St. Peter-st.. 
St. Paul. Minnesota. Agents for the celebrated 
A. M.McPhail t Co.'s Star and Grand Scale Pi- 
anos, Also, the Prrlor Gem 

Mr. Wilder is a Piano Maker, and has been in 
the business over 20 years, and will sell nothing 
but flrst-class Instruments. Every Instrument 
will be warranted, and all Pianos sold by the firm 
will be kept in tun** one year tree of charge, If 
within a reasonable distance. 

49- Pianos and Melodeons tuned and repaired. 

Lesson given on tbe Piano and Melodeon. 
B036-<ffcwly 



COP- 



^E^EET IRON, TIN PLATE, 
PER BOTTOMS, 
ZINC AND TINNERS' STOCK, 




THE GALENIC INSTITUTE. 

FOR THE TREATMENT OF 

VENEREAL DISEASES, 



Tj^ S T A B L I S H i: D 17 6 0. 

Peter T^orillard, 

Snuff and Tobacco Manufacturer, 

lA and Id Chaiub<>ra>Ht., 

(Formerly 42 Chambers Street, New York,) 
Would call the attention of Dealers to the articles 
of his manufacture, viz : 

BROWN SNUFF. 

aacaboy, Demigro?, 

Fine Rappee, Pure Vglnja. , ^. 

Coar.fo Rappee, Nachitoches, 

American Genllema a, Copenhagen 

YELLOW SNUFF. 

Scotch, Honey D^wScotch, Hi ?b Toast .Scotch, 

Fresh Honey Dpw .--cotch, Irish UigU 

Toast, or Lundyfoot, Freeh 

Scotcn. 

B3- Attention is called to the large reduction 

In prices of Fine-Cut Chewing ind Smoking 1 o- 

bacco, which will be found of « superior quality. 

TOBACCO 
FINE CUT CHEWING.— P A.L.,or plain; 
Cavendish, or Sweet; Sweet licentedOronoco; 

^^S^'SKfNG.-ag; NO. 1 ; .0.2; Nos. 1 and 2 
Mixed; Granulated; S. Jago; Spanish; Canas- 

*^'n. b"-A circular of prices niU t>e 8_ent on ap 
plication. 



/CLOTHING AND 

Gent's Furnishing Goods, 

AT THK BTORK OK 

-W. H. TEMPLE, 

THIRD ABOVE MINNESOTA ST. 

Overcoats. 

FINE B EAVER $14, $18 and $25. 

BLACK DOESKIN, CASSIMKRE 

AND CLOTH »14 to $20. 

PETERSHAM, PILOT & SATINET.. $» to fib. 

Business Coats, Frocks & Sacks 

A large assortment, $fi to $20, 

Pantaloons for the Million. 

From a coarse Satinet to a fine Doeskin, all new 
goods, and made up in style. 

VESTS. 

Black Doeskin, CMh, Figured Casslmere, Silk 
and Silk Velvet, of different grades. 

SMrts and IDra^vers, 

winter Caps, Hats, Gloves, Socks, Ties, 
FINE WHITE AND FANCY WOOL SHIRTS. 

We have now In store one of the largest stocks 
of Clotliing in the .State. Our goods have been 
bought so that wo can give bargains. Those in 
want of any article In our line would do well to 
give us a call. 

my:!0-tf 



\¥. U. TKyiPM^Wt. 



marl5-ly 



ap24 ly 
DATENT 



For sale by 

NICOLS. DEAN 



AMALGAM 



fc CO. 

BELL, 



SUITABLE FOR A SCHOOL HOUSE 
SMALL CHURCH. 



OR 



For sale low by 
dec2-tf 



NICOLS, DEAN fc CO. 



F 



OR SALE CHEAP. 



stoves, Tin Ware, Hardware, Hollow Ware, 
Steel Traps and Shingles. Highest price paid in 
cash for Wheat, Wool, Old Copper, Iron, Lead 
and liags. Robert-»t., «rst "tore from Thlrd-st. 

marll-tf Wfesi « ou. 



AND 

AH Affections of the Urinary and Generative 

Organs, &c., &c. 

Tf«» Pi'RiisiiFD— A Mkdical Report, 30th" edition, containing 80 large pages, and 60 fine 
and Mind, including a Treatise on 

VETsTEREAL DISEASES, 

uuMic ui mc ^■^>"^y^__ __^ „ , li Kono\-nlpnt associations." he. 



ir>o o T 



S AND SHOES 



AT 



T^ESIRABLE LANDS FOR SALE. 

Lands In fjio valley of the Upper Mississippi, 
and adjacent.'to Uic line of the St. Paul and Paci- 
fic Railroad. « „ ., , ^ 

The SL Paul and Pacific Railroad Company 
now ofll^r in tract* of 40, 80, 120 and IWJ acres and 
upwards— 120 sections, or 7C>,S00 acres of land, In 
the following townships, viz : 

Town. .^2, Range 22. 
" 33, " 22. 
«« 32, " 23. 
•« 3.1, " 2:i. 
«' 32, " 24. 

83, " 24. 
24, " 24. 
86, " 24. 
33, " 25. 

84, " 25. 
35, " 25. 
M, " 26. 
35, " 2tl. 

Tliese lands «re situated in the connties of 
Anoka, Isanti nnd Sherburne, and comprise some 
of the most valuable lauds in the townships 
named. 

They wUl be sold for cash, the bonds ef 
Company at par. or on long credit. 

For prices and terms of payment apply i 
LAND tOMMISSlUNER, 
St. Paul snd I'acific Railroad Company, 

•c27-dfcwOm bt. Paul, Minnesota. 



■I 

M 
<l 
II 
i< 
• I 
•I 



NEW YORK PRICES. 

SO per Oent.. Saved. 



to 



BY 



BUYING YOUll SHOES 



N 



O T I C E 



AT 



physician Is a regular grai 



' former sufferers ," and " benevolent associations," he. 



^UmalTfinractrcedbv advertising quacks, "former sufferers," anu •• oenevoieni aBsuciauo.o, ..^, 



DOZEN DUBOIS BEST CAST 

steel Axes. Also 30 doaen Red Rirej 
l80 2S Boxes assorted Blued Tacks, first 

** J. C. fc H. C. BUKBAmt fc Co.'s 



wiVt'ten'years, and is prepared to give patients as good treatment 
ThSU afflicted with any of the above diseases, should let no false delicacy diter them, but apply 

*'FEMAtE*^^9EAs'A.-Partieular attention given to »» Fem.Je Dlse^^es suchas suppre^ 
unhealthy Men.struati on. Leuchorrhea, Chlorosis, DLeases of the Womband Os U.eri, fcc. Also, 

receive a Blank 
Medicines sent to 



nnneaiuiy ai»-".-'i.i"»>^'"«>. L'euchorrhea, Chlorosis, 

AKent for Dewee's FemaU Pills Jot obUructed Menstruation, price $1 per box. 

PATIENTS AT A DisTAMCK-Bv sending a brief statement ot their symptoms, will 
Chart containing a list of questions, our terms for the course of treatment, fcc. M 
inv oart of the "ountry to cure any case at home, free from damage or curiosity. 
"LSfofCln Concert Hall Block, near the Post Office. Consultations P";'f «J°<1 «o°« J«°"*\;^^ 

to I r. M. afternoons, from 3 to 5. Sundays tf to 10 A. M. All letters should tw 



BROWN'S, 

NIEW^ STORE!, 

113 Tliird Street, 

One block above the Me: -chant's Hotel. 
je5-y 



MADAME ANDREWS, 
Clalirvo:rant, 

Has returned and taken the two story frame housrt 
on Tenth-st., two doors west of St. Peter-st, on 
right hand side, where she can be eonsulted for K 
short time only. „ ,» _ 

Clairvoyant Examinations $1. Past, Present 
and future, 60c. 

Persons wishing to consult her, are requested 
to walk up stairs without knocking. Hour* front 
9A. M.toUr.JC. dec8-3m 



T 



HIRD STREET PROPERTY. 



hours from 9 A. M 
directed to 

Jft 



THE GALENIC INSTITUTE 

9«z 199 J 8aJlmtP»«l,llliui«M>«i 



RINTERS' INKS 



All sorts, kinds, and colors, from the celebrated 
ninufactory of J. E. Wade, New York, for sale 
at manufacturer's jprices, by ,.„^„ .„_ . .,_ 

dccl2 J.C.fcH.C.liUKBANKfcCO, 



FOR S-A.LE, 

Lot 2, Block 22, Rice fc Ir> Ine's Addition— comef 
lot, 72 feet front on Third street and l.V» fe«>t on 
Hill street, adjoining Hope Engine House. V^iU 
be sold low. 
TERMS— Part eash and part o^*4ih«T.l^• 
AoDlyto D.COOPE». _ 

fflOtlf I rvine's bW 

DkMONTREVILLE, 

D K N" T I 8 T . 

(OfBoe in French's Block,) 
Third Street, ssesar tls« ^—t ••«•« 

SAINT PAUL ••••••• MINNESOTA^ 

)an29-l7 




I 



.^ 



\ 



-»* 5 



W ftf » ■ 




■^ 



ll » » M I « *' » 



. ■^» n 




T" 



>#<i«i 



1 



THE SAINT PAUL PEESS, TUESDAY, J ANUABY 5, 1864. 



hh: city. 

Tk«moai«trical Itecord. 

IKPT BT DAT & JKNKS, l.UUGGISTS.COKNEROF 

TiiiRT) a:;d ckdau strkf.ts. 

•; .■in t -M 1P.M. 6 P. M 
.jYSfAF.T. 7:^ A.M. ir.^1. _ 



1 Friilav 

•i Satiinliy •• 

3 StuKuiy ..•■ 

4 Monday... 



3<>* 
30* 

IS* 



4* 



2:j* 

1.0* 

7* 

4* 



Mkikorolooical Notes for Dkcfm- 
BF.r 18G3.-Jrhc month taine in Avith a very 
luoJcrat. tcn,pcratm-e, which continncl until 
t' c inh This wns su.ccciled by a A'cck of 
cohl, during which the mercnry fell below the 
zero point tvico, re.ul.in^' on the morning' of 
ihc lUth *\>1 dcg. Then again we were fnv.na 
uirhawcek ot mihl weather, the thcnnomc- 
tcr not lallini,' Ix-low 23 de^^ nor rising' above 
;}1 dcL'. This w.is also a week of contmnc-d 
el. ludines-s dnrin- which the sun was not visi- 
ble, and on tivc day.s of which snow was de- 
p, .sited. Tlie month terminated witii an access 
of vcrv severe cold. Ou the evening of the 
.-ilst, at nine o'clock, the mercury liad sunk to 
••>S dcg. Yet, with an unusual amount of 
c"oudv weather, the month past cannot well 
be called an iiniA^:^:mt one, f>.r the wintl, an 
im;.oitant clement inthis climate, was uucom- 
muulv moderate. 

The thermometer yielded flic following 

results: 

ilaxiimini of the month, (:5<1) •••^ 

Minimr.n. " " T-lst) *;^^ 

Highest daily mean (:)d) "^^ 

Lcwo,t '• " (:»i'0 *^:, 

( ; reutwst daily range, (-• l.*t) -^^ 

Lean " •' (=-'"»'^ ,:' 

ISange of the month ' ,., 

Ml an t.iniM'raliire of the month '-i^^'W 

M 'an cloutliiK ("s of t!ie month "•! 

Me:in forof of tlvwiu.l '-'•' 

Uaiu tell on one day (:th) to the amount of .4:! 
ot an inch; and snow on twelve days, to the 
anion n; of about nine inches. The total depoi'it 
ol moisture was i.:;o inches, a tritle loss than that 
oij Lecen.ber l^^.•-'. fie? dear fair days w en- about 
e.,ual louiiie. The winds cuuie very e.jually from 
all i-oiiits of the compass. 

% OMPAKISU.S-S WITH KOEMKUTtAUS, 

Mean temiieiature of IVe., ls.V.» "'-tl 



Deposit of moiiture 



isr.0 

Ksj-.l 

istu 

Is'Vi, .... 
i><>'.) (inches) 

ImUi 

l.N'i! 

1SG2 

l^Mk>• ••■•••••■ 



...•1.:M 

.■,-,'.05 

.•J0.:.5 

M 

.41 

.10 

l.:!0 



SIMMAUV OK OnSKUVATIONS KOll VEAK ISCT. 



..41.01 
..»•,'.<■.! 

..u.;'.; 
..H.r: 



The mean temperature cf !><■>$, was 

ift;,'. ■ 

" iMJf.", 

.1 ♦• l^olt. 

The total amount of water which reached the 
e-nrth in iho form of rain or melted snow, wn- in 

iv,-.a ir,>y iuche* 

l^,i '•■''•'•'^- 

iw,,;. :Ju.oO " 

l«-()0 ,;».< t 

1^5'.• — *■•' 

Th > avi-rage nuau lemijcrature ol New York is 
about .".I degr.'es, and the avera^'e piecipitition 
about J"" inelie*. 

The ni".\imum tt nip'Tature of hsftJ occurred at 
Saint Paul on the Ptli of .July, lJ*th of Aueust and 
l.">th of S.ptenilicr, lU degrees. The niiiiiniaui 
■Wis r. ached on the :id ot Ft-bruary, *:'.l degr es. 

The range of tin' year therefore was 12-,' deg. 

Fair weather prevail- d ou l;VJ days. 

.Snow fell to the amount of 33 inches on ■i\ days. 

It Tiiined on o' diys. 

OtbiTS were day.s ol cloudiness without fall of 
rain or .onow. 

St. Tail, Jan. 2, lf>«H. I'. 



Below zero. 



••*■ 



Forxn Almost >PnozF.x — Ye.stenlay 
morning alxjut two o'clock, as Bnrbank's stage 
wns coining into town over Dayton's Blull',thc 
driver saw a man lying beside the road appa- 
rently lifeless. He st >pped the stage and the 
passengers got out and picked him up. He 
was found to be almost lifeless from cold, be- 
ing so stupid and benumbed as to bL> almost 
unable to .speak. He was put into the stage 
and brought to the Tuternational Hotel, and 
restoratives applied to liring him to, which 
was accompli-hed in a short time. He gave 
li:s name as William Ilogcrs, and confessed 
that having d-.anU too much li juor he had 
jitarted at a late hour towards his home near 
the Poor Farm, and had most probably fallen 
down ovpri>owercd with tlie cold ami lienor. 
The thermometer was about 20" below zero, 
and in a few minutes more he would have 
l>een t<M) far gone to have Veen revived. It 
was found on examination, that his hands 
were .so badly frozen that it is certain that 
they will have to be amputated. 

ANXlVEHSAltY Seua^ON. — The Anni- 
versary Sermon of the First Baptist Church 
wa-: preached on Sunday morning last. It re- 
viewed the p.i.-t of the Church, showing what 
God had wrought for it in its prosperity. 
From a vcn-v humble beginning it had now be- 
come a 1 jv.er anions' the people, as was every 
Church rightly eondncted, and calcui-iud to 
do good in th?^ community. 

This Society is now entering on>its four- 
teenth yeai-. and is in exceedingly prosperous 
circuiu.-.tauees. Rev. J. D. Pope, the Pastor, 
has been settled over the Consn-egation over 
six years now. His ministry has been very 
successful. AVliile on this sulyect we give 
place to a note cirrccting an error in our 
notice of tliis Church last Friday : 
For the Press. 

CouRKCTioN. — Please correct an error in 
your excellent number ot January 1st. In 
vour history of the First Baptist Church of St. 
"Paul.remariicd : "Rev. E.C. Cresscy was next 
ordained." Instead of E. C. you should have 
said : T. R. Cresscy ; and instead of "or- 
dained" yon should have said settled, for I 
was ordained twenty years before that time in 
the old Bay State. 

Kespcctfullv, 

'f. R. CRKSREY. 
MixxEAPOLis, Minn., Jan. 2, 18G1. 



SiiooTixd An'R.vY.— A sbootint; af- 
frav occurred at the house ot a notorious 
character called FranTc Gale, on Rol)ert 
street, a night or two since, in which a des- 
perado named Mike Dcwan was badly wonn- 
ded by Gale. Dewan and some comrades 
went into Gale's place, end attacked him, 
when Gale fired at Dewan with a pocket re- 
volver. One ball went through his left shoul- 
der, and another grazed the collar of his coat. 
Some others of the gang had narrow escapes. 

Gale was arrested and appeared for trial 
yesterday morning, but no one appearing 

ag.iinst liim, lie was discharged. 

— .•■» 

TiiKSTEitF.osroPTiox Last Night.— 
A large house turned out to IngersoU's Hall 
last r.iglit to sec the sterooscopticon. The ex- 
hibition wonltl In— b-^c".' :t very fine one, had 
the supply of ga?. with which Mr. Eggleston 
manufactures his l^la i.iovcd sunicient. but 
ow ing to an unavoidable accident a few min- 
ntcs before the time for the exhibition to com- 
mence, part of it was lost. The pictures ex- 
hibited were very fine— some of them peri'cct 
jri-nis— but the light was not <iuite intense 
enough to brmg them out as plain as was de- 
siral .le. We hope Mr. I'.gglcston will give an- 
other exhibition soon, as all are anxious to 
see in perteetion what they saw imperfectly 

last night. 

-.. ■■» 

How A Rkcruit was Oi5TAIXK1>.— 

Last week a fellow (whose real name we did 
not learn) stole a watch from the inmate of a 
hoH^eof ill-fame in this city, and started 
ilown the river. He was arrested at Waba- 
shaw, brou>:ht back, and lodged in the Jail 
here. The owner of the watch on recovering 
it refused to prosecute the man, and he was 
released on condition of enlisting in the army, 
which he at once consented to do, and was 
taken forthwith to tlic I'rovost-Marshal's of- 
fice and sworn into the Third Biittery. 

Our D(H'»lk Sheet.— We have still 
a few copies of our double sheet New Years 
l):ipcr left. This is an excellent paper to send 
East to your friends. It contains a brief sum- 
m.iry of the history of Minnesota, the history 
of St. Paul in full, a review of the Trade of 
IS!).';, and many other interesting articles. 
This will be acoini)lete docnmcut to send to 
any eastern licrson to give him an idea of the 
past progiv.-s and present standing of our city. 

The School Board. — The School 
Board failed to have a (luorum last night, 
ow ing.no doubt, to the extreme cold weather. 
There was not much business to have come 
up, had there been a ijuorum, however. The 
schools have only been in session about two 
weeks since the last meeting of the Board. 
•«» 

Joux r. Kkxxa, auctioneer, had one 
of his hands badly frozen one night last week 
while sitting on the sidewalk, and had the 
police not picked him up in time, he would 
have doubtless perished. He has been ex- 
empted from the draft on account of support- 
ing an aged mother. Fortunately, only one 

finger will have toMn? amputated. 

— ^»»* • 

Capt. Chas. J. Stees of the 0th, and 
V.'. W. Bradeii have been detailed to recruit 
for the 6th regiment. Capt. Stees commands 
the Young. Men's Guard, one of the finest 
companies ever raised here. He will receive 
and forward recruits for any company how- 
ever. The Sixth is a fine regiment, and is 

now on home duty. 

- ♦•♦ - - — 
Through to Axoka. — Yesterday the 
first passenger train ran through to Anoka, 
and from and after to-day that pretty village 
may be considered one of our suburbs, in- 
stead of being accessible, as hitlierto, only by 
a three hours ride in the stage. The road to 
that pointjvill be formally dedicated in a few 
da vs. 



Press Book Bixdery.— Wc take oc- 

oasion to inform our friends and the public that 
wc have in connection with this office one of the 
bfst BOOK BIXDKRIES and BLANK BOOK 
MAXUFACTORI Kb in this city, and are prepared 
to do KUUN(; and mSDiSO as desired. MAGA- 
ZINES, PERIODKALS, ftc, bound in any style 
required, and OLD BOOKS re-bound at pl-.ort 
notice. Ledgers, JournaLs and Blank Books, for 
Railroads, ,«teamboats, Banking Houses, &e.^ 
mauufacturcd on as reasonable terms as any oth- 
er establishment. Merchants and others will do 
well to give us a call. 

Mi:s. Leoxart), late from Mt. Auburn 
Seminary, ilississippi, v islies to inform the pub- 
lic tli»tslie will give lessons in Vocal or Instru- 
mental Music, Piano, etc. Persons not having 
an instrument of th^ir own, can practice ou Mrs. 
L.'s I'iano. For terms api>ly to her rooms, at Dr^ 
Crary's, Robert-st., cr Dr.C. I). Williams, 0th-8t| 

RBI BRK CKS.— Itev. Dr. JIcMasters, Mungfr 
Brothers, A. T. C. Pi.rson, Rev. Dr. Crary,Fred. 
1 iriscoll. Dr. C. D. Williams. dec'-'O-nm 

Enlist axp Avoih the Drai-t.- 

Recruits will be permitted to enlist in any of the 
organized Regiments or Batteries they may select 
and will receive ^%0i bounty and premium. Per 
sons desiring to enlist can get any pirticulars, by 
applying to MARK HENDRICKS, Recruiting 
Agent, at the NorthwesU'rn Express Office, No. 
•,Mr. Tliird-st., .St. Paul. Office hours from A. M 
to 1'. M. ^^ 

We will i>o it —In order to .sell olT 
and reduce our oxten»ivo stock of Clothixo 
ANP Gent's FirnxisH no Goons, wo oiler «ur 
whole 8to3k at from 10 to ','J per cent, less than 
our re'gulir price. We think it safe to say that 
those purchasing of us will R<*t Goods about the 
wholesale price. We otfer these inducements to 
the people rathe; tlian to Merchants. Our low- 
est I'uu'i. wii.L nt; STATd:D AT OSCl. A Call 
from those iu want of any article in our hue is 
respectfully solicited. 

no,'l-tf ^V. II. TEMPLE, Third-st. 



COIN AKD EXCHANGE QCOTATIOKS OF 

Tlioiitipsoii Bro's-9 

Saixt Paul, December 28, 18C3. 

Bankersand licensed Dealersin Land YT''^yh 
Revolutionary atid Adult Half Breed Scrtp,<)c 

EXCMANGK RATES. 

Selling for. Premium 

BankableFunif >i perct.prem 

American Gold 40.',' per ot. 

Orders for United States Land Warrants, Stat 
warrants, *c., promptly executed. 

State and United States Coupons paid at cm 

""passage Certificates via Liverpool and Ham 
burK; Drafts on England, rreland and Scotland 
France, G»>rmany and Switzerland, Sweden and 
Korway, for sale at our office. 



IIl,OIV and STEEHi, 



H^IDAY GOODS 



4 < r^ REENBACKS ABE GOOD, BUT 
ROBACK'S ARE BETTER." 



SUITABLE FOR 

Medicinal and Family Use. 

OLD BOURBON AND RYE WHISKY, 

OLD QUEEN'S PORT WINE, 

OLD »L\DEIRA WINE, 

FINE OLD PALE SHERRY', 

FINE OLD COGNAC BRANDY, 

CHOICE OLD HOLLAND GIN, 

JAMAICA AND ST. CROIX RUM, 

CHAMPAGNE WINES, 

S P A R K L I N (i CATAWBA, 

And nil other Articles in our line of business 
gr. It'ATSOIf ITBBB, Jr., 

Successor to WALTER W. WEBB, 

myl» .. Sibley Block, 



MONETARY. 

[By Telegraph.] 
Mew York Money 9Iark«t. 

•Nlw Yi)KK, .liinuary 4. 
Gold 51?,. 

»*♦■«■» 



A/TICIIIGAN 



RAIL 



CENTRAI. 

ROAD. 

Oroat Central R.oiito 



HFAYY HARDW.A.RE 
O R D E K 

NOBWAY NAIL RODS, 
BURDEN'S HORSE SHOES 

Nails and Spikes, 

SLEIGH S.H O E S , 

OUTTKR SHOES. 

^leigli and Onttex 

R,UTVIVEItS, 

Bent Cutter StufF, 
ov 

HALL, KIMBARK & CO., 

O H I G A O O . 

auW-d&wt feb 20 




GREENLEAF'S. 



ROBACK'S STOnnCU BITTERS. 
ROBACK'M MT09IACH BITTERS. 
ROBACK'S STO.TtACUl BITTERS. 

USED BY RVEllYBODY. 
USED BY EVERYBODY. 
USED BY EVEIIYBODY. 
USED BY EVERYBODY. 

FOR ALL BILIOUS DISEASES. 
FOR ALL niLIOlS DISEASES. 
FOR ALL lilLIOrs DISEASES. 
FOR ALL BILIOUS DISEASES. 

THE BEST TO.Mi: IX TUE WORLD. 
TUE BEST TOXIC IN THE WORLD. 
THE BEST TOXIC IX THE WORLD. 
THE BEST TOXIC IX THE WOBLD. 

Warranted Equal to Coin. 
Tal>le Spoons, 

DESERT SPOONS, TEA SPOOls^S, 

Solid Silver Table and Tea 
lilVIVEJ^, 

USED IX ALL HOSPITALS 

TABLE FORKS, DESERl FORKS, used is all hospitals 

USED IN ALL HOSPITALS. 

PICKLE FORKS, ' USED ix all hospitals. 

^RDINE FORKS, 



ROBACK'S CATAITBA BRA^TBY. 
liOBACK'N C.ITAWIJA BRASfBT. 
ROB.4CK'M CATA^VBA BHAWBY. 
ROBACK'S C.%TA%«'BA BRAXBIT. 

MADE FUOM THE CATAWBA GRAPE. 
MADE FROM THE CATAWBA GRaPK. 
MADE FROM THE CATAWBA GRAPE. 
MADE FROM THE CATAWBA GRAPE. 



The Cold Snap. — The weather on 

Siimlay ami yesterday was much more mode 

rat^ than the hitter part of last week, and the 

streets resumed their wonted appearance. Xo 

further cai-res of frost-hite.s than those already 

mentioned have turned up. 

. «•• '■ 

Military Movkmknt.-^. — Company II. 
8th regiment, (Capt. McCoy) an-ived at Fort 
Snelling on Tuesday last, trom Fort Ripley. 
. •••- 

TiiK semi-annual muster for the elec- 
tion of o.'licers for the ensuing six months of 
the St. Paid .\thletic Club rooms, on Wednes- 
day evening, January 6tli, at 7 1-2 o'clock. A 
full attendance is requested. 

Bv order of R. C. 5IUNGER, 

President. 



2t 



I. O. O. F.— The election and Installa- 
tion of officers will occur this evening. 
-••• 

The Public Schools commenced their 
Winter Term vestcrday. 



Ax Ar jlooyDkclixkd. — A lady apol- 
ogized to her visitors the other day at the tea. 
table, lor inferior biscuit. A lady who was a 
guest accepted the apology only upon condition 
iliut her friend wonlU promise ever after to use 
onlv Do Land & Co.'s Chemical Saleratus, assur- 
ing'lii'r that with tliat article silw would have no 
occasion to apologize. Fewiiousewivesarn igno- 
rant of thu value of tliis article and none need be, 
for idl I lie oest grcc^rs sell it. 



COMMERCIAL. 

[By Telegraph.! 
2V«w ^'ork ^Market. 

Nkw\York, Jan. I. 
Flour firm. 
Wlieat linn. 

IWeetiusr of tlt« Supreme Court. 

The Supreme Court meets to-day at the 
Court room in the Capitol. The following is 
the calendar : 

I,. C. Porter, ct al., Respondents, vs.Charles 
Leonard, et. al., Appellants. 
L. Barber, C. C. Wilson. 

2. Charles Symonds, Respondent, vs. John 
M. Castner, Appellant. 

Horn, Lund & Gaiusha ) Smith v^ (iilman. 
and Masterson & Simons \ 

3. John W. Cathcart, Respondent, vs. Kos- 
tam 11. Peck, et ai.. Appellants. 
Austin it Warner, and I A. G. Chattield. 
Higclow & Dulrymple. S 

4. Henry Ru.<stdi, Respondent, vs. C. H. 
Schurmief, Appellant. 

Brisbin tS; Warner, L. Allis. 

'y Rachel Catlin. Phiintllf in Error, vs. Lorn 
Fletcher, Dcfendantiu Error. July 9th, 1862. 
Chatlicld iv Buell. Austin & Warner. 

ii Robert Whitaker, Plaintilf in l-'.rror, vs. 
Edmund Rice andtJeorge L. Becker, Defend- 
ants in Error. Aug. 8tli, 1S63. 
Bigclow iSc Dalrymplc. Masterson & Simons. 

7 Samuel Laiidis, Ex'r of John Lubrick, de- 
cea-^ed. Respondent, vs. Frederick A. Olds, 
imi>leaded with others, Appellants. August 
1.3th, lS6:i. 
L. Barber. C. C. Willsoii. 

.S Felix Paguin, Plaintifl' in J^rror, vs. John 
B. Braley, Defendant in Error. Nov. 27th, 

rsi).*.. 

Batchelder & Buckham. S Berry, Perkins 

\ Si Perkins. 
9 Joid Rose, Respondent, vs. William H. 
Roberts, Appellant. Nov.2ith, 18(i:}. 
R. A. Jones. Henry C. Butler. 

10 Thomas D. Williams, Appellant, vs. Wil- 
Ham II. Anderson, Respondent. Nov. IStli, 

1863. 

11 Henrv Hinds, Respondent, vs. Henry 
Fcgebank, Appellant. Nov. 27th, 1863. 
Henrv Hhids, in person. Brown & Ba.\ter. 
1-2 Vv'ra. Ramsden, Appellant, vs. William 
O'Kecfe, et al.. Respondent. Nov. 2Sth, 18()3. 
L. M. Brown. Henry Hinds. 
13 Wilhelmina Fegebank, Appellant, vs. 
Henry Fegebank, Respondent. Nov. 30th, 
1SG3. 

Henrv Hinds. 15rown i1 Baxter. 

U David C. Montgomcrj', Respondent, vs. 
William McEwen, Ai.pcllant. Dec. 21st, 1863. 
L. M. Brown. Henry Hinds. 

1.5 F. A. W. Davis, Respondent, vs. Wilcox 
& Barber, Appcll.ants. Dec. 2Gth, 18!)3. 
Van Ettcn & Ollicer. D. Cooper. 

IG Joel W. Fletcher, Appellant, vs. Asaph 
Si)aulding, Respondent. Dee. 2Gth, 1863. 
Henry C. Butler. C. G. Ripley. 

17. Thomas McRoborts, Respondent, vs. 
William D. Washburne, et al. Appellants, 
Hugh Cameron, J F. R. E. & W. B. Cornell 

( and IL R. Bigelow. 

18. Hinckley & Egcvy, Respondents, vs. 
St. Anthony Falls Water Power Company, 
impleaded, 'etc. Appellants, 
F. R. E. & W. B. Cornell. Miner & Hemiup. 

19. Cyrus Aldrich, Respondent, vs. The 
Press Printing Company. Appellants, 
" R. F:. & W. B. Cornell I D. Cooper. 



To New York, New England and the 
Canadas. 

On and after SUNDAY, Nov. L.th, 1803, trains 
leave the tJreat Central Union Depot,footof Lake 
street, as follows : 

0.30 ». m.— (Sundays excepted,) arrives at 
Detroit at f>.:» i*. m. ; Toronto 4.05 
A..M. ; Suspension Bridge 4 05 A. 
31.; liiiflalo, i.:)i)A. M.; Albany, 
:j.4.> v. M. ; New York, ".".SO v. .v. : 
Boston, 12 50 A. 31. 
».-AO p. m.— v'Snturdays excepted ) arrives at 
Detroit at 0.00 A. 31.; loronto, 
4.45 r. 31.; SusiH'nsion Briiltre, 
4.45 i>. 3!.; Bullalo, 5.00 i". M.; Al- 
bany, 5.45 A. 3f.; New York, 11.50 
A. 3t.; Boston, 4.00 I'. 31. 
lO OOi». Ml.— vSalurdavs and t>uudays except- 
ed,'* arrives at Detroit lo.W a. m.; 
Toronto, t».Oj P.M.; Suspension 
Bridge, y.lO p.m.; A'bany, 8.40 
A. M. ; New York, 2 15 p. 3i. ; Bos- 
ton 5.(X>r. 31. 
Cincinnati train?, via M. C. Railroad, leave 
Chicago at O.aOA.si., MailTrdu; 10 p. .M.tast 
Express. 

Tlie 10 p. 31. train leaving Chicago runs through 
to Cincinnati without change of cars or baggage. 
RUTTAN'S PATENT VENTILATING AND 
WVRMING APPARATUS on «11 Cars of this 
Comnauy. An elegant Smokers' Car, wi'h Kuchre 
Tables, h:is lately been added to our Day Trains. 

Patent Sleeping Cars on Night T)-ains. 
ttaggitgri Checked Throuwli. 



»- Through tickets for sale at all Principal 
Railroad Offices in the West, at the General Office, 
corner Lake and Dearborn streets, (under the 
Tremont House,) Chicago, and at the Depot. 

R. N. RICE, General Superintendent. 
li.C.WENTWOIMH, 
my5-tf Gen'l Western Pass. Ag't, Chicago- 



MANUFAOTUKIi^iG COMPANY, 



MERCHANTS IN THE 
COUNTRY 

CAN FIND AT OUR STORE A 
LARGE STOCK OF 

MEN'S BUFFALO SHOES, 

AXD 

Women's Buffalo Shoes. 



CHEESE FORKS, 

PIE KNIVES. 

CAKE KNIVES, 

BUTTER KNIVES, 

CHEESE KNIVES, 

SOUP LADLES, 

SUGAR SPOONS, 

SUGAR SIFTERS, 

12 doz. Silver Napkin Rings, 

JELLY SPOONS, 

BERRY SPOONS, 

OYSTER LADLES, 

MUSTARD SPOONS, 
SALT SPOONS, 
ICE CREAM SI OONS, 

EGG srOONS, GOLD LINED, 

PRESERVE SPOONS, 

SILVER CUP AND GOBLEfS, 
TEA STRAINERS, 
TOBACCO BOXES, 
CARD CASES, 

SPECTACLE CASES, 
PORTE MONNIE8, 
SILVER SPECTACLES, 
SALT CELLARS, 
FRUIT KNIVES, 



ADOPTED BY THE U. S. GOVERNMENT. 
ADOPTED BY THE U. S. GOVERNMENT. 
ADOPTED BY Til E U. S. GOVERNMENT. 
ADOPTED BY THE U. S. GOVERNMENT. 

Sold ill St. Paul by 
Sold in St. Paul by 

CHARLES A. UPHAM. 
CHARLES A. UPHAM. 

DR.C W. ROBACK, Preprietor, CIn., O. 
C. A. COOK, Chicago, General N. W. Ajcent. 

noir-eodly 



pRINCE & GO'S. 

IMPROVED 

MEI.OI3^EON SI 

WARRANTKD KOK FIVK YKAK8. 



The oldest establishnK'nt in the United Statei, 
employing 200 men, and tinishing eighty Inetru- 
ments per week. 

MANCFACTOKY CORSKR OF MAKYLAND AHD 
MIAOAKA STREETS, 

BUFFALO, IV. Y. 



WHOLESALE DEPOTS. 
47 Kulton street New lorlc 

83 Lake street V.',* *: '^U;;:.;.; Chicago 

WHOLESALE AGENTS. 

Henry Tollnaan & Co Boston, MaM 

W. V. Colburn Cincinnati, t 

Bal mer & Weber St . l-oius, M« 

Ciiiid's Knives, Forks & S,)ooiis, n™r^';.••.;■.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.■.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.^M 

' I Ph. P. Werleln New Orleaa 




CJ4^- 



no V(>'J u.'.xv 

STEAM E^^^iSMCSOll KOILEUi 

PATENT FIRE EVAPORATORS. 
PATENT SUGAR CANK MILI.S, 

PATKXT STEAM COIL KA'APORATOBS, 

PATENT STAMP MILLS 

FOR 

PmE'S PEAK OR LAKE SUPERIOR 

Send for Circulars, with cuts and descriptions, 
prices, &c. ; also, 
SAW UlLLS, FLOURING MH.LS, 

ANU M.VCmSKRY OF ALL, niiSCBIPTlONS, 

Too numerous to mention. 
CHICAGO, - - Illinois. 

P. W. GATES, President. 
N. B. Agen wanted everywhere. mr7-d&wy 



N 



O. 1 CARBON OH., 



For sale low, w^holesalo and retail to close oon- 
signment, at 
Tlio St. r*aiil Lamp Stoi*e, 

doc.3-tf Opposite Pioneer Office, 



MA»VAJL 3rOTJ[C£». 



St r AM) Garter Saloon, Jackson 
street, next to lllingwortli's 3Iainmoth Town 
Clock. The only plac<' where you can get a genu- 
ine Half and Half. The Bar is supplied with the 
choicest Liijuors and Cigars. Ousters served up 
in every style and at all hours. jao5-lw 

Grand Raffle. — A grand rallle •will 

take place at .Jim Davis' Merchants' Exchange, 
oa Saturday evening, the Uth inst., lor a flue 
II)rse, Cutter, Harness and Robe — the whole 
vahipd for $110. The chances are placed at $'i 
each — only j."> chance". jaD.">-lw 



TiiK Gkf.vtk.st Boon of the Age. — 
"We ob.seive the ^n-eat denuind forthe Wheeler 
& Wilson Sewiuj? M.ichine has compelled Mr. 
F. M. John^on, the Agent inGrccnlears Block, 
to order a new .supply, which have jii.st aiTived. 
We need not say a word in favor of these ex- 
cellent machines. They are used in hundreds 
of households in Saint Paul, and are consid- 
ered indispensaldc. In fact, those who have 
them would not do witliont them now forany 
price. They have banished from thousands 
of households the health-destroying drudgery 
of the needle, and suhrtitutcd in its stead a 
pleasant and ea.sy employmvMit. llemcmber 
that the Sewing Machine saves its cost every 
year in a family where much sewing is done. 
Call at Mr. Johnson's, and look at these ma- 
chines. 

, ••• 

AGooi> OrPOKriMTV. — James Wylie 
ft Co., previous to their departure for New 
York the coming week, to lay in .another 
supply of goods will sell anything in their es- 
tablishment from aTurkcy carpet to a window 
shade at first cost with freight added. Their 
stock is yet quite complete, liaving every va- 
riety of carpets, upholstery, window shades 
andtrimmings, anda well selected stock of 
wall papvr of every pattern. Perions desiring 
to purchase at this time will do weil to call 
soon. 



Metropoliten Billiard Hall and 
RKsTA^RA^T.— Josejih Hall, Proprietor. — ^This 
establishment is one of tlio most fashionable and 
popular in tlie city, and is fitted up iu a styli! that 
will coini);iie with any in the East. The Billiard 
Room is furnished with six of Phalen's best 
marble bed Tables— two of which are arranged 
for the carom game. Ojsters, and all kind-* of 
game, &c., will be served np on short order In 
the Restaurant Department. fan5 Im 

Another stock of Wheeler & Wilson's 
splendid Sewing JIaehines received by express 
to-day at 204 Third st. 

F. M. JOHNSON, Agent. 

December -.ifsth, ISiVJ. dec"-"J-lw 



Gold Pex.s Re-pointed Equal 

TO Nf.nv, on the receipt of .35 cents. 
Circulars for the Johnson Pen, sent on 
applicatioB, by - 'sil or otherwise. 
E. S. .lOHNSON, Manufactory and Office, 
15 MAIDEM LANE, New York City, 

dec27-lm 



Diseases of the Nervous, Seminal, 
Urinary AND Sexual Systems — New and re- 
liable treatment— in Reports of the HOWARD 
ASSOCIATION— Sent by mail in sealed letter 
envelopes, free of charge. Address, Dr. J. 
SKILLIN HOUGHTON, Howard Association, 
No. 2 South Ninth street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

dec-i d&w3in 



F. R. E. & W. B. Cornell ) 
and H. R. Bigelow. > 

20. John L. Men-iam, riaintiflf in EiTor, vs. 
D. A. J. Baker, Defendant in Error. 
CJreenlenf Clark and HI. J. Horn .and Smith 
II. R. Bigelow. S & Oilman. 

•21. Bridget C. Duly, Appellant, vs. The 
City of St. Paul, Respondent. 
Loren/.o Allis. S. M. Flint. 

22. Ovid Piuncy, Respondent, vs. Abram 
M. Fridlcv, Appellant. 

L. M. Stewart. F. R. E. & W. B. Cornell. 

23. John II. Dodge, Appellant, vs. Martin 
S. Chandler, blierirt" of Goodhue County, Re- 
spondent. 

W. K. (Jastonand Brisbin ^Morris Lamprey. 
& Warner. S 

24. Benjamin F. Baker, Respondent, vs. 
Samuel Hidden, Appellant. 

F. K. E. &. W. B. Cornell. Wilson & McXair. 

25. Jane Tulli>, by next friend, ApiicUant, 
vs. Abram M. Fridlcy, Respondent. 

Morris Lamprey. 1). A. Secoml)e. 

26. J. S. Reynolds, Respondent, vs. The 
Steamboat Favorite, Appellant. 

(Jeorge L. Otis. Lorenzo Allis. 

27 The State of Minnesota, Ex. Rcl. Chas. 
A Wanicr, vs. The County Commissioners. 
Ai)plication fur peremptory mandamus. 
Geo. li. Otis. 

28 John R. l''ranklin. Respondent, vs. John 
B. Warden, ct al., Anpeliants 

H. J. Horn. C. C.Lund and II. U. Bigclow. 

29 St. .v. D. Balcomlie, Appellant, vs. Frank- 
lin Steele, impleaded, *tc., Resi)Ondent. 
Brisbin & Warner. Horn. Lund & Ualusha. 

m:w casks. 

30 Michael Tierney, et al., Plantilfs in Error, 
vs. Henry M. Dodge, Acting City Justice of 
the City of Saint Paul, Defendimt in Error. 
Brisbin & Warner. S. M. Flint. 

31 Casper H. Schurmeicr, Appellant, vs. Hen- 
ry Rii.ssell, ctal.. Respondents. 

Lorenzo Allis. Brisbin & Warner. 

32 Robert Whitacrc, Respondent, vs. George 
Culver, Appellant. 

Smith & Gilmnn. 
Horn, Lund & Galushu, ami H. R. Bigelow. 

33 Francis Z. Arper, Respondent, vs. Albert 
Bazc, Appellant. 

David Cooper. Smith & Gilraan. 



E C T U R E S . 

Pror. C S. I»OWERS, 

Will commence a short course oi Lfcturai on 
various Scientific and Social Questions, at 

INO^ERSOLL'S HALL, 

In this city, on 
SATURDAY EVEXIXG, January 9th, 1864 
4^ See posters and circulars. 
dec27-td A. TOWN80N, Agent. 



O. CUR.XIS, 

Geieral Insurance Agent, 

OFFICE IN 

Thompson's Blocli. 

decl8-t£ 



Being Tortunatu In the purchase of these, we are 

selling them for much less than they 

bring in Chicago. 



We have also a full supply of 

OIL TAN MOCCASINS, 
MITTS A^D GLOA^Eb, 

Please call oa us and we guarantee to show you a 

Coinplete StocU 

▲T 

LOAV PRICES. 

WM. J. SMITH &> CO., 

ST. PAUL. 



C 



A R P E T S 



STRONG'S CARPET HALL, 
225 Third-st., Rogers' Block, 

where will be found a large a.'jsortmcnt of 

CarpetSjOil Cloths, Mattings, 

CURTAIN AND SHADE MATERIALS, 

MATTRES8KS, FKATHKKS, WALi, IWPER, &C. 

New Goods constantly arriving and sold ai 
low as the lowest. 

UrnOLSTERISG DONE TO ORDER. 
niarl2-ly ». O. WXWOMC. 



N 



EW PHOTOGRAPH GALLERY, 



Third St., between Cedar and Wabashaic, 

m:. c txjttle 



Has just opened a New (Jallery on the ground 
floor, where ho will be pleased to see his old 
friends and customers. His stock and apparatus 
are new, and have all the latest improvements. 

"»5~ EspECi.vT. AxrExrioN uivk.n to tak.ixo 
Cmi-nuKN's Pk-tiues. 
Pictures from Locket Size to Life Size, in the 

Finest St^-le. 

a- Photograph AUiumx furnUheil an eftctip- ai 
ami other liousf, awl a I'urte de VinUe taken 
qr'atis i no24-t4 



A 



PPLEi'— APPLES— APPLES. 



A very choice lot of selected Winter Fr»it, for 
sale by the single bbl. or quantity, by 

J. P. HUTCHINSON & CO., 
no20 Slbley-8t, between Third and I.*vee. 



100 



KEGS SUGAR HOUSE, GOl^ 

den and Ambre, a choice article, at 
J.C. &H.C. BURliAKN fc Co.'b 



500 



VOLUNTEERS WANTED 



For the 5th Regiment Minnesota 
Infantry Volunteers. 

4(40'1 Bounty will bo paid to veterans. 

^.tO-4 " to new recruits, rations, clothing, 

and #13 per month. 

Apniy to Lieut. Col. WILLIAM B. GEKB, at 
recruiting rendezvous, MtKubtn's block. Third 
street, St. Paul; Capt. K. A. RICE, Karibault, or 
Capt. T. J.SHEEUAN, Albert Lea, Recruiting 
OfBcers. no28-jan5 



FOR SALE.— A yoke of Oxen suit- 
able for the Pineries. Enquire of 

G. N. BEMAN & CO., 
decZl Comer Roberts and Sth-its. 



declG-.'iim 

Q y S T E R S-0 Y S T E R S . 

The undersigned are now and have been for the 
past TEN VEAiis, the only Agents in Minnesota 
for 

MAIiTBY'S CELEBRATED 
BALTIMORE 

O Y S T E K S . 

We GUABANTEB to the public that these 
Oy ters are superior to anv others brought to • his 
market. The cans are larger, and are tilled with 
Ovsters. , , 

'$fg- A larg(! supply constantly on liantl. 

Orders Iroia any i>art of the State promptly at- 
tended to. 

I>epot SIO Tlili*a Street, 
St. I*aiil. 

no2<-.-tf J. C. BUR BAJIK k, CO. 

^ POLLOCK, 

DONALDSON AND 
O G D E N , 

DBALSHS IH 

Oli&ita, OlttiBis Sc Earthen 
Wai'e, 

WITH AK BNDI.K89 VAKIBTT OF 

Housekeeping Articles. 

It is the design of this House to supply 1I0U8E 

KBEIPERS witli every possible want. 
UNION BLOCK, No. 115 Third-st., 

COR. THIRD AND ROBEBT-STS., MIN. 

)e5-dJtw 

J Mc CLOUD, JR. 

Oommeroial Brolcer, 

No. 103 Third Street, (Catholic Block.) 

Will buy and sell . 

REAL ESTATE, AND^ MERCHANDISE 

Of all kinds on Commiision, 
LOAN MONEY, MAKE COLLECTIONS, PA JT 
TAXES, &C., &C. 
491- CommUslons Boliclted and promptU- at- 
tended to. BO 20 Jm. 




ALL PUR1-: SILVER, 

AX CjTi-eenleoLr's. 

A large assortment of 

SILVER PLATED W.ft^RE, 
A.t Grreenleaf s. 

THE AMERICAN WATCHES, 

A large lot. In Gold and Silver cases, a.ljusted to 

heat and cold. Warmnted good 1 ime- 

kecpers. Sold cheap at 

GHiEE]VLEiVlB'»S 

lOO CiiKes 

Setli Tliomas' ClocUs 

AT GREENLEAF'S. 

SOlcinds of oiDer Mlakers' Cloelcf* 

AT GREENLEAFS. 

150 VARIETIES OF POCKET CUTLERY 
AT GREENLEAF'S. 

A mill Hue of IVORY TABLE CUTLERY, 

AT GREENLEAFS. 

COME ANV SEK THE DIAMOND GOODS 

A-t Grreenlenfs. 

The largest assortment of 

Gold and Silver Watches in 
the State, 

AT GREENLEAF'S. 

DIAMOND, OPAL, PEARL, RUBY, 
EMERALD, RINGS & PINS, 

At Oreciileaf '» 

ONYX JEWEIRY, 

AT GREENLEAF'S. 

SOLID GOLD BRACELETS 

GOLD CHAINS, a large lot, 

At Grreenleaf's- 

SOLID GOLD RINGS, BUCKLES. SLEEVE 

I5UTTON.S, STUDS, KEYS, SE^ LS &c., 

AT WHOLESALE OR RETAIL, 

AT <J^REElSrLEAF'S. 

Any pattern of 

HAIR -KV<3Tl.TL 

MADE AT OREENLEjrS. 

Any pattern of Gold J^**!;/ "'tr"^«^.*"t*;«*''" 
re-set, at GRKLS LEAFS. 

Everyth&ig to be found In * «^JVI,^^i a V?*^ 
Store, can 1i.e foun.l ut GREL SLLA* ft. 

GREENXEAF'S Goods were purchased for 
cash, the rt>ason wii v, you all know 

^ (^h paid for old Gold ayJI^Tp** ^.g. 
Walches and Jewelry repaired In^UeheBt^^an- 
n8r» ^^ 

store iJi Greenleaf *s Block, 

Opposite Concr: Ha", ""r the I'ost-Offlce. 



A.. & S. Nordhelmer. 



.Toronto C. M 



Persons unacquainted with the Melodeon tni 
its history, will bear in mind that we are the pl« 
neersand leading manufacturer;-, not only in tW 
United States, but In the world. We commence, 
the manufacture of ilelodeons In the taU of tta 
vear IHir, and since that time have finished an* 
^old TW ENT Y-SEVEN THO USAND. TheN 
instruments are now In use not only In tlie Unv 
ted States and Canada, but also In i-urope ^^fjfj 
Africa, South America and the >\ est Innies, ari4 
from a 1 these quarters we have ihe most flattei- 
tng testimonials of the high estimation In whid 
they are held. 

.VT ALL INDUSTRIAL EXHIBITIONS THKl 
HAVK INVARIABLY BEKN AWARDED 
THE HIOIIEST PREMIUM WHEN- 
EVER EXHIBITED IX COMPK- 
TITIOX WITH OTHERS. 
We shall take pleasure In forwarding by mall, 
(at our own expense), our Illustrated ( atalogue, 
in which every Instrument we mauutacture Is 
fully descilb«dand illustrated by elegant engra- 

^ A^rMelodeons of our manufacture, either sold 
bv us or dealers in any part of the United States 
or Ca :ada, are warranted to be perfect in every 
respect,and should any repairs be nec.-ssary be- 
fore the expiration ol five years from date of 
gale, we hold ourselvts ready andwillingto make 
the same free of charge, provided the injury is 
not caused bv accident or <;esign. 

Agents forthe sale of our ilelodeons »jay.,be 
found in all the principal towns of the Lmted 
States and Canada. 

Address either , ^^ „ 

(JEO. A. PR1N<E & CO., Buffalo, N.^ . 
GEO. A. PRINCE & CO , sr Fujton-st^N. Y. 
GEO., A. PRINCE & CO, 43 Lake-st., Chicago. 

Or either of the above Wholesale Agents. 

jis- For sale by MUNGER BROS., Agents St. 
Paul, Minnesota. apr2 tf-dfcwl y'6< 

pUICAGO BREWERY. 



LILL & I>1VERSY 

BREWERS OF 

LILL'S SXOCK 

A? I) 

Crea-m Fale A.le, 

PORTER AND BROWN STOUT 

FOR SALE BY 
WM. CONSTANS, 

oe21-.Sm AGKNT. ST. Pacu 



u 



NITED STATES NAVY. 



m:etvwaivtei3 

for tue united states navy, to 

SERVE IN THE MISSISSIPPI 
Si^UADRON. 

Good pay and prize money given. 

Recruits will be shipped for one, two, or three 
years, or during the war. 

The fact that men may enlUt for one >/««• »|<^ 
•jood quarters on ship board, good pay and priae 
money! which has ihus far amounted to more 
than fh.! bounty paid f jr the arinv recruits 

Each recruit for one vear wid receive the fol- 
lowing articles of clothing. 

One pia jacket. 

One pair blue cloth trousers. 

One blue flannel overshirt. 

Two under llannel iddrts. 

Two pairs of flannel drawers. 

One mat trass. 

Twoblankt;ts. 

One seamless cap. 

One black silk handkerchief. 

AnnK artL^'unUed States Naval Rende.^«. 
ove?*^ LaNGI/eY & TEMPLE'S AUCTIOl/ 
STORE, Third street, St. Paul. ^„,,..„ 
° ' A. WILLARD CREED, 

no25-2m Recruiting Agent L. S. Navy. 



L BEACH & CO.. 
• Manufacturers of superior 

SOAP ANr> CANOLES, 

Eagle-St., near Upper Levee. 

HIGHEST MARKET PRICE PAID FOR 

Lard, Xalloi^ and Oi-ea»e 

I., bkach. r8Pt•^6-lyd&.wl A. w. pkaesos 



s 



TEAM ENGINES AND BOILERS, 



docl-lm 



Fairba:nk's 

STANDiRD 

SOAXiES 

oyALt.Ki»n8. 
^ Also. Warehouse! ruokB, Letter 
fj Presses, &;.,kc. 

FAIRBAKKB.GBEENLEArkCO, 



New and second hand, for sale extremely low, 
at^he Pioneer Foundry. ^^^^^ ^ ^^ 



RECEIVED ON CONSIGNMENT, 
1,000 PoLNns DRIED Peaches, and 7.000 

POUNDS DRIBU ^Pr^5*>>°n^»«ix7 t't^ 
)e8 J. C. & H. C. BUjtBANJt^ fc CU. 




100 



BARRELS CIDER, 



J ust received on consignment and tor ale low. 
ociS-tf J.C.fcH.C. BURBANK CO. 



IF 



ERY UP! UUEBY IP! 



_ I /-< s, II i' llaii>ha.nk & CO. .... . I _.«« « Trkirw 



All you Mechanics, that want TOOLS, coma 
right along, and fill up your chests, while you can 






ooW-3in JOHN McCLOUD, Brown't Block. 




















- 



f 



i 



/\ 



J 



r«r3r 



.U '■ ■.*■ ■ ' ■ • 



— « m>> fci II » ■ « 



' m •» '.U.. .'„ 



?.m st i. 




•^rmmmm 



f^ 



-9 



■■vrti 



I* V piX 



Ifva**"*^** 



m. 



> 



•« 



THE SAINT 



PAUL 



DAILY PRESS. 



VOLUME IV. 



^^^^^^T^IjjjT'we^n^ 



ISrUM:BEIi 4r. 



2Ut ^aiut faul ftf^ 

^INl- PAAJlT WEDNESDAY. JAN. C. 



THE XE%VJ*. 

TiiK rebels are to be brought 

terms for rcfu.-ini: to recognize 

an olH>-or. in exchange 

All tlie rebel prisoners are 

under his charge, a nd no 

one else 



to 
Gen. 

Bi ^ _ii: .*iw in i'A.!_ui»iiii^ ne 
utkT as 

{.O iationn 

tJ be placed 

ill be authorized to make ex- 



wii 



ehanjres. 



doah 



are said to be 
eneniv have six or 



llrui.r, movements in the Shenan« 
Valley are ixclting some apprehen 
E ion si though the reports 
exairjie rated. The 

seven thousand men near Woodstock, but 
it is thought (lenorals Sullivan and Aver- 
ill will be able to take care of them. 

\ .vprt'KEn letter written at Charles- 
ton, intimates pretty broadly that tae 
dtv i< mined, so that iu case it should 
fall into our possession it could be de- 
strovod with its conquerors. The letter 
shows how terrible a penalty the doomed 

city ij- paying. 

Tur. Ohio Legislature organized Mon- 
day, and Governor ToJ sent in his mes- 
sa-c. We leuru by it that Ohio has fur- 
nished 2n0,671 soldiers since the "war 
commenced. 

Gen. liruNSiDK has been induced 1o 
'Withdraw his resignation, and it is thongl.t 
he w.U be re-appointed to the command 
of the Department of the Ohio. 

Gov. Seymour takes occasion in his 

,«iessase to d.scuss national affairs and 

proclaim that onlv wise statesmanship is 

necessary to bring about a (Copperhead) 

peace. 
LE«;isL.YTiVK.-Thc Legislature did 

not organize vesterday. Both Houses 
met at noon, the Senate being called to 
order by Mr. Daniels, of Olmsted. Mt. 
Norton, of Winona, was appointed chair- 
man. The roll was called, and sixteen 
members answered to their names, five 
bein- absent. The oath of ofVice was 
then°ad.ninisterel by Attorney General 
Cole, and the Senate adjourned. 

Tiie House was called to order by ^Ir. 
Richardson of Steams, and Mr. Wiswell, 
of Blue Earth was appointed Clerk. 
Tiiirty-onc members answered to roll-call 
and were sworn in. Lleven were ab- 

;nt. The House adjourned until 2 r. 

to-dav. 

. ' ♦■•»■♦ " 

FI.AG9 OF THE riFXM Ml^.^E 
HOTA. 

Adjutant General Malmros yesterday re- 1 
c 'ived two flags from the Fifth Minnesota 
Regiment, accompanied by the following 
letter, which explains itself: 
Col Oscar Malmros, AJJt. Gen. Minnesota:^ 

liEADQl AUTEBS OTll Ufo't MiNK. INF ^ 

Vol r A Uran^c, Tenn., Decembor 1>. 1S63. 
Coi:;>vnL-I herewith transmit tor dcpusi 
nt the hearJqnartors of the S^ate, the o d flu, 
o' the Filth Kt n'ucIK, we havine bc.-n fur 
Sisnedby Government with a inew stand ot 



In the meantime, volunteering is pro- 
gressing favorably, the second cavalry 
has thirteen companies, and Capt. Saun- 
ders has telegraphed for authority to 
raise a battery. 

The Government has authorized Capt. 
Keith to hire suitable quarters for con- 
scripts, which is an evidence that the 

draft is near at hand. 

» ' ♦ ' ♦ ; „ 

TiiK following commissions in the Sec- 
ond Cavalry were issued yesterday : 

II. S. Bingham, Fxicc county. Captain; 
Frank McGrade, Scott, First Lieutenant; 
Ch.rlcs E.Lincoln, Olmsted, Second Lieuten- 
ant. John C. Henley, Chisago, Captain; 



Legislature ot Minnesota. | LATEST NEWS, 
— ■ J3y rrelegT*a. ph.» 

SIXTH SESSIOlSr. : - 

EXCHANGES 

TO BE MADE 

BY BUTLER 

AND NO 

OTHER. 



Gardner, Nicollet, F.rst Lieutcn- 
C. Griswold, Dakota. Second 
'Lieutenant. Henry S. Ho«o,l)od?o, Captain ; 
Jonathan Barrow, Dodge, First Lieutenant ; 
Thomas Larkcv, Do.l?e, Second Lieutenant 
PeU-r B. Davy, Faribault, Captain ; Samuel 
B. Miller, Faribault, First Li.-uUnant; Geo. 
Andrews, Faribault, Second Lieutenant. 



Patrick S 
ant ; Francis 



» I » ■ ♦ 



Wk note the following arrivals of mem- 
bers of the Legislature sin- e our last is- 
sue : 

Senatk .— Luke Miller, Fillmore countj ; J. 

V. Daniels, Ohnsted. 

IIoisE.— S. C. Grannis, Goodhue county; 
Thomas H. ConifT, Houston ; K. N. Guitcau, 
Dakota; Philo WoodrulF, A. S.Hunt and T- 
H. Armstrong. 



>■♦ » ■*■ 



Gov. Swift , who has been detained at 
home for some time by sickness in his 
family, arrived in the city last night. 

We regret to learn that one of his chil- 
dren is still dangerousl y ill. i 

Mu. W. B. GiuswoLT) has purchased 
the Cbaska Valley Herald cf C. A. War- 
ner Esq.. and will hereafter edit and pub- 
lish the paper. 



FROM PEMBINA. 



MAJOR HATCH PILING UP 
SC.\LP.^. 



SIOUX 



M. 



colors 



Thc'otTiccrs and men of the rcginrient part 
with the tattered remains ot tlicir batile- 
r^aincd l.gwith emotions of the most pro- 
found rc-i^et. There is not a soldier ol the 
commmiri but what tVels for this rehe c^ pa> 
campai-ns a sincere and devoted atiection. It 
h ™beeii b.rnc bv them on an hundred w 
. . 1 „..-..;. ..I in triiiniT)li thri)Ugn 



eary 
marches, amrc:^ried in triumph thnmgh tiie 
fierce coA:iicts of many 1' \vd tought helds Its 
numerous rents are the evidence of its pres- 
ume at he two battles of Corinth, n Jackson 
irthe sJege and f.crce a.ssault^f Vick Jur. .. 
Mcehan;c<burg and llr.hmond. Its soiicu 
and fS tolls tell of the dozen punpa.giis 
through whieh it has l)een borne during e 
two yrar»' service of the regiment, lo the 
iTterans who are left, this flag is a memen o 
of the mournful, yet glorious "^^^^^^^yXTor 
four hundred eomradcs who J'a%e fa.kn or 
become disal»!ed bv the e »su ilties of w ar. 

Iboardi!- ofiicers convened by order of 
Gen Grant, "to investigate the claims ot itit- 
"rent "g ments to honorable mention for 
meritorious services,- authorized jho Iif h 
Minncs.;ta Infantry to place ahe followmg in 
scriptious on its flag : 

"Siege of Corinth." 
»Corinfh,(>ct.3&4,18G2." 

"JaeUson." , ^ . „ 

"Vickstiurg, Siege and Assault. 

•'Bed Wood." 

"Fort Ridgely." 
In the two latter, though but a detach- 
ment of thercsiment was engaged, yet, in 
^ewof the el.araeter of the actions and the 
loss sustiiued, the inscriptions )vere author- 
ized. The battle before Corinth, May ^6. 
l1«2 being considered a part of the ' biege of 
Connth." and also the actions at Richmond 
and Meehanicsburg a P;"-' ^'.^ ^^^ VJI^J.? 
Vicksburu," no separate inscriptions for either 
of those anions were allowed to uny of the 

''SiSf ' the- soldiers of the regiment part 
with their old banner wich a pang of [^^'gj 
vet thev feci some degree of pride and satis 
FactS presenting To the State this record 
of their services. 
Very respectfully. y^J^'" ^^VurVIrD,. 



Coirespondoncoof the St. Paul PreiS. 

Pembina, Dec. 1», lsf»- 
I take pleasure in tellii g you that Major 
Hatch is not only busily engaged building up 
winter quarters at Pembina, but is also busi y 
engaged piling up Sioux scalps, and I would 
not be the least surprised in the world, if he 
had a prettv big pile of them before Spring. 

The Major detoiled on the loth mst., at ii 
o'clock at night a detachment of 15 men Act- 
in ' Adjutant Grin, in command, to go to M. 
Jo^scph after Sioux scalps. In this they have 
been successful. They returned yesterday, 
the 17th inst., at 3 o'clock r. m., makmg a 
march of 89 miles in 39 hours, with five scalps. 
Three men, a boy and a woman of the red 
devils' race have been sent to the infernal re- 
gions The bovs went at them without any 
mcrcv, none of them raised the crj- of " Lo ! 
the poor Indians." for H-tch's Battalion being 
prineipallv composed of men raised on the 
frontier, and who had relatives and friends 
killed bv these brutes they will show them, I 
assure vou, no quarter. None of the boys were 
hurt in'anv wav whatever. It was a small 
but complete victory. They attacked them 
a'wut rundown on the afternoon of the 16th 
inst The first Indian that got out of the • te- 
pee 'was shot through the body, he then dis- 
charged his gun at the soldiers, fortunately 
without ctVect and then was finished by an- 
other soldier's piece of lead. One of the 
other Indians, aged about 18 years, stout and 
stron", would not die without being hrst 
scalped. The bovs went and scalped him. 
That is what finished him. The work was 
well done and the boys deserve credit for it. 
Means of conveyance : f<nir sledges, each 
ilrawn by a horse. Thermometer, 3G ° below 
zero. 



SENATE. 

Ti-ESDAT, January 5, 18G4. 
The Scmtc was called toorderat 12 o'cljck, 
M bv Hon. J. V. Daniels, senior mcmljcr. 

Tl e CH \IR appointed Mr. Norton, of Wi- 
noua'as secretary pro tem, and directed him 
ti» rail the roll of districts. 

is each district was called, the Senator rcp- 
rescnti?! " tl e s.ame appeared and gave in Ins 
crcdei Uils. When the li^t was eompleted, 
Attorcv General Cle appeared and admm- 
istcrcd the oath of ollicc as follows . 
hintrkt. Same of member. 

1 _r/:. Rice, of Itamsty-^ieyvt.^ 

li —John McRusick, of Washmgton. 

III.— J. P. Wilson. 

IV _j. y, PiUsbury. 

V -DoriUus Morrison, of Hennepin. 
VL— Charles A. Warner. 
VII— D F. Lan^hy, ot Dakota. 
Vlli.— John M. Berry, of Ri' e. 
IX-— J. A. Thaeher, of Guouhue. 
X— U. Ottman, of Wabashaw. 
xi — D. S. Norton, of Winona. 
XII —J. V. Daniels of Olmsted. 
XlIL-naniel Cameron, of Houston. 
^\\—\Luke Miller of Filhnore-absent.] 

XV. [n- l>- Sprar^ue — abtent.\ 

XVI.— F. S. Stevens. 

XVII J. J. Porter. 

XVIIL— Isaac Lincoln. ,. „ ^ , ., 

XIX — [//. A. Stcift, of yicolUt— absent.] 

XX — rb. B. Shiilock— absent.] 
XXL— John Nicols, of Ramsey. 
Mr. TIIACHER moved to adjourn, which 

was carried. , 

The Senate thereupon adjournea. 

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. 
Tuesday, January 5, 1864. 

At 12 o'clock the House was called to order 
bv Hon R M. RICHARDSON, of St.arns, 
aJdnCn J. A. WISWELL, of Blue Earth, 
was designated as temporary clerk. 

The fCUowing named members came for- 
ward by districts, presented their credentials, 
and were sworn Irl. the Attorney General ad- 
ministering the oath of nflice. 

I.— J. P. Kidder, R. IL litz. 

II— Anscll Smith, Jesse H. Soule, K. R. 

"iIwIr. M. Richardson, W.T. Rigby. 
IV.— Jarcd Uenson, Jonathan Ferrm. 
v.— John A. Coleman. ^ ^ _ , Tr-.,..^ 
^-II_W. G. Butler, J. S. Letford, Henry 

Hill. 
VII.— K.N.Guiteau. 

VIII.— A. N. Noursc, A. H. BuUis. 

IX.— S. S. Grannis, J. M. Gates. 

X.— J. J. McKay. 

XL— E. S. Yonmans. 

XIV.— A. S. Hunt. 

XV.— Roval Crane, S, A. Barlow 

XVi —Philo Woodruff. , v t 

XVII.— J. A. Wiswell, R. Butters, John L 

Measlier. 
XVIIL— Hugh Johnson. 
XIX.— Samuel Coflm. 
XX.— J. A. Latimer. 

U^oni;;oUoA i?Hon. JARED BENSON it 
was voted that when the House adjourn, it l,c 
till two o'clock to-morrow aftcmoou. 

Adjourned. • 

»!♦■■♦■ 



ALL REBEL PRISONERS 

PLACED IN HIS 

CHARGE. 



CHARLESTON TO BE 
BLOWN UP BY THE 
REBELS IF CAP- 
TURED. 



A Secesli Letter r>esoril>- 
in.ec tlio City. 



Operations in the Shen- 
andoah Vallej^. 



GOV. TOD'S MESSA.OE, 



Most of the families have gone to Dor- 
chester, Suuimerviile, Icombo and Wat- 
erboro, and every house in those places 
is crowded ; nearly every room is hlled 
with beds and every bed has to accommo- 
date three or four persons. So much lor 
war, but I would willingly live in a city 
the remainder of my life if it would keep 
the Yankee miscreants out of our city. 
A m.ajoritv of our people here have left 
most of their furniture iu their houses ex- 
pecting iu a few weeks to return to them, 
but of^course they know that if the Yan- 
kees take the city their houses and furni- 
ture will all be destoryed. I 

Gen. Beauregard has caused informa- 
tion to reich all that if he finds it impos- 
sible to hold the city he will leave it a 
mass of ruins. No one will complain ol 
this, as they know the barbarians have 
sworn to destroy every vcstij^e of the se- 
cession nest if thev can take it. 

If thev should 'ever enter our house 
mav Goil have mercy on them, for I can- 
not. If thev ever enter the city you 
will hear of the greatest earthquake ever 
caused bv human agency. 

Itwill'be a consolation, Louise, for 
you to know that should the vandals ever 
cret here thev will never be able to reach 

iSlacon. Gen. Beauregard is confident 
they could never get ten miles beyond 
the citv in any direction, but he is equal- 
ly confident they can never come. 

It is painful to go through our streets, 
once alive with beauty and fashion, and 
see them entirely deserted, with the ex- 
ception of now and then one of our col- 
ored people, or a squallid Irishwoman. 
But I am to see you so soon that I will 
not write a long letter. P>ed. sends his 
love, but says that he will not write until 
dipping his pen in a Yankee carcass, he 
can write with red ink. 

THE WAn IX V£»CJ£->'1 A. 



$55 000, but was chartered to Go'^ern- 
ment from ISIarch, 18G2, to Oct«»ber. 
1803, at $35,000 per an num. 

FROM AI.BA:Jlir. 



MES9AOK OF cjov. »Eir.«om;». 



WAHHllfGTO^. 



Movemeuts of the Itel»cls !¥ oar Win. 
cheater - Evagrsrerateil Beports- 
It'liaC They are Doing-. 

■NVashin-gton, Jan. 4. 

[Special to Herald.']— A dispatch re- 
ceived here from a reliable source states 

■ " ' ith three 



Oi^anizatiou of the Xo*r Yorli leffU 
laturc-Mei.umicaii Officer* FU^cted 
— Covernor Seymour's Mei(»i»SC-tte 

IBiscnssex Feace. 

Albant, Jan. 5. 

[Special to rr;?')-m.]— The Logisb- 
turc met and organized this morning. 
Ik-publican oiiicers were elected tc both 

Houses. , 

The Governor's message was read. Al- 
ter referring to State topics, he d.:votes 
a portion ot Lis message to the corsidei- 
ation of military matters, in connection 
■vilh the draft, &e. He goes iribo tlie 
consideration cf national alVairs at length, 
and after asking what has been accora- 
pi;-lied by the Government in territoiy 
wrested from the rebellion, says but one 
course will eave us from national luin. 

^Ve must adhere to the solemn pledges 
made bv our Government at the outstait 
of the war ; we must seek to restore the 
Union and uphold the Constitution . To 
Ihis end, while we put forth every effort 
to beat down armed rebels, we must use 
everv influence of wise statesman -hip to 
brm'r back States who now reject their 
conslitntional oblig.itions ; we mrsthold 
forth every honoral>le inducemen: to. the 
people of the South to assume again the 
rif^hts and duties of " American"' citizen- 
slu p . We have reached that point in the pro- 
crress of the war for which wc havij strug- 
-ded ; we now stand before the world a great 
avid successful military power; wise 
.statesmanship can now bring this war to 
a close npou the terms solemnly avowed 
at the outset. Good faith to publ ic cred- 
itors, to all classes of citizens, and the 
world, demands that this shall be done. 
The triumphs won by our soldiers should 
be followed up ar.d secured by the peace- 
making policy of th3 statesrarn in the 
cabinet, and in no other way can we save 
the Union. 



m: A. B Pt I K D . 

At St. Anthonr, on Sunday January 3d 18^4 ? J 
tl:'? Rev. William McKinloy.EMEUV D.NOEIH 
of the 8th Minnesota Infantry, and ISABELLA 
MeKIXLEY of Cannon Fall?, Minn. 

At tlie same place, by the samo,D?cember Soth, 
1863,AXUREW J. McCOKMACK of Sauk Cci- 
Jre, and MARY ANN il^CLELLAX, of Saint 
Anthony. 

In Minneapolis, Minn., January 1st, 1801, at 
the house of llicbiidfe'.f tatlicr, EZUA A31ES to 
M&UY HOPPEU, an of MiuneapolU. 
D I K 13 . 



At Minneapolis, on tlie 3d Inst., ANN ELIZA, 
wlfGof Edwin Elackman, aged 4U yeari, of Chi- 
cago, lll.,t3 which placo her remains will be taken 
for interment. 

Chicago, 111., and Burlington.Vt., papers please 

notice. 

Monday, 5th January, of scarlet fever, MAUY 
WELSH, youngest child of Ilcnry M. and Matil- 
da W. Rico, agi'd IS months. 

Friends of the family aro iavited to attend 
without farther notice. 

Funeral at 2 o'clock to-day. 

At Princeton, ]lliil Lac Co.,Min«., Jan. 1st, 

1S04. in Hospitnl, Private ANDREW J. GATES, 

Co. G, 8th Regt. Minn., Vol., aged 27 years. 

Cjrps returned to his friends in DakoU County. 

ILiMinps I apeis plea.'^e copy. 



[m ^^vttimmmt». 



W 



ANTED 



A GIRL who thoroughly understands COOK- 
ING. None others nt-ed apply. Application 
must be made immediately, at iliis office. 



janO 



F 



O R 



SALE 



It 
re-as- 



The Supply Expedition. 

Its Safe Arrival at Mankato. 

From the Mankato Record, 2d. 

The three companies of the Sixth regi- 
ment, which left here in November la.st, 
as an escort to the Indian supply tram, 
were not delaved at Yanckton, as stated 
bv the St. P^ul papers, but a small de- 
tichment has already arrived hero and 
the main body will be here on INIonday. 
They left the Winnebago Agency, in 
Dakota, on the 5th instant, and returned 
via Siou.^ C 
and Fairmount — - 

Winnebago City, 3G miles south of Man- 
kato last evening. Th^y encountered 
much severe weather on their return tnp^ 



FROM 

Burn.Kles lle.lif nation WltU.lrat»» 
-Butler- ■"«••«-'«*« *•"»• «»»* »'«-e«l 
dent - »o«ecran» - Treasury :Vo«e» 
ttent Out-Batler to liave Excln.ive 
Ctaart^e of Exch»«8:e»-I»«^«»"««»»» 
for Outlaw Iii6r-S«»"«»»*»"'* S"**^**- 
■or 

New Youk, Jan. 5. 

The Tribune's Washington special says 
Major General Burnside, who is now 
here, has, at the earnest desire -f the 
President, withdrawn his resignation 
is not improbable that he will be r 
signed the command of the Departmept 
of the Ohio. , , 

Major General Stoneman has been re- 
lieved from command of the Cavalry Bu- 
reau and assigned to duty as Chief of 
Cavalry at the West, whither he proceed- 

ed at once. . , . x„.„„ 

Iklaior General Butler arrived in town 
vesterdav from Point Lookout, where he 
'was met'bv the dispatch from the 1 resi- 
dent. He' had a long conversation witb 
Mr. Lincoln to-day upon matters per- 
- d on the 



taining to his department, an 

subject of exchanges and pardoning of 

- , , those rebel prisoners at Point Lookout 

:ity and Spirit Lake, Iowa, ^j^^^ jj^^.^ t-^pressed their willingness to 
jnt in this State, arriving at ^^^ ^^^ ^^th of allegiance. 

It is understood to be definitely ar- 
ranged that Rosecrans is to take the 
_i_.°. ^f s;nhnfii.ld in the department ol 



[iiuv;u o^w»-»^ .T^.--— -- - _ 

being exposed to all the cold weather of 
the past few weeks with no other shelter 
than their canvas- 
Spirit Lake, they 



-ban their canvas tents. When near 
were met by a cold, 
dfizzling rain, which froze as 'fast as it 
fell, covering their clothing with ice. 
At a station forty or fifty miles west of 



Spirit Lake, Captains Whitney and Duly 
and Lieut. King started in advance of the 



Col. 0th Minn. Inf'y Vols. 
One of the flags is the regimental 
standard which was presented to the 5th 
two years since by the ladies of the 
State. It has seen hard usage, one shell 
havin- explode! in its very lolds tearing 
it almost to pieces. The other flag is 
the "stjirry emblem of Freedom." On 
its stripes are inscribed the names of the 
battles mentioned above. They are in- 
teresting relics, and in the after years of 
our State will be pointed to with pnde 
by those who wish to extol the bravery 

of her sons. 

_— » > » » ♦ 

As we anticipated the draft did not 
resterday. Capt. Saunders 



The Ilttllroad at Aaoka. 

Correspondence of the St. Paul Press. 

AxoKA, January 1, 13G4. 

Notwithstanding it is mid-winter, wc 
begin to feel the benefit of the Railroad 
which is just completed to this place. 
Buildings are goin^ np in all directions ; 
our hotels (we have three large houses) 
are all well patronized, and our mer- 
chants are doing a lively business . From 
the pineries we learn that more teams are 
in this winter, both on Rum and the Mis- 
sissippi rivers, than have ever been known 
before. Last year's logs are yet up the 
Mississippi, and if we have a good rise in 
the river next season, you can look for 
lively times in the lumber market. 
I W^e have now a good foot of snow on 
the ground, enabling farmers to bring in 
their produce readily. We feel the 
effects ot last summer's drouth in the 
scant supply of grain— particularly oats 
and corn, compelling teams to be fed on 
a good share of crushed-wheat. Farmers 
look for a bountiful harvest next year, 
however, and more ground was 
the past fall for spring grains 
1 been done before for years. 

Capitalists looking for chances to in- 
vest in manufacturing operations, will 
find great facilities offered in the water 
power at Anoka. 

I hope to have the pleasure of meeting 
you and all "the rest of mankind" at the 
Railroad Celebration here, which is 
come off the present month. 



train, but lost their way, and for two 
davfl lived upon the corn they had taken 
alon"- for their horses, arriving at Lster- 
ville^the same evening that the escort 
reached there. They remained with the 
train until it reached iairmount. where 
they again left it. arriving here late last 

^'^riJis side of Spirit Lake a part of the 
escort hired teams to bring them to tlus 
place, where they arrived yesterday 



pla?e of Schofield in the 
the Missouri. 

W-vsiiiNOTOX, Jan. 5. 

ISIajor Generals Butler and Burnside 
are among the latest distinguished am- 

Brigadier General Garrard has been 
ordere.l to take charge of the Cavalry 
Bureau, thus relieving Gen. Stoneman. 

A large installment of the five per cent. 
Treasury notes were sent forward, to-day 
to the associated bauks of j^.^^^^^^jA 
Philadelphia and Boston and $^.0^«'^^ 
of these^iotes have been ^^^tr^buted pro 
rata to these cities. Nearly $9. 0OU,UUU 
more are packed readyfor transpoi tation 
and a large additional amount will go to 
the banks to-morrow. 

There has been atotal misapprehension 
in certain quarters as to the recent ar- 
rangement ot 



that the rebel General Lariy wi _ 
brigades ol Ewell's corps perhaps o,|00 
in ail, besides the forces of Imboden, .^Ic- 
Neil 'and other rebel leaders, and also 
Fitz, Hugh, and Lee's cavalry are in 
Shenandoah Valley and west ol it towards 
Petersburgh. 

Bri<r. Gen. Sullivan and Gen. Averill 
under°command of Gen. Kelley, are in 
"ood force and Avide awake. 
" Wasiiixgton-, Jan. 4. 

The rumors of the enemy's contempla- 
ted operations in the Shenandoah V alley 
are exaggerated. Fitz Hugh Lee's cav- 
alry, perhaps^ l.OW strong, supported by 
Early's negro brigade on loot, with Imo- 
dei. and other local leaders with deracli- 
ments. numbering, all told, 0,000 or 
7 000 men, are near Woodstocv and 
Mount Jackson, and make an occasional 
dash as far north as Winchester. 

The latest indications point to the 
Morefield valley, if not west of Mount 
.Jackson, as the scene of their operations, 
certainly they have not appeared as yet 
in sight of the Paltimcre and Ohio Lail- 
road, the trains of which arc running rog- 
ulaily and successfully with large quan- 
tities of freight and many passengers. 

The "reatett evidence of ofTicial conti- 
dence in the safety of the route is the 
sending of important detachments over 

it. 

rnoM ciaiCEJiaA'M. 

Oi^anlEatlon of the Ohio I.e«rUlaturc 
—Gov. Tod'« .TBei»»asre - Xavlgratiou 
Suspemlea on the Ohio-Ark»r»a. 
Xryliiff to Come Back. 

CixciNXATi, Jan. .5. 

The Ohio Legislature organized jcs- 
terday. J. R- Hubbell was elected 
speaker of the House and Wm. L. Davis 
clerk of the Senate. ^ 

Gov Tod's message is very brut. 
The financial affairs of the Mate were 
never in better tradition. 1 he public 
debt has been reduced $570,000; the 
militia system adopted by the Legislature 
last winter, has proved a success ; he re- 






Forest ruMuert hy ttrey •on- Arrival 
of Cotton auti feiuffar. 

Caiuo, Jan. 4. 
The steamer Duke Argyle arr.ved from 
New Orleans, and Ililman, from Alem- 

No serious damage was done ilie ^lera- 
phis and Charieston Railroad by Forest 
when his force crossed it last wfcek. 

Gen. Gnyson was pursuing lim at last 
accounts soi'ith of Coldwater. 

Lee reinforced Fo. est from Oakland 
The truerrilla General Kichards(m crossed 
our Tines on the 28th ult., ou his way 

AH is quiet in the interior of tlie State 
since his departure. 

A large amount ol cotton, sugar and 
molasses has arrived here during the past 
week, mostlv from Cincinnati. 

The Duke Argvle brought 256 bales of 
cotton, 4:JS hog^heads sugar, 5 lOO barrels 
molasses, mostly from New Orieans. 
The Ililman brought 235 bales cotton. 

Gens. Ord, Veicth, Huntt'r, Sawyer 
and Sherman have been here Juring the 
past week, and the latter is still here. A 



A two story Frame House, on Dayton's Bluff, 
on 4th Btreet, lieiween Mr. Woolpy and Mr. IJay- 
ton This house has six rooms and a eel ar, and 
a cistern in the cellar. I will sell or excnanga 
for a hout^e near th city, or iu the city. 1-or in- 
foimation apply on the premis es. ja-^O-.w. 

NURSE GIRL WANTED.— Apply at 
FranVlin fc Halt's Uarktr Shop, 3d street, 
tour doo! s west of Wabashaw. jan(>-3t* 

NICE PIANO FOR H IRE.— Ap- 
ply to Mrs. Watklns, at her Gallery, on 3d 
street, opposite the Bridge. jauO^lt^ 

AUCTION. AUCITON . 

i-AIRCair.U & CO., sell next Saturday, at 



refidence of G. K. ijarch, on Uayti.nAvci 
VV. .sellj^'s 1st class rarlor 



n Avenue, 
and 



Kitchen do.: Carnaijee, 

lOT 



next door to J 

Ciiamber Furniture, j«, - 

HuruedS, tadJle, &c. The I'arlor and <i»m 
furniture Is Uosewcod, Bureau and \N a hsUnd* 
marble tupped; and all in use bat a short umo. 
juuO 4t _ 



W- ANTED. 

To buy a good second hand Molodeon, of mod- 
ern make, and a* least live octaves. EnquirwM 
TUii t-T. I'ALL 1 AMI' «r<Jl{h, 
jan5-lw Ihird-st., :5d door bel ow Cedar. 

LOST.— A Certificate of Deposit of 
of Williu* Bros. & Dun^ar, No. 1, 7 11, for 
tortv-two SO-lOO dollars, d.ited Noveui.>er 2)th, 
IKiV' and payable on or after November'-jlh, .ir03, 
♦otTie order of tU« undersigu'd, wa« lost n^cr 
Trow Wing. The Under is re.]U.'Bted to lorward 
♦ho -■'ami! lo this otficf.or VVillius Bros, ci ;^u:.bai'. 
it will be of no value to him a-i payroen-. has b' ?a 
stopped. (jan5-lw) 



rt.TEttCLAKK. 



UCKWHKAT FLOUR, 



supper was given 
of his arrival. 



here last nig it in honor 



the negotiation ot $35 

o,; m600"through the s"l!J,'?'^>P^'°f,^fS 

:tv of the national banks. ^ be *oO,000.000 

^ ?aken by the associated banks were hrst 

to be defivered to them. No comm.s.ion 

Tvas paid for placing them m either case. 

itr.oiiTvriTnv. Jan. 0. 



The main body of the escort was at 
Fairmount during the severe storm on 
Thursday, ; rrived at Winnebago Cit> 
last night and are expected here on Mon- 

Yesterday morning, the Quartermaster 
and Comm'issary Departments ^t this 

place, sent otft severafloads of clothing . L^ "— .^''J^-— ^ ^^^i^, to be out- 
knd provisions to supply the wants of the | J^o^" ^ P^^^°^J^^j^"J„^^ The exchange of 



r Times' Special.^ —Our 

•- .. 'i /' »_nl H,,tl0 



WAsuixGToy, Jan, 5 

Government 



men. 



[General Sibley -receive i information 

the entire escort had 

Press. 



that 



yesterday 

reached Mankato in safety.— Ed 
♦ t o « ♦ 



Injnstico of Court. lHartlal - »o. 
mance In R«al I<tf«. 

The Washington Eepublican, com- 
menting on an article in a New York pa- 

'^^-The author of the article ought to 
, plowed I know by this time that courts martial do 
than ha" not always arrive at correct conclusions, 
than has ) ncn _^^^)^^^ ^^^ ^^^^ «»"^« '°. ." 

mation reached the President, that a 
young man belonging to the Army of the 
Potomac had been sentenced by court 
martial to be shot for desertion. The 
boy was doomed to die m a few hows 
when the despatch was received. JNo 
time was to be lost. A telegram was 
sent to General Meade suspending the 
execution. An examination of the case 
^as ordered by the President, when it 



to 



♦ « • » ♦ 



commence y 

telegraphed Col. Fry informing him that 
the °Vdjutaiit General had not been able 
to asccrtaip the credit due a large num- 
ber of towns, and asking a postponement 1 ^bout four months to these parts in sea 
of the draft for a few days in order to ob- | ^^^ ^^ ^^^ j^^j ^tijer game which we 



The Chippewa* TrouUlesome. 

Correspondence of the St. Paul Tress. 

We have in the vicinity of Itasca, and 
between there and Princeton, quite a 
raber cf Chippewa Indians. » These 
have been tolerated full long 
h, as they make annual visits, of 



nu 
things 



was ascertained that the young man ought 



[• 



- i 



tain a correct apportionment. 

He received, last evening, in reply the 

following : 

Wasuixoton, 10 :30 a. m.— Jan. 5. 

Capt. T. M. Saunders : 
Do not commence the draft until you get 

Bpecific orders from here. 
^ JAMES B. FRY, 

Trovost-Marshal General. 
No apprehension need be felt but that 
time will be given to arrange the quotas 
fairly, and it is better that the draft 
Bhould be postponed for a few days rather 
than have bju»tice done to any locality. 



think belong to white folks. If the prop- 
er authorities will notify these whelps to 
keep on their own lands it will save 
trouble, else some of them may acciden- 
tally be taken for deer by our hunters. 

They take the liberty to go into houses 
and help themselves in the back settle- 
ments to what they want. Governor 
Swift will confer a favor upon the sett?er8 
in the Northern line of Sherburne County, 
by sending the renegades where they be- 
lonf*. and the sooner the better. 

O. H. K. 



have been promoted long a^o for gal- 
lant and meritorious service, mstead ot 
beincr shot ! It appeared that iipon the 
mar "h of the Army of the Potomac to- 
wards Maryland, on the occasion of Lees 
first raid northward, the young man al- 
luded to became exhausted and fell outot 
the ranks, and as soon as he recovered 
he proceeded on alter his regiment, but 
not finding it and there being no time to 
lose he fell into the ranks of another 
reg'ment, and fought gallantly at South 
Mountain and Antietam and """"IZT^^ 
dedinthe last named battle, lie was 
sent to a hospital, which fact, by the ab- 
sence of a proper system in such cases 
did not reach the officers of his regiment. 
At last he was arrested as a deserter, 
fred condemned, and was about to be 
shot, when, by the interference of the 
Executive, his life was saved, and a 
voun" man. hastily condemned to an ig- 
Jominous death, was suddenly restored to 

honor. 

. ♦■«♦■♦ " 

— The Russian fleet have gone to 
Fo;;;is Monroe. «ud wIU winter in the Ro..d.. 



prisoners%om.^u';^d to him will be left in 
his hands. Secretary Stanton to-day ha 
enlarged Butler's powers by P"".ng all 
the rebel prisoners under his care There 
will be 20,000 at Point LooKout witliin 
three weeks. The policy is resolutely in- 
sisted on that all exchange shall take 
place through Butler, and none except 
Through him^. Jefferson Davis was m 
favor of recognizing him as Ould had al- 
ready done. Benjamin wrote a proclama- 
tion outlawing Butler. L'"<^ohi's ast 
proclamation outlawed the w^^olo R ch- 
mond government, and through this 
equality in disability there is no doubt 
but exchanges will be again re-estab- 

"stoneman has been assigned as Grant's 

chief of cavalry. 

WASHixoToy, Jan. 5. 

Major Girard, a cavalry officer of the 
Southwest, replaces Stoneman here. 

Lieutenant Colonel Elgin has been 
made chief Q. M. of cavalry bureau, vice 
Lawtell. 



commends that banking corporations n^w 
existing under State authority, be given 
ill reasonable facilities for closing their 
business ; tl.e escape of General John 
Morgan was through negligence 
arising from a misunderstanding 
between the Military and Civil 
authorities atpenitontiary of theirrespec- 
tive duties; be calls attention to tae 
bravery and gallantry of our soldiers in 
the held and says, although the 
wicked rebellion still continues, we can 
iustly claim for Ohio the full performance 
of duties in the effort to crush it .tiid the 
number of troops raised since the begin- 
ning of the war IS 200,671. The river here 
is full of floating ice; "* '° ="'" 

pended. 



THE COi-M »XA)?. 

Teii JWejrreen n^-low a5er«- at Mem- 
l.lil»-?*oI.Uer» Froxtu-Tlio »Ils«»t- 
sippi Clo«t'rt. 

Cairo, Jan. 4. 

The thermometer was 10 decrees below 
zero .at Memphis on Uie moinmg of the 
1st, and at Cairo the same morning 10 
dciees below. A number of persons 
wJre fbund (rozen to death I clow Cairo 
on new years evening. 

Ten negro soldiers perishi.d at Island 
No 10, and the bodies of thi-ee members 
of the .'■/2d Indiana regiment were founc 
on a sindbaria the river, six miles above 
Fort Pillow. One of them was Lie it. 
Edward Alexander. 

The r.iilroad tr.xins. have not 
l)een running on the Illinois Central road 
for several days on account of a 



B 

Graham Flour, New Corn M-al, r.-^^li E'-g^ 
Choice Butter, Kresh Lard, < ranx-.i ■' , '-♦'*^ 
and Teas, Honpy.and ev.-rv thing u<ivr / •'.-'* •7 
Family i.roceries, can be found at •;iu j-ocer/ 

^S»^5 "^ ^•^- WIMBIsn, Jreksca tt. 

„ r-, r, ™ f^ n- C-. r- o, « ™ •-; - ' ^ T, J!' ?J 

FRUIT TJE^:^^^9 

VINES, SHRUBS, ?Li ilTC, 

And All Kinds of Seeds, '^ c*. 

For IMinaOiSCwSi. 



The undersigned is now making p.rri.'jenieaf to 
commence, next i^n^i, 

A Ittinnesota .taucciir^^rlln:; 
Nursexy, 



Near St. Paul, and to c?cn 

A Seed and Hortlcultu 

IS TUB CITT 



-! 






strike 



amrng the engineers. 

T'ho weather has moderat<:d sonn 
but it is still .nowing with about 
inches on the ground, 
the Ohio river, out of which large (luanti- 
ties of ice are coming, buttlie Mississippi 
is closed. 



Earl 
orn 



Iv in March next, he will virit ^x^^^ l^ortV 
Nurseries «nd Jieed (.ro;^«8 c^u d • h,^ 



, , nuichase Stock. He, 'nracautiui^, '--'.•f «^ 
ewhat " for any article in this I'ne oi bu.»^c>., *oa 



four 
Boats still go up 



ders for any 



erpecially, at an early date, lor 

FRUIT TREES, APPLE,Pr A ^ :P:^^^ 
CHERRY AND QU1:T0;^3. 



navigation is sus- 



fROA CH ARI.ESTO^. 



An Iiitere.tlii»llel»el I.etter-Ch«rte«- 
ton :»Uned-A nc»ureof its present 
Conaiflon-Fred Be»lre» »•« I-«*- 

New York, Jin. 5. 

The Iribitne vouches for the genuine- 
ness of the following letter, which inti- 
mates that the city of Charleston is mined 
with powder : 

Charleston, Nov. 9. 

Dear Cousix : Fred has at last con- 
sented to let me come to Macon, so you 
may expect me in a very few days. Ihe 
other day a Yankee shell exploded just 
around the comer from our house, tear- 
ing a building to pieces and setting two 
others on fire. No one was injured, as 
all the buildings were vacated some weelcs 
ago. I don't believe there are two bun 
dred ladies in town who are able to gel 
awav, for Fred declared we should not 
leave while we had a roof over us, but 
now that he sees the danger we are in. 
he is glad to hurry us off. 



Headquarters department of tic Ohio Andrews 
will be removed to Lexington, kcntucky, 
to-morrow. . 

A special to the Commercial from Cairo 
says a delegation of prominent citizens 
of Arkansas arrived there en route to 
Washington to arrange for Arkansas to 
resume hBr place in the Union. 

Fraud* on «he Cfoverninent Exposed. 

Norfolk, Va., Jan. 4. 
The Military Commission, of which 
Gen. Wistar is President, has bce» m 
session here during the past week 1 he 
case of J.M. Hunt, late Superintendent 
of vessels at Ft. ISIonroe, is on trial, and 
the developments are excitingly intercs.- 
inc Among the points elicited are the 
payment of $3,000 in fees to Sonator 
Hale, by Hunt, to obtain his release from 
the Old Capitol Prison. 

To-day Capt- Conors, of the steamer 
John A. Warner, testified that the boa. 
was worth $05 000 when she first went 
into Government service ; that at the rate 



nebel l»«l« irorfc. O.'Stroyed. 

Nkw Tork, Jan.'_5. 
The Herald's correspo idcnce from 
Key West by steamship Blackstone states 
that naval opor.itlons on the coast of 
Florida are active and successf^ul. An 
extensive salt work of the rebels v^as 
destroyed in St Andrews Bay, and St. 
citv leveled to Ihe ground by 
the crew of the steamers Bloomer and 
Restless. The salt works destroyed are 
valued in at nea rly $3,000 OOP. 

A Freetl Slen'n CelBUration. 

New York, Jan. o. 
Freed men's celcbratioii of the auni- 
versarv of the J mancipaiion Proclama- 
tion took place at Coope:- Institute last 
nioht. Addresses were made by Kev. 
Dn Bellows, Dr. Cheevtr, and others, 
and letters read from <lov. Andrew, 
Chase, Sumner and others. The prmci- 
pal portion of the audienc e color ed. 

Snow. 

Nev Y'ork, Jan, 5. 
the 



noth SUndardand Dwarf Trees :>e V;:»1.^=W* 
to furuisli varieties of I>warf Apyle .. . '^ ' ^ * 
will produce fruit in one year, u.._. • laKf 
Trees within three or four yc.i*. Jr : J^ 

^r^tT^oos^^'er^y »«'* Blackberry; '^. 11 for 



'..p.cially solicited, for the best impro..-.^ .'^ri 
ti- of. .^ Grape, ^r^'r^f.^i^F^^I'lJ^': 



kinds ol Kru 



it .Seeds adapted to our EJil lit:. 
~rorr.o' 




rS^^'ruu! that wKl be/better adap^ea 




10 c'r-r.perate iu this enterprise, 

man lug 

MINNESOTA A GRKAT FRUIT GltOWKJU 

s 1 A rE. 




annViRibiedcalerx; and in many instances from 
vPant of knowledge in the mo<<e of culture, ^eleo- 
)^^» nf «7.i' apwct. &c. Tlie und'-rsiRn-d will 
irra<^etV;e |enuinene.sofev,ry article that m^^ 
^fordercd; ^ill lurnl.-h the same at as luw a 



oriCB as purchases could be made in »ny other 
««v • and will aUo furnish to each purchaser, 
wK' c;:^rge, a pa™phlec. containing ihe ex^ 



About an inch of snow fell during the 
night, and was still snowing at 9 o clock 

this morning. 

A Comm^r^^r'Ad^lralFarrasnt- 

New York, Jan. 5. 
Admiral Farragut is expected to sail 



;ii"ran.1 r^u.l'-.^ot r^e atte'innts thu. far made. 
■ .w^.!.Tf,. and unsucco3sf.ll Iruit culture in 
lar-ate Bhowins he best varie.i.s of trees 
A «'nd I'l'e b"st modes of culture for our .^oil 
a^'d climat'e'; with "general instructions to guKl« 

"^S^^:^:^ -d orders Invited from .U 



Let none 



who fe«>l an uuerest in ^l^^^Xl'^'Trthelu^.T. 
'^ ^'''''rjAran o7de7 /.'r"(slSletroe, 



sisrned wi 
vine or sli 
the same care, as to one 



aijiu.--. •. — --- . . .yortli of seeds, with 

vine or shrub, or for ^-^ _%^'>^^.l\^„^rei\\mift 



asm 



S\.u-W«Bnlrf.sV.l".vr~t" 



ri,.TS:r ^iTe • i;ad ear„eJ 8173 M« [ .o-day in the J^f WfJ.-'%tcC.ding 
to date ; that the Government had , command ot the i-.,asiLru xj 



up 



,u^ppUed her w,,l, coal j 'bat ber a^rage 



running expenses 



were from $1,500 to 



Squadron. 



$2,000 per month, but that they had been 
met by profits on meals and berths, and 
that she belonged to the l>f ^ff ^''^r^^ 
steamboat company, of which John Ir ce 
Wetherell. of Philadelphia, was president, 
and Andrew M. Anderson, ^^ '"• j=;- 
Allen. Willett Paxton, and Samuel Har- 
lan, Jr., directors. , ^ . v»,. 
Capt. Conner says that her fir^t char- 
ter was made with Jno. Tucker, late 1st 
Secretary of War. and second with Q. 

M. Gen.'Meigs. , , i „,t,„T. 

The prosecution has overhauled other 

fatiobs in the steamboat line, and the 
IbyVolet I evidence stands thus far that there h.as 
aoie lo B u a king of contractors interested with 

the one at Bath, with which Belger was 
connected. The steamer West Lnd— an 



Union Trluaiph. 

Baltimore, Jan. 4. 



fisU a useful and remunerative business. 

r^ Also, furnished to farmers the best 
varieties of WHEAT. RYE, 



BARLEY and 
MTCKW-n KATV.^V(;iully selected for «eed; and 
'R^^7: "/nl? A *.i MKi-fD.S. adapted tothecll- 



The annual election ol directors of the , „„.. -...^- c. 
altimore Commercial Exchange to-day | P«.v-';;;^j;'l-^'^:,^'- 



all kinds of GU ASS SEEDS, adapU 
mate of Minnesota. 

All ori^ers to be paid for on delivery at Saint 
Paul, unles'agreeinent be mude for deuvery and 



Old one-was offered in New York at [ o'clock f. v, 



resulted in the triumph c f the Union tick- 
ets over the di.loj al. Thi.s is considered 
(juite a triumph by the oyal members of 
the institution. 

IXogra. 

Chicago, Jan. 4. 
Very little doing in begs in consequence 
of light re ceipts. 

X^RS.~WILLEY .& HAND, 
PLEASANT STREKT, ST. PAUL. 

OFnCB IIOUBS-8.t0 10 A. M., *^^^°^^.^ 



Address, 

D. A. ROBERTSON, 

St. Paul. Miinn. 

ST.PAUL,Jan. 4, lSi>l. i»»*- 



XTNITED STATES 
f»ElNSION AGENCY 

ST. PAUL. . -^'- MINNESOTA. 

Office m llogors' Block, Sd-st., near the Bridja. 

ffitr/^o'rr^;;^^^^^^^^^^^ 



t i - ii -wr . 



i 



l' 




i 
1 













>• I 




- 



--^ s - 



fv ■ »■ 




■.— 




■ 






' — 












































' 
















1 










► 
















! 

1 





■ F" 



■* 



^ ■ ■ r 



^mmmrmmmmmm^^m^ 



^m m • '*\ 



^^trnt 



I' ' ■' 






■^■^ 



i^i^i^ 



TB:E BAINT PATJ-L press, T^Ji.DIS'ESDAY. JAISTUAEY 6, 1864. 



t 



ghc ^aint Ja£ Jvr^ 



Indeed and indeed, "death lo^cs a 
.-Lining mark," and tbe roll of olllcers for 
wbom'thcr couira<k'S say to-day, "dead 
on the Held of honor," will lend a splen- 
dor to the storv of Mission Ridge forever. 
Clothed be thc^Tth Ohio in mourning and 



power to prevent? Are wc, and we g p ^ (] J A L NOTICES. 

alone, to sufter the penalty of their trana- 



acdianemt^. 



prossions 




liVl 

ei. 



to ore a-J 

■il'.'"'oeac!i ; tweutj ur morc.toone aiiirLSB, 



o:- in.)!.', * !.7?' <^acJi ; ton or more. 



red 



AFTER THE BATTLE. 

nv KKXiAMr: r. tayi-ok. 

trjTo the r;i:?aEO.Jou.jj.;l 

AVIicn a (unuiee is i.i Hast, tbe 
l.iMutaiu .4)arkles and ;.lays like a moun- 
tain spriii/r, and ihc rude snrrounihngs 
Iri- hun to tlie f eak of tiie rougli ratters 
•with a strange innntv. When ihc hre w 
out, and tin. hi- k r-.kI r.^gg. d nuis<o« ot 
dull iiou lie dead upon the grouiid, Mitn 
.•I duiiib and stubborn ro.^stanee, 
widd liave dreanieil that thvycvL-rit 



who 



v/ 



aped 



one hund'red and twenty-t^o ba; s single 
and double leaves silver and gold and 
six spread e.airl'-s lav bloody and blont— 
the total loss in the two divisions ot 
Wood and Sheridan alone bemg twenty- 
three hundred and forty-four. 

Ihey cried in the white heat of \\ edncs- 
dav alternoon, "the rebels mass their 
batteries! They converge tlveir hre .^ 
tahi"<r onr divisions througn 



Are our soldiers, uho are 
figliiing our b:«ttlcs, to be deprived of 
fiTod, that tbcv may have plenty ? No, 
by all that is just, all that is j)atriot!e, all 
that IS truly geiK-rous ! Let them sulFer 
the penalty of their own atrocities, and 
thank their stars that it is not harder to 
bear. 

We would be perfectly justified m stint- 
ing them to a half or a (pun ter of thj al- 
lowance we make to om- own soldiers, in- 
stead of giving them exactly the same ra- 
tions that our soldiers receive. If any- 
bodv sutlers, it is perfectly just that it 



Brown's Bronchial Troches, for 

Coughs ano Colds.— A neglected Cougli, Cold 
an Irritated or Sore Throat if allowed to progress 
results in serious Pulmonary Broucliial and Asth- 
matic Diseases oftentimes Incurable. Biows's 
\ Broxchial Tkoches reach directly the aff.cted 
i parts, and give olmo?t imin'^diate relief. For 
' Bronchitis, Asthma, Catarrh, and CoSSCMPTIVK 
' Couoiis the Troches are useful. Public Speakers 
i and .Singers should have the Trochee to clo-r and 
strengthen the voice. MiliUry Officers and Sol- 
diers who overtax the,,A?«ice, and are exposed to 
sudden changes should use them. Obtain only 
the genuine. " Brown's Bronchial Troches" hav- 



OSEPH I. BEAUMONT, 



DEALEU IS 



FOR 90 DAYS! 

EARE BAKGAINSl 



^imltmxtm^. 



1. , ; 



in defiance of' all the laws that regu'ate 
the proceedings oi war, there should be 

and vet, taf- — ...v........ ...^c^.. ' no sullering at all. It is of the nature of 

and throui;!-, 
evenly as V. it 
clouds of heaven. 

Spots along that rough and 

mountain route are waiting some poet „ .„ VuV..,,, f „;no foo If thcv live 

breath to blossom with tlowers immortid. ; lor want hc^mu.t pine too. It thcv 

Here, by 

one shoidd 

,1 



should be thev, but for those acts done , iDg;>romaheir etncacy by a testof many jeirs, 



1 VI t tfvl;J"?T onr mvisiuus imuur," — ■ o , , .,i,fv,,l,l 

' ^'^^' ^^ ■■ I rain fell as the prisoner^ condition that he should 

Wn shed bv the I sluare the lot of those with whom he is a 

I prisoner. He cannot expect better fare 

terrible ■ than that which is received by the soldiers 

3 ' to whom he sui renders. If they pine 

blossom with tlowers immorti.i. \ lor want he mu.t pine too. If they live 

fs^rav rock, lav the soldier, | plentifully, he mu.t ^^^ t>l«"t'ff >;f^ ;'^'\^,: 

Ider ° battered like a piece of If one party or the other must suffer, he 



are highly recommended and prescribed by Phy- 
icians and Surgeons in the Army, and have re- 
ceived testimonials from many eminent men. 

Sold by nil Druggists and Dealers in Mndidna 
in the United States and most Foreign countries 
at 25 cts., per box, 



docs Imdtw 



TEAS, COFFEES, SPICES, 
Sugars, Syrups, 

AND ALL GOODS PERTAINING TO THE 
COCEiiY BrslNEr^S, INCLUDING 

XOU^VCCOS, CIOA^K^S, 

Wines, Liciuors, and 

Pure Old Eye and Bourbon 

^V Irl I S K I E S . 

Cumcr 3a &. JacSiaon St's. Qo::0-d&w8w 



IX 



x> u, ^^ 



aIII;e. It 



with hie and li;:ht ? 

A la! tie and a furnace are 
is wundcrhil ho.y dull natures brighten 
itlv in the glow of battle; 



worth ar.d v.'calth. there 
and the common 



J nd ifvov. cos 

how U»«- sterling 

iire in them. sLine ou 

finds traiis.'iiiurcd, his heart, m his 

' his foot ia the realm cl heroic 

IJiit ah. wiicn the lire is out. 



potter^s clav, and thus urged two com- 
kid s who had hdted to bear him to the 
rear: don't stop lor me— Fm of no ac- 
count-for Gods sake, push right up 
with the boys !"— and on they went and 
hfthim weltering in his bloody vcst- 



ruar 
hand aii'i 

ciandeur. - , ... 

a'ld tiic s-:irrtd carih is heaped with rii;:>l 
clav, the bhi'.k mouths o.' the guns speech- 
less, migl.tv hammers and r.o hands, the 
ll:.'sturied, the wild hurrah died away, 
and all the splendid action of the charge 
vani^hetl trom tlie rugf^ed licld like a last 
flash of suiiihine, and you wander atnong 
the dull r.-maimUM-s, the dead embers ol 
the i- tt.n.NC;t iile and glow that sv.-ej)t 
yo'ir soul out, only } c>terday, .ind drilled 
it on with the skirmish line, you bcginto 
know what ihose v/ords mean, " alter the 

batii;-." ^ ,, ^ 

It is dav3 since great waves ot gallant 
life dashed against Mission llidge and 
swept vp and over it in surges; days 
siuc. I tried to tell you how it looked ; 
60 mmi;/ uavs tliat it is tven now indura- 
ting into hi^to^y, and yet, 1 feel like tak- 
Kig^up the storv just where I lelt it. on 
■\\"edne>day atsunse^, when our tlags 
Happed like caghs' wings, and the wild 
crv of triumph tjuivered along the moun- 
tuln. Stamiin:: on the cd^je ot the liehl 
in the moonlight, calm as "(iod's acre'" 
."tretches the rough valley that, but an 
liour before, j '.rred Avith the rush and 
'./IhtI of the h:\n\t'. From away beyond 
the llidge, indeed, thrct^ miles out to 
Cblcka'nauga Station, the dropping shots 
frou\ Sheridan's gr.ns faintly punctu.stc 

as 30U will. 

the' click of 

Ui 'Tiee wheels, sluwlv rolling in with 



; him weltering m his Diooo) vi^t- i^jr. Saulsburv 
nts. Do ye talk of your royal purple ^nal appears 

Tvriandves? Beside that hero lying t^^^^ He is ab. 



must be that p: 



rty, 



me 
or 

tlcre, those tints grow dull as gray 
November. Hard by that little oak. Col. 
II:irker, crowding up the hill, saw two 
brothers, one wounded unto death, the 
other bending over him. The Colonel, 
not seeing the fallen man, ordered the 
other to move on. "liut this is my 
brother," he pleadingly said. The poor 
stricken fellow on the ground rallied an 
instant: "Yes, that's right, George ; go 
on, goon!" George turned a piteous 
'tlance upon his dying brother, grasped 
ins musket, and clambered on. And t.iat 
was hh last farewell, for, the summit 
reichcd, he hastened back, and there, be- 
side the little oak, the soldier lay m that 
sleep without a dream. Between the hrst 
nml second ranges of rebel works, right 
in the llusli of the charge, a captain Icii, 
an<l two men came to his aid. "Don t 



t 
wait here," he said> "go back to your 
company ; one useless man is enough : 
don't make it three." Just then a 
heer Hoated down the mountain as they 
the rille-i>it. " Don't 



c 
took 



le-pit. 



the sil*^.nce, but here, listen 

vot: '.'xn fae;ir no so;;nd but 

am 

their maiif led burdens ; no si^di, no 

gro ti, nothing but th'.' sobbing lapse of 

V 



V 

3. 
J 
i. 



^va:■■;•. 
It iS sti 

livS b. 



T 



;.i: 



■ \ti 



t 

■4- 



!r.-.s< e. I can never tell you with 
. 1 •cling at the heart 1 looked 
.... iho Ftderai fires kindh'ng 
; ■ w cousleliation upop Jiission 
wn-^i as welcome as dawn- 
■ .:.c eyes that have wat-hed 
out. The old baleful glare from 
1 iMUV) and signal lights were 
wit!i something thi.ker th.an 
..i Chattanooga was at peac. 
;a_'': ihaD a battle almost always 
V ;'en two breaths of sltcu ; tin' 
.■;b :<luiiroer into which n^ea fi'i! 
■,■: ;''j. calm repose they sinlc 
.;. lairly held its breath 
-;•: c^iiuus; the wing of silence 
-,- , rtiii all. Then came Ihurs- 

( : brlifht and beautiful. You 

: \1 ; and you keep saying 

'< "alter tiie batti»i — alter 

. .n prone upon the laces 
. l.:'sement; here one, hi.s 
L I'pviu his folded ar:i)s : 
• une, iiir- cheek pressed upon a stone 
/ ■ r.t Ijcthci; yond r one, 

; •r.'.i round his in isket. 

iSov/ yoa pao3 v/uore a butternut and a 
T-'-. blue have gone down together, the 
oi i'lt; o.ie ilung over the other ; 
boy of fifteen lies fxvc up- 
.- clasped over Isis henvr. 
'> • -. cbeu the frost that whit- 

I . . ii he had grovrn old in a 

. , . , : r; like tears fresh-fallen 

;:• on hii; ; where a lieutenant 

a : s u im died vai:dy feeling 
jiu iipoa earth and li(e, where a 
sla:;iiid t^ii if;v:is you to a sheller beiiind 
R ro.-h, 9P there a dead Captain who 
lad crept a'Vi,y ou', oi sight and fallen 
asLcp; wbeve rebels and true hearts lie 
in ?Lor», v/iiidows, as if Death had begun 
to h'.rvciit arid had wearied of the work. 
/■' '1 so, thiojgh tiie valley and up the 
j.iuge, in n\:ry attitude lie the unburied 
•h aa.: lie just as they fell in the glow of 
V'i'--- And those faces are not as 
\-X tiiink ; hardly one distorted 
r>:i ; almost white and calm, as 
.i"' dream of peace; many 
. .. o^iiiethlag like n xmilj ; a 
. .^euUviul. Wo.;, -.^d ones 
the moonlight search have 
waiting fqr morning, without 
i>.uiiiplaint ; glad they are 
* ■ ■ .^ ' l ievi'il they are wounded, for 
^t take the Ridpfo V they say ; 
• he old soldiery yplrit of one 
. S'- an expiring candh', and <:o 



you hear 
that?" he cried, " march !" and away they 
went. Such incidents as these strow all 
the w.av from ba^e to crest ; happening 
in"an inst.tnt, lost and forgotten in the 
whirlwind ; worthy, every one of them, 
of a medal in gold ; worthy, every one of 
them, of a place in loyal hearts. n ith 
such a spirit inspiring rank and file— a 
spirit as lofty as the Alpine traveler 
breathed, whose burden, as he went, was 
i^till "e.xcehior," who can wonder that 
Mission llidge was carried in a Novem- 
ber afternoon? As 1 think of it all, I 
seem to have the poet's (piickened ear, 
to me, standing in the valley below. 



.'•nd 



from hundreds of lips now white and still, 
a voice Hows down the Ridge's side in 
'.rrand accord : 



" A voice comes like a falling star, 
Exci:lsiou !" 



»»♦»♦■ 



.^ut there on the field as he spoke ; 

itie't wi."h the last word on his lips, and 
•'went up higher." 

I said something of tiking the back- 
ward step and retracting the grour.d 
made classic by a thou^and det:ds of 
valor ; it is a work beyond the narrow 
verge of a writer of letters, but while 
abanduning it to more auibitior.s hands 1 
cannot deny myself the privilege of re- 
cording two or three incidents. Colonel 
Wiley, of the 41st Ohio, fell terribly 
wounded at the first line of rllle pits, and 
Geii-ral Hizen rude v.p, with thu words, 
*'I hope you arc net L'adly wounded." 
•'Do you think we will make it.^"' asked 
the Cclonel, "I do," was the r- ply. 
"That's enough," said the gallant olli-er, 
"I can statHl this !" and there he lay 
bleeding and content, and the tide of the 
battle rolled on. 

A division General turned abruptly to 
me in th.e course of a desultory conversa- 
tion, witii "If you write anything about 
Wednesday's allair, as you will, don't 
forget Col.' jlilier, of the 3Gth lilinois— 
one of the most gallant little hdiows that 
ever drew a swcr 1." I did not need that 
injunction, for Col. Silas Miller rode 
through the storm to the summit of the 
Kid"e at the head of his regiment like a 
veteran, inspiring hU n<eB till the little 
SGthwas a ph-ilanx of heroes. Tbe Col- 
onel used to b". adjutant of types and 
lead a column, now and then, in the ot- 
fi' e of the Chicago Journal, ai;d, true to 
his old love, be headed a column at iMis- 
sion llido-e. Co!. F. T. Sherman, of yo ir 
citv, who commanded Gen. Sherman's 
brigade, displayed a cool courage and 
clear judgment worthy the name and 
fame tf Illinois In truth all the Colo- 
nels on that day were tit to be named 
with him of continental memory, who 
".'uHopcd through tbe white infernal 
powder-cloud." 



— Captain (ioodrich, of the Hth Cnn- 
nccti'.-ut, six feet till, mnscMlar and smart, 
was I'ln.'cd in command of a hard set of boys, 
\vh> had defied their former oflicers. He 
made tlicni a speech : " ]3oys, I liear that you 
are ' sonic' on a skinnisli, and th;it c.Mcli of yon 
iuv spoiling' for a tight. Now, Ijcforc I iro nny 
further, 1 want to eoiac to an understandnif? 
witli vt)U. If there is one of you that thinks 
he t. '.ii will!) inc, fct liim now step out of the 
ranks :uid trv it." Not a m.in stirred, and tlic 
compnny Ijeiamc noted for its good discipline. 

— \ New Orleans letter says that work- 
in.',niicn arc prospcnuis, wages being vcr.y hi„'h. 
Tl'ierc are no slaves, and every al)lc-l>odied 
■tenant expects twciitv dollars per month. 
The " Yankees" have come m with the " eur- 
rcniv,'and they want "help." They li.ive 
t ikeh the stoics, put up l)ig rod and gilt signs 
of " Div Ouods," " Yankee Notions," "Pro- 
duce," t'lc, and gradually they are making a 
new eity. 

— During the battle of Missionary 
Riduc a rebel Captain was captured by a boy 
tjciongin"-' to one of the Ohio regiments, and 
rcTusing to go to the rear, gave fiim a kick in 
the region of liis "base" that sent him head- 
long down tlic hill, accompanying thedemoii- 
stratiou with the shout, "Chiekamauga, d— n 
you '" 

— Among Union prisoners recently 
cscaport from Riclimond. the name ot John 11. 
McCuIlougli, of the 1st Wisconsin, is reported. 
McCullough fei.;ncd dcii^l, and was carried out 
in a CO. tin. Some Union ladies of Ilichmond 
furnished him a co it, made of sccesh bhinkct, 
by means of whicli he was enabled to work 
his way up to our lines and finally to reach 
Washington. 

— .Vs it has been quite frequently as- 
serted that General Hooker needlessly sacri- 
liced a thousand men m the tight at Itinggold, 
Georgia, it may be well to state that in the 
last cami)ai!,'n,Gon. Hooker's command fought 
four battles'^ besides several skirmishes, cap- 
tared over t'.vo-thirdsof all the prisoners,arins 
and camp equipage taken, and seven pieces of 
ai-tillery, with a total loss not exceeding one 
thousand men. 

— 'I he late Maj. Gen. Buford. than 
wlioin j)roI»abIy no commander was so devoted- 
ly loved by tliose around him, was otfcred a 
Major-tJencrars commission in the Rebel 
arinv when in Utah. He crushed the commu- 
niea'tion in his hand, and declared that he 
would live and die under the flag of the Un- 
ion. .\ few hours before his death, and while 
sntfering from delirium, lie roundly scolded 
his negro servant; but recovering him.«clf 
temporarily, lie called the negro to his bed- 
side and siiid to him : "Edward, I he:ir I have 
been scolding you. I did not know what I 
was saving. You have been a f uthful ser- 
vant, Edward." The poor negro sat down and 
wept as though Ins heart was broken. AVhcn 
Gen. Buford received his commission as Ma- 
i(>r-General, lie exclaimed, "Now, I wish that 
I could live." His last intelligible words, ut- 
tered during an attack of delirium, were : 
"Put guards on all the roads, and ilon't let the 
men run hack to the rear." This was an il- 
lustratiim of the ruling passion strong in 
death, for no trait in CJen. IJuford's character 
was more than his dislike to sec men skulk- 
ing or hanging on the rear. — Washiiiffion 
Chronicle. 

♦ « ♦ « 4 



The I'rUoners— ^Tli.r tUvj have be**!! 
Starved. 

From the Richmond Dispatch, Dec. 22. 
Our soldiers have fared badly at times, 
owing to circumstances with which all 
acquainted. The Yankees, last Spring 
and Summer, sent bands of marauders 
into the country lying between the Poto- 
m.ic and James rivers. They reduced it 
almost to a desert. They destroyed the 
crops, burnt the mills, shotall the horses, 
mules, sheep, oxen and cows that they 
could not carry ofl", collected all the 
plows, hoes, axes and agricultural im- 
plements of every kind into piles and set 
hre to them, and went off, carrying with 
them all the negroes that could be induc- 
ed to follow them. Tbe object, boldly 
avowed by Lincoln himself, was to starve 
the people into submission. 

Modern history presents but one par- 
allel to the cold-blooded atrocity of this 
proceeding. And now, when these Yan- 
kee prisoners are sufTering from their 
own acts — when they are pinched for the 
food which their own hands have destroy- 
ed — when they pine for the luxuries which 
their own infernal malignity has rendered 
it inq)essible to procure — are we to bear 
the burden of their inifiuity ? Are we to 
bo blamed for what it was not in our 



ttrnatorial rcTSonaffes. 

Washington Cor. of the Ciacinnati Commercial 
Mlt. SAUI.fUUUY. 

Saulsbury is a man of very fine 
arance, about forty years of 
bove the medium bight, 
rather stoutly built. His hair is jet black, 
his eyes keen, piercing, and well adap- 
ted to flashing anger in the face of an op- 
ponent. His lace is large, and raav be 
termed handsome. He wears neither 
■wliiskers nor moustache. He dresses 
neatly, in fine broad-cloth. He is a good 
speaker, uses choice language, and enun- 
ciates distinctly. He is not altogether 
free from the imputation of vanity, 1 
should sav, from the number of times he 
looks at the galleries while speaking, with 
an air of "How do you like it? Wouldn^t 
my opponent be better ofl if he hadn't 
said any tiling?" 

MR. U.VY.^RP. 

'Mr Bayard is about trenty years 
older thair his colleague, a very pretty 
figure, rather inclined to corpulency. 
iTis hair is <piife gray, and what little 
there is of it is parted in the middle. 
Time has furrowed his face quite deenly. 
He speaks wi'.h very little animation, 
and at times thero is considerable of a 
whine in his utterance. He was recently 
re-elected to the Senate, and it now. de- 
volves upon him to take the recently 
prescribed oath, or be expelled from that 
body. He will take the oath, though 
not with much relish. 

MR. .'^L'.MNP^R. 

Mr. Sumner's personal appearance has 
been so often described that 1 will not 
make one of my poor attempts to convey 
to the reader an idea ol how this eminent 
statesman and scholar looks on the floor 
of the Senate. It would not r..(iuire a 
very good judge of human nature to point 
him out as he sits at his desk, whether 
reading, writing or listening to the re- 
marks of another Senator, as the noblest 
Roman of them all. There is something 
about him that cannot fail to impress any 
man oi ordinary intelligence with the fact 
that he is no tr'ickly politician, no pseudo 
ttiitesn-.an, no mere socialist. Hut when 
be rises to an iinpromtu speech, he dis- 
enchants you, and you cannot help asking 
3 0urself, or somebody near, "Is that 
Sumner ? Certainly it can't be he who is 
making such a poor attempt on such a j 
trivial subject I" But it is even Charles 
Sumner, the profound scholar, the great 
thinker, and one of the poorest off-hand 
speakers in the Senate. It is because he 
is such a great thinker and such a pro- 
found student, and. perhaps, too, that 
one is apt to expect so much from him, 
that he impresses you so unfavorably 
when a question is suddenly sprung upon 
him, for which lie had no time for thought 
or research. 

jn:. riissEXDKN 
is one of the keenest deb.aters in t'.e Sen- 
ate — alwa)"* prepared, no matter what 
subject is brought up — always ready to 
give sound, logical views, no matter v/hat 
the topic under discussion. The most 
dilhcult antagonist to overcome, and the 
safest guide to follow. 

MR. m'DOUG.A.L 
hails fiom California ; was elected as a 
L'nion man, but has taken to Peace De- 
mocracy and bad whiskey ; is very eccen- 
tric, and usually drunk ; comes into the 
Senate Chamber booted and spurred for 
a horse race or a cavalry raid. 

.MR. S1IER.M.\X. 

The young Senator from Ohio— the 
rising man of the Senate — has a high ap- 
preciation of the value of time, and never 
attempts to argue a point when he knows 
he cannot hope to change a vote by doing 
so. Makes few speeches, and good ones. 
Is energetic, and zealous in the discharge 
of every duty assigned to him. 

REX. W.VDE. 

Rough, unpolished, but honest and ca- 
pable. Talks strongly when he does 
talk, which is seldom. Is said to be some- 
what ot an anti-slavery man. 

MR. POWELL. 

Evidently intended for a farmer, and 
not for a Senator. Is very fond of quib- 
bling, and has a word to say ag:ainst 
everything proposed by the Administra- 
tion party. His remarks would be more 
acceptable if more grammatical. 

.IIM L.VXK. 

Very quiet and unobtrusive for a jay- 
hawker. Is not often heard from, yet 
was heard from once too often when he 
attempted fro make a reformation in Wall 
street. 

.MR. SPRAGCE. 

will not make a very profound impression 
as a statesman or an orator. Has more 
wealth than genius, and can accomplish 
more witii the former than the latter. 

MR. LAKE, OF INDIANA. 

Honest and faithful. Xot very ambi- 
tious ; and not very desirious of public 
applause. A good worker but not an 
extraordinary speaker. 

MR. HEXDICKS. 

A peaceable member of the peace par- 
ty. Says little, but always votes wrong. 



Home Lii e Ixsukakce Company, 

Nkw YonK, oiFors the mostliboral advautages to 
parties desiring to effect insurar.ce. 

KliV. EDW'D. EGGLtCSTON, 
State Aot^t kob 1Ii;jxe«ota, 
th nol9-t sep t 2 '64 _St. Taal. 

A Beautiful Complexion, free from 
T.ix, Pimples and FrecLlcs, may easily be pro- 
Cjr?a byuiilngthe " Kalmoi Thousand Flowers." 
r^r fchaviug it is unsurpassed. Itiacomposed of 
palm oil, honey, and other valuable articles, high- 
ly perfumed by its own ingredients, and when 
used for washing, night and morning, renders 
the 8kin soft and white, and free from 'ulemlsb 
I'rice 50 cents. For sale by 

DAY & J 1:N KS, St. raul, and 

Beptl9-cowly N. II. UEMlUf, Kt. Anthony. 



s. 



WINES AND LIQTJOE 
i 

FOR 



Mediclafi! vM Privaie Usct 



TuE Mutual Life Insurance Com- 
pany OF >Vi.sco!isiN, is the be.n Company for 
Western men to insure in. 

It is made up of and managed by Western men, 
and is thus having its risks all reside in this the 
healthiest part uf the Union. It is believed that 
its rate of mortality will be lower than that of 
the Eastern Companies, in the luturo £s It ha 

been in the past. . „, , n • 

The Company is now in its fifth year of busi. 
ncsa, and h:ia proven an entire success, having 
issued over four ttiou.-^anu policio.s. and accumu- 
lated in rexerve premiums two hundred thousand 
dollars. It started v.ithout guarantee capital, and 
experience has proven that none was necessary. 
The bu.-luess ot the Company is conducted upon 
the same general basis as that of the mo.<?t suo- 
cei.'ful Ka?tern Coinpanie:',vith Wic advantage of 
having the experience of the older ones as iis 

Ihe're are now a largo number of members of 
the Company in !<t. I'aul and vicinity, among 
whom are some of our be.st business men. 
NOilTlI WE.STE 1 1 N AG ENC Y, 
Thompson's Block, Third street, St. I'aul. 
O. CURTIS, Manager. 
S. r. SNVnFIt, Agent, MinnnapoMs. 
Either of the al<ove nain-^d gentlemen will be 
happv to give infoimatlon to members or others 
desinnr, in t garJ to the Company, and asi'ii't in 
making apj UcatLons for Policies. 



PURE OLD RYE VrUlSJCY, 

PURE OLD BOURBON WHISKY, 
FINE OLD FRENCH BRANDY, 
FINE SCOTCH VrilTSKY, 
PALE SHERRY WINE. 
PURE JUICE PORT WINE, 
OLD BURGUNDY PORT WINE, 
W0LFF;S SCHIEDAM SCHNAPPS, 

OLD JAMAICA HUM, 

MUMMS' CABINET CHAMPAGNE, 

CURACOA. 

. - FOR SALE BY 



W 



HOLES/ 



iLE LA:3L 

next door tD 



G^ o o i:> s 5 

May ba made at 

No. 13S Third Street, 

SAINT PAUL. 

We offer at reduced prices to close out tie stock : 
«0 pes. Freneli IMLeriiios, 

At $1.00 to $1.50, worth $1.13 to $l.r5. 

10 pes. Inlaid 3Ete]>ps. 

At ~5c, worth 90c. 

100 pes. MOIiAI]:^ 

DRESS GOODS 

At 30 to COc. worth 40 to ;5c. 

100 pes. pi^iisnrs. 

At 20c, worth 25c. 

50 PIECE SI 

COTTON FLANNELS, 

At 35 to 55c, with 40 to COc. 

f50 pes. OETS^IIMS, 

At 30 to 60c, worth 40 to 65c. 

500 I^OXnSTDS. 

^YOOLLEN YARN, 

STORIi, At $1.25, worth $1.50. 



Im- 



Mlarvin's Croclcery 

LAELPi SHADES. CHIM- 
NEYS, OIL, 
AND ALL TIIE ARTICLES 



BE- 



noS-3ia 



LONGING TO THE TRADE, 

Can be found at the Store adjoining Marvin's 
(.'rockery Importing House. 
An exclusive Lamp aud Oil .'^^tore to meet the 
demsn 1« of the Wholei^ahi pnd I'.etail trade, has 
long b"e:i dcsir.^ble in Ht. Paul. Couiitiy Mer 
f'haiits cm now bo supplied at Eastern prices 
(transportation add.'d.) Odl at tlie Carbon Oil 
and Lamp Store ailjoiniug Marvin's Crockery 

House. , „ . .i , 

£ar Country Merchants are especially invit°a. 

Call and see. . 8ept29 



I5OOO I^OlTlOLClS 

AYOOLLEIsr YAim, 



TiiK Amkkican ExFitKSs Company, 

would respectfully announce to the Merchants of 
thit city and vicinity that tliey ara now prepared 
to bring forward from La Crosse, Wis., a«d de- 
liver to points of destination all "Merchants' 
Dispatch" and ordinary Railroad fivight. 

Merchants and others who may wish to avail 
themselves of this means of transportation, will 
please mark {heir goods to our cate at La Crosse, 
at the same time giving us notice so that we muy 
see that such goods are delivered to us at La 
Crosse, without any unnecessary d;'lay. 

For tariff rates call at their oflSce, 210 Thlrd-8t., 
opposite Stage OlVice. 

decO 1" T"- WAnXEll, Agent. 



H''' 



FOR THE CAVALRY! 

Capt. A-. K. IS-ixssell, 

Having received authority from llie Governor 
proiioses to raise a Coifipaiiy fur the 

2d Minnesota Cavalry. 

All \\ ho wish to avoid the Di'.AKt which is I'osi- 
T.vr.LV to take place on the 5th of Jan., Ihirl- 
have a chance to enii.sfin a regiment that v.Mll 
posiTiVKU'i never leav;- tlie frtate in any case as 
long as force's are need-d on our frontier, 'i'lie 
BOUNTY is the same as in any other regiment, 
old or now. Subsistence and transportation fur- 
nished to ever reor i . IV-rsons dasiring tM-n- 
li-t in « apt Itussell's Company, can st-e him be- 
tween the hours of 9 A.m. and 4 r. m. at the 
Union Hotel, corner of 4th and Wabaslsaw-sts., 
St. I'aul. CAPT. A. It. IIU^SKLL. 

dccO-lm Keciuiti ng OfSci. r. 



S— T— 1860— X. 
DRAKE'S PLANTATION BITTERS. 

They purify, strengthen and invigorate. 

They create a healthy appetite. 
Theyare an antidote to change of water and diet. 
They overcome effects of dissipation and late hours 
They strengthen the system ind enliven the mind. 
They prevent miasmatic and intermittent fevers. 
They purify the breath and acidity of the stomach. 
They cure Dyspepsia and Constipation. 
They cure Diarrhoea, Choleraand Cholera Morbus. 
1 hey cure LiverComplalnt and Nervous Headache 

They are the best Bitters in the woiid. They 
make the weak man strong, and are exhausted 
nature's great restorer. They are made of pure 
St. Croix Kum, the celebrated Cali^aya Bark 
roots and herb.", and are taken with the pleasure 
of a beverage, without regard to age or time oi 
day. Particularly recommended to delicate per 
sons requiring a geu'.le stimulant. Sold by all 
Grocers, Druggists, Hotels and Saloons. P. U. 
Drake & Co , 20J Broadway, N. V. auS-eowly 



J. 



H. MURPHY, M. D., 



At $1.50, worth $1.75. 
A FULL LINE OF ALL OTHER 

DOMESTIC GOODS, 

At Proportionate I*riqes. 
IN HOSIERY, 

GLOVES, 

W^HITE GOODS, 

AND 

EMBROIDERIES OR NOTIONS, 
We will not be Undersold. 

Remember the rule, 

ALL GOODS UUAUA:>rrEEi> AS KEPRE 

SENTED, OR NO SALll, 

Atid the place, 

No. 132 TMrd-St., St. Paul. 
O^^TPHC^^HT ^c CO. 

decll Im 



COME ONE, COME ALL, 

a:,d buy youe 

CHRISTMAS 

PRESENTS 

AT 

THE CHEAP CASH STOKE, 

For t^at Is the place you can got vour 

MONEY'S AVOrtTH. 

Wc have a splendid assortment of 

BlEIillMrOE^ 

and 

EMPRESS CLOTHS, 

"Which we Willi ell 

As JLtOw as ilio Lo-vFCst- 

IF YOU WANT 

Sontags, Nubias or Hoods, 

Go to llic Cheap Cash Store. 

IF YOU WANT 

rJAJLT^XORAT- SKIRTS, 

ou 
HOOT:' SKIRTS, 

GO TO THE CnEAI*^ASn STORE. 
We have a fine assortment of 

Which we are selliag; low to 

CLOSE OUT TIIE STOCK. 

IF YOU WANT 

HOSIERY OR GLOVES, 

Tor the cold weather, go to 

FOE TUE GENTLEMEN WE HAVfi 

Cloths, Beavers, Cassimeres, SatlnettB, Neck 
Ties aud Cclhrs, which we will sell 

CHEAP FOR OASH. 
The Clieoip CasK Store 

l8 the place to buy any kind of Doaaestic Goods, 



I 



♦ 

I 



wrr^nt 



PHYEICIAN AND SURGEON. 

Offine on Jackson street, in the office formerly 
occupied by Drt. Jlorton & Wharton, (opposite 
tho TempeVanee House.) 

Especial attention paid to Surgery. dec23 Cm 



N 



EW BOOK OF CHURCH MUSIC. 



TUH: IIAUP OF JUDAII; A Collection of 
Sacred aicd Kectdar Music lor Choirs, Schools, 
Musical VJonveutious, ^ocietios nu.l tlie Home 
Circle; I5v L. O. Km-rsnn, Author of the "Gold- 
en Wreath " " fubbath Harmony," &c. 

A book embracing everj- variety of choice mu- 
sic adopted to the capacitus of all grades of sing- 
er-i. Though published but a few months since 
it has already beeii used by twelve Musical Con- 
ventions, aud nearly all the leading conventions 
in the United States are effecti'ig arran?;em<'n_t!' 
to do so th*! coming season. Choirs and 'Jench- 
era are rapidly adopting it because they can lind 
no book equal to it in every leiiuirement desira- 
ble in sach a work. Specimen p iges {tO tunes) 
will be sriit free 10 any one on application. 

I'rice of the " Harp ot'.Iudah" $1 per copy, 
19 per dozen. OLIVER DITSON & CO., 

dtc23-ljd&w Publishers, Boston. 



s. i:.. 



baiil.:e"^ ^c CO 



nno 



WYNKOOP'S ICELAND PECTOKAL. 

Diseases ol the Throat, Cliest and Pulmonary 
organs are ever prevalent, insidious and danger- 
ous. The properties of a medicine to alleviate, 
cure and uproot these complaints, must be Ex- 
pectorant, Anodyne and Invigorating, loosening 
the mucus ol the throat, and imparting tone to 
the entire system. No discovery m medical sci- 
ence ever mastered this class of diseases like Dr. 
Wynkoop's Iceland Pectoral. It is used with the 
most asmnishiugresults in all cases of Bronchitis, 
Influenza, Whooping Cough, Diptheria or Putrid 
Sore Throat, Asthma, Croup, Coughs, Colds, 
Nervous Irritability, &c. 

The Rev. J. J.Potter certifies, "that I have 
nsed Dr. Wynkoop's Pectoral for several years, 
myself and in my family, for severe Pulmonary 
Complaints, and have recommended it to many 
others, and have never seen its equal." 

Rev. J. J. POTTER, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Ilandreds and thousandi of important testi- 
monials could be produced, showing its remarka- 
ble cures and that it never fuil.i. 

It is composed of pure Iceland Moss, Balm ol 
Gilead. Peruvian Balsam, Elecampane, Comfrey, 
Burdock, and other invaluable expectorant and 
tonic ingredients. It is harmless, prompt and 
lasting. Invalids and suflTerers cannot allord to 
neglect a tri;d. Every family sliould have it. It 
is remarkable for Croup. Full descriptions, re- 
commendations and diriHJtions accompany each 
bottle. 

Sold by all principal Druggists. 

Prepared bv Dr. R. D. W ynkoop, and sold by 
D. S. Barne8'& Co., New York — ' 



aul5-eowdtw&w 



MACK. 



♦ » » » ♦ 



Confe«1«^rat«4 Carrenc.r Cirriilated at 
til** l*oint of the Bujouct. 

GeNER.XL OuDKR. — HEAUQtARTF.RS, FoR- 

rest's Cavaluy Coups, Athens, Tenn., Sep- 
tember 23, 18G3. — Confederate money is the 
currency of the country. All persons refusing 
to Like it in current transactions fur produce 
or manufactures necessary tor the arnay or 
people V, ill subject themselves to being arrest- 
ed and being sent to army headquarters for 
attempting the depreciation of our money, and 
to having their goods, produce, &c., confisca- 
ted. All bonds, oaths and obligations imposed 
upon citizens by the federal government arc 
declared null and void. Bv order. 

Brig. General FOllREST, Com'dg. 
CiiAS. AvDr.RsoN, A. A. G. 

tTeceived on consignment, 

Xfc. 1,000 Pounds Dribc Peachks, and 7,000 

Porsns Dried Apj'LKS, to be sold low for cash. 

Je8 J. C. & U. C. BURBANK k CO. 



HAGAITS MAGNOLIA BALM 
This is the most delightful and extraordinary 
article ever discovered. It changes the sun burnt 
face and hand? to a pearly satin texture of ravi 
ishing beauty, imparting the marble purity ol 
yoMth. And the distingv.e appearance so inviting 
In the city belle of fashion. It removes tan, 
freckles, pimples and roughness from the skin, 
leaving the complexion fresh, transparent and 
smooth. It contains no material iiyurious to the 
skin. Patronized by Actresses aud Opera Sing 
era. It is what every lady should have. Sold 
overywhere.^^^_^_ ^ ^ „.„„^„ ^ 



rilOMOTE GOOD HEALTH 

USE THi: 

I>AI\I>ELION 

AND 

In PintBottles, price 50c; in Quart Bottles, 75, 

These Bitters are composed of the best Itoots 

Barks aud Herbs known', and peculiarly adapted 

to the immediate cure of all diseases produced by 

an inactive liver. 

Dandelion and Wild Cherry Bitters 

CURB SICK HEADACHE. 
Dandelion and Wild Cherrv Bitters 
CURE JAUNDICE. 
Dandelion and Wild Cherry Hitters 

CURE INDIGESTION. 
Dandelion and Wild Cherrv Hitters 

CURE CUSTIVENKSS. 
Dandelion and Wild Cherry Bitters 

CURE HEART BURN. 
Dandelion and Wild Cherry Bitters 

CURE WEAKNESS. 
Dandelion and Wild Cherry Bitters ^ 
CURE LOSTAPPETim 
Dandelion and Wild Cherry Bitters 
CURE AGUE, 
In its worst forms. They perform these cure* 
simply, by one otSce, regulating the liver. 
For sale bv dealers iu Medioines, everywherf 
b. HUNTINGTON, Proprietor, 
Farmersburg, Clayton County, Iowa 
For sale by E. II. Biggs, H. W. Robinson, I'au. 
Reiger, St. Paul : S N. Wickershara, Charles Ben 
son, L. Welnand & Co^ and S. Ed • ards. Whole- 
sale Agent, Winona; Charles Hawley, Chatfield; 
D. B. Stout, Preston; S. Y. Hyde, Fillmore- 
Charles Morrill, Marion: Ccpt. Mills andJ. D. 
Bunce, Pleasant Grove; S. B. Robinson, Genera! 
Wholesale Agent, address Chnttield, Min. 

Also— Huntington's Writing Fluid; Howe L 
Stevens' Familv Dve Colors ; \ an Dusen's Worm 
Confections; Van l)usen'3 Mai;!cal Blueirg; Al- 
den's Condition Powders; Talman & Collins 
Concentrated Extract ot Lemon; Talman & Col 
lins' Leather Preservative : Dutcher's Dead Shot 
for Bed Bugs ; Sleeper's Lightning Fly Killer. 
DAY & J-E»lt», St. Paul, 
iny27-ly Wholesale end Retail Agents. 



Are not the Aeonts for Cooper's Ca'dnet Photo- 
graphs, but they have on hand the 
largest stock of 

Cabinet and Oliair 

TO BE FOUND IN ST. PAUL. 

Ot>al Frames, Gilt and Posewood Mmhlings, ifc. 
Also, a i'ew riiotoaraphs which they will sell 
(not at cost) but at (Cahill & Co.'s] the Agents' 
prices. decS-lm 

■pOR TIIE HOLIDAYS! 
AT COMBS' BOOK 13T0RE, 

CAN KK KOrXD A LARGE STOCK 0» 

Cliildrosisi' Books., 

Oif t I5ooU.vJ, 
I?liotogrrfti>l>. A.ll>iii«is?, 

I$il>lcs, I*i-ayer Boolcs, 

&.C., suitable for presents. Call in ind examine. 

DIArtlES for ISG^, all Styles, 
decl-tf AT COMBS' BOC K STORE. 



either Cotton or AVooUen. 
Remember tbe place, 

And tliat we will sell goods as cheap as the 
cluapest, 

H. KNOX TAYLOR, 

No. 218 Third Street, St. Paul, 

MCinnesota. 

dec20-tl 



ST. PAUL LAMP STORE, 

(Branch of the great Alac.din,) 
Opposite Pioneer-' Office. 



AT COST ! AT COST ! 

FOR TIIE NEXT FOUR WEEKS WE WILL 

SELL AT COST 

Our stock of 

CLOTHING, 

Shirts, Drawers, Hats 

AND 

Fnrnishiing" Groods, 

As at the end of that time we Intend leaving for 
the East to purchase our 

spiMivG^ stock:. 

Those who want BARGAINS IN CLOTHING, 
will find this a rare chance. 

BLOOI^IIKGDALE & RHINE, 

S13 THIRD-ST., ADJOINING THE AMER 
ICAN EXPRESS OFFICE. 

dccl5-lmd&w 



OILS, 

LAMPS, 

SHADES, 

GLOBES, 

LANTERNS 


CO .. 

w pi 

^ tf !^ r 

^ ^ < » 


The Larsest Stock, . . ,t • . 

The Gn«test Variety, 

and ,thu 


Clieapest 


Groods 


EVER EXHIBITED 


IN TI'IS CITY. 


JIS- Wholesale Buyers 
cash prices. 


suppliel at Eastern 
dec3-tf 



DEMAS S. BARNES & 
auSdtw&w ly 



General Agents, 
202 Broadway, I^. T. 



[Commnnicated.J 

Pulmonary Consumption a Curable 
DiHEASKlII— A Card.— To Consumptives.— 
The undersigned having been restored to health 
in a few weeks, by Yi very simple remedy, after 
having suffered several years with a severe lung 
affection, and thatd-ead disease Consumption— is 
anxious to make known to his feilow-suflerers 
the means of cure. 

To all who desire it, he will send a copy of the 
prescription used (free of charge), with the di- 
rections for preparing and using the same, which 
they will find a sure cure for Consumption, 
Asthma, Bronchitis, Coughs, Colds, &c. 
The only object of the advertiser in sending the 
Prescription is to benefit the afflicted, and spread 
information which he conceives to be invaluable; 
and ho hopes every sufferer will try his remedy, as 
it will cost them nothing, and may prove a bless- 
ing. Parties wishing the prescription will please 
address REV. EDWARD A. WILSON, 

Williamsburgh, Kings County, 

oc8-3rad*w NewTork. 



SPRING TRADE.TO THE MER- 
CUANTS OF TUE NORTH-WEST. 
We respectfully Invite you to examine our une- 
qualled Miscellaneous stock of 
STAPLE AND FANCY DRY GOODS, YAN- 
KEE NOTIONS, WOOLEN GOODS, 
HOSIERY, CKOCKERY, CHINA, 
GLASS, CUTLEJtY, PLATED 
GOODS, ETC., ETC. 
No house in the country offers better Induce- 
ments in goods and prices. We have every facil- 
ity and are prepared to sell the Best Cash Trade 
at a profit below Eastern figures. 

iK^Special attention paid to all orders accom- 
nied with money or references. 

JBOWEIV BnOTHERS, 
l.inporterM wnd Jobhera, 
N08. 72, 74 and 7C I.ake St., Chicago. 
m3l-ir< 

TTORSE BLANKETS, 

SKATES 

AND 

SLEIOH BELLS. 

Large assortment Just received and for sale low 
at the Saddlery Warehouse of 



JUST RECEIVED 
.AlIstd for, sale, 

100 Barrels 
CA.i^B01V OIL. 

CIIAS. A. UPHAM & CO., 

TVo. 4, Prince's Block, JTaciitson Street, 

St. Paul, :ninn 

nolO-ly ' 



TB[IIM> STPJ^EET, 






A Ck BUSHELS CHOICE RIPE 
ttw owMOjrs, 

Just received by A. 11. WIMBISH. 

nov5 



Jaskson Street. 



T 



A X 



D E E ;o S 



THE PRESS PRINTING COMPANY 
Have now on har.d tho latest and best form 
tax deeds. It is suitable for salei under the sev 
eralaots of the Legislature, and in conformity 
with all their requisitions, and is preparedly tue 
State authorities . a ^ 

Price 50 c^^nts per dosen. or fS uer nandred. 



w 



ANTED, 



ocse 



C. PROA.L. 
Corner of Third and Bober^sts. 



O. CUItTIS, 

Geieral Insurance Agent, 

OFFICE IN 

TliompsonL's Block. 

deol8-tf 



Spikers and Laborers on the construction work 
of t'le St. P:iul and Pacific RailroaL Liberal 
wages will hr paid. Payments made weekly. 
Apply to F.R. Delano, Assistant Superintendent, 
at Freight Depot, fct. Paul, or .lohn Murphy, 
Foreman, M-^numin. 

oc30 tf W. B. LITCHFIELD fc CO. 



BARRELS 



400 

GOOD WINTER APPLES, 

FOR SALE BY 
G^eo. E. Schitiabel, 

» d«cl2-tf Cor. Jackson and 4tli-iti. 



HOOBS, SONTKtS k SUBIAS, 
B^^LlWCOir^L 

AND 

HOOP» SKIRTS, 

JUST RECEIVED BY 



L. C. 



BURT, 
4 6 



THIED STREET. 

oc20-1y 



c 



A R P E T S 



STRONG'S CARPET HALL, 

225 Third-St., Rogers* Block, 

where will be found a large a-Hortment of 

Carpets,Oil Cloths, Mattings, 

CURTAIN AND SHADE MATERIALS, 

MATTRESSES, FKATHKBS, W ALl. PAPER, ftO. 

New Goods odftstantly arriving and sold m 
low as the lowest. 

DOXE rO ORDER. 



UPHOLSTERLVG 
marl2-ly 



T^EW PHOTOGRAPH GALLERY, 

Third St., between Cedar and Wabashav, 
WC. C TXJTTLT3. 

Has lust opened a New Gallery on ihe ground 
floor, where he will be pleased to sec Ins old 
friends and customers His stock and apparatus 
are new, aud lyive all the latest improvements. 
«- Especial ArrrNTios tiivi;x to takiko 

CHILDKKN"S PIOTCRES 

Pictures from Locket Siie to Life bite, In tiM 

iW- Photograph Albumx furvished as cheap a* 
11/ other ifouae, and a Cartt dt t'irite taken 



an 
grmtiti 



noa*-tt 



A 




1\ DEFECTIVE PAGE 



.w» fc . ■ «i ■ 



* t ». » >. ■ vj.. .„- ' .. 



TTT* 



^ 



\ 



-rrr^r- 



- — ,r. 



F— 



i»I J «l f**i^i>l^> 



1 



^l^w* 






mm.' m i it I 





SAINT 



PAUL DAILY 



PRKSS. 



NUMB/EH 4. 



VOI^TJME IV. 



SIISrA.T I^j^TJL, A^TEDNESIDj^Y, J^ISTUA-HY 6, 1864=. 



Khc f ^mt iaui iyc.$$. 



SAIS-l* PAUL. WEDNESDAY. JAN. 6. 



Tin: rebels arc to bj brought to 
torms for rtfiising to recognize (Icn. 
Butler as an olRcer, in ex •hange ne- 
{.o iations. All the rebel prisoners are 
to be placed untler his charge, an>l no 
one elt^e will be authorized to make ex- 
chanffcs. 

Ukijkl movements in the Shenandoah 
Valley are exciting some approhen- 
yions, though the reports are said to be 
cx^jrrreratcd. The enemy have six or 
seven tliouisand men near Woodstock, but 
it is thought Generals Sullivan and Aver- 
ill will be able to take care of them. 

A CaITCuku letter written at Charles- 
ton, intimates pretty broadly that tue 
citv is mined, so that in case it should 
fall into our possession it could be de- 
stroyed with its conquerors. The letter 
shows how terrible a penalty the doomed 
city is paying. 

Tin: Ohio Legislat ire organized Mon- 
day, and Governor Tol sent in his mes- 
sage. We learn by it that Ohio has fur- 
nished 200,671 soldiers sine3 the war 
commenced. 

Gex. r>ruxsipn has been induced 1o 
withdraw his resignation, and it is thougl t 
he will be rc-apnointed to the command 
of t]:e Department of the Ohio, 

Gov. Sr-.YMorn take^ occasion in his 
message to discuss national afiai.-s and 
proclaim that only wise statesmanship is 
necessary to bring about a (Copperhead) 

peace. 

LEGisr.\TiVE.— The Legi'lature did 
not organize yesterday. Both Houses 
met at noon, the Senate being called to 
order by I^Ir. Daniels, of Olmsted. Mt. 
Norton, of Winona, was appointed chair- 
man. The roll was called, and sixteen 
members answertd to their names, five 
being absent. The oath ot office was 
then admmistere 1 by Attorney General 
Cole, and the Senate adjourned. 

The House was called to order by-^Ir. 
Ri.hardson of Steams, and Mr. Wiswcll, 
of Blue Earth was appointed Clerk. 
Tuirty-one members answered to roll-call 
and were sworn in. Eleven were ab- 
« nt. The House adjourned until 2 r. 

M. to-day. 

_. ' — ♦«♦■■♦ — 



In the meantime, volunteering is pro- 
Tressinjj favorably, the second cavalry 
has thirteen companies, and Capt. Saun- 
ders has telegraphed for authority to 
raise a battery. 

The Govei'nment has authorized Capt. 
ICcilh to hire suitable quarters for con- 
scripts, which is an evidence that the 

draft is near at hand. 

. ■ » « ♦ « ♦ ■ 

The following commissions in the Sec- 
ond Cavalry were issued yesterday : 

II. S. Bingham, Rice county. Captain; 
Frank I»IcGrade, Scott, First Lieutenant; 
Chnrlcs E.Lincoln, Olmsted, Second Lieuten- 
ant. John C. llenlcy, Chisago, Captain; 
Patrick S. Gardner, Nicollet, F:rst Lieuten- 
ant; Francis C. GriswoUl, Dakota. Second 
LiititJnant. Henry S. IIowc,Dod{,'o, Captain ; 
Jonathan Darrow, Dodge, First Lieutenant ; 
Thomas Larkcy, Dod.sc, Second Lieutenant. 
Peter B. Davy, Faribault, Captain; Samuel 
B. Miller, Faribault, First I-ieuttnant ; Geo. 
Andrews, Faiit)ault, Second Lieutenant. 
» » ♦ » ♦ 

Wi: note the following arrivals of mem- 
bers of the Legislature sin e our last is- 
sue : 

Senate.— Luke Milier, Fillmore county; J. 
V. Daniels, Olmsted. 

Iloisr.— S. C. Grannis, Goodhue county; 

Thomas II. Conitf, Houston ; K. N. Guiteau, 

Dakota; Philo Woodruff, A. S. Hunt and T- 

II. Armstrong. 

»»♦«.» 

Gov. Swift , who has been detained at 
home for some time by sickness in his 
family, .-.rrived in the city last night. 

We rcf»ret to learn that one of his chil- 
dren is still dangerously ill. 

. » I ♦ » ♦ — 

Mk. W. B. Giuswoi.D has purchased 
the Chaska A^ alley Her aid cf C. A. War- 
ner Esq., and will hereafter edit and pub- 
lish the paper. 

♦■«»»♦ 

FROM PEMBINA. 



Legislature ot Minnesota. 



SIXTH SESSION". 



FI.lCiA OF 



MAJOR HATCH PILING UP SIOUX 
SCALPS. 



Adjutant General Malmros yesterday re- 
C nved two flags from the Filth Minnesota 
Regiment, accomp.inied by the following 
letter, which explains itself: 
Col. Oscir :tLihnos, Ailit. Gen. Minnesota:^ 

IlEADQlAKTEKS OTH Kf.o't MiXN. Inf'Y 

Voi s,, Li (irangc, Tcnn., December !:». KHb3. 
CoLoxrr.— I herewith tran.^mit for deposit 
at the headquarters of the State, the old fla- 
of the Firth Re-imcnt, we having been fur- 
nished by Government with a jncw stand ot 

colors. . . ^ . 

The officers and men of the rcgmient part 
with the tattered remains of their battle- 
stained flig v.iih emotions of the most pro- 
found re'jrct. There is not a soldier i)f the 
commanil but what tVels for this relic ot past 
campaigns a sincere and devoted atfection. It 
has been borne bv thciu on an hundred weary 
mirehk-s, and carried in triumph through ttie 
fierce eonllicts of many hnrdtought ticlds. Its 
numerous rents are the evidence of its pres- 
ence at the two battles of Corinth, at Jackson, 
at the siege and tierce assault of Vicksburg, at 
Mfchanicsburg and Richmond. Its soilcu 
and faded lolds tell of the dozen cainpa:f:ns 
through which it has been borne durmg the 
two v"»ars' service of the regiment. To the 
veterans who are left, this flag is a memento 
of the mouniful, vet glorious memorv of their 
four hundre«I comrades who have fjxllen or 
become disabled by the casualties of war. 

■Aboard of officers convened by order ot 
Gen. Grant, "to investigate the claims ot dit- 
fercnt n^-giments to honorable mention for 
meritorious senices," authorized the Fif:h 
Minnesota Infantry to place [the following in 
script.ons on its tfug : 

"Siege of Corinth." 
"Corinth, Oct. 3 & 4, 18G2." 
"Jackson." „ 

"Vicksl>urg, Siege and Assault. 
"Red Wo'id." 
"Fort Ridgely." 
In the two latter, though but a detach- 
ment of the rcuMinent was engaged, yet, in 
view of the character of the .letions and the 
loss sustr.ined, the inscriptions were author- 
ized. The battlo before Corinth, M.\v Ih 
1862 being considered a part of the "Siege of 
Corinth," and also the actions at Richmond 
and Mechauiesburg a part of the "Siege of 
Vicksljurg," no separate inscriptions for either 
of those actions were allowed to any of the 
triMjps engaged. .. » 

Thou-^h the soldiers of the regiment part 
with their old banner with a pang of regret, 
vet they teel some degree of pride and satis- 
faction in presenting to the State this record 
of their services. 
Very respectfully, ^o^"' ob t^s^e^^^^^^ 

Col. Sth Minn. Inf'y Vols, 
the regimental 



Coiresipondcnceof the St. Paul Press. 

I'EMniNA, Dec. 18, 1863. 
I take pleasure in telling you that Major 
Hatch is not only busily engaged building up 
winter quarters at Pembina, but is also busily 
engaged piling up Sioux scalps, and I would 
not be the least surprised in the world, if he 
had a pretty big pile of them 1»eforc Spring. 

The Major detailed on the 15tli inst., at 11 
o'clock at night a detachment of 15 men Act- 
in,' AdjutJint Orin, in command, to go to St. 
Joseph after Sioux scalps. In this they have 
been successful. They returned yesterdivy, 
the 17th in.^t., at 3 o'clock p. m., making a 
march of 8'J miles in 39 hours, with five scalps. 
Three men, a bov and a woman of the red 
levils' race have been sent to the infernal re- 
gions. The boys went at them without any 
mcrcv, none of them raised the crj- of " Lo ! 
the poor Indians," for H.itch's Battalion b?ing 
principally composed of men raised on the 
frontier, and who had relatives and friends 
killed by these brutes they will show them, I 
assure you, no quarter. None of the boys were 
hurt in any way whatever. It was a small 
but complete victory. They attacked them 
about sundown on the afternoon of the I6th 
inst. The first Indian that got out of tlie te- 
pee was shot through the body, he then dis- 
charged \\U gun at the soldiers, fortunately 
without tlTect and then was finished by an- 
other soldier's piece of lead. One of the 
other Indians, aged about 18 years, stout and 
strong, would not die wTthout being first 
scalped. The boys went and scalped him. 
That i.'* what finished him. The work was 
well done and the boys deserve credit for it. 
Means of conveyance : four sledges, each 
drawn by a horse. Thermometer, 36 => below 

zcr.^. 

-»»♦«♦ 



SENATE. 
Tuesday, January 5, 18G4. 

The Senate was called toorder at 12 o'cbck, 
M by Hon. J. V. Daniels, senior member. 

The CHAIR appointed Mr. Norton, of Wi- 
nona, as Secretary pro tern, and directed him 
to call the roll of districts. 

As each district was called, the Senator rep- 
resenting the same appeared and gave m his 
credentials. ^Nhen the list was completed, 
\ttornev General C(^lc appeared and admin- 
istered the oath of oilice, as follows : 
Diatrict. Same of number. 

L— r/i. /i'ce, of Ramsty— absent.'] 

Il.—John Mcfvusick, of Washington. 

III.— J. P. Wilson. 

IV.— J. S. Pillsbury. 

V,— Dorillus Morrison, of Hennepm. 

VL— Charles A. Warner. 

VII.— D F. Lan-rlcv, of Dakota. 

VIIL— John M. Berry, of Rice. 

IX_J. A. Thacher, of Goouhue. 

X — R. Ottman, of Wabashaw. 

XL— D.S. Norton, of Winona. 

XII.— J. V. Daniels, of Olmsted. 

XIIL— Daniel Cameron, of Houston. 

XIV.— [/.m/cc Miller of Fillmore— absent.] 

XV.— [ii. D. Spraffue — absent.] 

XVI. — F. S. Stevens. 

XVII J. J. Porter. 

XVIIL— Isaac Lincoln. , ^, 

XIX.— r^/. -•!• f^'<^iff> "/" Nicollet— <U/sent.] 

\\.—[D. B. Shillock— absent.] 

XXL— John Nieols, of Ramsey. 

Mr. THACHER moved to adjourn, which 
was carried. 

The Senate thereupon adjourned. 

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. 
TiESDAY, January 5, 1864. 

At 12 o'clock the House was called to order 
by Hon. R. M. RICHARDSON, of Stearns, 
and Hon. J. A. WISWELL, of Blue Earth, 
was designated as temporary clerk. 

The following named meratiers came for- 
ward bv districts, presented their credentials, 
and were sworn in, the Attorney General ad- 
ministering the oath ot oftiee. 

L— J. P. Kidder, R. H. Fitz. 

II— .\nsell Smith, Jesse H. Soule, R. R. 

HI.— R. M. Richardson, W. T. Rigby. 

IV.— Jared Benson, Jonathan Ferrin. 

v.— John A. Colemau. 

VII— W. G. Butler, J. S. Letford, Henrj- 
Hill. 

VII.— K. N. Guiteau. 

VIIL— A. N. Nourse, A. H. Bullis. 

IX.— S.S. Grannis, J. M. Gates. 

X.— J. J. McKay. 

XL— E. S. Youmans. 

XIV.— A. S. Hunt. 

XV.— Roval Crane, S. A. Barlow 

XVI.— Philo Woodruff". , ,. » 

XVIL— J. A. Wiswcll, R. Butters, John L 
Meagher. 

XVIIL— Hugh Johnson. 

XIX.— S.imucl Coffin. 

XX. — J. A. Latimer. 

XXL— A. R. Keifer. 

Upon motion of Hon. JARED BENSON it 
was voted that when the House adjourn, it be 
.till two o'clock to-morrow afternoon. 

Adjourned. 

. » t ♦ « ♦ 



LATEST NEWS, 

By Telegrrapli. 

EXCHANGES 

TO BE MADE 

BY BUTLER 

AND NO 

OTHER. 



ALL REBEL PRISONERS 

PLACED IN HIS 

CHARGE. 



CHARLESTON TO BE 
BLOWN UP BY THE 
REBELS IF CAP- 
TURED. . 



A Seccslx Letter r>esoril>- 
ingf tlie City. 



Operations in the Slien- 
andoali Valley. 



Most of the families have gone to Dor- 
chester, Summerville, Icombo and Wat- 
erboro, and every house in those places 
is crowded ; nearly every room is filled 
with beds and every bed has to accommo- 
date three or four persons. So much lor 
war, but I would willingly live in a city 
the remainder of my life if it would keep 
the Yankee miscreants out of our city. 
A majority of our people here have left 
most of their furniture iu their houses ex- 
pecting in a few weeks to return to them, 
but of course they know that if the Yan- 
kees take the city their houses and furni- 
ture will all be destoryed. 

Gen. Beauregard Las caused informa- 
tion to re-lch all that if he iin<ls it impos- 
sible to hold the city he will leave it a 
niasB of ruins. No one will complain ol 
this, as they know the barbarians have 
sworn to destroy every vestige of the se- 
cession nest if they can take it. 

If they should ever enter our house 
may God have mercy on them, for I can- 
not. If they ever' enter the city you 
will hear of the greatest earthquake ever 
caused by human agency. 

It willbe a consolation, Louise, for 
you to know that should the vandals ever 
get here they will never be able to reach 
Slacon. Gen. Beauregard is confident 
they could never get ten miles beyond 
the city in any direction, but he is equal- 
ly confident they can never come. 

It is painful to go through our streets, 
once alive with beauty and fashion, and 
see them entirely deserted, with the ex- 
ception of now and then one of our col- 
ored people, or a squallid Irishwoman. 
But I am to see you so soon that I will 
not write a long letter. Fred, sends his 
love, but says that Kl will not write until 
dipping his pen in a Yankee carcass, he 
can write with red ink. 



$55,000, but was chartered to Govern- 
ment from March, 18G2, to October, 
18G3, at $35,000 per annum. 



GOV. TOD'S TklESSA-GrE. 



MESSAOE OF CJOV. REYMOIB. 



TUE ^TAn i:V VX»Ci£5i'£A. 



Fno:ni ^TAsiikifeTox. 



The Supply Expedition. 

Its Safe Arrival at Mankato. 



One of the flags is 
standar.l which was presented to the oth 
two years since by the ladies of the 
State! It has seen hard usage, one shell 
having exploded in its very lolds, tearing 
it almost to pieces. The other flag is 
the "starry emblem of Freedom." On 
its stripes are inscribed the names of the 
battles mentioned above. They are in- 
teresting relics, and in the after years of 
our State will be pointed to with prit'e 
bv those who wish to extol the bravery 
of her sons. 



OThe nail road a< Anoka. 

Correspondence of the St. Paul I'ress. 

Anoka, January 1, 1854. 
Notwithstanding it is mid-winter, we 
bemn to feel the benefit of the Railroad 
which is just completed to this place. 
Buildings are going up in all directions ; 
our hotels (we have three large houses) 
are all well patronized, and our mer- 
chants are doing a lively business. From 
the pineries we learn that more teams are 
in this winter, both on Rum and the Mis- 
sissippi rivers, than have ever been known 
before. Last year's logs are yet up the 
Mississippi, and if we have a good rise in 
the river next season, you can look lor 
lively times in the lumber market. 

AVe have now a good foot of snow on 
the ground, enabling farmers to bring in 
their produce readily. We feel the 
cfTccts ot last summer's drouth in the 
scant supply of grain — particularly oats 
and corn, compelling teams to be fed on 
a good share of crushed wheat. Farmers 
look for a bountiful harvest next year, 
however, and more ground was plowed 
the past fall for spring grains than has 
been done before for years. 

Capitalists looking for chances to in- 
vest in manufacturing operations, will 
find creat facilities offered in the water 
power at Anoka. 

I hope to have the pleasure of meeting 
vou and all "the rest of mankind" at the 
Railroad Celebration here, which is to 
come off the present month. 



From the Mankato Kecord, 2d. 

The three companies of the Sixth regi- 
ment, which left here in November last, 
as an escort to the Indian supply train, 
were not delaved at Yanckton, as stated 
by the St. P^ul papers, but a small de- 
tachment has already arrived here and 
the main body will be here on Monday. 
They left the Winnebago Agency, in 
Dakota, on the 5th instant, and returned 
via Sioux City and Spirit Lake, Iowa, 
and Fairmount m this State, arriving at 
Winnebago City, 3G miles south of ^lan- 
kato last evening. They encountered 
much severe weather on their return trip, 
being exposed to all the cold weather of 
the past few weeks with no other shelter 
:han their canvas tents. When near 
Spirit Lake, they were met by a cold, 
drizzling rain, which froze as fast as it 
fell, covering their clothing with ice. 

At a station forty or fifty miles west of 
Spirit Lake, Captains Whitney and Duly 
and Lieut. King Started in advance of the 
train, but lost their way, and for two 
days lived upon the corn they had taken 
along for their horses, arriving at Ester- 
ville the same evening that the escort 
reached there. They remained with the 
train until it reached Fairmount. where 
they again left it, arriving here late last 

nigh^ . , 

This side of Spirit Lake a part of the 
escort hired teams to bring them to this 
place, where they arrived yesterday. 

The main body of the escort was at 
Fairmount during the severe storm on 
Thursday, rrrived at Winnebago City 
last night and are expected here on Mon- 

dav. 

Yesterday morning, the Quartermaster 
and Commissary Departments at this 
place, sent out several loads of clothing 
and provisions to supply the wants of the 
men. 

[General Sibley received information 
yesterday, that the entire escort had 
reached Mankato in safety.— Ed. Press. 
♦■•«■♦ • 



!*lartial — Bo 



» « o « ■♦■ 



As we anticipated the draft did not 
commence yesterday. Capt. Saunders 
telegraphed Col. Fry informing him that 
the Adjutant General had not been able 
to ascertain the credit due a large num- 
ber of towns, and asking a postponement 
of the draft for a few days in order to ob- 

in a correct apportionment. 

^e received, last evening, in reply the 



« ♦ » • 



tai 



<t>r*»wnig: 



1 



Wapiiixgtox, 10 :30 A. m.— Jan. 5. 
Capt. T. -V. Saunders : 
Do not commence the draft until you get 

fpecitic orders from here. 
'^ JAMES B. FRY, 

Provoot-Marshal General. 
No apprehension need be felt but that 
time will be given to arrange the quotas 
fairly, and it is better that the draft 
ehou'ld be postponed for a few days rather 
than have injuitice done to any locality. 



Tbe Cblppewa* Trool»le»oin«. 

Correspondence of the St. Paul I'reBs. 

We have in the vicinity of Itasca, and 
between there and Princeton, quite a 
number of Chippewa Indians. These 
things have been tolerated full long 
enough, as they make annual visits of 
about four months to these parts in sea- 
son of deer and other game which we 
think belong to white folks. If the prop- 
er authorities will notify these whelps to 
keep on their own lands it will save 
trouble, else some of them may acciden- 
tally be taken for deer by our hunters. 

They take the liberty to go into houses 
and help themselves in the back settle- 
ments to what they want. Governor 
Swift will confer a favor upon the settlers 
in the Northern line of Sherburne County, 
by sending the renegades where they be- 
long, and the sooner the Ij^etter. 

O. H. K. 



Injnstice of Conr«» 

niance In Meal I<lf«. 

The Washington Republican, com- 
menting on an article in a New York pa- 
per, savs : 

"The author of the article ought to 
know bv this time that courts martial do 
not always arrive at correct conclusions. 
For instance, not many days since infor- 
mation reached the President, that a 
young man belonging to the Army of the 
Potomac had been sentenced by court 
martial to be shot lor desertion. The 
boy was doomed to die in a few hours 
when the despatch was received. No 
time was to be lost. A telegram was 
sent to General Meade suspending the 
execution. An examination of the case 
was ordered by the President, when it 
was ascertained that the voung man ought 
to have been promoted long ago for gal- 
lant and meritorious service, instead of 
being shot ! It appearpd that upon the 
march of the Army of the Potomac to- 
wards Maryland, on the occasion of Lee's 
first raid northward, the young man al- 
luded to became exhausted and fell out of 
the ranks, and as soon as he recovered, 
he proceeded on after his regiment, but 
not finding it and there being no time to 
lose, he fell into the ranks of another 
regiment, and fought gallantly at South 
Mountain and Antietam, and was woun- 
ded in the last named battle. lie was 
sent to a hospital, which fact, by the ab- 
sence of a proper system in such cases, 
did not reach tbe officers of his i-egimei.t. 
At last he was arrested as a deserter, 
tried, condemned, and was about to be 
shot, when, by the interference of the 
Executive, his life was saved, and a 
young man, hastily condemned to an ig- 
nominous death, was suddenly restored to 

honor. 

» I • » ♦ 

— The Russian fleet have gone to 
Fortreis Monroe, and will winter.in the Koad». 



Burnslde's Heslsmatlon Wltlwlrawn 
—Butler's Interrlew ^Itb tlio I»r««»- 
dcut — Mo»«cran» — Treatury Xote* 
»«»n« Oa«-Bttiler to bave ExcImbIvo 
Charg-e of ExebaBsro«-«**taliatloM 
for Oatlawlog-— Stoneiaan'* Succes- 
sor 

New YoiiK, Jan. 5. 
The Tribune's Wa.shington special says 
Major General Burnside, who is now 
here, has, at the earnest desire of the 
President, withdrawn his resignation. It 
is not improbable that he will be "rc-as- 
signed the command of the Department 
of the Ohio. 

Major General Stoneman has been re- 
lieved from command of the Cavalry Bu- 
reau and assigned to duty as Chief of 
Cavalry at the West, whither he proceed- 
ed at once. 

Major General Butler arrived in town 
vesterdav from Point Lookout, where he 
was mct'bv the dispatch from the Presi- 
dent. He' had a long conversation with 
Mr. Lincoln lo-d.iy upon matters per- 
taining to his department, and en tie 
subjec't of exchanges and pardoning of 
those rebel prisoners at Point Lookout, 
who have expressed their willingness to 
take the oath of allegiance. 

It is understood to be definitely ar- 
ranged that Rosecrans is to take the 
place of Schofield in the department of 
the Missouri. 

Washington, Jan. 5. 

Major Generals Butler and Burnside 
are among the latest distinguished arri- 
vals here. 

Brigadier General Garrard has been 
ordered to take charge of the Cavalry 
Bureau, thus relieving Gen. Stoneman. 

A large installment of the five per cent. 
Treasury notes were sent forward to-day 
to the associated banks of New York, 
Philadelphia and Boston and $2,0^.0,000 
of these notes have been distributed pro 
rata to these cities. Nearly $9,000,000 
more are packed ready for transpoi tation 
and a Large additional amount will go to 
the banks to-morrow. 

There has been atotal misapprehension 
in certain quarters as to the recent ar- 
rangement of the negotiation of $35.- 
00(\000 through the subscription agency 
of the national banks. The $50,000,000 
taken by the associated banks were first 
to be delivered to them. No commission 
was paid for placing them in either case. 
Washington. Jan, 5. 
[^Times' Special.']— Our Government 
won't permit General Butler to be out- 
lawed by Benjamin. The exchange of 
prisoners committed to him will be left in 
his hands. Secretary Stanton to-day has 
enlarged Butler's powers by putting all 
the rebel prisoners under his care There 
will be 20,000 at Point Lookout within 
three weeks. The policy is resolutely in- 
sisted on that all exchange shall take 
place through Butler, and none except 
through him. Jefferson Davis was m 
favor of recognizing him as Ould had al- 
ready done. Benjamin wrote a proclama- 
tion outlawing Butler. Lincoln's last 
proclamation outlawed the whole Rich- 
mond government, and through this 
equality in disability there is no doubt 
but exchanges will be again re-estab- 
lished. 

Stoneman has heen assigned as Grant s 

chief of cavalry. 

Washington, Jan. 5. 

Major Girard, a cavalry officer of the 
Southwest, replaces Stoneman here. 

Lieutenant Colonel Elgin has been 
made chief Q. M. of cavalry bureau, vice 
Lawtell. 



Movements of the Siebels.iTear Win- 
Chester — Exagrg-erated Keports— 
IVhMt They are noiug-. 

Washington, Jan. 4. 

[Special to ITerald.'l— A dispatch re- 
ceived here from a reliable source states 
that the rebel General Early with three 
brigades of Ewcll's corps perhaps 5,f'00 
in all, besides the forces of Imboden, Mc- 
Neil and other rebel leaders, and also 
Fitz, Hugh, and Lee's cavalry are in 
Shenandoah Valley and west ol it towards 
Petersburg!!. j 

Brig. Gen. Sullivan and Gen. Averill 
under command of Gen. Kellcy, are in 
good force and wide awake. 

V>''asuington, Jan. 4. 
The rumors of the enemy's contempla- 
ted operations iu the Shenandoah Valluy 
are exaggerated. Fitz Hugh Lee's cav- 
alrv, perhaps 1,000 strong, supported by 
Early's negro brigade on loot, with Imo- 
deii and other local leaders with detach- 
ments, numbering, all told, 0,000 or 
7,000 men, are near Woodstock and 
Mount Jackson, and uiake an occasion.al 
dash as far north as Winchester. 

The latest indications point to the 
Morefield valley, if not west of Mount 
Jackson, as the scene of their operations, 
certainly they have not appeared as yet 
in sight of the Paltimcre and Oliio Rail- 
road, the trains of which arc running rrg- 
ulaily and successfully with large quan- 
tities of freight and many passengers 

The greatest evidence of official confi- 
dence in the safety of the route is the 
sending of important detachments over 
it. 



Or;;-anization of the Wew YorS* lieyis- 
lature— iteE»ubllcan Officers Iblected 
—Governor !«ie.rniour'8 Messuife— He 
l>iacussvM Pt'uce. 

Alb.vxv, fan. 5. 

{Special to Express.']— Thu Legisla- 
ture met and organized this n.orning. 
Republican officers were elected to both 
Houses. 

The Governor's message was read. Af- 
ter referring to State topics, he devotes 
a jiortion ot his message to the cansider- 
ation of military matters, in connection 
with the draft, &c. He goes into the 
consideration cf national affairs a' length, 
and after asking what has been accom- 
plished by the Government in territory 
wrested from the rebellion, says but one 
course will save us from national ruin. 

We must adhere to the solemn pledges 
made by our Government at the outstait 
of the war ; we must seek to rest ore the 
Union and uphold the Constitution. To 
this end, while we put forth every effort 
to beat down armed rebels, we must use 
every influence of wise statesmanship to 
bring back States who now rej';ct their 
constitution.al obligations ; we must hold 
forth evei-y honoraljle inducement to the 
people of the South to assume igain the 
rights and duties of " Americ.Tn" citizen- 
sliip. We havereachedthatpoint ill the pro- 
gress of the war for which we haire strug- 
gled -jwe now stand before the world a great 
and successful military power; wise 
statesmanship can now bring this war to 
a close upon the terms solcinnlr avowed 
at the outset. Good faith to pu .)lic cred- 
itors, to all classes of citizens, and the 
world, demands that this shall be done. 
Tlie triumphs won by our soldu rs should 
be followed up and secured by the peace- 
making policy of the statesnicn in the 
cabinet, and in no other way cai we save 
the Union. 



MARRIED. 

■ Anthonr, on .Sunday January 3d 1894 J j 
At St. ^Uliam \tcKinIo>-,EMEIlV D. XOETH 

the Rev. "N* -«ebota Infantry, and ISABELLA 

of the 8th 5Iiu. nnon Fails, 3Iinn. 

MeKINLEY of C- "^v the samcDt'combPr 25th, 
At tlje saniG place, ^ "OKjIACK of Sank Cec- 

1853, ANDREW J. jIcl. '^LiiLLAX, of taint 

tre, and MAKY ANN M.v. 

Anthony. Ut, l«>J,at 

In Minneapolis, Minn., January \j^ES to 

the house of th« bride's lather, KZUA. 

MAKY HOrPElJ, all of Miuneapulis. 

i:)iEi>. 



At Minneapolis, on the 3d inst., ANN ELIZA, 
wife of Edwin Blackman, ag*d 42 years, of Chi- 
cago, Ill.,to which place her romalus wUl be taken 
for interment. 

Chicago, 111,, and Burlington.Vt., papers please 

notice. 

Monday, 5th January, of scarlet fovor, MAIIT 
WELSU, youngest chiid of lionry M. and Matil- 
da W. Rice, agc-d 18 months. 

Friends of the family arc invited to attend 
without farther notice. 

Funeral at 2 o'clock to-day. 

At Princeton, Mill Lac Co., Minr*., Jan. lat, 
ISOl, in HospiUl, Private ANDREW J. GATES, 
Co. G, 8th Regt. Minn., Vol., aged 27 years. 
Corps returned to his friends in DakoU County, 

■ Hastings lapcis please copy. ^^^^ 



§tvc ^Avtxtmmnt^, 



Ty ANTED. 

A GIRL who thoroughly understnnds COOK- 
ING. None other!* ufcrt applj-. ApplicaUon 
must be made immediately, at ilu8 offlce. jan6 



F 



OR SALE 



A two story Frnme House, on Dayton'.^ Bluff, 
on 4th street, I.etween Mr. Wooley and Mr. Day- 
ton. Tills hous« has six rooms and a ccl ar, and 
a cistern in the cellar. I will sell or t-xetianga 
lor a house near t!i ■■ city, or in the city. For in- 
formation apply 8n the premises. ja«>0-(w. 

NURSE GHIE WANTED.— Anply at 
FranVlin & Hah's Barker Shop, 3d street, 



tour dooi s west of Wabashaw. 



jan0-3t» 



FR0.1I IffiJE.^PHSH A5r» ^TEW OR- 



Forest JPuMueil by CJreysou -Arrival 
uf Cotton and Mug'ar. 

Caiu), Jan. 4." 

The steamer Duke Argyle arrived from 
Xew Orleans, and Hilma'n, from Mem- 
phis. 

Xo serious damage was done the Mem- 
phis and Charleston Railroad by Forest 
when his force crossed it last vreek. 

Gen. Gr(y.-on was pursuing bim at last 
accounts south of Coldvvatcr. 

Lee reinforced Fo.est fron Oakland. 
The guerrilla General Richardson crossed 
our lines on the 28th ult., on his way 
south. 

All is quiet in the interior of the State 
since his departure 



A NICE PL\NO FOR HIRE.— Ap- 
ply to Mrs. Walklns, at her Gallery, on 3d 
strL'Ct, opposite the Bridge. janOlt 

4 UCTION, AUCI ION. 

tAlRCeiLD & CO., sell next Saturday, al 
^e^idence of G. R. March, on Dayton Aronnc. 

iiit class Parlor and 



next door to J. W. !i(.'ll>\ '• 
CliambiT Furniture, Kitchen do 



Carttacea, 

Harness, S-addh?, &c. The i'arlor and Ch^niV* 



mrniture is Rosewood, Bureau and Wa. h»U«<U 
marble topped; and all in use bat a short ttaa. 
jauO 4t 

Yy ANTED. 

To buy a good second-hand Molodoon, of mod- 
ern make, and a' least five octavos. Enquiraa* 
THE sT. PALL I A.MP hrORL. 
jan5-lw 1 hird-st,, 3d door below Cedar. 



A large amount ol cotton, sugar 



and 



FnOilt ClIVClXIifAXF. 



molasses has arrived here duri;ig the past 
week, mostly from Cincinnati 

The Duke' Argyle brought 28G bales ol 
cotton, 4^)8 hog^llcad3 sugar, 3U0 barrels 
molasses, mostly from Nev Orleans. 
The Hilman brought 235 bales cotton. 

Gens. Ord, Veicth, Hunter, Sawyer 
and Sherman have been here during the 
past week, and the latter is st il here. A 
supper was given here iastninht in honor 
of his arrival. 

•luis roiiU m:va!P. 



LOST.— A Certificate of Deposit of 
of Willius Bros, ft Dunbar, No. I,7il, fo* 
t(jrty-t\vo NJ-lOO dolUrn, iated H»>»»n>b?r 'iMIl, 
18i>2, a»i<l payable on or after ^0T«mfc«•r35%h, :aW, 
lo the order ofth- uijdersifn»-d, waa loM •*>»» 
(^row Wing. The Under is roqucMrd to forwa.*4 
tin; i^anv to this office, or Willlatllros.fc l>uiiljar. 
It will be of no vnluf to him as iiarmfat IMM t^"** 

PLTKHCLAEK. 



stopped. 



(jan5-lw) 



B 



UCKWHEAT FLOUR, 



Graham Flour, Now Corn 
Choice Butter, Fresh Lard, 



Mral, Freih 



and Peas, Hoiiry, and ev.-rythlM umally Ur pi •f 
Family (.roceries, otn be found at ilia Hwmrf 
Store of 
janj A. U. WIMBISH, Jac%««B i«. 



Ortrantzaffon of the Ohio lics-lalatcsr© 
— ttov. Xod'a .^*'9«a3r« — :*iivisra«ion 
Huapendrd on the Ohio— Arka aas 
Tr^injf to Coiue Jttuck. 

CiNCixN.A^Ti, J.an. 5. 
The Ohio Legislature organized yes- 
terday. J. R- Hubbell was elected 
speaker of the House and Wm. E. Davis 
clerk ol the Senate. 

Gov. Tod's message is very bri» f. 
The financial affairs of the Mate w. re 
never in better c jndition. The public 
debt has been reduced $570,000; the 
militia system adopted by the Legislature 
last winter, has proved a success : he re- 
commends that banking corporations now 
existing under State authority, be given 
ill reasonable facilities for closing their 
business ; the escape of General John 
Morgan was through negligence 
arisin" from a misunderstanding 
between the Military and Civil 
authorities at penitentiary of theirrcspec- 
tive duties; he calls attention to the 
bravery and gallantry of our soldiers in 
the held and says, although the 
wicked rebellion still continues, we can 
justly claim for Ohio the full performance 
of duties in the effort to crush it and the 
number of troops raised since the begin- 
ning of the war is2U0,671. The river here 
is lull of floating ice ; navigation is sus- 
pended. 

Headquarters department of tl e Ohio 
will be removed to Lexington, Kentucky, 
to-morrow. 

A special to the Commercial from Cairo 
says a delegation of prominent citizens 
of Arkansas arrived there en route to 
Washington to arrange lor Arkansas to 
resume her place in the Union. 



Fraud* on the Government Expoaed. 

Norfolk, Va., Jan. 4. 

The Military Commission, of which 
Gen. Wistar is President, has been ia 
session here during the past week. The 
case of J. M. Hunt, late Superintendent 
of vessels at Ft. Monroe, is on trial, and 
the developments are excitingly interest- 
ing. Among the pointJ* elicited are the 
payment of $3,000 in fees to Senator 
Hale, by Hunt, to obtain his release from 
the Old Capitol Prison. 

To-day Capt. Conors, of the steamer 
John A. Warner, testified that the boat 



Ten B>efrr«'o« Kelow Zero at Iflem- 
pliis— ."ioidicrs Fro/.« n— 'F)»e Misule- 
sil»I>l Ciosci^ 

Cairo, Jan. 4. 

The thermometer was 10 dcj^rees below 
■/.cvo at Memphis on the moming of the 
1st, and At Cairo the same inorning IG 
degiccs below. A nunil.'er of persons 
were found Irozen to death below Cairo 
on new years evening. 

Ten negro soldiers perished at Island 
No. 10, .and the bodii^s of three members 
of the 52d Indiana regiment were founc 
on a sand bar in the river, six nilcs above 
Fort Pillow. One of them was Lieut. 
Edward ^Uexander. 

The railroad trai»is have not 
been running on the Illinois (Antral road 
for several days on account of a strike 
amrng the engineers. 

Th(! weather has moderated somewhat 
but it is still snowing with about four 
inches on the ground. Boats still go up 
the Ohio river, out of which large quanti- 
ties of ice arc coming, butth<5 Mississippi 
is closed. 



Xlebc'l Salt WorUa Oeiitroyed. 

New Yokk, Jan.'S. 
The Herald's correspondence from 
Key West by steamship lilac istone states 
that naval opcr.ations on the coast of 
Florida are active and successful. An 
extensive salt work of tl;<! rebels was 
d'^stroyed in St Andrews Bay, and St. 
Andrews city leveled to thf? ground by 



the crew 



of tlie steamers Jloomer and 
Rcstlesii. The isalt works testroye.l are 
valued in at nearly $3,000,0)0. 



FBOn CU AKIiESTO^. 



An Intereatinj: Rebel I^etter— Charlea- 
ton mined-A IMctnreof ita Present 
Condition— Fred Deairea Red Ink. 

New Yokk, Jin. 5. 
The Iribune vouches for the genuine- 
ness of the following letter, which inti- 
mates that the city of Charleston is mined 
with powder : 

CUAHLESTOX, NoV. 9. 

Deak Cousin : Fred has at last con- 
sented to let me come to Macon, so you 
may expect me in a very few days. The 
other day a Yankee shell exploded just 
around the comer from our house, tear- 
ing a building to pieces and setting two 
others on fire. No one was injured, as 
all the buildings were vacated some weeks 
ago. I don't believe there arc two hun- 
dred ladies in town who are able to get 
awav, for Fred declared we should not 
leave while we had a roof over us, but 
now that he sees the danger we are in, 
he is glad to hurry us off. 



was worth $05 000 when she first went 
into Government service ; that at the rate 
of her charter she had earned $173,500 
up to date ; that the Government had 
supplied her with coal ; that her average 
running expenses were from Sl.aOi) to 
$2,000 per month, but that they had been 
met by proBts on meals and berths, and 
that she belonged to the Delaware river 
steamboat company, of which John Price 
Wethereli, of Philadelphia, was president, 
and Andrew M. Anderson, Wm. S. 
Allen. Will«tt Paxton, and Samuel Har- 
lan, Jr., directors. 

Capt. Conner says that her first char- 
ter was made with Jno. Tucker, late 1st 
Secretary of War. and second with Q. 
M. Gen.'Meigs. 

The prosecution has overhauled other 
fat jobs in the steamboat line, and the 
evidence stands thus far that there has 
been a king of contractors interested with 
the one at Bath, with which Belger was 
connected. The steamer West End — an 
old one — was offered in N«w York at 



A Freed 3tcn's Celelj ration. 

New Youk, Jan. 5. 
Freed men's celebration of the anni- 
versary of the Jimancipaticn Proclama- 
tion took place at Cooper Institute last 
night. Addresses were made by Rev. 
Dr. Bellows, Dr. Cheever, and others, 
and letters read from Gov. Andrew, 
Chase, Sumner and others. TIkj princi- 
pal portion of the audience (colored. 

liinow. 

New IfORK, Jan, 5. 

About an inch of snow fell during the 

night, and was still snowing at 9 o'clock 

this morning. 

<^ 

A Command for Adniirikl Farrag-nt. 

New "ioRK, Jan. 5. 
Admiral Farragut is expected to sail 
to-dav in the flagship liar ford, to take 
command of the Eastern Blockading 
Squadron. 

Union Triuniiih. 

Balti vioRE, Jan. 4. 
The annual election of directors of the 
Baltimore Commercial Exchange to-day 
resulted in the triumph of tlie Union tick- 
ets over the di:»lo} al. This is conside-ed 
quite a triumph by the loyj.l members of 
the institution. 



VINES, SHRUBS, PLANTS, 

And All Rinds of Seeds, l4», 

For Milnnosota,. 



TIic undersigned li now m«Mn* arm 
commenc^^, next Spring, 



A Minnesota AccllmtEtlnf 
NuTiery, 

Neir St. Paul, tnd to ojet 

A Seed and UorticBltflnl Stirt 

m Tiis crrr. 

Karlv in March next, he wl'.l Tttl* the >«• VwHk- 

ern Nurseries and ?l»ed (*roweTi, and 4*» •», •» 
pincliase Stock. He, ♦■ inp«n*liii«, tvHaAt •?• 
diTs for any article In t!iH ttn* •! kwtetM; amd 
e-pccially, at an early dat#, for 

FRUIT TREES, APPLE,PEAR,PLUM. 

CHERRY AND QUINCIE9, 

Roth Standard and Dwarf Tn>e«. He wfll h% tl>!« 
to fiimisli varieties of l>w«rf Aj)ple Tr^«a tlMt 
will produce fruit In oie y«ir; ••d !HaM«r4 
Trees v.ithin three or frmr ywTs. «^»l»«••i•o. 
especially (solicited, f<jT tlie beat twrrfrtad rtrti^ 
lies of the Grape, Stmwb-ny. f.at^Mrrf. (.'•r- 
rent, OooselMT'y and P.la«kb»rry; mtM fc»f aU 
kinds of Kruit Sc»"1s aiJapHrd to omr ao*! an4 «li- 
mafe. Ho purtiojlarly di^«»rr« to jfro w oa« ttt<t 
sow! op ol fruit «ted», atii by aff^^nmc fMtivtiM 
or their supply and dUtrtboli jn,rxM««* to afWnl 
esisential aid iu cansiug the prMatiMm of %9W •» 
riet es of Irult. that wtil Ij« bvitn ••fajKad to MW 
Holl and climaic than any hlthrri** k»«wm. Vmom 
ilie ,-taud-ard s.-edlings thua obwiawl p*«4»>iaf 
inferior fruit.the heet vari< tlaa laay be »'»fffmfl*4. 
KvtTY farmer in the SjUt^ ar.i e»err ha*— 
hol'ter.who has ground for ■ gardea la invtaM 
ioco-.iperate in this enterpriae, and to aid la 
making 

•MINNESOTA A GRKAT FRUIT GROWIFQ 
STATF. 

All the fruits designated hare been prown fa 
Minnesota alr.ady. Our faihir^i htiherro tn flnrtfc 
tree planting have, in mo^t ca«es, been tli» re- 
sult ol purchasing noor trot»i careleaaly pMfea«L, 
or of unsuitable varieties,from Indifferent or in 
sponsible (i'/alers ; and in many iu8«anc«9 fra 
Aant ofknowl^dg.' in the mot'e of culture, »aK 
tiou ot soil, asi>eet, &c. 'I he nnderasifn-d *U1 
gjaratee the genuineness of evcryar;iola that mmf 
oi'ordortd; will !urni;h the Miii^e at aa low a 
price as purchases could be made in nay otiiaf 
way: and will also furnish to each purchSfa.-, 
without cl'-.irge, a pamphhn, containing' the exy 
rience and results o! the attempts thus far nintl», 
iu bucc'ssful and unsuccessful truit culnre la 
this State; showing the best vaiic-.i-e of treaa. 
fee, and the best modes of culture for our aoil 
and climate ; with general instructions to piidj 
the inexperienced. 

Correspondence and orders invited from all 
who feel an interest in thi- enterprise. Let nono 
be afriid to send small orders, ior the under- 
signed will attend to an order for a single tree, 
vine or shrub, or for 25 cts worth of seeds, with 
the fame care, aa to one for five h\>ndrod tim«a 
as much ; the design iKinj to inter.?st as inanr as 
possible in tlie enterprise of making Minnesota a 
great Fruit producing Mate, as well as to cstal)- 
iish a useful and remunerutire business. 

^^ Also, furnished to farmers the beat 

varieties of WHEAT, RYE, BAKLEY and 
BUCK \V U K AT, caretully selcctal for seed ; and 
all kinds of GRASS SEEDS, adapted to the cU- 
mate of Minnesota. 

All orders to be paid for on delivery at Saint 
Paul, unless agreement be m.^<!c for deJvcry and 
payment elsewhere. 

Address, 

D. A. ROBERTSON. 

St. Ptvul, 31iiin. 

St. PACt., Jan. 4, 18fi4. janO- 



llogra. 

CincAGo, Jan. 4. 
Very little doing in bogs i a consequence 
of light receipts. 



TJNITED STATES 
PENSION AOENCY 



TTVRS. WILLEY & HAND, 

PLEASANT STREET, 3T. PAUL. 
Office IIoprs— « to 10 a. m., and from 2 toS 
o'clock v. M. aeptis amw 



ST. PAUL, 



AT 



MINNESOTA. 



Offlca In Rogers' Block, 3d-it., near the Brldga. 
OfRce hours from H to 10 a. m. 
All letters to tho olBco mu«t inclose stampa t« 
pay return posUfe. ROBitBT F. EOVIS, 
noM tv«wl7 P«nslOD AgenU 




-»<s- 



rir ». — -I r- 







r 






I 






If 




I 



■ r^ 



^' "•■ 



• *im' 




THE SAINT PAUL PRESS, WJi;DKESDAY, JAT>rUARY 6, 1864. 



fir ST' 



She ^aiut ja ul _|w^ 

rUBLISIISD DAILT.TKI-WKKKLY ASD WEEKLY. 

Office— A.d.ioiiiintf Hie Bridtfe. 

T»'rm«i:— OAU.V I*!:K.Sf>— By mail, $8.00 per 
annum, or TDc jM-r month incarlably in advance. 

TItl-WKKKLY I'liKSS— i-j por annum ; »2.60 
forfix inoul'i-'; ^^l.-ijlorfhrefinoutha; live cojj- 
lej.toon.-a.jdivifs, :pi.00each; ten do., eiesch. 

WKKKLY FKt^S— One copy, one riaf. ^y 
five or more, $!.7.> pncli ; ten or more, to one »a- 
rtress, $!.t>J«;ach ; twonty or more.tooue adaress, 
l| 1.50 each. 



AFTER THE BATTLE. 



BY UF.NMAMIN l". lAYLOR. 

From the Chicago Jourual 

When a (urnace is in blast, the red 
foiiiitaiu sparkles and j>lays like a moun- 
tain spring, anil tiie rude surroundings 
brit'hten to tlie peaii of the rough ratters 
v.ith a stranijc beauty. When the fire is 
out, and the' black and ragficd masses of 
(lull iron lie dekd upon the ground, with 
a dunib and stubborn resistance, who 
would have drt-auied that they ever leaped 
with life and light ? 

A battle and a lurnace are alike. It 
is wonderUil how dull natures brighten 
and gruw eostly in the glow of battle ; 
how the sterling worth and wealth, there 
are in them. .shiHe out, and the eonunon 
man stands transfigured, his heart m his 
liand and his foot in the realui of heroie 
grandeur. But ah, when the lire is out. 
and tlu- searrtd earth is heaped with rigid 
clay, the blai-k montiis of th.-gunsspeeeh- 
less, nughty hanuners and no hands, the 
llags furled, the wild hurrah died away, 
and all tht.' splt-ndid action of the eharge 
vanislu'd Iroui the ruggfd field like a last 
Hash of sunshine, and you wander ansong 
the dull remaindtrs, the dead embers ot 
tiie i; tensot life and gluw that swept 
your .><or.l out, only yesterday, and drilted 
It on with the skirnli^h line, you begin to 
know what those wor<ls mean, " alter the 
battle." 

It is days sinec great waves of gallant 
life dashed against Mission llidge and 
swept up and over it in surges ; days 
sinee. 1 tried to tell you liov/ it looked ; 
60 mamj days that it is even now indur.a- 
ting into hi>tory, and ye", 1 feel like.' tak- 
ing up the story just where I left it. on 
^V^edne^d!y at' sunset, when our Hags 
il.ipped like eagles' wind's, and the wild 
crv of triumph cjuivered along the moun- 
tain, t^tanciing on the edge of the field 
in the moonlight, ealia as "(Jod's aere" 
strctehes the rough valley that, but an 
hour before, jarred with the rush and 
whiil of the battlo. From away beyond 
the Ridge, indeed, threo miles out to 
< liickdmauga Statiors, the dropping shots 
from Siieriiiarrs guns faintly punctuate 
the silence, but here, listen as you will, 
you ean he;ir no sound but the eliek of 
ambulance wheels, slowly rolling in with 
their mangled burdens ; no sigh, no 
jjroan, nothitig but the sobbing lapse of 
the Ttnni>sSv.M\ I can never tell you with 
what a warm feeling at the heart I looked 
up and sav,' the Fedei-al fires kindl.ng 
like a nevs- eonstellatioii upoe Mission 
Ridge ; they v<-ere as welcome as dawn- 
ing day to the eyes that have watched 
the nigiit out. Tl'ie old bahful glare IVom 
the rebel c-iimp and signal liglits were 
ipienched with something thicker than 
water, and Chattanooga was at peace. 
It is strini'3 that: a battle almost always 
lies bctv*een two breaths of sleep ; the 
dreamless slumber into which men fall 
npr»n its eve: the cahn repose they sink 
in its end. ^'ight fairly held its breath 
above the camps ; the wing of silence 
was over them all. Then came Thurs- 
day morning bright and beautiful. You 
goout to the field; and you keep saying 
over and over, "after the battle — after 
the battle."' Men prone upon the f:iees 
in deallTs deep abasement; here one, his 
pillowed upon his folded arms: 
one, his cheek pressed upon a stone 



Indeed and indeed, "death loves a ' power to prevent? Are we. pd ^c § P £ CI A L NOTICES. 

shininc' mark," and the roll of officers for alone, to suffer the penalty of their trans- j _^_____ 

Sc^v t hat lost birteen of its seventeen that is truly generous ! Let them sulTer results In serious Fulmonary Bronc h.al and A ih^ 
glS;s sEeri^^^^^^^^^^ lost at the penalt/ of their own atrocities and ™.... nuea,e, ofte„t,n.es incurable. B.o.ns 

Stone Rivci seventv-two : at Chiekamau- thank their stars that it is not harder to 
ga, ninctv-six ; while at Mission Ridge, bear. . ., • »r i • r ♦ 

Sne hundred and twenty-two bai s single \ \\ e would be perfectly justified in stint- 
and double leaves silver and gold and ing them to a half or a (luarter of the al- 
six spread eagles lav bloody and blent— lowance we make to our own soldiers, m- 
the total los" in the two divisions of stead of giving them exactly the same ra- 
Wood and Sheridan alone being twenty- ; tions that our soldiers receive. U any- 

' bodv suffers, it is perfectly just that it 

should be they, but for those acts done 

in defiance of all the laws that regu'ate 

the proceedings of war, there should be 

no suffering at all. It is of the nature of 

the prisoner's condition that he should 

share the lot of those with whom he is a 

prisoner. He cannot expect better fare 

than that Avhich is received by the soldiers 
moiintain rout'e are waiting some poet's ' to whom he suirenders. i^^^^)' P|"« 
breath to blossom with flowers immort:il. | for want he must pine too. If thev live 
Here, by this gray rock, lay the soldier, 
one shoulder shattered like a piece of 
potter's clav, and thus urged two com 
rid s who had halted to bear him to '' 



JOSEPH I. BEAUMONT, 



DKALER IN 



FOR 90 DAYS I 

BARE BARGAINS 



three hundred and forty-four. 

They cried in the white heat of Wednes- 
day afternoon, "the rebels mass their 
batteries ! They converge their fire !" 
and yet, taking o^r dU-is^ons through 
and through, the u.cidlui rain fell as 
evenly as if it ba 1 '....:i shed by the 
cloufls of heaven. 

Spots along that rough and terrible 



the 
rear: don't stop for me— I'm of no ac- 
count—for God s sake, push right up 
with the boys !"— and on they went and 
left him weltering in his bloody vest- 
ments. Do ye talk of your royal purple 
or Tyrian dyes ? Beside that hero lying 
there, those tints grow dull as gray 
November. Hard by that little oak. Col. 
Ilarker, crowding up the hill, saw two 
brothers, one wounded unto death, the 
other bending over him. The Colonel, 
not seeing the fallen man, ordered the 
otlier to move on. "But this is my 
brother,'' he pleadingly said. The poor 
stricken fellow on the ground rallied an 
instant: "Yes, that's right, George; go 



plentifully, he must be plentifully fed also. 
If one party or the other must sufler, he 
must be that party. 



on, go on 



! •' Gi 



turned a piteous 



elance upon his dying brother, grasped 
h:.^ musket, and clambered on. And that 
wa-! his last farewell, for, the summit 
reached, he hastened back, and there, be- 
side the little oak. the soldier lay in that 
sleep without a dream. Between the first 
and second ranges of rebel works, right 
in the flush of the charge, a captain fell, 
an<l two men came to his aid. "Don't 
wait here," he said; "go back to your 
company ; one useless man is enough ; 
don't make it three." Just then a 
j cheer floated down the mountain as they 
took the rifle-pit. " Don't you hear 
that ?" he cried, " inarch !" and away they 
w<-nt. Such incidents as these strow all 
the way from base to crest ; happening 
in an instant, lost and forgotten in the 
whirlwind ; worthy, every one of them, 
of a medal in gold ; worthy, every one of 
them, of a place in loyal hearts. With 
such a spirit inspiring rank and file — a 
spirit as lofty as the Alpine traveler 
breathed, whose burden, as he went, was 
still " excelsior," who can wonder that 
Mission llidge was carried in a Novem- 
ber afternoon? As I think of it all, I 
seem to have the poet's cpiiekened ear, 
and to me, standing in the valley below, 
from hundreds of lips now white and still, 
a voi''e flows down the Ridge's side in 
grand accord : 

" A voice co'.ncs like a fallin',' star, 



■♦«■♦• 



EXCKI. 



"toil : 



head 

there 

as was Jaco'>".> at l'>e!hel; yond. r one, 

his lingers 



stiffened round his misket. 
Now you pass where a butternut and a 
true blue have gone down together, the 
arm of the one tiung over the other ; 
wlierc a young boy of fifteen lies face up- 
ward, both Lands clasped over his heart. 
Tic sun lias tou'hed the frost that whit- 
ened his hair, as if he had gro\.-n old in a 
liiyht, and it hangs like tears fresh-fallen 
tii-m his cheeks ; where a lieutenant 
grasps a bush as if he died vainly feeling 
lur a little hold upon earth and life, where a 
stained trail lea Is yon to a shelter be.iisid 
H rock, and there a dead Captain who 
bad crept away out of sight and fallen 
asleep ; where rebels and true hearts lie 
in short windows, as if Death had begun 
to harvest and had wi-aried of the work. 
And so, through the valley and up the 
Ridge, in everv attitude lie the unburied 



dead : lit; just a«; they fell 



111 



glow 



of 
the battle. And those faces are not as 
you would think ; hardly one distorted 
by p ission : almost white and calm, as 
Ben. .'. ...j-n's dream ot peace ; many 
brightened wl:i! something like a >m'l - ; a 
lew, strangely beauiiiul. \\ ouiidcU ones 
that eseapeii ilie moonlight search have 
lain sileuily waiting for morning, without 
murmur or complaint ; glatl they are 
alive; not grieveti ihey are wounded, lor 
"did we not ta'.e the Hidgi- !" they say ; 
thus did the old soldiery spirit of one 
Hash up like an expiring candle, and go 
out right there on the field as he spoke ; 
he died with the last word on his lips, and 
"went up highiT." 

I said something of taking the back- 
ward step and retracting the ground 
made classic by a thousand de«;ds of 
valor ; it is a work beyond the narrow 
verge of a writer of letters, but while 
abandoning it to more ambitious hands I 
eannot deny myself the privilc-ge of re- 
cording two or three incidents. Colonel 
■\Viiey, of tlie 41.st Ohio, fell terribly 
Wduiided at the first line of rifle ]>its, and 
(ieneral Hiz mi rode up, with the words, 
"I hope _\ou are not badly wounded." 
"Do vou th'nk we will make it?" asked 
the Crlonel, "I do," was the reply. 

"That's enough," said the gallant officer. From the Richmond Dispatch, Dec. 22, 

"I ean staiid this !" and there he lay Q^r soldiers have fared badiv at times, 

bleeding and content, and the tide of the owing to circumstances with which all 

battle rolled on. aecpiainted. The Yankees, last Spring 

A division General turned abruptly to and Summer, sent bands of marauders 

me in the course of a desultory eonversa- into the country lying between the Poto- 

tion, with "If yoa write anything about m^c and James rivers. They reduced it 

Wednesday's affair, as you will, don't almost to a desert. They destroyed the 

forget ('ol. ^Miller, of the oGth Illinois — crops, burnt the mills, shotall the horses, 

one of the mo»t gallant little fellows that mules, sheep, oxen and cows that they 

ever drew a sword." I did not need that 'could not carry off, collected all the 

iniunction, for Col. Silas Miller rode plows, hoes, axes and agricultural im- 

throug'i 1 he storm to the summit of the plements of every kind into piles and set 

Ridge at the head of his regiment like a fire to them, and went off, carrying with 

veteran, inspiring his men till the little them all the negroes that could be induc- 

oGth was a phalanx of heroes. The Col- ed to follow them. The object, boldly 

onel used to be adjutant of types and avowed by Lincoln himself, was to starve 

lead a column, nov/ and then, in the of- the people into submission, 

fi- e of the Chicago Journal, and, true to Modern history presents but one par- 

his old love, he headed a column at Mis- allel to the cold-blooded atrocity of this 

sion Ridge. Col. V. T. Sherman, of voir proceeding. And now, when these Yan- 

city, who commanded (u'n. SI erm:in's kee prisoners are suiTering from their 

brigade, displayed a cool courage and own acts — when they are pinched for the 

clear judgment worthy the name and | food which their own hands have destroy- 
fame of Illinois. In truth all the Colo- j ed — when they pine for the luxuries which 

nels on that day were fit to be named ' their own infernal malignity has rendered 

with him of continental memory, who it imp<~ssible to procure — are we to bear 

"galloped through the white infernal the burden of their iniquity? Are we to 

powder-cloud." be blamed for what it was not in our 



— Captain (ioodrich, of the Hth Con- 
nc>titnt, six feet tall, nuiscHlar and smart, 
wai iilaced in command of a liard set of boys, 
who had dtiied their t'ornier olflcers. He 
niit'lc them a speech : " ISoy?, I liear that yon 
are 'some' on a skirmish, and tliat cadi of you 
are sp:>ilinpr f'T a tiirlit. Now, before I fio any 
tiiither, I v.ant to come to an understanding 
with vim. If tlierc is one of you tliat tlnnlis 
lie e.in whiu nic, let him now step out of the 
ranks ar.d try it." Not a man stirred, and the 
coinp.any became noted for its good discipline. 

— A New Orleans letter says that work- 
insuien arc prosperous, wages being very high. 
TiKre are no slaves, and every able-bodied 
servant expeetM twenty dollars per month. 
The " Yankees" have come in with the " cur- 
reiuv, ' .nnd they want "help." They have 
takeii the stores,' put up big red and gilt signs 
of '-Drv Goods," "Yankee Notions," "I'ro- 
dtice," kc, and gradually they aie making a 
new city. 

— During the battle of Missionary 
llidge a rebel Cajjtain wa*; captured by a boy 
belonging to one of the Ohio regiments, and 
refusing to go to the rear, gave him a kick in 
tiie region of his "base" tliat sent liim head- 
long down the hill, accompanying thedemon- 
stnaion with tJie shout, "Chiekamauga, d— n 
you :" 

— Among Union prisoners recently 
e.scapiil from Richmond, the name ot John U. 
M'-f nllongh, of tiie 1st Wisconsin, is reported. 
MeC'iiiloagh feigned dead, and was carried out 
in a co:lin. Some Union ladies of Richmond 
furnished him a coat, made of socesh Ijlankct, 
by means of which he was enabled to work 
his way up to our lines and finally to reach 
Waj^hington. 

— .\s it has been quite frequently as- 
serted that General Hooker needlessly sacri- 
ficed a thousand men in the fight at Ringgold, 
Georgia, It may be well to state that in the 
last campa'gn.Gon.IIcjoker's command fonght 
four battles, Ijcsidcs several skirmishes, cap- 
tured over two-thiidsof all the prisoncrs,arms 
and camp ecinipage taken, and seven pieces of 
artilery, with a total loss not exceeding one 
thousand men. 

— The late ]SIaj. Gen. Buford, than 
whom probably no commander was so devoted- 
ly loved by those around him, was otfcred a 
Major-General's commission in the Rebel 
arnjy when in Utah. He crushed the commu- 
nication in his hand, and dechired that he 
would live and die under the tfag of the Un- 
ion. A few hi-urs l)efore his death, and while 
sutrering from dclinum, he roundly secMdcd 
his negro servant; Imt recovering himself 
temjiorarily, he called the negro to his bed- 
side and said to him : "Falward, I hear I have 
been scolding you. I did not know what I 
was saving. You have been a faithful ser- 
vant, Edward." The poor negro sat down and 
wept as though his heart was broken. When 
Gen. Bnfi.Td received liis commission as Ma- 
Jor-Gencraf, he exclaimed, "Now, I wish that 
I cjuld live." His last intelligible words, ut- 
tered during nn attaclt of delirinm, were : 
"Put guards on all the roads, and don't let the 
men run l)ack to the rear." This was an il- 
lustration of the ruling i)assion strong in 
death, for no trait in Gen. Buford's character 
was more than his dislike to sec men skulk- 
ing or hanging on the rear. — Washington 
Chronicle. 

» « ♦ « ♦ 

Tlin Prisouerit — 'VFuy they bave been 
Starved. 



lienatorial J*er«»nareB. 

Washington Cor. of the Cincinnati Commercial. 
MK. SAUl.SHl'liY. 

Mr. Saulsbur}' is a man of very fine 
personal appearance, about forty years of 
age. He is above the medium hight. 
rather stoutly built. His hair is jet black, 
his eyes keen, piercing, md well adap- 
ted to flashing anger in the face of an op- 
ponent. His lace is large, and may be 
termed huiidsome. He wears neither 
whiskers nor moustache. He dresses 
neatly, in fine broad-cloth. He is a good 
speaker, uses choice language, and enun- 
ciates distinctly. He is not altogether 
free from the imputation of vanity, I 
should say, from the number Of times he 
looks at the galleries while speaking, with 
an air of "How do you like it ? Wouldn't 
my op[)onent be better off if he hadn't 
said anything ?" 

MR. UAYARD. 

Mr Bayard is about tTcnty years 
older than his colleague, a very pretty 
figure, rather inclined to corpulency. 
His hair is quite gray, and what little 
there is of it is parted in the middle. 
Time has furrowed his face quite deeply. 
He speaks with very little animation, 
and at times there is considerable of a 
whine in his utterance. He was recently 
re-elected to the Senate, aiul it now de- 
volves upon him to take the recently 
prescribed oath, or be expelled from that 
body. He will tal:e the oath, though 
not with much relish. 

MR. SL'.MXEH. 

Mr. Sumner's person.al appearance has 
been so often described that I will not 
make one of my poor attempts to convey 
to the reader an idea of how this eminent 
statesman and scholar looks on the floor 
of the Senate. It would not require a 
very good judge ol human nature to point 
him out as he sits at his desk, whether 
reading, writing or listening to the re- 
marks of another Senator, as the noblest 
Roman of them all. There is something 
about him that cannot fall to impn^ss any 
man of ordinaiy intelligence with the fact 
that he is no trickly politician, no pseud o 
statesman, no mere socialist. But when 
he rises to an impromtu speech, he dis- 
enchants you, and you cannot help asking 
3 ourself, or somebody near, "Is that 
Sumner ? Certainly it can't be he who is 
making such a poor attempt on such a 
trivial subject I ' But it is even Charles 
Sumner, the profound scholar, the great 
thinker, and one of the poorest off-hand 
speakers in the Senate. It is because he 
is such a great thinker and such a pro- 
found student, and, perhaps, too, that 
one is apt to expect so much from him, 
that he impresses you so unfavorably 
when a cjuestion is suddenly sprung upon 
him, fur which he bad no time for thought 
or research. 



matic Diseases oftentimes incurable 
BiiONciiiAi. Troches reaclx directly the affected 
parts, and give almost immediate relief. For 
Bronchitis, Asthma, Catarrh, and Consumptive 
Coughs the Troches are useful. Public Speakers 
and Singers should have the Troches to clear and 
strengthen the voice. Military Officers and Sol- 
diers wlio overtax the voice, and are exposed to 
sudden changes sliould use tlicm. Obtain only 
the genuine. " Brown's Bronchial Troches" hav 
ingprorerf their efficacy by a test of many 3 o^rs, 
are Mghly recommended and prescribed by Phy- 
iclans and Surgeons in the Army, and liave re- 
ceived testimonials from many eminent men. 

Sold by all Druggists and Uaalers in Medicine 
in the United States and most Foreign countries 
at L'5 cts., per box^ decb Imdifcw 

IIoMR Life Insurance Company, 

Nkw Youk, offers the mostllberal advantages to 
parties desiring to effect ingurance. 

KEV. EDW'D. E'iGLEST.X, 
Statk At;h»T roll Minnksot*, 
th nol9-t sept 2 '64 St. Taul. 

A Beautiful (Complexion, FREK FROM 

Tan, I'imples and Freckles, may easily be pro- 
cured by using the " Balm of Thousand Flower?." 
For slaving it is unsurpassed. It Is composed of 
palm oil, honey, and other valuable articles, high- 
ly perfumed by its own ingredients, and when 
used for wasliing, night and morning, renders 
the skin soft and white, and free from blemi^h 
Price 50 cents. For sale by 

DAY & JEXKS, St. Paul, and 
geptl9-eowly N. H. HEMIUP. St . Anthony. 

The Mutual Like Insurance Com- 
pany of Wis(;onsin, is tlie best Company for 
Western men to insure in. 

It is made up of and managed by Western men, 

and is thus having its ri.->ks all reside in this the 

healthiest part of the Union. It is believed that 

its rate of nnrtality will be lower than that of 

the Eastern Companies, in the future as it ha 

been in the jiast. 
The Company is now In its fifth year of busl- 

ness, and has proven an entire success, having 
issued over four thousand policies, and accumu- 
lated in reserve premiums two hundred thousand 
dollars. Itstarted without guarantee cnpitnl, and 
experience has proven that none was necessary. 

The business ot the Company is conducted u]>on 
the same general basis as t!iat of the most sue 
cespfiil Eastern Compaules,wlth the advantage of 
having the experience of tho older ones as its 
guii'e. 

'J here are now a large number of members of 

tho Company in St. Paul and vicinity, among 
whom are some of our best business men. 
NORTHWESTERN AGENCY, 
Thompson's Block, Third street, St. Paul. 
O. CURTIS, Manager. 
S. r. SNYDER, Agent, MinneapoMs. 
Either of the above named gentlemen will be 
happv to give information to members or otliers 
desirin/, in -r gar 1 to the Company, and assist in 
making apf lications for Policies. noS 3m 



TEAS, COFFEES, SPICES, 
Sixgars, Syrups, 

AND ALL GOODS PERTAINING TO THE 
GROCERY BUSINESS, INCLUDING 

TOBACCO .S, CI G Alts, 

"W^ines, Licxiiors, and. 
Pure Old Rye and Bourbon 

^V H I S K I E S . 

Corner 3d A Jackson HVm. no39-d&w8w 

wijS'es and liquoes, 

FOR 

medicinal and Private Use. 



IN 



Pfetrftotteottisi, 



PURE OLD RYE WHISKY, 
PURE OLD BOURBON WHISKY, 
FINE OLD FRENCH BRANDY, 
FINE SCOTCH WHISKY, 
PALE SHERRY WINE. 
PURE JUICE PORT WINE, 
OLD BURGUNDY PORT WINE, 
WOLFE'S SCHIEDAM SCHNAPPS, 

OLD JAMAICA RUM, 

MUMMS' CABINET CHAMPAGNE, 

CURACOA. 



FOR SALE BY 
now d&w8w J. T. 



mSAXlM^V. 



W 



TnK American E.xrRESS Company, 

would respectfully announce to tlie Merchants of 
this city and vicinity th\t tliey are now prepared 
to bring forward from La Croi^se, Wis., and de- 
liver to points of destination all "Merchantb' 
Dispatch'' and ordinary Itailroad freight. 

Merchants and others who may wish to avail 
thfynselves of this means of tran'^portution, will 
please mark the'r goods to our Cixre at La Crosse, 
at the same time giving us notice so tliat we may 
see that such goods are delivered to us at La 
Crosse, without any unnecessary d'day. 

For tariff rates call at their office, Vl'J Third-st., 
opposite Stage Office. 

decO E. F. •WAUNKR, Agent. 



HOLESALE LA ML yTORE, 

ii'^xt door to 
]Mar>'iiii'« Crooliery Iiwi- 
jortinc: House. 

LAMPS SHADES. CHIM- 
NEYS, OIL, 
AND ALL THE ARTICLES BE- 
LONGING TO THE TRADE, 

Can be found at the Store adjoining Marvin's 
Crockery Importing House. 

An exclusive Lamp and Oil Store to meet the 
denianrts of tlie Wholesale and Retail trade, hfss 
loi:;^ l>.^cn desirable in St. Paul. Country Jler 
cliants can now he .supiilied at Eastern prices 
(Irunsportatlon added.) Call «t the Carbon OH 
and Lamp Store adjoiuiug ilarvin's Crockery 
House. 

tHif Country Merchants are especially invited. 
Call and see. Bept<.'9 



X> I^ "if G^OOI^S, 

Maybe made at 

IVo. 13S Thii-tl Street, 

SAINT T*ATJL. 

We offer at reduced prices to close out the dock : 
%iO pc». Freneli IMerinos, 

At $1.00 to $1.50, worth $1.13 to $1.75. 

lO pes. Inlaid. Hepps, 

At 75c, worth 90c. 

100 pes. MOHAIR 

DRESS GOODS 

At W to COc. worth 40 to 75c. 

lOO pes. I^IMIVTlS, 

At 20c, worth 25c. 

50 PIECES 

COTTON FLANNELS, 

At 35 to 55c, with 40 to COc. 

C>0 pes. IDEIVIMiS, 

At 30 to 50c, worth 40 to 65c. 

500 POUNDS 

WOOLLEN YAKN, 

At $1.25, worth $1.60. 

I5OOO r^oi^mcls 

WOOLLEN YARI^, 

At $1.50, worth $1.75. 
A FULL LINE OF ALL OTHER 



I-F-' 



FOR THE CAVALRY! 



.MR. I'ESSENDEN 

is one of the keenest debaters in t';e Sen- 
ate — always prepared, no matter what 
subject is brought up — always ready to 
give sound, logical views, no matter what 
the topic under discussion. The most 
diilicult antagonist to overcome, and the 
safest guide to follow. 

Mi;, .m'docgal 

hails from California ; was elected as a 
Union man, but has taken to Peace De- 
mocracy and bad whiskey ; is very eccen- 
tric, and usually drinik ; comes into the 
Senate Chamber booted and spurred for 
a horse race or a cavalry raid. 

MU. SHKRMAX. 

The young Senator from Ohio — the 
rising man of the Senate — has a high ap- 
preciation of the value of time, and never 
attempts to argue a point when he knows 
he cannot hope to change a vote by doing 
so. Makes few speeches, and good ones. 
Is energetic, and zealous in the discharge 
of every duty assigned to him. 

HKX. VVAUK. 

Rough, unpolished, but honest and ca- 
pable. Talks strongly when he does 
talk, which is seldom. Is said to be some- 
what ot an anti-slavery man. 

MIS. POWELL. 
Evidently intended for a farmer, and 
not for a Senator. Is very fond of quib- 
bling, and has a word to say against 
everything proposed by the Administra- 
tion party. His remarks would be more 
acceptabla.if more grammatical. 

.JIM LANK. 

Very quiet and unobtrusive for a jay- 
hawker. Is not often heard from, yet 
was heard from once too often when he 
attempted to make a reformation in Wall 
street. 

MR. .SPRAGUE. 

will not make a very profound impression 
as a statesman or an orator. Has more 
wealth than genius, and can accomplish 
more with the former than the latter. 

MR. LANK, OP INDIANA. 

Honest and faithful. Not very ambi- 
tious ; and not very desirious of public 
applause. A good worker but not an 
extraordinary speaker. 

MR. HENDICKS. 

A peaceable member of the peace par- 
ty. Says little, but always votes wrong. 



S— T— 18G0— X. 
DR.UCi!:'S PLANTATION BITTERS. 

They purify, strengthen and Invigorate, 

They create a healtiiy appetite. 
Tli'iyare an antidote to change of water and diet. 
They overcome effects of dissipation and late hours 
They strengthen the system «nd enliven the mind. 
Tliey prevent miasmatic and intermittent fevers. 
They purify the breath and acidity of the stomach. 
They cure Dyspeps^ia and Constipation, 
rhey cure Diarrhoea, Cholera and Cholera Morbus. 
Ihey cure LiverComplaiut and Nervous Headache 

Tliey are the best Bitters in the world. They 
make the weak man strong, and are exhausted 
nature's great restorer. They are made of pure 
St. Croix Rum, the celebrated Callsaya Bark 
roots and herbs, and are taken with the pleasure 
of a beverage, without regard to age or time ol 
day. Particularly recommended to delicate per 
sons requiring a gentle stimulaut. Sold by all 
Grocers, Druggists, Hotels and Saloons. P. U. 
Drake & Co , v:02 Broadway, N. Y. aus-eowly 



Capt. A.. 3E^. I^Tissell, 

Having received authority from the Governor 
proposes to raise a Company for tlie 

2cl Minnesota Cavalry. 

All who wish to avoid the DRAtr wliich is rosi- 
TiVKi.v to fake place on the 5th of Jan., INOl- 
have a clianco to enlist In a regiment tliat will 
losrnVKLi never leavethe f^tate in any case as 
long as forces are needed on our frontier. The 
POUNTY is tlie same as in any other regiment, 
old or new. .Subsistence and transportation fur- 
nished to ever ■■■ recr i . Persons dpsiring to en 
Htt in Capt. KussoH's Compaui , can see liim be- 
tween the hours of 9 A.M. and 4 r. m. at the 
Union Hotel, corner of 4th and Wal;asliaw-sts., 
!St. I'aul. CAPT. A. K. IIU.SSKLL. 

decD-lm Kecrultlng Officer. 



J. 



II. MURPHY, M. D. 



PBYSICIAN AND SURGEON. 

Office on Jackson street, in the office formerly 
occupied by Drs. Morton & Wharton, (opposite 
the Temperance House.) 

Especial atteni ion iiaid to Surgery. dec23 Cm 

EW BOOK OF CHURCH MUSIC. 



DOMESTIC GOODS, 

At I?ropoi"tionate Prices. 
IN HOSIERY, 

GLOVES, 

WHITE GaODS, 

AND 

EMBROIDERIES OR NOTIONS, 
We will not bo Undersold. 

Uemerabcr the rule, 
ALL GOODS GUARANTEED AS KEPRE 

SENTED, OR NO SALE, 
And the place, 

No. 132 Third-st., St. Paul. 
OA.THOA.K.T & CO. 

decll Im 

gs. I^. BAILElir Sc 00 , 

Are not the Agents for Cooper's Cabinc t Photo- 



COME ONE, COME ALL, 

./LND BUY YOUR 

CHRISTMAS 

PRESENTS 

AT 

THE CHEAP CASH STORE, 

For that is the placo you can get your 

MONEY'S ^VORTH. 

We have a splendid assortment of 

]\lEIM3VOES 

AND 

EMPRESS CLOTHS, 

Whicli we will fell 
As Low as tlie Lo-^vest. 

IF YOU WANT 

Sontags, Nubias or Hoods, 

(lO lo the Cheap Cash Store. 

IF YOU WANT 

baltm:otjal siiirtTS, 

OR 

HOOP SKIRTS, 

GO TO THE CHEAP CASH STORE. 
We have a fine assortment of 

LiVDIES' CLOiVIiS 

Which we are selling low to 

CLOSE OUT THE STOCK. 



N 



WYNKOOP'S ICELAND PECTORAL. 

Diseases ol the Throat, Chest and Pulmonary 
organs are ever prevalent, insidious and danger- 
ous. The properties of a medicine to alleviate, 
cure and uproot these complaints, must be Ex- 
pectorant, Anodyne and Invigorating, loosening 
tlie mucus ol the throat, and imparting tone to 
the entire system. No discovery in medical sci- 
ence ever mastered this class of diseases like Dr. 
Wy nkoop's Iceland Pectoral. It is used with the 
most ast«uishing results in all cases of Bronchitis, 
Influenza, Whooping Cough, Diptheria or Putrid 
Sore Throat, Asthma, Croup, Coughs, Colds, 
Nervous Irritubility, &c. 

Tho Rev. J. J. Potfer certifies, "that I have 
nsed Dr. Wynkoop's Pectoral for several years, 
myself and in my family, for severe Pulmonary 
Complaints, and have r<>commended it to many 
others, and have never seen Its equal." 

Rev. J. J. POTTER, Brooklyn, N. T. 

Hundreds and thousand.^ of important testi- 
monials could be produced, showing its remarka- 
ble cures and that it nerer fails. 

It is composed of pure'Iceland Moss, Balm of 
Gilead. Peruvian Balsam, El<*campane. Comfrey. 
Burdock, and other invaluable e.vpectorant and 
tonic Ingredients. It is harmless, prompt and 
lasting. Invalids and sufferers cannot afford to 
neglect a trial. Every family should have it. It 
is remarkable for Croup. Full descriptions, re- 
commendations and directions accompany each 
bottle. 

Sold by all principal Druggists. 

Prepared by Dr; It. D. Wynkoop, and sold by 
D. S. Barnes & Co., New York. aul5-eowdt w&w 



THE HARP OF JUDAII; A Collection of 
Sacred and Secular 3Iu8ic for Choirs, Schools, 
Musical Convention-!, Societies and tlie Home 
Circle; By L. O. Emerson, Author of the "Gold- 
en Wreatii." " Sabbath Harmony," &c. 

A book embracing every varietv of choice mu- 
sic adopted to the capacities of all grades of sing- 
ers. Tliough publi^lied bat a few months since 
it has already been used by twelve ^Musical Con- 
ventions, and nearly all tlie leading conventions 
in the United State's are effecting aiTHngements 
to do 80 the coming season. Choirs aud 'leacli 
ers are rapidly adopting it because they can liud 
no book (Miual to it in every requirement desira- 
b.e in sucli a work. Specimen pages (20 tunes) 
■w ill be sent free to any one on a))plicatiuu. 

Price of thi' " Harp of Jiidali " $1 per copy, 
$0 per dozen. OLIVER DITSON & CO., 

dec",':!-lyd&w . Publinliers, Boston. 



graplis, 



but they hive on 
largest 8tock of 



hand the 



T 



0' PROMOTE 



MACK. 



♦ « ♦ * ♦ 



Confe«lerat« Cnrrencj Circulat««1 at 
tli« Point of tbe llayoneC. 

QeN-EUAL OuDF.K. — IIl-ADQUAllTEKS, FoR- 

kest's Cavat.ky Corps, Athens, Texn., Sep- 
tember 23, 186.3. — Confederate money is tlie 
currency of the country. All persons refusing 
to take it in current transactions for produce 
or manufactures necessary for the army or 
people will subject themselves to Ixing arrest- 
ed and being sent to army headquarters for 
attempting the depreciation of our money, and 
to having their goods, produce, &c., confisca- 
tc«l. All bonds, oaths aud obligationsimposed 
upon citizens by the federal government are 
declared null and void. Bv order. 

Brig. General FORREST, Com'dg. 
CiiAS. Amiersox, a. a. G. 

KECEFV^ED ON CONSIGNMENT, 
»,000 PoCN D8 Drikd Peaches, and 7,000 
Pounds Dkibu Applks, to l>e sold low for cash. 
)e8 J. C. & U. C. BURBANK fc CO. 



HAGAN'S MAGNOLIA BALM 

This is the most delightful and extraordinary 

article ever discovered. It changes the sun burnt 

face and hands to a pearly satin texture of rav 

tailing beauty, imparting the marble purity ol 

youth, and the dixtingue appearance so inviting 

in the city belle of fashion. It removes tan, 

freckles, pimples and roughness from the skin, 

leaving the complexion fresh, transparent aud 

smooth. It contains no material injurious to the 

skin. Patronized by Actresses and Opera Sing 

ers. It Is what every lady should have. Sold 

everywhere. 

DEMAS S. BARNES & CO., 

General Agents, 
aa8 dtw&w ly 802 Broadway, N. Y. 

[Communicated.] 
Pulmonary CoNstJMPxiON a Curable 
Disease III— A Cabd.— -To Consumptives.— 
The undersigned liaving been restored to health 
in a few weeks, by a very simple remedy, after 
having suffered several years with a severe lung 
affection, andthatd'ead disease Consumption— Is 
anxious to make known to his fellow-sufferers 
the means of cure. 

To all who desire it, he will send a copy ot the 
prescription used (free of charge), with the di- 
rections for preparing and using the same, which 
they will find a sure cure for Consumption, 
Asthma, Bronchitis, Coughs, Colds, &c. 
The only object of the advertiser in sending the 
Prescription is to l)enefit the afllicted, and spread 
information which he conceives to be invaluable ; 
and he hopes every sufferer will try his remedy, as 
it will cost them nothing, and may prove a bless- 
ing. Parties wishing the prescription will please 
address REV. EDWARD A. WILSON, 

Williamsburgh, Kings County, 

oc8-3md&w New York. 



GOOD HEALTH 

use the 

DATSDELIOIV 

AND 

^W^ild Olierr^ir Bitters. 

In Pint Bottles, price 50c; in Quart Bottles, 75. 

These Bitters are composed of the best Roots, 

Barks an<l Herbs known, aud peculiarly adajiteo 

to the immediate cure of ail diseases produced b> 

an inactive liver. 

Dandelion and Wild Cherry Bitters 

CURE SICK HEADACHE. 
Dandelion and Wild Cherry Bitters 
CURE JAUNDICE. 
Dandelion and Wild Cherry Bitters 

CURE INDIGESTION. 
Dandelion and Wild Cherrv Bitters 

CUKE COST1VEXKS8, 
Dandelion and Wild Cherry Bitters 

CURE HEART BURN. 
Dandelion and Wild Cherry Bitters 

CUItE WEAKNESS. 
Dandelion and Wild Cherry Bitters 

CUKE LOST APPETITE. 
Dandelion and Wild Cherry Bitters 
CURE AGUE, 
In its worst forms. They perform, these cure^ 
simply, by one office, regulating the liver. 
For sale by dealers in Medicines, everywhere 
S. HUNTINGTON, Proprietor, 
Farmersburg, Clavton County, Iowa 
For sale by E. H. Biggs, H. W. Robinson, Pau. 
Reiger, St. Paul ; S N. Wickcrsham, Charles Ben- 
son, L. Weinand & Co^ and 8. Ed • ards. Whole- 
sale Agent, Winoua; Charles Hawley, Chatlield; 
D. B. Stout, Preston; S. Y. Hyde, Fillmore; 
Charles Morrill, Marion ; Capt. Mills and J. D. 
Bunce, Pli-Msant Grove ; S. B. Hobinson, General 
Wholesrale Agent, address Chatlield, Min. 

Also— Huntington's Writing Fluid; Ho%re X 
Stevens' Family Dye Colors ; ^ an Dusen's AVorrc 
Confections; Van Dusen's Magical Blueing; Al- 
den's Condition Powders; Talman & Collins 
Concentrated Extract of Lemon ; Tnlman & Col 
lins' Leather Preservative ; Dutclier's Dead Shot 
for Bed Bugs; Sleeper's Lightning Fly Killer. 
DAY & jrx::%'KM. St. Paul, 
my27-ly Wholesale and Retail Agents. 



Oal>inet and Clliair 

TO BE FOUND IN ST. PAUL. 

Oval Frames, flilt and rosewood Monh'iags, <Jr. 
Also, a few Photographs which the r will sell 
(not at cost) but at (CahlU & Co.'s) the Agents' 
jirices. dec8-lm 

Tj^OR THE HOLIDAYS! 

AT COMBS' BOOK STORE, 

can ni: F3U.VD a lap.<;e stock of 
Cliildrens' Boolcs, 

Oirt Boolcss, 
I?liotoe:rai>liL A.ll>iiiii6', 

Bil>les, I?ra:rci* "Boolcs, 

&.C., suitable for presents. Call in and examine. 



IF YOU WANT 

HOSIERY Oil GLOVES, 

For the cold weather, go to 

FOR THE (.ENTLEMEN WE HAVE 

Cloths, Beavers, Cassimeres, Satlnetts, Neck 
Ties and CoUirs, vhich we will sell 

CHEAP FOR CASH. 
Tlie Clieap Casli Store 

la the place to buy any kind of Domestic Goods, 
either Cotton or Woollen. 

Remember the place. 

And that we will sell goods as cheap as the 
cheapest. 

H. KNOX TAYLOR, 

No. 218 Third Street, St. Paul, 

IMCiiiYiesota • 

dec20-tl 

AT COST ! AT COST ! 



DIA^RIES 

decl-tf 



for 1S64-, all Styles, 
AT COMBS' BOOK MTORE. 



ST. PAUL LAMP SIORE, 

(Branch of the great Aladdin ) 

Opposite Pioneer G*fllce* 



OILS, 

LAMPS, 

SHADES, 

GLOBES, 

LANTERNS 


CHIMNEYS 
BURNERS, 
CANS, 
&€., &c. 


The Largest Stock, 

The Greatcft Variety, 
and ,tho 


Olieapest 


GroodLs 


EVER EXHIBITED 


IN THIS CITY. 


i^- Wholesale Buyers 


supplied at Eastern 


cash prices. 


dec3-tf 



Spr 
Cl 



PRING TRADE.TO THE MER- 
CHANTS OF THE NORTH-WEST. 
We respectfully invite you to examine our une- 
qualled Miscellaneous etock of 

STAPLE AND FANCY DRY GOODS, YAN- 
KEE NOTIONS, WOOLEN GOODS, 
HOSIERY, CKOCKERY, CHINA, 
GLASS, CUTLEKY, PLATED 
GOODS, ETC., ETC. 
No house in tlie country offers better induce- 
ments in goods and prices. We have every facil- 
ity aud are prepared to sell the Best Cash Trade 
at a profit below I'^stern figures. 

49rSpecial attention paid to all orders accom- 
nied with money or references. 

Bo«« e:v bmothctrs, 

Iliiiportrra and JTobtters, 

Nos. 72, 74 and 76 Lake St., Chicago. 
toXX-Xy, 

TXORSE BLANKETS, 

SKATES 



AND 



Large 



BELLS. 



0029 



assortment last received and for Eale low 
at the Saddlery Warehouee of 

C. PROAL, 

Comer of Third and Bobert-sts. 



O. CURXI8, 

Geieral Insurance Agent, 

OFFICE IN 

Thoinpsoii's Block. 

decl8-tf 



JUST RECEIVED 

A.ivr> FOR. SA.LE, 

100 Barrels 

CAJRBOIV OIL. 

CHAS. A. UPHAM & CO., 

7Vo.4, Prince'* IBlock, JTacksoit Street, 
St. Punl, minn. 

n»10-ly 



40 



BUSHELS CHOICE RIPE 

Just received by A. H. WIMBISH, 

noV5 Jackson Street. 



T 



AX DEEDS 



THE PRESS PRINTING COMPANY 

Have now on hand the latest and best form 
tax deeds. It is suitable for sales under the sev 
eralacts of tiie Legislature, and in conformity 
with all their requisitions, and is preptredby iAe 
State authorities 
Prloe SO oentR per dozen, or $• per h indred. 



w 



ANTED, 



Spikers and laborers on the conBtru<:tion work 
of the St. Paul and Pacific Railroa'i. Liberal 
wages will be pr.id. Payments mace weekly. 
Apply to F. R. Deljmo, Assistant Super intendent, 
at Freight Depot, St. Paul, or John Murphy, 
Foreman, Manomin. 

oc.30tf W. B. LITCHFIELD > fc CO. 



4-00 BARRELS 

GOOD WINTER APl^LES, 

FOR SALE BY 
Gl-eo. £2. ^cliiial>el. 



FOR THE NEXT FOUR WEEKS WE WILL 

SELL ^T COST 

Our stock of 

CLOTHING, 

Shirts, Drawers, Hats 

AXD 

Fnrnisliiiigr Oood-S, 

As at the end of that time we intend leaving for 
the East to purcliasc our 

si»iMivo stock:. 

Those who want BARGAINS IN CLOTHING, 

will find this a rare chance. 

BLOOiHIXGUALE & RHINE, 

sei."* THIRD-ST., ADJOINING THE AMER 
ICAN EXPRESS OFFICE. 

decl5-lmd&w 



TmiM> STIl^EET, 



decl2-tf 



Cor. Jackson and 4th-8ts. 



HOODS, SONTAGS k NUBIAS, 



B^\.LTW[OIl^^4.L 



AND 



HOOF SKIRTS, 



JUST RECEIVED BY 



L. C. BURT 



14 6 



THIRD STREET. 

oc20-ly 



c 



A R P E T S 



STRONG'S CARPET HALL, 

225 Third-st., Rogers' Block, 

where will be found a large assortment of 

Carpets,Oil Cloths, Mattings, 

CURTAIN AND SHADE MATERIALS, 

MATTBKS8E3, FEATHERS, WALi. PA^ER, *C. 

New Goods constantly arriving and sold M 
low as the lowest. 

UPHOLSTERING DOXE TO ORD'^//^ 
marl2-ly B. O. STROITCi. 

ICTEW PHOTOGRAPH GALLERY, 

Third St. .between Cedar and Wabashaw, 

MI. C TTJTTLE. 

Has just opened a New Gallery on the ground 
floor, where he will be pleased to see his old 
friends and customers. His stock and apparatus 
are new, and have all the latest improvements. 

j|a- Especial. Attention given to taking 
Children's Piotuuks 

Pictures from Locket Size to Life Size, in the 

Finest Style. 

j(^ Photograph Alhuma /Urnished as cheap at 
any other House, and a Carte de J'i»i7« taken 
^rmUa 1 no«-tl 



■ ■■ ■ I n 



^* 














^ I 



V 



'*«« ««i^x:: 



^. a^^ 



i 



ftr " r 



— -w- 



^ 



1 



T 



'I 



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*- 




F— 



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\ 



■ ■■» 



ii* ■'■' ' 



Mi^ 




SAmr PAUL PRESS, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 6, 1864. 



! 



gnifi^ aud ^idiauoj* 



SIMS, VAWTER & ROSE. 

DRUGS, DRUGS, MUGS, 



Padwate. 



AT 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

(UNION BLOCK,) 

IVo. Ill Tliircl Street. 

Our aim I^ tokepp in otorc a well selected and 

C-OMPI-KTE ASSORTMENT OF GOODS. 

W»MVflt;:attliii3 far our tMrorts liavc boon luly 
Dpprp.irttfd, and trusSiuj! a continuance 
of latronagp, we roisew 
cudeavor<». 



uitr 



OILS, PAINTS AND GLASS. 

Onr BURMXG OILS we noticp csjKcially.and 

Bsk a trial of its merits. Tiie Oil tliat is 

most i.rKAiti.K, giving the same 

li^lit, \^ of course 

The Oil to T^wy• 

TILDEN'S FLUID EXTRACTS, 

rilli« and Granules, at card prices. 

Hilton's Insoluble Cement, 

For PK-nding Furniture and wood in all shapes; 

Ivory, IJon.', Crockery, Glass, E;'.rthcn- 

Waro, l..'atli<r, Paper, &c., &c., 

SrrKRCKUES ALL OTHERS. 
Tliio Ainovieaii IMojufootlc 

Geo. II. I>ii'.d, Vi'tcriuary Surgeon, says " I have 

ox:uiiined and pronouniv tlu'ni, tfie best 

CONIHTION I'OWDKlt, now in 



Has now received from the Eastern Manufacturers 
a full and complete assortment of 

IRON, 

Harcl-vi^are, IVails, 

Ste.->1 of all kinds. Springs, Axles, Bolts, Nut8, 

Axes, Horse Shoes, 11 orse Kails, Sleigh 

Shoes, Thimblf Skeins, Carriage 

Trimmings, 

\Vagoii and Buggy 'Wood, 

Iron Kettles, Coal, Window Glass and Sash, 
ami alt other Goods in our line, sold Wholesale 
and Ki'titil. 

Warehouse 154 Third street, St. Paul. 

apl7-ly . 

-piONEER FOUNDRY AND 

AGRICULTURAL WORKS, 

ST. PAUL, - - - MINNESOTA, 

Manufactures all kinds of Machinery, Steam 
Engines, Horse Powers, Mill and Machine Cast- 
irga of all descriptions. Having the largest as- 
sortment of Patterns -of any establisluiiont 



(Sw^rrleifii. 



l@04r. 



1804. 



G 



o 



T O 



in 

this State, we are prL^pared to'do all kinds ol Irou 
ami Br.is8 Casting, ol^tinisliing, iiromiitly, at tlie 
lowest KiistiTii rates. Particular attention given 
to Tlirt'shlng Machine, Steam Engine and Boiler 

'•r'n'"''- OII.MAS tCO. 



T 



IIRESHING ftLA^CUINES, 



1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8 and 10 Horse Power, for sale very 



low, at 
Works. 



tlie Pioneer Foundry and 
(aull) GILMA 



ana Agricultural 



& CO. 



SLEIGH SHOES AND 



/CORDAGE, 

FANNING MILLS. 



For sale by 
Jel4-tf 



NICOLS, DEAN ft CO. 



wi: 



HOLD lilt: AGENCY 



Our .-tock of PEKFrMEUlKS and Fancy Goods 
will eiiual any ia the city. 

CALL, EXAMINE, PRICE AND PURCHASE. 



K»M», VA^^TEIt 



dk noss, 

St. Pail, 



T 



HE CELEIJKATED FAMILY DYE 
COLORS. 

to suit dealers, and also at 



In cases, assorteu 
retail. 

SI.MS, VAWTER & ROSE, 



/CARBON OIL. 
Cai-l>oii Oil l>y tlieBain'el. 

For sale low. 
Je5-tf NICOLS, DEAN & CO . 

OHEET IRON, TIN PLATE, COP- 

PER BOTTOMS, 
ZINC AND TINNERS' STOCK, 



I* u T IV A m: » s 



FOR 

FRESH CANNED 

RASPBERRIES, 

BLACKBERRIES,' 
STRAWBERRIES, 
PEACHES, 

PINE APPLES. 

TOMATOES, 

CHERRIES 

NE\^r DRIED 

BLACKBERRIES, 

RASPBERRIES, 
CHERRIES, 

PEACHES, 

APPLES, 

RAISIS'S, 

CITRON, 
CURRANTS, SAGO, FARINA, 

TAPIOCA AND HOMONY. 

Stuart's White Drip, Extra Honey, Golden, Am- 
ber and Sugar House Syrups. 

New Sugar Cared Dried Bet-f, and Pine Apple 

Cheese, atd a complf-te and desirable 

stock ot Freth 

^ r»roviNioiiK. 

S. K. PUTNAM, 

near the Post Offioe. 



COOLEY, CARVER & CO., 
WHOLESALE GROCERS, 

IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 

foreig:n^ and domestic liquors, wmEs, 

CIGARS, &C., &0. 
Jaelrson Street, betvreen Levee and Third, 



§ti^l §0txm. 



O T I C E 



N 



In the matter ol the application of the Minne- 
apolis, Faribault and Cedar Valley Railroad Com- 
pany lor the appointment of three Con jnissioners 
10 examine and assess the damages wl ich may be 
sustained bv the several owners or claimants ot 
the lands th'rough which the road of said Compa- 
ny (the St. Paul branch) Is located within the 
county of Ramsey in the State ol Mi inejota, by 
reason of the appropriation of such lands lor 
Railroad purposes by said Company : 

To the several owners and ciaimi nts ot lue 
lands in tliis notice mentioned, or of any part 
thereof, and to all and every persor or persons 
having or claiming any estate, right oi- interest m 



any portion of such lands : "^'ou"and .jach of V' 



ou 



janl-tf 



SA.I]S^T FAXrHi, 



Nos. 



Grroeevies 



CIDER. 

100 bbls. pure Juice of the Apple, at PUTNAM'S. 
O I* A I? E S . 

25 boxes Isabellas and Catawbas, at PUTNAM'S 



A. I* I* L E S . 

400 barrels Winter, at PUTNAM'S. 



no4 



G 



EO. E. SCHNABEL 

GENERAL DEALER IS 



ap24 ly 



For sale by 
NICOLS. 



DEAN ft CO. 



T3ATENT AMALGAM BELL, 

SCITAllLR FOR A SCHOOL nOUSE 
SMALL CHURCn. 



OR 



For sale low by 
dec2-tf 



NICOLS, DEAN & CO. 



C<OR SALE CHEAP. 



B 



Jy25-tf 



No. Ill Third street. 



s 



TKKLING'S A^HUIOSIA. 



JIETMSTREET'S INIMITABLE IIAIR 
COLOR /yo I OR THE HAIR. 

SIMS, VAWTER i ROSE'S, 

No. Ill Third street. 



Ji-25- 



YTAGAN'S BALM, 

FOR THE COM PL EX TON. 
SIMS, VAWTER & ROSE, 
Jy^S-tf ■ Union Block. 



Stoves, Tin Ware, Hardware, Hollow Ware, 
Steel Traps and Shinties. Highest price paid in 
c.sh for Wheat, Wool, Old Copper, Iron, Lead 
and Rags. Robert-st., ftrst store from Third-st. 

marU-tf WEST & CO. 

DUBOIS BEST CAS'I 

. Also 30 dozen Red Rivei 
Boxes assorted Blued Tacks, first 



^g \ DOZEN 
OXJ steel Axes 



Axes : also 25 
quality, at 



J. C. & H. C. BURBANK ft Co.'s 



SAQI-S WORKS 
MANUFACTURING COMPANY 



ISei. 1864:7 1864. 

AVinter* A.rira.iigreM"'***- 

MINNESOTA STAGE COMPANY. 
PA-SSENGEPv LINK. 




Family Grroceries, 
GRAIN AND PROVISIONS. 

In Moffet's Castle, corner Jackson and Fourl 
street, 

Goods delivered to all parts of the City ftee ol 
charge. "o-'^-t< 

A P P L E S . 

200 bbls. selected 
Fall aiia Winter Apples 

AT PUTNAJl'S. 

Choice Wliite 

Winter Wheat Flour, 

AT PUTNAM'S. 

CHEESE— ONE THOUSAND LBS. 
Extra H:aiiil>virg'li, 

Oc9tl AT PUTNAM'S. 



BRADFORD BROTHERS, 

WHOLESALE DEALERS, 
1ST' aad ISO East "Water Street, 

Are now opening an immense Stock of Domes- 
tic, Staple and Fancy Dry Goods to which they 
call the attention of the Merchants of the North 
west- -among which we offer the following : 

25 Cases M. De Laines, ] 250 Cases Prints, 
25 Bales Twilled Flannels, ^ 200 Bales Shirtings, 

50 Bales Fine Shirting, 
24 Bales Satinets, all grades, 
10 " Grey Cassimeres, 
10 Cases Fancy Cassimeres, 
100 Pieces Alpaccas, 



D. W. INGERSOLL & CO i 

Are BOW eoeivinj an extensive stock of 

Fall and TVinter 

DilYGOODS, 



from 



20 " Plain colored do., 
100 Cases Deniius, 

75 " 
30 " 
50 " 
20 '' 



' Stripes, 

' Ticking, 

' Cotton Flannels, 

' Linseys, 
3000 lbs. AVool Yarn, 
1000 doz. Wool Socks, 
200 Bales assorted Batting, 



2000 



n 



Cob 



ergs, 



VOU V.ANT 



The roaas are well stocked with first class 
horses, Concord Coaches, with carefnl and expe. 
ri«aced drivers, all uader the control of oomp€. 
tent agents. 

SCHEUUIKOF UKPAETl'RES FROM aAIST PAUt*. 

For lla.tines, K«l Wing, Lake City, Reed^s 
Wabashaw, .Vliuneiska, Winona, and La Crosse 
at O'l o'clock A. M. 

:r<»r Stillwater — Dail?' at 8 A. M. 

For -^Miukopee, Jordan, St. Lawrence, Belk 
PlJin. 11 -Ss^A. Le Sueur, Ottawa, Traverse de 
Sioux, St. Peter and ilaukato-Daily at 4 o'clock 

■^'For Rosemount. Castle Kock, Northfield, Can 
non CMty, Faribault. Modford. Clinton Falls a^^^^ 

OwaTouna, conneci.ng at V^***'''"*',, uS?o' 
Kt Marv's WiuiPbaj^o Ag<'ncy and AlanKato 
"•-o 1-or Rkv LaWe, Claremont, Wasioja, M.-ia 
I^^mI, Roche-.ter, ChaiUeld, and Winona-Uail) 

*Vor' ""industriana, Anoka, Orono, Orlando 
Monticello, Clearwat&r, St. Augusta and St. 

^'^:i^ Sa'^ali kapUs,B\^e Prairie, Fort Ripley and 
Crow Wiug-ltondays, Wednesdays and Fii- 

^0,"' liS!^^: '«auk Ce^re Ale^ndna^ 
ChiDi'ewa, Pomme de Terre, Breckinridge, Fort 
Ab^^c-oralie, Mondays and Thursdays at . 

'''FC^Littr'" Canada, Columbus, Sunrise City- 
Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, at 7 o'clock 

■*■ ^'' particulars inquire at the General 



STEAfrl E>(a\KS OU BOILERi 



PATENT FIRE EVAPORATORS. 
PATENT SUGAR CANE MILLS, 

PATEXT STK.\M COIL EVAPORATORS, 

PATENT STAMP MILLS 

FOR 

PIKE'S PEAK OR LAKE SUPERIOB 

Send for Circulars, with cuts and descriptions, 
prices, &c. ; also, 
SAW MILLS, FLOURING MILLS, 

AND MAnilSERT OP ALL DESCRIPTIONS, 

Too numerous to mention. 
CUICAGO, • - Illinois. 

P. W. GA.TE3, President. 
N. B. Agen wanted everywhere. mr7-d&wy 



/^ W. WOOLLEY, 

*LOWER LEVEE, SAINT PAUL, 
FOR^W.A.Ri:>INGr 

AND 

Commission IMercliaiit, 

DEALER IN GROCKRIES 
GRAIN, PROVISIONS, LIME, &C.. &C., tC. 

AND 
AGENT FOR THE 

PENNSYLVANIA RAILROAD AND 

CONNECIIOXS. 
Contracts for transportation between St. Paul 
Boston, New England, Montreal, New \ ork and 
all points East, made upon the lowest and most 

'X7k paclfaTes. -C. W. WOOLLEY. 



janl-dly 



St. PAUL, 
For- 



Twine, Wicking, 
AVaddlng, Cotton Yarn, 
&c., &c., &c., &c. 

ALSO, 

A FULL LINE OF YANKEE NOTIONS, 

WHITE GOODS, RIBBONS, HOODS, 

SHIRTS and DRAWERS, RIBBED JACKETS, 
BLANKETS, SAXONY PLAIDS, HOSIERY, 
GLOVES, BUCK GLOVES and MITTS; 

AND 

Inmimerable other goods pertaining to the Jobbing 
Dry Goods Business, making an Immense Stock 
which for EXTENT, ASSORTMENT and CHEAP 
NESS is unrivalled in the "West. 

To those wishing to buy at New- York Prices 
and less, we would solicit an examination of our 
Stock and Prices. Respectfully, 



are hereby notified that an application will be 
made by and in behalf of the Minneapolis, lari- 
bault and Cedar Valley Railroad Comi.any, to the 
Hon. Edward C. Palmer, .ludg.' of 1 ho District 
Court, of the Second .ludicial Dif.tiict, of the 
State of Minn-'sota, at the Court H nise, in the 
city of Saint Paul, in said Kainsey County, on 
the thirteentli day of January, a. u. ;s<rl, at 
el -veu o'clock in the forenoon of that day, tor 
the api>ointnient of three Commissioners to ex- 
amine and assess the damages which may be sus- 
tainer. bv the several owupr.-; and claiiiants < t tlic 
several pieces, parcls, lots or tracts of land, 
througii or upon wliicli tlie road of sai 1 Companv, 
to wii: the St. Paul branch thereof, is located in 
said county of Ramsey, by reason o tlie appro- 
pi iation and taking thereof by said Company, for 
Kailroiid purposes, to w it : for the right of way 
for their said road, the necessary turnouts, sites 
for water buildings, conduit8,tauks, d -pots, sttre.- 
houses, machine and other shops, and extra 
tracks necessary tlierefor, and to ancertain and 
fix tlie compensaiion to be paid thei elor by said 

Company. , , ,. ... , ,_ 

The following is a description o the lands 
within the said county of IMmsey, through or 
upon which said road is located, and which is 
sought to be taken and appropriated for the pur- 
poses aforesaid : 

In Rice tj- Irvine's AddUwn to S '. Paul. 

Part of lots 5, 6, 7 and 8, in block 3 ). 

Part of lots t>, 7, 8, 9, 10, U and 12, in block 37. 

The whole ol block ;if. 

1 he wliol'J of block :J9. 

The whole of block 40. 

Part of lots 5, »i , 7, 8 and 9, in block 41. 

The whole of block i-i. u^ ^^. ±± 

Part of lots 1 , 2, :{, 4, 5, C, 7, 8 and <;, in block 44. 

Part of lots 1, 2, a, 4, 5 and 11, in block 4a. 

The wliole of lots 1,2, a, 4, 5, band . , in block 4C. 

The whole of block 47. 

The whole of block 48. ^ „ . u, • ^o 

The whole of lots 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and f , in blocK 49. 

Ill Irvine's Enlargemen . 

Part of lots 8, 0, 10, 11, 12 and 13, and the whole 
of lots 17 to 25, incltfsive, in block, f 8. Also, the 
strip of land lying between lots 8 und 9, in said 
block 08, and the whole of blocks i;9 and 70. 

In Lmch's Addition to St, I'aul. 

Part of lot 7, in block 7. 

/;* Winslow^a Addition to St. Paul. 
Part of lots 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5, in block 14. 
Part of lots 4, 5 and 0, in block 15, 
I'art of block 17. 
In Stiusf H, Broicn if Ramsey's Aldition to St. 
Paul. 

Part of the south lialf of block 15. 

Part of lot 11, in the north half ol bloci 15. 

Part of block 10. „ ^. . 

Part ol lots 11, 12, 28, 29, 30, 59,60, 01. 63, 61 and 
05, in the nu'j-dicision of block 28, 

Part of lots 2, 3, 4 and 5, in the sv.b-difision ol 
block 29. 

Also, Part cf the 8 e }i of the a > U of sec. 1, 
of township 28, range 23, and part of the n w .U 
of ihe n e '4 of sec. 12, of tlie same township and 

''"^^* II. R. BIGELOW, Attorreyforthe 

M., F. & C. V. K. 11. Co., St. Paul, Minn. 
Dated December 12tli, a. d. lHH^i . de«U-td 



Late Cash Sales in New York 



Consisting in part of 



NOTICE. 



Milwaukee, Sept. 28, 1863, 



BRADFORD BROTHERS.,,,, 



MIL'W-^TJKBE. 



CASH BUYERS OF DRY GOODS 



J. 



P. HUTCHINSON & CO., 



OommiNMiou IMercliaiit* 

AND 

PRODUCE DEALERS, 

SIBLEY STREET, NEAK LEVEE 

ocl6-ly St. Paul, Minnesota. 

TOEAUPRE & KELLY, 
FORWARDING AND COMMISSION 

AND 

Wholesale Grocers, 

Prince's Block, Jackson-st., St. Paul. 



ARK OFFERED THE 



MOST MANIFEST INDUCEMENTS, 

BY THE NEW HOUSE, 

172 and 174 East Water Street. 



/-COMMISSIONERS' 

The under^^igneQ, having been ( uly appointed 
by the Probate Court of Ramsey County, Com- 
mistionors to receive, examine and audit all 
claims against the estate of Nichol is Heavey, de- 
ceased, hereby give notice that all ]iersons having 
claims against the estate of said d "ceased are re- 
quired to present them to said ( ommissionors 
within six months from the 18th day of ^'ovem- 
ber, 18<«, or be forever barred. „ .. t. • 

The Commissioners will meet on the first >ri- 
dav of each month at ten o'cloci ii the forenoon, 
at the office of K. C. Lambert, TMrd street, in 
the city of St. Paul. 

Dated November 17th, iSd'J. .^ . „^ 

J. Q.A. WARD, 
JAS.D. SKINNER, 
Commissioners of theestMeof 

w no 18-4 w Nicholas Heav ?y, deceased. 



MUSLIN , DE LAINES, 



LUPIN'S TRENCH MERINOES, 

EMPRESS CLOTHS, 

FRENCH REPS, 

PARIS SILK STRIPES, 
PARAMATTAS, 

Alpaccas, Mohairs, &c., &o 
IVXoiiriiiiigr GJ-ood.s. 

LADIES' LONG AND SQUARE 

In every variety. 

^Cloakings, Balmoral Skirts, 

Kid Padded Hoop Skirts, 

Koods, Scarfls, Soiitosr»- 
HOSIER-"^, 

Conaistlng of English and German Cotton, Wool 
len and Worsted Hose. 

LADIES & CHILDREN'S BALMORAL HOSE. 
White and mixed 

WRAPPERS & DRAWERS 

CLOTHS andCASSHaCEIlES. 

White, red and mixed J 

Sheetings, Shirtings, Tickings, 

X>eiiixxis, BlanUfBts. 



( 



au20-d tw&w 



IH-OIV and STEELm 



FREIGHT AGENTS FOR 

Milwaukee & Prairie du Chien R.R 



LAFLIN, SMITH & CO.'S 

St Paul, October 13, 1863. OOl3-6m 



For further p; 
OfHce on Third Street. 

J. G 
»p21-dly 

TD^TTr THE 



BU RBANK & CO. 
Propri<*tor9 



CARS 



Onr Omulbusses will ran to and from th« prln 
d'lal Hotels and Boats in connection with the 

traiui of tha 

ST. PAUL AND PACIFIC RAILROAD. 

Passengers and baggage will ^e .called for in 
an w<-r to orders lelt at the American, Interna 
tion^aand Merchants, - "^l B I^RB^^K^feCO^ 

ERCHANTS^ISPATCH 



M 



Fast 



rlit luine. 



Freij 

0-Y5»-n A»D MASAOKDBT 



EEAYY HAEDWARE- 

O n D E R 
^ H E E,T 1 1^ O IV 5 

NORWAY NAIL RODS, 

BURDEN'S HORSE SHOES 

Nails and Spikes, 
SLEIGH SHOES, 

OUTTKH SHOES, 

Sleigfli and Cnttex 
IMJ IV IV E K- S 5 

Bent Cntter StnfF, 



^min% §Xi^thm^. 



CUTTER, SECOMBE & CO., 

HAVE ESTABLISHED A 

PAPEtt WAREHOUSE 



Wheeler & Wilson's 




WHOLESALE 

In this city, in connection with their 

I»AI*ER MITuL, IIV ST. AIVXHOTVY, 

And desire to caU the attention of buyers to their 

Immense Stock of 

LETTER, NOTE AND CAP PAPER, ENVELOPES, BOOK AND NEWS PRmTFI^T ANB 

ALL KINDS OF WRAPPING PAPERS, PRINTERS' AND WUIrI^G INKS 

AND FLUIDS, PENS, PENCILS, &c., &c. 

Agents for 

GREENLEAF & TAYLOR'S MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

We will sell as low as Eastern Jobbers with Freight added, 

THE HIGHEST MARKET PRICE IN CASH PAID FOR 

PAPER RAGS, ROPE, GUNNIES & OLD NEWSPAPERS 

oc2Mf Office No. 3SO Third-St.. St. Faial. INXiii. 



CHANCERY SALE-C I R C U I T 
COURT OF THE UNITED STATES OF 
AMEIUCA-NINTH CIRCUIT- IN AND FOR 
THE DISTRICT OF IflNNESOTA-SS. 

Cliarles A. Edgorton and Apollc s C. Fdgerton, 
as the Executor.^^ ol the last will and testament 
of Garden II. Edgerton, deceased, vs. Justus C. 
Ramsey, Alexander Ramsey and .ohn P.Owens. 

FORECLOSURE IN CH-ANCERY. 
Decree, June Term, a n. 180:J— $1,303 50, with 
interest, at the rate of seven per cent, per an- 
num, costs and expenses of salt . 
Pursuant to the decretal arder of said 
Court, made inthiscause atthe June Term, there- 
of V. n. 1.S03, the undersigned, a S pcciai Master in 
Chancery, appointed by said C( urt, to execute 
s id decretal order, will sell at pi bile auction, to 
the highest ca.«ii bidder, on 

SATLRDAV, THE SECOND DAY -OF JAN- 
UARY, A. D. IHM, 

\t eleven o'clock in the forencon,at thefront 
entrance to the place of holding said Court, in 
Brown's Block, Third street, in the city of baint 
Paul, in said District of Minnesota: 

riH- following described lands and tenements 
lying and be ug in the city of St. Paul, County of 
Hamsey, and State of Minnesota, described as 
follows, to wit: The undivided one-hall of lots 
mM.d)er lifteen (15), sixf^en (10), seveuieen (1,), 
and eit-liteen (IN), in block numb'r twenty-eight 
■■>K) in Kicc *t Irvine's Addition to Saint laul; 
also, lot number fourfe^^n (H), ii block number 
tweitj-seven, in Rice & Itvin^'s Addition to 
i'aint Paul, together with all i.nd singular the 
appurtensnces and hereditaments thereunto be- 
longing or in any wise appertain ng. 

Special Mas-ter' iu Ciiancefy 
W. K. GasI'^X, Plainlills' Solicitor. 
St. Paul, Min., >ov. 10, lt>03. 



ALL COUNTRY MERCHANTS who purchase 

FOR CASH. 

Should examine our stock before purchasing. 
We will not be undersold in this market. 

r>, w. iiMBre>^»oii ^ Co., 



Sept. 1 :ly 



ST. PAi:i>, mMM. 



w nol8 6w 



ST. PAUL & PACIFIC RAILROAD— WlBiTEll ARRASGEMEtiT. 



CO 



All overcharges settled by J. C. & H. C Bar 

'^New York*otfi"e,'iii Murray street. 

Boston office, oa Washington street. 

inar;:5-d ly . 

BBLS. STUARTS BEST HON- 
er Svrup, a choice article, for table use at 
^ J c! & H. C. BU RBANK & Co.'b. 

A 



20 



T-K7vi50Xl':S V/. R. CHEESE; 

I O W prime article, at low fiirures, at 
•*-^-^ F J (_; ^ gt H. c. BUR B ANK & Co.'B 

-T'I^XrGE STOCK OF CKJARS, 

i\. which we offer at price* that will insure 
quick sales, at^ ^ ^ ^ ^ BURBANK & Co.'B 



125 

Currants and 

prices to Huitjhe times. ^ ^^^^^^^ ^ ^o.^s 



HALL, KIMBARK & CO., 

CHICAGO. 

8u29-d&wt feb 29 



I 15,000 

Of them ia use In this country 
and Europe. 

These are the only machines making 
the Lock Stitch with the Rotating 

Hook. 
Are profitable and available a life 

time. 
Equal to ten seamstresses. 
An annual dividend of 100 to 500 

per cent, fon their cost) may be obtained in 
use— by tfieir possessor. 

The Class Cloth-Presser, (so pop» 
lar,) can only be had with these Machines. 

jjri4 264 Third street, St. Paul. 



On and after JANUARY Ist, 1»04, the Passenger Trains will run as follows 

EVENING. 



MORNING 

Leaves St.Paul 

I^eaves St. Anthony 

Leaves Manomin 

Arrive at Anoka 



7:00 a.m. 

7:45 A.M. 

8:05 A.M. 

8:40 A.M. 



PACKAGES ASSORTED 

Fruits consisting of Plums, Prunes, 
Citron, ail new crop, for sale at 



•xrOU WH.L FIND ONE OF THE 

X largest an.", best selected stocks of Grocer 

I2O 

orauas, at 



BOXES ASSORTED TO- 

bacco, comprising all the favorite 

J. C. & H. C. BURBANK fc Cq.'b 



FAIRBANK'S 
STANDARD 

SCALES 

OF ALL KIHD8. 

AlBO, WarehouseTruckB, Lett«I 
Presses, fcc.,&c. 
FAIRBANKS,GREENLEAFfcCO., 
172 I..ake Street. Chicago. For sale in St. f aui, 
by J. C. & H. C. Burbank & Co. 
Be careful to buy only the genuine 




B'^ 



O T S AND SHOES 



Leaves Anoka S ?^ ^ ' 

Leaves Manomin ore* 

Leaves St.Antliony '-^^ ■*■ 

Arrive at St. Paul 



.10:36 A 



M. 

M. 
M. 
M. 



Leaves St.Paul 

Leaves St. Anthony. 
Leaves Manomin .... 
Arrive at Anoka 

Leaves Anoka 

Leaves Manomin. . . . 
Leaves St. Anthony. 
Arrive at St. Paul... 



, .2 :45 p. M. 

..3:.30P. M. 
..3:50 p.m. 
..4::i5P. M. 

..4.40P. M 

..5:15 P.M. 
..5:40 p. M. 
. .6 :20 P. M. 



Ajs distant Suporintendent. 



Tj^STABLISHED 1760. 

Peter X^orillard, 

SnuiT and Tobacco Manufacturer, 

1«» anil 1«* C;haiuti«'r«-Mt., 

(Formerly 4'i Chambers Stree:, New Yorli,) 
Would call the attention of Deahrs to the articles 
of his manufacture, viz : 

BROWN SNUFF. 

Jacaboy, Demigrot, 

Fine Rappee, Pure VrK'n'at. 

Coariie Rappee, Naclutoches, 

American Gentleman, Copenhagen 

YELLOW SNUFF. 

Scotch; Honey Dew Scotch, Hi.sh Toast Scotch, 

Fresh Honey Dew >cotch, Irish High 

Toast, or Lundyfoot, Fresh 

Scotch. 

«a- Attention is called to tV.e large reduction 

in prices of Fine-Cut Cliewing md Smoking lo- 

bacco, which will be found ol » superior quality. 

TOBACCO 

FINE CUT CH EWING.— P A. L., or plain ; 
Cavendish, or Sweet; Sweet JJcentedOronoco; 

Tin Foil Cavendish. «. _ ,, , .• » 

SMOKING.-Long ; No. 1 ; > o. 2 ; N 08. 1 and 2 

Mixed; Granulated; S. Jago; Spanish; Canae- 

%'. b"-A Circular of prices v HI be sent on ap- 
plication. marl5-ly 



/CLOTHING AND 

Gent's Furnishing Goods, 

AT THB STORE OF 

THIRD ABOVE MINNESOTA ST. 

Overcoats. 

FINE BEAVER $14, $18 and $25. 

BLACK DOESKIN, CASSIMERE 

AND CLOTH $14 to $20. 

PETERSHAM, PILOT & SATINET. .$8 to $18. 

Business Coats, Frocks & Sacks 

A large assortment, $6 to $20. 

Pantaloons for the Million. 

From a coarse Satinet to a fine Doeskin, all new 
goods, and made up in style. 

VESTS. 

Black Doeskin, Ch th. Figured Cassimere, Silk 
and Silk Velvet, of difl'erent grades. 

Shirts and. Ora^vers, 

Winter Caps, Hats, Gloves, Socks, Ties, 
FINE WHITE AND FANCY WOOL SHIRTS. 

We have now in store one of the largest stocks 
of Clothing In the State. Our goods 
bought so tliat we can give bargains 
want of any article in our 
give us a call. 

my30-tf 



. 



have been 
Those in 
do well to 



line would 



LANDS FOR SALE. 



r^ESIRABLE 

Lands in €he valley of the Upper Mississippi, 
and adjacent to the line Of the St. Paul and Paci- 
fic Railroad. .. ^ ^ 

The St. Paul and Pacific Railroad Company 
now offer in tract* of 40, 80, 120 and 100 acres and 
upwards— 120 sectioi's, or 7<i,800 acres oi land, in 
the following townships, viz : 

Town. 32, Range 22. 



apl8tf 



ti 


33, 




22. 


<c 


82 


<i 


23. 


« 


83, 


« 


23. 


« 


32, 


i< 


24. 


(1 


83. 


ii 


24. 


« 


24, 


ti 


24. 


M 


36, 


t« 


24. 


<i 


33 


ii 


25. 


« 


84 


(< 


25. 


«C 


35, 


<i 


25. 


tC 


34, 


<c 


26. 




35, 
^ situa 


ted 


26. 
in the counties 



AT 



J8l4.dwly 



300 



WHOLE, HALF AND QUAR- 

ter boxes Raisins, crop of 18«- . »* 
J. C. 4 U.C. BURBANK & Co.'s 




POLLOCK, 

DONALDSON AND 

O G D E N , 



NEW YORK PRICES, 

so per Oent. Saved 



THE GALENIC INSTITUTE. 

FOR THE TREATMENT OF 

ATEISTEREA-L DISE^IlSES, 



iotefe* 



BV 



BmriNG YOUR SHOES 




AND 



All Affections of the Urinary and Generative 
- Organs, &c., &c. 

Oth edition, conUining 80 large pages 



T 



EMPERANCE HOUSE. 

John BURNH am, Proprle tor, would respect 
fuUy announce to the trav tiling public that he has 
onened the new and commodicus building on the 
corner of Jackson and Fourth streets, for the ac 
oommodation of travelers, wh<Te he will be hap 



These lands »re situated In the counties of 
Anoka, Isanti and Sherburne, and comprise some 
of the mc St valuable lands in the townships 

named. ...,,., 

They w". 1 be sold for cash, the bonds ef 
Company at par, or on lonjj; credit. 
For prices and terms of payment apply to 
LAND COMMISSIONER, 
St. Paul and Pacific Railroad Company, 
ec27-d&w6m St. Paul, Minnesota. 



I 




„. .. PtBUSHKr-A Mltnif *'i .^L^^n^he'lmro^edTre^mentSf^^si^^^^^^^ 
plates and engravingSj^§rice^only^l^5jent8,^on the ['^V^^;'^^ ^^^f^^^^,,^^ ^r Self Abuse on the Body 



XIajrtlien 



mo MY FRIENDS & PATRONS. 

T,-avine engaged mjeerrioeB to the Messrs. J. 

<^ V ?• St issa rt?iT^o!l«^'IS: 

''^r. .T.U i- a S llf ^^iT sheeted stock 
-" „Si ....^'v k.'btin our line, on hand, whi.h 

S? js. As '.vs-t/ju'isJ^s- 

tOMTo ' 



DBALBBS IH 

Oliina, Glass & 
"Ware, 

WITH AH ENDLESS VARIBTT OF 

Housekeeping Articles. 

It is the design of this House to supply HOUSE 

KEEPERS with every possible want. 

UNION BLOCK, No. 116 Third-st., 

COR. THIRD AND ROBERT-STS., MIN. 

]e5-d&W 



AT 



BROWN'S 

NiE^^ STORE!, 
113 Third Street, 

One block above the Merchant's Hot«l. 
je5-y 



___ and 60 fine 

JrsT 
plates { 

Weakness, Nervous 
and Mind, including a Treatise on ^ « .„ * ^ -r-. c^ 

VETSJ^EREAL DISEASES, 

- - • • Bladder, and Kidneys, with 
and the prevention of Con- 
cents or stamps, 
ption, Kc. ceiii I" ""•' ""Y";^ ""^~ "~~._"»<ai /.harter in 1850. The method of treatment adopted 
'i^hls Institution was organized under a «f^^^l>UharteT n^^ American hospitals. The attenSin, 

18 the f'^n'? a«ii>» ,^;"P]^^^a\p of he Co/4f i °^^^^^ Ohioensis. Without degrading it into em^.yrf- 

K^a^-fs AiXM^S^^^^ L^^eTyts^SrS t^^^ 

"^^tSr;?irtaSis'^?eiaSf J&SHeSuar^^^ coulS obUi^ in Eastern 

Thos^ afflicted with any of the above diseases, should let no false delicacy d.ter them, but apply 
at once and be cured. . , -ttention given to all Fero'Ie DIseijes, such as suppressed, or 

Jy^^KhySi"^'^^^ o* the womb and OS Uteri, &c. Aiso. 

Stent fo? d!wX Female Pills, for obstructed Menstruauoii .price « 1 por^box. 




only 

toS^bolt&Vee'o/''c^'i^e. lable supplied with 
the best tiie market affori 
tached to the promises. 
St. Paul, AprU 9.18€3. 



Baggage will )ecaniedfrom and 
c. la 
brds. Good stabling at- 

apll-ly 



N 



O T I C E 



» 



XITHITCHER'S HOTEL. 

Fourth- St., between Rohrrt and Jackson 

ST. PAUL, MINNESOTA, 

E. B. WHITCHER, - • - Proprietor 

The above house having recently been opened 
and thoroughly renovated ai d refurnished, the 
I'roprietor would respectfully solicit a share ol 
• "^ — 49~(f00d Stabling 



the "public patronage, 
careful Hostlers in attendance 



and 
jylO-tf 



PATIENTS AT A Dl.STASCE 

Chart contolning a list of questions, 



100 



KEGS SUGAR HOUSE, GULr 

den and Ambre, a choice article, at 
J. C. fc H. C. BURBAKN k Co.'a 



F 



OR SALE.— A yoke of Oxen suit- 



able for the Pineries. Enquire of 

G. N. BEMAN k CO. 



deoet 



G«rner Rot>«rts and Sth-sU. 



hours fyom 
directed to 

if* 



By sending a brief statement of their syjnptonas.will recei.i« » Blank 

- our terms for tlie course of treatment, *c. Medicines sent tC 

free from damage or cm iosity. 

• ■ andconfldential. Omok 
All letters should be 



-J^„.^Vrtofthe country to cure any case at home, free from cUraage or cuiiosiij 
"i^ Offi.^ in ConceV/HaU Block, near the Post (5flice. Consultations private an 
ho^ from J a/m. to 1 P. M. afternoons, from 3 to 5. Sundays U to 10 A. M. 



THE GALENIC INSTITUTE 

|i«x 199,) S»UtF»al,lHDiieactft 



CIGARS, PIPES. 



TOBACCO, 
SNUFF, &c. 

F. \V^. TXJCHELT, 

Wliolesale and Retail Dealei In Tobacco, Cigars, 
&c. Fine Imported Cigars, Smoking and Chew- 
Ine Tobacco. Fine Cut Che\.ing, superior to any 
Briar Re ot Pipes, a large as- 



MADAilE ANDREWS, 
Clairvoyant, 

Has returned and taken the two story frame house 
on Tenth-st., two doors west of St. Peter-st , on 
right hand side, where she can be consulted for a 
short time only. ^ „ ^ « 

Clairvoyant Examinations fl. Past, Present 
and future, 50c. 

Persons wishing to consult her, are requested 
to walk up stairs without knocking. Hours from 
9 A. M. to 9 p. M. dec8-3m 

rpHUlD STREET PROPERTY. 

FOR SA-TLilBl, 

Lot 2, Block 22, Rice k Irvine's Addition— eomer 
lot, Ti feet front on Third street »nd 150 feet on 
Hill street, acUoinlng Hope Engine House, will 
be sold low. 
TERMS— Part cash and part credit. 

Apply to ^-W^?!',.^ 
apiotf Irvine's BloA 



^ 



^f 



in the city*, 
sortment. 

my«-iy 



Sweet . ^^ ^. ^j,^,ygj .p 

Third-st., near B dgerton's Bank, 

St. Paul. 




DR. DkMONTREVILLE, 

DKNTIST, 

(Office In French's Block,) 

SAINT PAUL MINNESOTA. 

)an29-ly 



,V 






y|^ 



■oiMa 



««■ 



►<*■ 



h f"v 



-tr—r-^. 



r*-« 



•^ " m • « .< H ' g g 



■■ ■J * 



i>. I.. ■ « ■ ■ .iii » i am .M 



-* 



I. m » . «■■» " '« < ■ 11' >■ 



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'ym 



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mfmrn 



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1 



•«MMapi 



THE SATNT PAUL PRESS, WED:rsEgDAY, JANUAl^Y b, 1864. 



THE O^T^^j^ 

^Thermomrtrlcal Record. 

KBPT BY DAY Sc JEN-il^aGGISTS.COESEKO? 

THiBi> Asn ci:r>AR streets. 

7:30 A.M. 1P.M. eP.M 



jAJfCART. 

1 Frl'ftv 

2 Satnril •>•... 

3 Suiiilny 

4 Monday.... 

•Jlolow Zero. 



.30* 
13* 



1*2* 
3* 
4* 



15* 
7* 
4* 



The City Councii..— The City Coun- 
cil held a regular sc hion yostcrJay, but very 
little business of .".ny importance w.ns trans- 
acted. Present, AM. Taine, Livingston, I'cck- 
hnni. Kin-, Uccd, Fink, Eddy, Gro.^, Lctz, 
and the Vice President, Aid. Thompson. 
ri;TiTioN.s. 

A petition was presented from .=cvcral per- 
sons, asking reimbursement for some money 
given to J. II. B»yd. a P^i'-Jper, to enable liuu 
to(?oEa>t to his hicnJ:^. Referred to Comrait- 
tee on Claims. 

From C. Syraonds, asking leave to build an 

Ice House iicar the corner of rcurlh and 

Ro9 ibel btrcet.-^. Referred to Committee on 

Streets. 

MrMoniAL. 

A memoriul to the Postmaster-General for 
Increase of m lil service on the route between 
St. P.inl and Superior, to six iimcs per week, 
and reducing the ranu ng time to three days, 
was read and passed. 

AID TO soi.nir.iis' famii.ii s. 

The Soi-retary of the Helief Fund reported 
188 timilies relieved during December, at an 
expense of S J 10. 

BRIDGE r.ECEIPTS. 

The Bridge Kereiver reported the gross 
amounts o;' toll collected for December to be 

OPENIXG OF STREETS. 

The Commissionrrs appointed in the matter 
of the openin- of Tenth street. Temperance 
stre t and Samt Peter street, m;'.de reports. 
The clerk was msirnctcd to give the usual 
notice. 

IMPROVEMENT B0ND3 FOR TAXES. 

On motion of Aid. Livingston, improvement 
bonds isji-jcd after Deceml)er 31. 1S"3, were 
made receivabio for taxes of 'o2, and prior 
years. 

REtlEF FOR MOKi; VOLlNTEnRS. 

On morion ot Aid. King, the city bounty of 
$3 per month was extended to all volunteers 
who enlisted up to Jan. oth. 

Aftn- <otnc further unimportant business, 

the Council adjouriiod. 

, »»• ■ 

rROP*GATIN-0 AND AcCUMATIXG XuH- 
SERV.— We arc gLid that wc arc to have in 
Saint Paul what wc have long needed— a 
Sccntifie Nursery for acdininting fruit trees 
and propagating valuable plant?. Our well 
known titiz. n. Col. Robertson, Sheriff of the 
Countv, is about to csnbl'sU such an msf.tu- 
tion. We refer to his advertisement else- 
where. Col. R. will in a few days start for 
the Fast to secure a stock of fine trees. Any 
one wishing t". send by him can thus secure 
good and thrifty trees, and avoid buing che ited 
by wandering tree-pcd'.ars. Col. Robertson 
was known in Ohio as one of the best horti- 
cuIturi:Us there, an^l we are glad to hear that 
be has conelu-lod to give the farmers of thi:- 
vicnity the benefit of his experience in aiding 
them to graw fruit. 

If you have not had a carto <1« visito 
of yourself taken yet, be sure to g;> to Tr.ttic's 
fCil'lcry, ISl Third street, and get one in his 
superior style. Tuttle docs not send any 
pic-.urcs away from his establishment except 
they are Xo. 1, in every respect. Unless the 
sitter is pleased with the portrait taken, it is 
not u-ed, but a new one taken. Be sure you 
go to Tiitrie's— you cannot fail of getting a 
good picture there. 



PiiES^ Book Bindery.— We take oc- 
casion to inform our friends and the public that 
we have in conuoction with this office one of the 
best BOOK IJINDKRIES and BLANK BOOK 
MANUFACTOKIKSin thiB city, and arc prepared 
to do RULING and bindisg aa dosired. MAGA- 
ZINES, I'EUIODICALS, &c., bound in any style 
required, and OLD BOOKS re-bound at short 
notice. Ledgers, Journals and Blank Books, for 
Itailroads, .'^teamboats. Banking Houses, &c., 
manufactured on as reasonable terms as any oth- 
er csteblishment. Merchants and othfrs will do 
well '.ogive us a call. 



Mrs. Leoxarp, late from Mt. Auburn 
Seminary, Mississippi, vislies to inform the pub- 
lic thit she will give lessons in Vocal or Instru- 
mental Music, Piano, etc. Persons not having 
an instrument of their own, can practic- on Mrs. 
L 's Piano. For terms apply to her rooms, at Dr. 
Cr.-iry>, Kob<- :■.. ■ --■ ^ • '^^ Williams, flth-st- 

llEiKKK^c;'".— K«v. T^r. McMasters, MungLT 
Brothers, A. T. C. 1 icr:.ou, Kev. Dr. Crary, Fred- 
Dri=coll, Dr. C. D. Williams. dec-20-3ra 

We wilt, do it.— In order to sell ofT 
and reduce our extensive stock of Ci^oririso 

AND GENT'S FURNISUfSQ GOODS, WB OlkT SUr 

whole slook at from 10 to '-'.5 per cent. Itss than 
our rcijular price. We think it safe to say tbat 



STATE afEfVS. 



6TEAUXS COUNTV. 

Mail Route —A petition is in circu- 
lation asking Congress lor the establish- 
ment ofa mail route, with weekly service, 
from Fort Abercrombic to Bannock City, 
in Idaho Territory, following as nearly as 
possible the eour'se pursued by Captain 
Fislc. It is receiving many signatures. 
— St. Cloud Democrat 

GOODllUi: COUNTV. 

At Cannon Falls, in this county, is lo- 
cated a woollen mill which is manufactur- 
ing a better quality of woollen goods than 
our merchants as a general ti ing keep in 
their stores. It is carried on by expe- 
rienced manufacturti.x. who are unable 
to supply the demand for their cloth. 
The proprietors have as fine a wa'cr- 
power as there is in the State, and from 
time to time will make additions and im- 
provements until they will be able to 
supply hair the people of Minnesota with 
woollens. — lied Winy Hep. 

Kkckuits. — This morning thirty-five 
recruits lilt this place for Fort Snelliiig. 
They are fr m riainview, WabashawCo., 



the people rather than to Merchants. Oar i ow 

KHT I-niCK WILL »i: STATED AT OXCi. A call 

from lliose iu want of auy article in our hue id 
rL-spcetfully solicited, 
no-'l-tf W. H. TEMPLE. Third-st. 



Anothkp. stock of Wheeler & Wdson's 
splendid Sewing Machines received by express 
to-day at Mt Third-st. 

F. M. JOHNSON, Agent. 

December 2Sth, I'SGS. dee',>'J-l w 



Gold Pens Re-pointei> Equal 

TO NEW, on the receipt of :!5 ci'nts. 
Circulars for the Johnson Pen, sent oa 
apn'.icatiop, by Mail or otherwise. 
ll, S. JOHNSON, Sfaniifactory and Oflice, 
10 MAIDKN LANE, New York City. 



Aic27- 1 in 

"^X. I». TVICHOLS, 

General Insurance Agent, 

THIRD-ST., 
St. raul, IVIinnesota. 

Policies issued in the following New York Co 

panicH : 

I^orillard, Metropolitan, 
Niagara, 7.^heriix, 

AND MUTUAL BKNKFIT LIFE INS. CO., OF 
NEW JEU6EY. 
js- Combined cash assets over $©,»00,000 



those purchasing of us wUl get Goods about the , ^j^^ voters of which have agreed to give 
wholesale price. We offeMhese inducements to I ^^^ voii,j,(eers a bounty of tlirec hundred 

j^jj^^^ ^j^.^ brought them out, for it 
placed their lamilies above want. Ten 
or more of this number have signed their 
names to go into the Firdt Biitteiy, and 
the balance will })robably go into the cav- 
alry regiment.— ii'eci Wing Volunteer, SWh. 

College at Fkontenac— Rev. B. U. 
Watkins, who has been preaching in Red 
Wing lor a few days, is the projector of 
a college for the benefit of the Society of 
Christian Disciples of Minnesota, to be 
located at Frontenac, in this county. The 
proposed location is one of the best iti 
the State, bt ing on the banks of Lake 
Fepin, where, during the season of navi- 
gation, it can be approached by steam- 
boats. Some fifteen thousand dollars 
have already been pledged by responsible 
parties for the erection of the necessary 
buikbiig, and it is ])voposed to raise 
twenty thousand dollars as a perpetual 
eiidowment, to be taken in hundred dol- 
lar scholarships. Scrip will be issued 
entitling the holders to tuition in 
the institution. There seems to 
be no doubt the enterprise will 
prove a success. We hope so. The 
parlies who have taken hold of the mat- 
ter will be aj)t to go through with it, as 
they are both liberal and responsible. — 
Ibid. 

BLUE EARTH COUNTV. 

Blue Earth has raised a sufllcient 
number of men to clear her from the 
draft. Though ic is jjossible that some 
more will be wanted to take the place of 
those who may be rejected. — Mankato 
Union. 



Do lou Want a Sleigh Ride? 

If so, you will need 

SLEIG^H BELLS AND 
Horse ^Blanliets. 

The larjfcst assortment of which in the city of 

-aiut Paul inuy be found at the Harness Store ot 

S. B. LOYE, 

Who is selling them as low as the lowest. 
KW ^tore next door to Edgerton's Bank, Third 
street. dec3I-tf 



A 



COMFORTABLE SLEIGH 

RIDE 

Can be had by using tha 

IVeAV Foot Stove - 

LAMPS CHEAPER THAN EVER, 

Some as low as 

THIIiT Y-FI VE C ENTS. 

Those usually sold for $1.50, we now sell for 



The place to buy Pocket Knives, Gold 
Pens, .Steel Pens, Pencils, Pen-holders, Ink, 
Mucilase, Envelopes, Cap, Letter and Note 
Paper, Portfolios. Writing Desks, Inkstands, 
Pocket Books, Blank Books, School Books, 
and anythin^r in the line of Miscellaneous 
Books and Stationery, is at :Merrill's popular 
Book Store, Third Street, No one can do 
better than to go there for what they want in 
his line. 



Pioneer Hook and Lapdeh Compa- 
ny No. 1.— The members of the Company are 
hereby notified to attend a regular meeting, 
to be held this evening at 7 o'clock. 

By order of the Foreman. 

F. JANSEN, Scc'y. 



•»»^ 



Any one who has lost a fine shawl can 
get track of it by enqniring at this otlice. 

••» 

The semi-annual muster for the elec- 
tion of oOicers for the ensuing six months of 
the St. Panl Athletic Cinb rooms, on Wednes- 
day ei-ening, January 6th, at 7 1-2 o'clock. A 
full attendance is reiincstcd. 

Pv order of H. C. "MrXGEn, 

2t ■ President. 



No Excuse roit Poou Buead.— We 

tell peope wher.-vor we g i tK t thore is no ex 
cug ■ tor poi r tread and bi.-cuits, if thoy have- 
g« d rtonr. De Land & Co.'s Chemical Saleratus 
mixed with ih > Hour v.ill produco the bri'ad. But 
mind, re ider, tli.\t y.ra al" m"> ft ;:.e .<ipni:ine in 
red pa era. Th -. spurious article is put up in 
green, and who wid be so green as to buy it, 
knowing what it la ? Good grocers sell the gen- 



I.OCA.1^ X4>ffACC9. 



StiR and Gauteu Saloon, Jackson 

street, next t> lllinjwortli's Mammoth Town 
Clock. The only place whore you can gf>t a genu- 
ine Half and Half. Tiie Kar is supplied with the 
choices- Lijuors and Cigars. 0>sier3 served up 
In every style and at all hours. janS-lw 

- . ^^ m 

Grand Bakkle. — A grand raflle will 
take place at Jim Davi#» Muchant^' Exchange. 
on Saturday evcnicg, the filh inst., lor a line 
Horse, « utter, Ilirnesa and Robe— the whole 
▼alued fo' 8U0. The chances are placed at $2 
each— only io chance-. jan5-lw 

Metropoliten Billiard Hall and 

RK.STArRM«T.— Joseph Hall, Proprietor.— This 
establishment is cue of the most fashionable and 
popular in the city, and is fitted up in a style that 
will compile wiih any in the East. Th" Billiard 
Room is furnished with six of Phalen's bfsi 
marbl." bed Tables— two of which are arranged 
for the carom game. Oysters, and all kinds of 
game, &c., will bo >erve 1 up on short order in 
the Restaurant Department. fanS-lm 

DISE.48E3 OF THE NeRVOUS, SeMINAL, 
Urisart asdSexuil Systems— Sew and re- 
liable treatment — in Reports of the HOVVAUD 
ASSOCI.A^TION — St-nt by mail in sealed letter 
envelopes, free of charge. Address, Du J. 
8KILLIN HOUGHTON, Howard Association, 
Wo. 2 South Ninth gtrect, Fhiladelphla, Pa. 

(iec2d&w3m 



Enlist and Avoid the Draft. — 

Kecruits wdl be permitted to enlist in any of the 
organized Regiments or Uatt.ries they may select 
and will receive $30-: bounty and premi'tm. Per 
■uns desiriug to enlist can get any pirticulars, by 
applying to MARK HENDRICKS, Recruiting 
Agent, at th,. Nortliwosiern Express Office, No 
tio 1 bird- t., St. Paul. Office hours from a . m 



E. & II. Y. BELL. 

St. Paul, Dec. 29, 1863. d*^*^^" 

/^ A R D . 

We will offer [forCOdajsJ our entire stock ol 

MILLINERY, 

at from 20 to 25 per cent, reduction ; 

SHAWLS, CLOAKS, CLOAKINGS 

AND FANX'Y ARTICLES, 

10 to 1.5 percent. 
DRESS AND HOUSEKEEPING GOODS, 

at Eastern prices. 

Those Goods were delayed until toolato,and 
now iT'ist be slaughtered to raise moii y. It 
would pav anv lady to keep them over. The Bon- 
net or Hat that cost $10 \esferday, and cheap at 
that, will be $7. .50 lo ijs to day. This is worth 
saving. You can pay your dollar with 75 or fcOc. 
We most respect luily solicit from our former 
custom -r.s and ladies thronpliout the State. Our 
stcre is below Dav & Jpnk'.-i Drug Store, Third 
street, St. Paul, .Minnesota, where ihe \s ax Fig- 
ure U in the Window. 

d c54 Mrs. J. J. DUGAN. 

y ADIES LOOK FOR YOURSELVES. 
SO I^er Cent. 

BELOW COST! 

LARGE REDUCTION IN 

1MIL1L.I1VERY GOODS, 

From this date till the Ist of February. 

MRS. J, B, LYGO, 

Preposes sell og 

WINTER MILLINERY GOODS, 

At the following low prices, viz : 

Velvet Bonnets at $C.OO worth f S.OO 

SilkBonnets $4 00 " $5.00 

Velvet flowers DOc each " tOc 

FeltHats $1.25 «' $1.75 

do $1.00 " $!.50 

Beaver Hats $1.50 " $2.00 

Muslin Flowers 15c each. 

CLOCKS, 

And all articles usually sold in a 
MILI^INEIfcY STORE, 

Including a very large assortment of Ribbons at 
a proportionate reduction. Call and see for your- 
selves I 

NO HUMBUG ! 

MRS. s. o. i.irco. 

p. S.— Mrs. LTGO having imported one of the 
largest M llinery ^tock of Goods ever brought to 
the West, and paid cash prices for the same, is 
thus enabled to offer to the Public the above 
Goods at the largely reduced prices to her Patrons 
and the Public in general. 

X. li.— Having such a large stock of Goods on 
hand, I am obligtd to sacrifice my Goods to make 
room for my Spring Importations. 

nans. jr. b. jlyoo. 

Third street, two doors below 
dec.30-3w Thoiftpsou's Bank. 

XJENJAMIN S. BULL, 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DBALER CI 

CROCKERY. CHINA AND GLASSWARE, 

Harrison's StOTM Block, Minneapolis, Min., 



Transfer of ^Mill rnorERTV. — The 
mill property at Garden City owned by 
Dilly, CnpwtU & Warner, lias been pur- 
chased by H. O. Capwell of the same 
tirin. Mr. Capwell has already put up a 
large dam worth $j')0, and is now get- 
ting out timber lor a gri&t mill, the eree- 
tion of whieh will be commeneed in the 
spring. — Ibid. 

DAKOTA COUNTY. 

For the Fort. — On Tuesday morn- 
ing last, several sleighs left this eily for 
Fort Snclling laden with the reeruils of 
Capt. Smith's Company, now swelled to 
over eijihtv elTi'jient men. — Uasiings In- 
dependerU. 
From the St. Peter Statesman, Doc. 30th, 

Lieut. Gardner started from here this 
xno.-ning with betwe'en 20 and 30 men for 
i- ort Snelling. We believe he has the 
same number there already ; and others 
are to foUov,'. 

Wc learn through j Sir. CofTin that his 
son, B. F . Coffin, of this county, late 
a sergeant in eompany D, Oth regiment, 
has been promoted to 1st Lieutenant in 
a negro regiment. 

Captain Cox commenced recruiting 
here about ten days ago, and has a com- 
pany almost full already. Thomas Hut- 
ledge, of Watonwan county, has joined 
with him — having 29 men. 

Caft. p. B Davj passed down to Fort 
Snelling on ^Monday morning last, and 
was followed yesterday by about 70 men 
from Faribault county, for the 2d Cav- 
alry. 

IIe.wy Clip of Wool. — Alex. Ilar- 
kin, in West Xewlon township, this coun- 
ty, last spring sheared nine pounds of 
wool from one ewe, whieh, at .50 cents 
per pour.d, brought $1.50 ! More than 
this. The same ewe had two lambs, and 
raises two every year. If there are any 
more profitable sheep in tec State, the 
fact ought to be made known. 



A Ifew Sledical IVork. 

Dr. Ounn's New Domestic Physician, or 
Home Book of Health, a complete guide for 
families, giving many valiiatjle siiitKestions 
for avoiding disease, and prolongmj: me. 
and pointing out, in familiar Linixuajie, the 
causes, symptoms, treatment and cure ot 
the diseases incident to men, women and 
children, with the simplest and best I'^m^- 
dies. Moore, Wilstach, Keys & Co., 1 ub- 
lishers, Cincinnati. 

This work of Dr. Gunn's is admirably 
adapted for family use, and supplies a 
want long felt by all intelligent p;rsons. 
It is a medical manual, wherein the "dis- 
eases whieh llesh is heir to'' are explain- 
ed, and remedies given therefor. 

Dr. Gunn will be remembered as the 
author of an old work entitled, "Gimn's 
Domestic Medicine," but this is an en- 
tirely new production, vastly superior 
and more extended. No one can exam- 
ine it without being struck by its compre- 
hensiveness, and the admirable manner 
in which it is arranged, doubles its value. 
No family should be without some medi- 
cal treatise for reference, and to prepare 
such a work is really more difllcuU t'.i;\n 
writing for the profession Dr. Gunn 
seems to have been especially adapted for 
this labor, and has produced a book 
whieh can be readily understood, while it 
gives full and accurate descriptions of 
diseases, and in plain language provides 
a remedy. 

In addition to this it contains a large 
and valuable collection of receipes. an 
instructive trcatiso on the laws of health, 
another on nursing the sick, &c. An 
alphabetically arranged index enables a 
person to find in a moment what the 
work contains concerning any particular 
disease. 

It is a book of 11 2D pages with several 
steel plate engravings, besides a number 
of lloral illustrations. The binding is 
leather and handsomely done. The pi ice 
has been fixed at $6, and few will be- 
gruilge the expense after the purchase 
has once been made. 

Mr. I. S. Dexter, who is agent for 
this State, will canvass this vicinity for 
subscribers. He will also appoint sub- 
agents in various portions of the State 
upon application, either by letter or in 
person, to him in this city. It should be 
borne in mind by those desirous of pur- 
chasing, that this is a subscription book 
exclusively, can be purchased at no book 
store, and can only be obtained of 



wixiis a:^d liquors 

suitable for 

Medicinal and Family Use. 



OLD BOURBON AND RYE WHISKY, 

OLD QUEEN'S PORT WINE, 

OLD MADEIRA WINE, 

FINE OLD PALE SHERRY, 

FINE OLD COGNAC BRANDY, 

CHOICE OLD HOLLAND GIN, 

JAMAICA AND ST. CROIX RUM, 

CHAMPAGNE WINES, 

SPARKLING CATAWBA, 

And all other Articles in our line of busincM 

J. WATSOir irJEllB, Jr., 

Suooessor to WALTER W. WEBB, 
myig Sibley Block. 



?tSJat(Uc^ and f etrdns* 



.-- r. 



B L A K E M A N ' S , 



"--==> 




MERCHANTS IN THE 
COUNTRY 

CAN FIND AT OUR STORE A 
LARGE STOCK OF 



THE NEW JEWELUf STORE, 

Four doors below THOJIPSON & BROTiiER S 

Bank, and next door below SHAW'S 

Fashionable; Hal fcitore. 

On Thii-d Stsroet, 

Can be seen splendid 

SILVER TEA 8ETS, CAKE BASKETS, ICE 

PircflKliS, CASTORS, 

Solid Silver Spoons — Pure as (Join, 

Diamond, Opal and Ruby Rings, SoIJji Go d Ear- 
Rings and Pins iu sets, 

iri'om #1*5 to #50. 

$10,000 worth of SETH THOMAS CI OCRS 

JUST RECEIVED. 
Those wishing to eupplv th{>ms?lves with a per- 
fect Clock, will buy the SETH THOMAS 
CLOCK of 

N. B.— The Cheap American Gothic Click, at 
Factory priccii. All warranted to run well. 

A FIXE AS.S0UTMENT of the American 
manufactured Watch adjusted to heat a»d cold, 
and tt'.e most perfect timer made. A. BLAKE- 
MAN sellt} tliern at manufactory prices, Don'l 
mistake the place. Be sure that you cill in at 
THi: NEW JEWELRY STORE. a;)18-ly 



ar^ REENBACKS ARE GOOD, BUT 
ROBACK'S ARE BETTER." 

nOBACH'8 STOMACH BITTERS. 
ItOMACK'S ttXOMAClI BITTERS. 
MOBACM'S fciTO.UACU BITTEBS. 

used by kteiiybody. 
used by everybody. 
usi:d by everybody. 

USED BY everybody. 

FOR ALL BILIOUS DISEASES. 
FOR ALL niLIOVS DISEASES. 
FOR ALL BILIOUS DISEASES. 
FOR ALL BILIOUS DISEASES. 

THE BE?T TOXIC IX THE WORLD. 
THE BF.Sl TOXIC IX THE WORLD. 
THK BKST TONIC IX THE WORLD. 
THE UEvr TOXIC IX THE WOBLD. 



MEN'S BUFFALO SHOES 



f) C. GREEN LEi^F'S 

Fashionable Jewelry Si ore, 



Tbtrd Street 







tinint JPauI. 



nOBAC-H'S CATA^VBA BBAJTBY. 
JSSOB.^C H'S CATAITKA BRAXBir. 
BOBAC'Iv'M C'ATA^VB.l BSIAXBY. 
ISOUACK4.'M CA'rA^« JBA BBAXBIT, 

MADE FKOM THE CATAWBA GRAPE. 
MADE FRO>I THE CATAWBA GRAPE. 
MAlii-; FROM THE CATAWBA GRAPE. 
MADE FROM THE CATAWBA GRAPE. 

USED IX ALL HOSPITALS. 
USED IN ALL HOSPITALS. 
USED IX ALL HOSPITALS. 
USED IN ALL HOSPITALS. 

ADOPTED BY THE U. S. GOVERNMENT. 
ADOPTED BY THE U. S. GOVERNMENT. 
ADOPTED BY THEU. S. GOVERNMENT. 
ADOPTED iJY THE U. S.GOVERXMEXT. 

Sold in St. P^aul by 
Sold ill Bt. Paul by 

CHARLES A. UPHAM. 
CHARLES A. UPHAM. 

DR. C W. ROBACK, Preprietor, Cin.,0. 
C. A. COOK, Chicaso, General X.W. Agent. 

nol"-eodly 



Ajrn 



Women's Buffalo Shoes. 



agents. 



Being fortunate in the purchase of these, we are 

gelling them for much le«s than they 

bring in Chicago. 



W« hare also a full supply of 



» « » « ♦ 



MONETARY. 

[By Telegraph. J 
Mew York JHonvj Market. 

Nkw Youk, January 5. 



Gold 51, ^', 



• » ♦ « ♦ 



COMMERCIAL. 

[By Telegraph.) 
Hew Yor k Iflarket. 

New Y'okk, Jan. 5. 
Flour quiet ani unchangod. 
Gkain— Wheat steady. Corn heavy and 
shade lower. 



MONKTA-RY. 

COIN AND EXCHANGE QUOTATIONS OF 

Thompson Bro'js., 

Saint Paul, January C, 1804. 

Bankersand licensed Denltrnin Land Warrants, 
Revolutionary and Adult Half Breed Scrip, i}c 

KXCriANOF R\TK8, 

Selling for. Premium 

BankableFunaa H perct.prem 

American Gold 40 >^ perot. 

Orders for United States land Warrsnts.Stat 
Warrants, &c., promptly executed. 

State and United States Coupons paid at ooi 
oounter. 

Passage Certificates via Liverpool and Ham 
burg; ln?fU on England, Ireinnd and Scotland 
France, Germany and Switzerland, Sweden and 
Norway, for sale at our oiBce. 



Keeps constantly on hand a large assortment of 
the above named goods, thither at 

Wholesale or Retail. 

Orders solicited, noll-Cmd&w 



A Bancing- Furtr in :%'om-a7. 

Soon we heard a sound resembling the 
ycHa of a pig. This was a violin. It 
was accompanied by a noiic rcjombiini^ 
the beating of a Hour mill, which, we 
lound, protecuod from the heel of the mu- 
sician, who had placed a wooden board 
under his left loot for the purpose o( 
beating time with effect, lie thus, as it 
were, played the fiddle and beat the 
drum at the same time. Round this mu- 
sician the youn^men and maidens formed 
a ring, and began to dance. There w.is 
little talking, r.nd that little was in an 
undertone. They went to work v.'ith tlie 
utmost gravity and decorum Scarcely 
a laugh was heard — nothing approaching 
to a shout during the whole night — nev- 
ertheless, they enjoyed themselves thor- 
oughly. I have no doubt whatever ol' 
that. ' The nature of their dance was 
somewhat incomprehensible. It seemed 
as if the chief object of the young men 
was to exhibit their agility by every spe- 
cies of impromptu bound and fling of 
v.hich the human frame is capable, includ- 
ing the rather desperate feat of dashing 
themselves flat upon the ground. The 
principal care of the girls seemed to be 
lo keep out of the way of the men, and 
to avoid being killed by a frantic kick, or 
felled by a random blow. But the des- 
perate features in each dance did not ap- 
pear at first. Every man began by 
seizing his partner's hand, and dragging 
her around the circle, ever and anon 
twirling her ronnd violently with one arm 
and catching her round the waist with the 
other, in order, as it appeared to me, to 
save her from an untimely end. To this 
treatment the fair damsels submitted with 
pleased though bashful looks. 13ut soon 
the men flung them off, and went at it 
entirely on their own account ; yet they 
kept up a sort of revolving course round 
their partners, like satellites encircling 
their separate suns. Presently the 
satellites assumed some of the charac- 
teristics of the comet. They ru.'-hed 
about the circle in wide erratic courses ; 
they leaped into the air, and while in that 
position slapped the soles of their feet 
with both hands. Should any one deem 
this an easy feat let them try it. 

Then they became a little more sane, 
and a waltz, or something like it, was got 
up. It was really pretty, and some of 
the movements were graceful ; but the 
wild spirit of the glens re-entered the 
men rather suJdenly. The females were 
expelled from the ring altogether, and 
the youths braced themselves up for a 
little really heavy work; they iUing and 
hurled themselves about like maniacs, 
stood on their heads and walked on their 
hands — in short, became a company oi 
acrobats, vet always kept up a sympa- 
thetic feeling for time with thn music, lint 
not a man, woman or child there gave 
vent to his or her feelings in laughter. 
They smiled ; they commented in a soft 
tone"; they looked happy — n.ay. I am 
convinced they were happy — but they 
did not laugh. Only once did they give 
away to noisy mirth, and that was when 
an aspiring youth (after having made the 
nearest possible approach to suicide) 
walked round the circle on his hands r.nd 
shock his feet in the air. We left them, 
after a time, in the full swing of a pros- 
perous manufacture of enjoyment, and 
walked home, about two oVlock in the 
morning, by brilliant dayligat.— Good 
Words. 



OIL TAN MOCCASINS, 



:MITTS AXD GLOYKb. 

Please call on us and we guarantee to show you a 

Complete ©t^ocU 

AT 

LOW PRICES. 

WML. J. SMIXH & CO., 



ST. PAUL. 



declC-3m 



o 



Y S T E R S-0 Y S T E R S 



1 he undersigned are now and have been for th« 
past TEN YEAUS, the Only Agents In Minnesota 
for 

MALTBY'S CELEBRATED 
BALTIMORE 

OYSTERS. 

We GU.\RANTEE to the public that the'C 
Oy ters are superior to any others brought to Ins 
market. The cans are larger, and are Jilled with 
Oysters. , , . 

4^ A. large supply constantly on hana. 

Orders Irom any part of the fctatc promptly at- 
tended to. 

Depot «10 Tliir-a Street, 

St. I*a"l. 

no20-tf J. C. BURBANK fc CO. 



The ladies and griitiemt:! oi ihi^ city and vioir- 
lty,are invited to call and examine the 

LARGEST AND CHOICEST ASSORIMENl 

or SKW STTLES OF JtWEI.RT, 

G^oia auil Silver IVatc lies, 

cLOCTca, sn.vER wark, platkd ware, 

DIAMOND GOOIjS, SILVER TEA SETS, 

Ca:-tor8, Cake Baskets, Gold Chains, Pin^s 
ThimUles, and everything else pertain ng to a 

FIRST CLASS JEWELRY STORE 

My goods wpr« purchased exclusively for cash 
from th!' largest wholesale houses in the Union 
andaro for sisilc at tlie 

J.O^VEST FRICES. 

All goods warrarcd pr»cisoly cs represented 
Cash paid for o!d Gold and .Silvor. A fuil ^lIpply 
WA'JCH MAlKlilALS always on hand. 

Agent for Seth Thomas' Clocks, also t gent for 
the celebrated 

A.meri«fin TTatciies. 

Parttcular attpntlon paid to repairing every 
df scriptlon of Watches, Clocks, and .It v.-eh-y in 
the be.st possible manu >r. We miaufi.cture oil 
km-ii of 

Or any other pattern ol Jewelry, &c.. In our line. 
All work will 'oa done tironiptly ia a 'vorkman- 
likemaiincr on-l ^'-itkr tka.n a:im (HHKRES- 

r/iDLISMMKM' s > II IS M <;T10N Ov TilK cori! 

TRY. Ali ord I J uy letter or otherwise will ro 
coivo prorapi atteriilou. 

,\llkiu<^Hof n>j\v wheels and new p: rtn of ttif 
watch niauuliictured for the trad.; ct a r.'asoua'ule 
discount. . . ., ^ i 

S<orcin Groenleaf's Klock, opposite Concert 
Uall, near the fost OL"::'-. 

apAtl. D-.C.GREKNLKAF. 

]>■■■■■■ I ■ ■li.JBJ-tf— C— CM**— — ^— '*^**^^'**^***^^^*'^** 

pOSTER & nARDE>:BURGiI, 

SHIP CHANDLERS AND 
SAIL MAKERS, 

So. aur Sonib water »«re«>t, C blcag-o* 

Have constantly on hard a large assortment ol 

l^Ianilla Sc Tnrred It ape, 
I>itoliiiijar rtopesj. 

Old Canvass, Oakum, Tar, Pitch, 

CUAmS. TACKLE BLOCKS, TEN c, AWK 

IXGS, WAGON COVERS, COT ION 

AND RCS.'hlA DUCKS, 

Common and Patent Hoint ^Theela, for build 

ings, constantly on lianc?. 
GEO. F. FosTKR. (Jei:My) c. >f. HAKni!:?.'BURon 

T3IANOS AND MELODEOIJS. 

17-. o. \viLr>id?, &' CO., 

Dealers in 'ianoForlP'', M^lodoons, Ilarmoni- 
ums 'cabinet Organs, .Sheet JIusic, ^iUMC Books, 
&c., SiC, No. v:>0 I hird-st.,Coriierof St IVter-st.. 
!rU. Paul. Mill. K^ota. Agents for the celebrated 
\. M Md'h 1^1 fe Co.'d S! ir and Gran 1 Scalo 1 1- 
Iitvis, Al-io, tiie I'lrlorGem , . ,. 

Mr. Wilder 1:^ a I'iasio JUkcr, and 1.;:? been in 
the business over 20 years, and will s >!1 nothing 
but tirst-cla.-s instruments. Kvery Instrument 
will be warranted, and all Pianos sold t»y the firm 
will be kept in tune one year free oi' charge, il 
within a reasonable distance. 

*3- I'ianos and Melodeons tuned and repaired. 

Li'isou gi\enonthe I'ianoimd ileloieon. 
no20-dbwiy 



p R I N C E & GO'S. 

IMPROVED 

Mii:i.oi3^ji:oN SI 

WARRANTED FOR FIVE YKAR8. 



The oldest e-^tablisbimnt in the United State*, 
employing 200 mes, and tiniKhing eighty iDStm* 
menls per week. 

MANUFACT.OEr COP.KKP. OF MARYLAND AHD 

KIAGAHA ETKKKTS, 

BXJFiTu^XuO, IN'. Y. 



WHOLESALE 

47 Fulton street 

43 Lake street 

WHOLESALE 

llonry Tollnj:;n & Ct 

VT. F. Coihnrn 

Balmor & Weber 

Jamf^s IJeliak 

A. Couse •• 

Ph. P. Werlein 

A. & S. Kordheimer 



DEPOTS. 

NcTT York 

Chicago 

AGENTS. 

Boston, Mast 

(Mncinnati, C 

, St. Louis, M< 

Philaclelphlf 

Detroit, Micl 

New Orleani 

Toronto CM 



Persons unaconrdnted with the Mclodeon an< 
its hlUorv, Will bear in mind tl:at we arc the pic 
neersaiid loading manufacturers, not only in tn( 
Unite 1 States, but fji the world. We conin'.enep( 
the mir.uiacture of Melodeons in the fall o! tw 
vear 1.S17, and since thct time Lave finished ant 
sold TWENTV-bEVEN THOLSAND. 'fheel 
instrunieuts ai" now iu use not only in the Uni< 
ted States and Canida, but also in Europe, Asir. 
AfricT, Soiuh America and the We^t Indies, aD4 
from a 1 these quarters we have the rncst Caltep 
tng testimonials of the high estiiuation in wUicI 
they are held. 

AT ALL i;;i)USTRIAL EXHI^XTIONS THKl 
HAVE INVARIABLY BEEN AWARDED 
THE HIGIIKST rKEMILM WIIEN- 
KVEil l^XIflBI TED IN COMPE- 
TITION WITH OTHERS. 

We shall take pleasure in forwarding by mail, 
(at our own expeube), our Illustrated C atalogne, 
in which every iustrumeji' we nianufucture is 
fully described and illuslralcci by elegant engra* 

ving**. 

All Melodeons of our mp.r.ufacture, either Bold 
by us or dealers in any part ot ihe United States 
or Ca ada, are warranted to be periect in every 
rerpeci.r.nd should any rep.-.irs be necessary be- 
fore \h'i I'xiiiratlt n ol live years fiom date of 
eale, wc hold ourselv; s ready and willingto make 
the Slime free of rV.'.irge, provided the injury is 
not caused by accident or i esi.m. 

Agents fur the sale of our Melodeons may be 
found in ell the princiijal towns of the Uuited 
Strtes and Canada. 

Address either 
O EO. A. PKl NCE & CO., Buffnlo, N. ^ . 
GEO, A. PRiN<;E &<:«>, h7 Fuiton-st., N. T. 
GKO. A. PRINCE & CO., 43 Lako-st., Chicago. 

Or either of the above Wi-.oh'.-alc Agents. 

j»3- For sale by MUNGER BROS., Agents, St. 
Pa ul, Minnesota. apr2'.>-d&wly'6t 

/-CHICAGO BREWERY. 



]y>JlCIIIGAN 



l^ORTH WESTERN 

Ale and Porter Brewery, 

ST. PAUL, MINNESOTA. 

DRE'^IVRY Sc SCOTTEIV 

Breweri? of 

Stock and Cream Ale and 
Foi'ter. 

Delivered to any part of the city in Barrels, Half 
and Quarter Barrels. 

ALSO 

Bottled Ale &I*oirter 

EXPRESSLY FOR HOTEL AND 
FAMILY USE. 



> Ordars flrom the country soHolted. 



Jani-ly 



» » » » ♦ 



Preaent Coventors of Rebel State*- 

From the Richmond Sentinel, Deo. 8. 

The following is a list of the Govern- 
ors of the several States of the Confede- 
racy : 

Alabama— Thomas H. Watts. 

Arkansas— E. Flannagin. 

Florida— John Milton. 

Georgia— Joseph E. Brown. 

Kentucky— Richard llawes. 

Lousiana— Henry W. Allen. 

Mississippi— Charles Clarke. 

Missouri— T. C. Reynolds. 

North Carolina— Z. B. Vance. 

South Carolina— L. M. Bonham. 

Tennessee— Robert L. Carathers (not yet 
inaugurated.) 

Texas— Pendleton Murrah. 

Virginiit-WUUam Smith (from January, 
186i.) 



CENTRAL RAIL 

liOAD. 

Oreat Central I?^oiito 

To New York, New England and the 
Canada s. 

Onandafler SUNDAY, Nov. 15th, 18(13, trains 

leave the Great Central Union Depot, foot of Lake 

street, as followH : 

O.aO a. m.— (Sundays excoplcd.) arrives at 
Detroit at CW r. Ji. ; Toronto 4.0o 
A.M.; »<u«pension Bridge 4 05 A, 
M.; lluffalo. 4.:iOA, M.; Albany, 
3,'l5 p, V. ; New York, 9,-30 v. M.; 
Boston, Iti.OO A.M. 

a.40 p. ■»,— (Saturdays excepted.) arrives at 
Detroit at 0,00 A. M,; Toronto, 
4 4'> 1*. M.; Suspension Bridge, 
4.45 P. M. ; Buffalo, 5.00 P. M. ; Al- 
bany. .'■>.^5 A. M.; New York, 11.50 
A. M.; Boston, 4.00 p. m. 

lOOOn.m.— (Saturdays and Sundays except- 
■ ed,) arrives at Detroit 10.00 A.M.; 

Tr.ronto, V.05 P.M.; Suspension 
Bridee, 9.10 p.m.; A'bany, 8.40 
A. M.; New Vork, 2 45 P.M.; Bos- 
ton 5.00 P. M, 
Cincinnati trains, via SI. C. Railroad, leave 

Chicago at 0.30 a.m., Mail Train; 10 p. M.last 

Expresf. 
The 10 P.M. train leaving Chicago runs through 

to Cincinnati without change of cars or bagjtago. 
RUTTAN'S P»TENT VENTILATING AND 

WAH.MING APPARATUS on «11 Cars of this 

Company. An elegant Smokers' Car, with Euchre 

Tables, has lately been added to our Day Trams. 

Patent Sleeping Cars on Night Trains. 

Itagvag'e Checked Tlsrougrli. 

as- Through tickets for sale at all Principal 
Railroad Officer in the We8t,at the General Office, 
corner Lake and Dearborn streets, f under the 
Tremont House,) Chicago, and at the Depot. 

R. N. RICE, General SupenntenUent. 
lECWENTWORfH, 
my5-tf Gen'l Western Pass. Ag't, Chicago' 



100 



BARRKLS CIDEU, 



Ju-tt received on consignment and to- de low. 
oc25tf .EC. teli.C. BCHBANK CO. 



LILIi & T>1VEIISY 

BREWERS OF 

LILL'S SXOCK 

Aro 

Oream I?a-le Ale, 

IjA.g-er. beer, 
PORTER AND BROWN STOUT 

FOB SALE BY 

WM. CONSTANS, 
oc21-.'Jm Ar.KNT. St. PArt.. 



H 



URRY UP! HURRY UP! 



All you Mechanics, that want TOOLS, come 
right along, and lill up your chests, wlile you can 
do It at low prices, 

no?2-:;m JOHN MoCLOUD, Brown's Block. 



QRIENTAL POWDER CO.. 

Offer for sale a superior quality of 

RIFLE SIZE TO COARSE DUCKING, 
In kees and cannlster. Also the famous Diamond 
Grain Powder, G, NEsVHALL, Ju , 

Wholesale Agent, Ki River street, Cliicago, 
ENOCH WOODS, 180 Lake-«t., 
dec20-3in Afi«ntfo< Ctdcv*. 



T M c CLOUD, JR. 
Commercial Broker, 

No. 103 Third Street, (Catholic 31eck,) 

Will buy and sell 

REAL E-STATE, AND. MERCHANDISE 

Of all kinds on Commission, 
LOAN MONEY, MAKE COLLECTIONS, PAY 
TAXES, AC, &C. 
«^ Commissions solicited and piomplly at- 
tended to, na20-.3m 



L 



]•: C T U R E S 



Will commence a -Miort course of l<FCtures on 
various Scientific and Social QuestJors. at 

iisraEiisoLX^'s hall, 

in this city, on 
SATURDAY EVEXIXG, January 9<A, 1864 
j^" Fee posters and circulars. 
dec27-ld A. TOWNSON', Agent. 



u 



NITED STATES NAVY. 



IMCEIV WANTED 

FOB THE UNITED STATES NAVY, TO 

SERVE IN THE MlSSlSSIPi^I 

.SQUADRON. 

Good pay and prize money sriven'. 

Recruits will be shipped for one, two, or tore* 
years, or during the war. 

The fact that men may enlist for one year with 
Bood quarters on ship board, good pay and pnre 
I. oney, wiiicli Has ilms lUr amoui.ted to more 
than tne bounty paid fur the army reciuits. 

Each recruit for one year wid receive the fol- 
lowing artiiles of clothing. 

One pea jacket. 

One pair btue cloth trousers. 

One blue flannel overshirt. 

Two under flinnel khirts'. 

Two pairs of llannel drawe."3. 

One maftrass. 

Two blankets. 

(<ne seamless cap. 

One black hUk handkerchief. 

All of navy pattern. 

AdoIv at ttie Uuit<?d States Naval RendeiWMii, 
over LANGLEY & TEMPLE'S AUCllOI* 

STORE, Third street, St. Paul. 

° ' A, WILLAKD CREED, 

no25-2m Recruiting Agcat U. S. Kavy. 



L BEACH & CO., 
• Afanufacturers of superior 

SOAI? -AJSI> CAIVI>LE8, 

Eaglt-St., near Upper Levee. 

HIGHEST MARKET PRICE PAID FOB 

X^ard, Tallo-w and Oreaso 

U BEACH, f 8Pt^6-lyd&Wl A. W. PEARSOW 



A 



PPLES— APPLES— APPLES. 



A very choice lot of selected Winter Fruit, for 
sale by the single bbl. or quantity, by 

J. P. HUTCHINSON & CO., 
no20 Sibley -St, between Third and Levee. 



TEAM ENGINES AND BOILERS, 

New and second hand, for sale extremely low, 
.. tt,, riower Foundry. ^^^^^ ^ ^ 



S 



1 CARBON OIL, 



J^O. 

For sale low, wholesale and retail to close con- 
signment, at 

The St. Paul r^mp Store, 

decC tf Opposite Pioneer Office. 



P 



RINTERS' INKS. 



All sorts, kinds, and colors, from tt e celebrated 
nanulactory of J. E. Wade, New Y<irk, for sale 
at manufiioturer's jprices, by ^,^„ . „,, .. /v« 

deou a.C.*tt.C,BU|»A.SIKfcCO. 



^OO V(>LUNTEERS WANTED 

For the 5tli Regiment Minnesota 
Infantry Volunteers. 

f 402 Bounty will bo paid to veterans. 
^03 " to new recrtWts, rations, clothisf , 

and* 13 per month, -.,„'TT»\rTt nruw .t 
Apply to Lieut, Col, ^ ILLTAM B. GE»E, at 
recruiting rendezvous, MiKubiu s block. Third 
street. St. Paul; Capt. E. A. RICE, ^anlwiult. or 
cS^T; J. SUKKlUN. Albc-rt Lea, H^^cr^^ 



^. i^ ,»—.''• 



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TTwrrrsr 



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THE SAINT 



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aIl 



DAILY PRESS 



VOLUME IV. 



She ^aint f aul i«Stf. 



SAINT PAUL, THTRSDAY. JAN. 7. 



THE 3lf:«l». 

Aftfr patiently emiuriiig the trilnila- 
tlons oi' publlsliinj^ a HtfJCA-paper, witli- 
uut liavi!:g received a mail for five days, 
it does seem a little cruel to be cut olF 1 j|^g 
from telegraphic communication. ' •^^ ires 
down— impossible to get them uv yester- 
day,' is the story in brief. We see a 
^dimmer of light ahead ; last Saturday's 
mail reached here last night, the magic 
spill of no mails is broken and the re- 
mainder now due may come to hand be- 
fore the openinj; of navigation. 

Lk«;i>i-ativk. — lioth Houses of the 
Le<'i=ilatiire were organized yesterday, a 
notice of which appears appears else- 
where. Hon. Jared Benson was chosen 
Speaker of the House unanimously, and 
upon accepting the Chair made a brief 
and elo<iuent spee.-h which will be found 
in our regular report. 

.\ joint committee was appointed to 
wait upon (lovernor Swift, and inform 
him lli;it the Legislatmv was ready to re- 
ceive any communication he might wish 
to uvike. He inform*^d the committee 
that he would be ready to deliver his 
message on Friday. 



their electors are chosen by the State 
Legislature; and Virginia is not included 
because it is not mentioned in the Presi- 
dent's Troclamation. It will be an easy 
matter to get the above number of votes 
in th« States named. Arkansas, Texas, 
Tennessee and Louisiana are more ihan 
prepared to accept the required condi- 
tions, and the rest will soon wheel into 



HAT-NTT- PJiJJJu, THXJRSE^Y. J^lSrU^RY 7, 1864. 

3 



NUMBER 5. 



From every point of the South where 
our arms are giving protection to the 
leople, the ue^vs comes up of a rapidly 



r 



(^rowing L'nlon sentiment. 

The stone is being rolled away from 
the sepulcbie of Southern loyalty, and 
the trumpet blast which announces the 
final victory over the Rebellion will be 
the signal of a universal resurrection of the 
buried patriotism of the South. The ball 
of reconstruction has been started in Ten- 
nessee, anil it will continue to roll on till 
every State is brought back to the Union 

loM.' 

What may be called the common peo- 
ple of the South have never lost their 
faith in the United St.ates Government, 
or their love for the old llag, and though 
they wore tricked into rebellion by their 
rulers, they have never been made to 
comprehend the subtle sophisms upon 
which the act was sought to be justified, 
or to realize any necessity or just cause 
for it. This is not only the feeling of the 
nou-slavehoU'.ing Unionists who hive 
kept aloof from the rebellion, but of tens 
of thousands who have bravely fought 
for a cause whose hopelessness betr.iys 
the secret of the guilt which sophi^try and 
falsehood have sought to hide. 

The rank and file of the rebel armies 
are fa>t beginning, from the rapid and 
disastrous failure of one after another of 
the brilliant promises held out to them 
by their balers, to realize the extent of 
the treacherv' which has duped them into 
rebellion. 

And the fact that it is no love for 
the cause they serve which keeps them in 
its ranks is amply pro\ ed by the desper- 
perate and infamous meanness which are 
resorted to to retain them in the 
service when their term of re-en- 
llstment has or shall have ex- 
pired. A bill has been Introduced 
into the rebel Congress eorapellin,' every 
rebel soldier, in violation of the 
terms of their enlistment, to . remain 
in the service tdl the close of the war— an 
act of tyrranny and tripitude which re- 
veals not only the desperation of the rebel 
chiefs but the disaflection of the army 
which requires such means of keeping it 
together. 

Could the President's Amnesty Procla- 
mation bo read to the rebel soldiers, and 
the men allowed free action to choose for 
themselves, there is every evidence in 
what has already transpired, that whole 
brigades would gladly accept the proffer- 
ed terms of pardon and return to their 
allegiance. And this will, in all proba- 
bilitv be the case before long, as the 
proclamation shall become known and 
discussed among the soldiers, ami oppor- 
tunity can be obtained to escape from the 
rebel lines. But those who are not held 
by the iron grasp of the rebel despotism 
in the ranks of the army or in the coun- 
try still subject to their sway, will take 
the eirliest opportunity to accept the 
terms of the proclamation and return to 

the Union. 
The work of reconstruction under the 

President's programme will first reach the 
test of actual experiment in Tennessee. 
The whole vote for President in Tennes- 
see in 18t30 was Mo,383, and under the 
proclamation it will require but one-tenth 
of these, or 1 l,o38 voters to reconstruct 
the State Government. 

In Arkansas, immense Union meetings 
arc being held, and resolutions adopted 
endorsing all tha acts of the Administra- 
tion, and call for a convention to restore 
the Stat J Government without slavery. 

In Texas, with the advance of Banks' 
forces, the Union sentiment is spreading 
like wild-tire, and thousands are flocking 
back to the protection of the old flag. 

And so the good work goes on all thro' 
the South 



THE I.E«l»LATi;itE 

The Fifth Legislature, in respect to 
the personal ch.aracter of its members is 
hi'dilv creditable to the average intelli- 
eence and discrimination of the constitu- 
encies whom they represent, ami to 
the State whose wellare is entrusted to 
their hands. We doubt very much if 
there is another frontier State in the Un- 
ion whose representative bodies are com- 
posed of as good material, or aggregate 
as great an amount of sterling character 
and educated intelligence as the recent 
Let^islatures of Minnesota; and the prrs- 
ent body compares favorably in these 
respects with any of its j>redecessor3. The 
Senate is; composed chielly of old mem- 
bers, some of them like Messrs. Thatcher 
of (ioodhue, and Sprague of Mower, hav- 
ing heretofore occupied seats in the Kep- 
resentative branch, while the latter body 
is made up largely of new material. 

The session does not promise to be an 
exciting one, as it is probable but few 
measures of great importance will re- 
(piire legislative action. 

In developing and maintaining the pru- 
dent and economical policies of their 
predecessors, and correcting the errors 
which experience has revealed in the op- 
eration of past legislation, they will find 
ample scope for the wise statesmenship 
which has heretofore characterized the 
action of our Republican Legislatures. 

THE ORCiAXIXATlOSf OF THE 
I.ECiIS»I.ATVRE. 

The Legislature was fully organized 
yesterday and is now ready for business. 
The election of Hon. Jared Benson for 
Speaker, without opposition, is a flatter- 
ing recognition of the popularity which 
that "entleman has won during his legis- 
lative career ; and of the sterling merit 
upon which his popularity rests. 

This is the third term for which Mr. 
Benson has been designated by the favor 
of the House to the Speakership of that 
bodv, a sufficient proof of his superior 
qualifications for the position. 

Andrew C. Dunn of Faribault County, 
and one of the best fellows in the world, 
was unanimously elected Chief Clerk of 
the House. 

The familiar face of our old friend Sol. 
Snow looms up as of old, in the desk of 
Assistant Clerk. 

The other oflicers of this body are not 
personally known to us. 

In the Senate, E. B. Ames, of Henne- 
pin, again assumes the part he filled so 
well last year, as Secretary. Geo. P. 
Wilson, of Houston, a i ew man,butdes- 
tlned to be a favorite, is his assistant. 

A. Stroecker, last year Enrolling Clerk 
of the House, is now transferred to the 
corresponding position in the Senate. 

J. H. Brant, Engrossing Clerk, we do 
not know. 

Levi Nutting again stands guard with 
the helmet of righteousness and the ar- 
mor of good nature, at the post of Ser- 
geant-at-Arms, to keep the wheels of leg- 
islation from flying off the track. 

Charly Weed, of our county, a sort of 
incarnate summer, sheds his genial 
warmth over the assembly as Fireman of 
the body. 

Rev. F. A. Noble, the eloquent clerg}'- 
man of the House of Hope does the pray- 
ing for all the rest. 

Fred. Uriscoll— Incidental Printer— 
wa think we know— but shall say nothing 

about him. 

» « ♦ » ♦ 



benefit of law, and the question might be 
discussed as to whether the refusal to 
give another, that which he does not 
himself possess, works any serious de- 
privation ; but it is too plain in this case 
to need elucdiation. Our government 
has at last determined to resent this un- 
heard of assumption by a paper nation, 
and the result of the measures taken will 
be watched with interest. Instead of ac- 
ceding to the infamous demands of the 
rebels, the authority of Ben Butler has 
been extended, and we are inclined to 
lelievethat with thirly thousand rebel 
prisoners under his iron rod, he will 
teach them there is a God in Israel, not- 
withstanding the "pale of military re- 
spectability." 

♦ 1 ♦ » ♦ 



Legislature of Minnesota. 



SIXTH SESSION. 



Legislative Items. 

Two Patriots Ei.KcrKi) to Okfice. 
-In the House of Representatives, two 
soldiers, each of whom has given an arm 
to his country, have been elected as ofli- 
cers. Erskin Ilawley, late of Co. A, 
Uth Wisconsin, regiment, and who lost 
his left arm at the siege of Vicksburg, by 
a bal', has been appointed messenger. 
He is a son of Rev. S. Ilawley, of this 
city. William Mortimer, late of the 4th 
Minnesota regiment, has been elected 
fireman. He lost his right arm in a skir- 
mish with guerrillas at Bradley's Land- 
ing, Arkansas, a shell which he was put- 
ting into a gun bursting prematurely. We 
are glad to see our disabled patriots elec- 
ted to office. They deserve it. 

♦ » ^ » ■ — 

Wk call attention to the prospectus 
published elsewhere of the New York 
World— \hQ organ of the Seymour Cop- 
perheads. If any body in this direction 
wants to see how weak a case the best 
journalistic talent on the Copperhead 
side can make out for the opposition to 
the Administration, we commend them 
to the World. 

nialornv on Supplies. 

From the Richmond Whig, Dec. 31. 

Member of Congress— How do you 
supply yourselves with fuel ? 

(jlerk— Go without it for the most 

part ? 

M. C— What, in this cold weather? 



Clerk — Yes, we and our families sutler 
equallv from hunger and cold. 

Editor— Why don't you take your 
familv to a hotel or boardiag-house ? 

Clerk — Because boarding-houses are 
broken up, or charge from .*S to $10 a 

da v. 

yi (J —How, then, do you live. 
CU-rk- A gentleman, with a family, 
rents one or two furnished rooms at 8«>U 
to $100 per month, and, if he does not 
live on bread, hires a cook at from $10 
to $20 per month, a laundress at $4 to 
$o per dozen, while the doctor's bills de- 
pend upon the number that have perished 
from cold, hunger, insuflicient clothing 
and other causes. That is the usual mode 
of living among the clerks, if living it can 
be called. Do you mean to do anything 
for them this session? 

M. C.— Doubtful. The soldiers would 
complain if we did. 

Clerk — But Government feeds and 
clothes the soldiers, and pays them some- 
thing beside. It does neither for the em- 
plojx'es in the civil departments, and yet 
It could not continue its operations with- 
out them. They set the wheels of Gov- 
ernment in motion and keep them per- 
petually in motion. 

Mem. Cong.— Perhaps we may give 
you rations. 

Clerk.— I understand the Secretary- of 
War and the Commissary General say 



SENATE. 
Wednesday, January 6, 18&1. 
The Senate met at 12 o'clock m., pursuant 
to adjournment, and was called to order by 
the Preside nt pro tern, Senator Daniels. 

The roll w.is called and the journal of yes- 
terday read anil approved. 

MORE MEMHF.KS. 

Senators Luke Miller, of Fillmore county, 
B. D. Sprague, of Dodge county. D. B. Shil- 
lock, ot Fairibault county, appCi'.rcd and took 
their scats; Attorney General Cole adminis- 
tered the oath to them. 

On motion the Senate proceeded to elect 
permanent members, with the followingresult : 
Secretary— F.. B, Ames, of Hennepin Co. 
Assistant Sccrelanj— George V. Wilson, of 
Houston Co. 

Enrolling Clerk—k. Streckcr. of Brown 
county. ^ _ 

Enqrossing Clerk— 3. H. Brant, of Co. 

Sergeant at Arms—\Jty\ Nntting, of Rice 
county. _ 

Fireman— C\in^. L. Weed, of Ramsey Co. 
Chaplain— nv:\: F. A. Noble, of Ramsey 
count V, 

Incidental Printer— Frcii. Driscoll, of Ram- 
sey county. 

The olliccrs elect wore then sworn in by 
Attorney General Cole, and assumed the du- 
ties of their respective othces. 

On motion of Senator BERRY, the rules ot 
order of the last session were adopted as the 
rules of order of the present scssi»m. 

Senator NICOLS moved tluit the Senate do 
now proceed to the election of a President 
pro. tcra. Carried. 

Senator J. V. Daniels, havinR received the 
unanimous vote of the Senate, was elected 
President pro. tcni. 

On motion of Senator NORTON, tbe Sen- 
ate took a recess until half-past two o'clock 

AFTERNOON SESSION. 
The Senate met and was called to order at 
half-past seven o'clock. 

CANVASSINO THE RETrKN'8. 

Oil motion of Senator MILLER, a commit- 
tee of three was appointed to confer with a 
similar committee on the pait of the House, 
and fix the time and place for a joint session 
for opening and canvassing the votes cast for 
Suite orticers. Senators Miller and McKusi^k 
were appointed such comuiittec. 

PERMANENT ORGANIZATION'. 

On motion of Senator TIIACHER, the Sec- 
retary was instructed to intorm the House ot 
the permanent organization of this lx)dy. 

PERMANENT RILES. 

On motion of Senator SPRAGUE, a com- 
mittee of three was appointed to prepare per- 
manent rules for the Senate. Senators 
Sprague, Berry, and Norton were appointed 
such committee. 

JOINT RII.ES. 

Senator OTTMAN moved thata comniiitec 
of three be appointed to eonter with a similar 
committee on the part of the House, and pre- 
pare joint rules. .Adopted, and Senators Ott- 
man, Wilson and Warner were appointed such 
committee. 

NEWSPAPERS. 

Senator OTTM.\N also moved that the 
Secretary be instructed to subscribe for live 
daily papers, or an equivalent in weeklies, for 
cadi Senator and officer. Carried, 

NOTIFICATION OF THE GOVERNOR. 

Senator NORTON moved that a committee 
of three be appointed to confer with a similar 
committee on the part of the House, to wait 
on the Governor and inform him that the 
Legislature is now organized and ready to re- 
ceire any communication which he may i>e 
pleased to make. ^ „ ^ 

The CHAIR appointed Senators Norton, 
Morrison and Lincoln such committee. Thev 
retired, and soon after appeared and reported 
that the Governor was absent, whereupon 

Senator WARNER mo^ed to adjourn. 
Carried. 



INCIDENTAL PRINTER. 

Mr. YOUMANS moved to proceed to the 
election of Incidental Printer. Carried. 

Mr. YOUMANS nominated Frederick Dris- 
coll. ^ . 

On the vote being taken, Mr. Driscoll was 
declared elected, he having received thirty - 
one votes to one for T. J. Green and two for 
Thomas Simons. 

Mr. MOULTON oflfered a resolution hxing 
10 A. M., astlic daily hour of assembly when 
not otherwise ordered. Adopted. 

A message foni the Senate by the Chief 
Clerk announced the organisation of the Sen- 
ate bv election of its officers ; qpd that the 



GUiANT'S a:RMY. 



Position of the Eebels in Front. 



Failvre. 



THE MERCir^SS CONSCRIPTION WITH- 
IN THE REBEL LINES. 



THE RECE^fT CA7«PA1CS:». 



Chattanooga, Tenn., December 17, 



Senate had api^inted a committee ot' two to ! -lo^J'!^ Active onerations ceased in front 
confer with a committee from the House on iQoa.— Attive operauuuo ucao _ 



time of holding joint convention to canvass 
votes of last election ; and also that the Senate 
had appointed members of a joint committee 
to report joint nilcs. 

The House having ordered the appointment, 
Messrs. Kidder and Youmans were named to 
confer on the time of holding joint convention, 
and Messrs. McKay, Richardson and Wood- 
rutf on joint committee on rules. 

L^pon a second message from the Senate, 
announcing the appointment of meml>er8 of a 
joint committee to inform tiie Governor that 
the Legislature was ready to receive commu- 
nications, the House having ordered the ap- 
pointment, Messrs. Letford, Coffin and Smith 
were named on sucli joint committee. 

The eominittee reported the Governor not 
to be founil. 

Mr. MOULTON offered a resolution direct- 
ing the Clerk to give certificates to each 
member for ten deodars each for the pur- 
chase of stationery. 

Mr. KIEFER moved U) amend by inserting 
$■') in place of $'I0. . 

Mr.McKAY moved to amend by Slo m 
place of $(10. 

The amendment was adopted and the reso- 
lution directing the issue of certificates of *lo 
to each of the members and officers of the 
House lor stationery was carried. 

Mr. (iATES offered a resolution directing 
the Clerk to subscril^e for tive dailies or an 
e(Uiivalent in wecklv papers for each member. 

Mr. otRied a substitute that each 

meinl>cr receive a certificate of §10 for the 
purchase of papers. 

The substitute was adopted and the resolu- 
tion carried. 
Adjourned to 10 a. m. 



of Chattanooga when cur victorious 
troops returned from ]iinggold, tw'> 
weeks or more ago, and tlie campaign in 
Northern Georgia was considered at an 
end. 

(JENEUALS SaEIlMAN AND GORDON' GKAX- 
GER, 

with a large column, wera dispatched to 
the relief of Burnside's beleaguered army, 
while the balance ot Grant's army took 
up pretty much the same position it had 
held on the 24th and U.'itl ult. Of course 
our lines were extended somewhat in 
front of the town — that is, measures were 
taken to secure a firm hDld on Lookout 
Mountain, Mission Kid,;e, their gaps, 
and Chattanooga vallej several miles 
down ; but no attempt was made towards 



Tke RcbclliOB 

From the N. Y. Tjibune. 

Our readers know that we have not 
been remarkably sanguine with regard to 
the progress and issue'of our great strug- 
gle. And when we say now that the re- 
beUion has failed, we do not imply that 
it has ceased to struggle, or will cease 
to-morrow, next month, or even next 
> ear The leaders have staked their all— 
mav as well hold out to the last as give 
up the day before-and will persist in 
fiahting so long as their bloodhounds- 
human or canine— can run down another 
poor white and force him into thur shiv- 
Ling shoeless ranks. The S ave Oli- 
garchy will die in the "last .ditch -not 
in the' last but one. , 

What we do mean is just this— tHe 
rebels have no longer a rational hope ol 
success. See if our position is not sus- 
tained by abundant facts : 

1. In war, an army cut thoroughly m 
two is beaten, because its smal or divis- 
ion is now liable to be overwhelmed and 
annihilated. It is the same with a nation 
as with an army. Now the rebellion was 
cut fairly in two nearly six months ago, 
and has not even seriously aUemptea to 
reunite. All communication between its 
forces west and those east of the Missis- 
sippi is infrequent, furtive, stealthy-— the 
work of bpies,not soldiers. 



^^^^ Guerrillas 

permanent occupation of the greater por- j ^n^'flving^'camps seek to diminish the 
tion of the Chickamauga country, through jyg'of our possession of the Missis- 



after 



§tw gidvertfemcntu. 



^Y ANTED. 

A GIRL who thoroughly unrterfitaTidn COOK- 
ING. None others need upply. Application 
must bf made immediately, at this office. j»nO 



which Bragg's army w€ re driven 
the battle, bleeding at eirery pore. 

OUU FROIfT 

is ia charge of a compe:ent cavalry and 

infantry force, under Colonel Lewis 1). ,.. . „„,,„,,.. 

Watklns. who is erapo\^ered to operate jouri two years and more ago, ami baa at 

in any direction and at any time he may least treble 'he Missourian^m the ran ks 
see tit. As a consequence, so much ol 



value of our possession 
sinpi by firing from its banks at our pass- 
ing vessels ; they do not seek to restore 
their lost communications. This is vir- 
tually giving up the contest. 

11. The rebels held a portion of Mis- 



F 



O R 



SAL K 



A two story Frame IIous«, on Dayton's BlulT, 
on 4th stroot, ktwpcn Mr. Wooley aud Mr. Day- 
ton. This house has six rooms and a celiar, an<l 
a cistprn in the cellar. I will sell or exchange 
for a fiouso near th" city, or in the citj;. Jhor m- 
formallon apply on the premises. j ano-lw. 

AUCTION, AUCTION. 

FAIRCHILD fc CO., seU next Saturday, M 
reeidencpof <J. R. March, on Dayton Avfnue, 
nPKt door to J. W. SelbVs 1st class I'arlor and 
Chamb.r Furniture, Kitchen do.: Carnajfes 
iiarne.js, ."^addle, &c. Tlie I'arlor and Chamber 
l-urniturt* is Rosewood, Bureau and \Va hstands 
marble topped ; aud all in use but a short lime. 

janO 4t 

^Vy" ANTED. 

To buy a good second hand Melodoon, of mod- 
em make, and at least live octaves. Enquire at 
THE ST. PAUL LAMP STORK. 
jan5-lw Third-8t., 3d door below Cedar. 



LOST.— A Certificate of Deposit of 
of Williiii Bros. & Dunbar^ Ko. 1,711, for 
forty-two hu-lDO doUirs, dated November 25tli, 
is<".-,', an<l payable on or after November 23th, 1863, 
to the order of the undersigned, was lost nfar 
Crow Wing. The tinder is re-iupsted to forward 
the same to this office, or Willius Bros. & Dunbar. 
It will be of no value to him as pav-inent has been 

~,TEK CLARK. 



3topi>ed. 



(jino-lw) 



PE1 



''.lIlLlTARir 



n EXPECT ABII<I* 

xir." 
" \n attempt at an informal renewal of the 
cartel has been ma.lc by the enemy, under 
the immediate agency of Gen. Butler, who 
initiated his etfort by sending 500 of our men 
t<j Citv Point. Commissioner OuUl rcturneu 
.500 Federal soldiers, but informed Commis- 
sioner Hitchcock that the Confederate authori- 
ties could hold no communication with Gen. 
Butler, and that there must be no further et- 
fort at partiid exchange. If the enemy desire 
to renew the cartel, it must be done upon fair 
terms, and through an agent not outlawed and 
beyond the pale of militarj- respectability. — 
Richmoiul Enquirer, iHth uU. 

If an ogre should deliver a discourse 
against cannibalism, while at the same 
time he picked the bones of his last human 
victim, his preaching would be exempli- 
fied by his practice in a far greater de- 
gree, than 13 the assumption of military 
or any other kind of "respectability" by 
the rebels. Gen. Butler, according [to 
rebel writers is "bey on 1 the pale of mili- 
tary respectability''' and consequently un- 
fit to confer with his royal highness, the 
Confederacy, Satan's Chief ot Staff. 

If we can rely upon the same authority. 
Judab P. Benjamin, is the author of the 
remarkable outlawing proclamation which 
esUblishes the grade of "military re- 
spectabiity." As a mere matter of com- 
position Judah presents, perhaps, the 
best qualifications of any villain in the 
Confederacy, as he was outlawed by Yale 
CoIle"-e, while attending that institution. 



they can not be furnished 

Mem. Cong.— Well, we must do some- 
thing for you ; raise your salaries— say 
twenty-five per cent. 

Clerk— What a gratuity ! Enough to 
purchase, once a month, a descent break- 
fast. Were you to double our present 
pav, you would only give us a fifth of 
what the Government promised us. 

Mem. Cong.— But that would be 

$3,fX)0! . I 

Clerk.— In Confederate currency, worth 
say $2J0 ; a mighty income, but the least 
that you should give till the currency is 
restored to the specie standard ; and as 
most of us have run in debt, the allow- 
ance should look back, and commence 
its operation from the first of July last. 

Mem. Cong —I confess it would be a 
a measure of justice at that ; but what 
would our constitutents say? What 
would Buncombe say ? 

Clerk— Never mind what your con- 
stituents would say. Do what is right, 
and what is absolutely necessary, if you 
would not have the departments of your 
(;overnment disbanded Thfc people of 
this country are too just and too high- 
minded to wish any clivss of their public 
servants to work for them wltnout being 
properly compensated for their services. 
Mem. Cong.— I believe it, sir ; I be- 
lieve it. Well, we will do the best for 
You may rest assured we 



HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. 
Wednespay, January 6, I8GI. 
Hon. R. M. Richardson in the Chau-, and 
Hon. J. A. WiswcU temporjiry Clerk. 

Messrs. Ackley, Armstrong, Connitf, Dixon, 
Foster, Gibbs, Graham, and Moulton pre- 
sented their credentials as memliers of the 
House, and the rath ot otiicc was administer- 
ed by the AttoiiK-y General. 

ELECTION or Sl'KAKEIl. 

Thirty-four votes were < ast for Speaker as 

follows: . ,, 

For Jared Benson, of Anoka— Messrs. 
Armstrong, Barlow, Butl«r, Butters, Coffin, 
Coleman, Crane,|Dixon, Ferrin. Fitz, Foster, 
Gates, Gibbs, Grannis, Graham, Gnitean, 
Henry. Hill, Hunt, Kidder, Kiefer, Liitimer, 
Utford, McKay, Meagher, Moulton, Nourse, 
Richards-in, Ricby, Smith, Soule, \v iswell, 
Wooilrutl and Youmans. 

Hon. Jared Benson having received all the 
votes cast, was declared elected. 

Messrs. Kidder and Coleman were appointed 
a committee to wait upon the Speaker elect, 
and inform him of the choice of the House. 

The committee having comlucted the 
Speaker elect to the chair, after subscribing 
the oath of office, he addressed the House as 

follows : 

SPEAKEU I'.KXSOn's AUBUES-J. 

Gentlemex : I tender you my heartiest ac- 
knowledgements for this evidence ot your 
Lonlidence and esteem. 

1 am not a stranger in this position, and i 
know that its duties are responsible, and otten 
ditRcult, and I shall not expect to be able al- 
wavs to satisfv vou or myself in their dis- 
charge. But i.iV most earnest endeavor shall 
be to discharge those duties acceptably to you. 
And I pledge you that an honest desire and 
Btiict impartiality shall always attend me 

here. ... i > 

The Legi lature assembles this year under 
more favorable circumstances than any Ijc- 
fore. Our material interests are greatly im- 
proved, and an era of very great prosperity is 
., ;„« ..,^,^n .w ThA .l»rk. hcavv cloud of 



B 



UCKWIIEAT FLOUR, 



Graham Flour, Xew Com Meal, Fresh Eggi, 
Choice Butter, Fresh Lard, < rai\berrip!<, Bea«» 
and Peas, Honey, and everything usually kept ty 
Familv t.roceries, can be found at the C»roc«rj 

" Jan5 A. II. WIMBISH, Ja«lt60H st. 






VINES, SHRUBS, PLANTS, 

And All Kinds of Seed§, &«., 

Forr 3rinne8iot«l. 

The undersigned is now making arrangen»«te t» 
commence, next spring, 

A Minnesota Acclimatins 
Nursery, 

Near St. Paul, and to »pen 

A Seed and Horlieullnral IUT» 

Xa THK CITT. 



jou we can 

will. . , 

Clerk- We hope and trust you will 
understand that we are reduced nearly to 
a state of starvation ; that jour currency 
is so depreciated that it is impossible, 
with the small amount there is doled out 
to us, to procure the necessaries of life. 
Whatever you do tor us, we pray you 
would do quickly. Frame your bill and 
pass it. if you please, with the least pos- 
sible delay, recollecting the old maxim — 
bis dat qui cito dat. 

» » ♦ » ♦ 



The foiiowing table shows the number I Jqj. stealing from his college mates, and 



of votes required — being one tenth of 
the number cast at the last Presidential 
election— in order to L^stablish State Gov- 
ernments under the Proclamation : 



Alabama, - 
Arkansas, 
Florida, 
(Jcorgia, - 
Louisiana, - 
Mississippi, 
Tennessee, - 
North Carolina, 
Texas, - 



9,03G 
5,046 
1,435 



has lived under the ban ever since. He 
of course knows what it is not to be re- 
spectable.and we should expect to find him 
terribly sensitive on this point. No ex- 
changes will be made with the outlaw, 
l6!637 I says the common thief, Benjamin, because 
- I'g-^ : he is "beyond the pale of respectability," 
ui.534 ' and who couM expect thieves to associ- 
6 298 *^® ''''^ outlaws. 



South Carolina is not named because! Outlawry is depriving a person of the idential candidate 



There are, perhaps, more printers 

in the armv, in proportion to the number in 
the countfv, than of any other profession. 
Such was the fact in the Texas and Mexican 
wars. In the war for the suppression ot the 
rebellion, the same is doubtless true. Among 
the number of killed at the battle of Chicka- 
mauga, there were thirtv printers and editors, 
showing that the tvpos were in the foremost , 
ranks, where the balls tlcw thickest and 
fa.stest. 

—Since the rebels refuse further ex- 
change of our prisoners. Gen. Butler proposes 
to go t<i Richmond and take them, if Halleck 
will let him. . 

In States, such as Wisconsin and 

Michigan, in which the first draft is not yet 
completed, the Government will secure hardly 
any of the enrolled men for service, commu- 
tJition being almost universally paid. 

The Washington Bepublican an- 
nounces from high authority, that General 
Grant is not, and does not desire to be, aPres- 



dawning upon us. The dark, heavy cloud 
war, brought upon us by the blackest treason, 
that has been hanging over us, sending deso- 
lation and ruin t«> so many homes, is passing 
away, and the blessing of peace must so(m be 

ours. , ^, ,„„» 

It will alwavs be a source of the proudest 
satisfaction to' the sons ot Minnesota that she 
contributed her full share to maintain the 
GoTemment in this gre;it conflict. Her l)P!^t 
blood has been freely shed upon nearly every 
battle field. , 

The demands of the Government now, aiia 
in the future, will as in the past, be promptly 
met, however large they may be, or however 
long continued, till treason and traitors shall 
no longer lie found, and the old flag, unre- 
strained, shall proudly float over the whole 
land. During this conflict and ever after, 
Minnesota will not forget the gallant, noble 
men who have and will leave their homes— 
their families— all they hold most dear— to 
battle for their country. Whether in thetield, 
in the hospitals, or the loathsome prisons of 
the South, they and their families will r»c held 
in grateful remembrance. ,_ , „ 

Thanking vou, gentlemen from the fullness 
of my heart," for the high honor you have con- 
ferred upon me, and the very flattering man- 
ner you h ive bestowed it, I am now ready to 
proceed with the business of the House. 

tLECTIOX or OTHER OFFICERS. 



Early in March next, he will vUlt ihe best 1* ttrft^ 
em Nurseries and Seed Growers, aud dea'ers, to 
purchase stock. He, Sn meantime, solicits or- 
ders for any article in this line ot buJiuess ; an^ 
especially, at an early date, for 

FRUIT TREES,APPLE,PEAR,PLUMr 

CHERRY AND QUINCIES, 

Both Standard and Dwarf Trees. He will be *!• 
to furnish varieties of Dwarf Apple frees .hal 
will produce fruit in one year; and sundaii* 
Trees within three or four years. Orders ^iso, 
especially solicited, for the best improved vari»- 
ties of the Grape, Strawbj-rfy. RasP*^">';. i-"; 
rent, lioos^berry aud Blackberry: and lor al 
kinds of Fruit .Seeds adapted to our soil and cli- 
mate. He particularly desires to Pr^'no^^ th« 
sowing ol fruit seeds, and V ^^-^ '*'",« ^^„'"'j;^''J 
tor their supply and distribution.expect. to afford 
e«scntial aid in causing the production of new va- 
rieties of fruit, that wUl be b<-tter adapted to our 
soil and climate than any hitherto known. Lpo" 
the standard seedlings thus ..bfained produnu. 
inferior fruit,the best varieties may l>e engrafted^ 
Kverv farmer in the State and every house, 
holder,- who has ground for a garden, is invited 
to co-operate in this enterprise, and to aid in 
making 

MINNESOTA A GREAT FRUIT GROWING 
STATE. 

All the fruiis designated have b^en groWTi fn 
MlnnesoU already. Our failures hitherto in fruft 
tree planting have, in mott cases been the i ♦ 
suit ot purchasing por trees, carelessly- packei, 
or of unsuitable varieties.from Indifferent or irre- 
sponsible dealers ; and in many instances from 
^ant of knowledge in the mot'e of culture, <ele<> 
tion of soil, aspi'ct, &c. Tlie ""•^''"'Knj'd will 
Kuaratee the genuineness of every artlcw that raajr 
be ordered; vill furni.-h the same at as Iowa 
price as purchases could be made in any otli«r 
way : and will also furnish to fach purchaser, 
without charge, a pamphlet, containing the ext e 
rience and result" of the attempts thus far m.ide, 
in successful and unsuccessful 



Irnit culture in 



The following persons were each unani- 
mously elected to the otticcs named : 

Chiif C/erA— Andrew C. Dunn. 

Assistant C/e/- A:— Solomon Snow. 

Engrossing Clerk — L. J. Stark. 

Enrolling C/erA— Christian Exel. 

Sergeant-at ■ Arms— iMther McDonaM. 

Firemmn—Wm. Mortimer, „ „ . , . 

The SPEAKKR appointed S. C. Robbms 
and Erskine Ilawley Messengers of the 

House. .... J . 

The oath of ofiicc was then administered to 

the officers elect. 

I'EKMAXENT OnOAXIZATION. 

Mr MOULTON offered a resolution to no- 
tify the Senate that the House was fully or- 
ganized. Adopted. ^ 

Mr. BUTLER offered a resolution adopting 
the rules of the last sessiou for the govern- 
ment ot the House. Adopted, ,, „ , 

Leave of absence was granted to Mr. bui- 

lis, ©n account of sickness in his family. 



this State: showing the best varienes of trees, 
kc and the best modes of culture for our soil 
and climate ; with general instructions to guide 
the inexperienced. . , . , n 

Correspondence and orders invited from all 
who feel an interest in thli enterprize. Let none 
be afraid to send small orders, lor the under- 
signed wiU attend to an order for a single tree 
vine or shrub, or for 25 cts worth of seeds, with 
the fame care, as to one for five hundred times 
a« much ; the design being to interest as many aa 
nossibltj in the enterprise of making Minnesota a 
great Fruit producing State, as well as to esto^b- 
Ush a useful and remunerative business. 

r^Also, furnished to fanners the best 
rleties of WHEAT. RYE, BAKLEY and 
fully 
5EE1 
mate of MinnesoU. 

All orders to be paiil far on delivery at Saint 
Paul, unless agreement be nude for delivery and 
payment elsewhere. 

Address, 

D. A. ROBERTSON, 

St. Paul, IMinn. 

SI. PAUL, Jan. 4, 1864. >»«- 



Northern Georgia as is required for Gen- 
oral Grant's purposes is kept clear of 
armed rebels. Ringgold being partially 
destroyed— the disloyal inhabitants hay- 
ing lied southward 'with the retreatnig 
rebel armv, the railroad and the bridges 
north of the town havir g been destroyed 
and torn up and burneJ, and the forage 
drawn to our depots— there is left no 
earthly inducement for :he rebels to come 
back in force, even if they were in condi- 
tion to do so. "Henc- we deduce^' t|'at 
we shall not be troubled while preparing 
for the great campaign next spring— if it 
does not commence socner. 

Tim IIEPEI.S. 

W. J. Ilardec, Li'.'utenant General, 
the superb tactician aid all that, is at 
Dalton, temporarily ii. command of the 
rebel array in Tennessee. His headquar- 
ters are established in a neat brick tene- 
ment, on the main street, at the edge of 
the town, to the left of the wayfarer who 
enters from Ringgold. His cavalry vi- 
dettes are posted at Tunnel Hill, and 
the main bodv of his a:*my is encamped in 
and around Dalton, ar d is represented to 
be about thirty-tive thousand strong. 
Gen. Wheeler's cavalry, or so much of it 
as escaped from before Knoxville with 
Longstreet, has rejoired Hardee, by wav 
of mountain passes east of Cleveland, and 
is now encamped on his right, recupera- 
ting for new deviltry. The "look of an- 
guish and chagrin"" 'which beclouded the 
countenance of Hardee when the exul- 
tant Yankees drove him from Mission 
I Ridge has worn away, I am told, and he 
^ is making strenuous efforts to patch up 
Bragg's old army w ith Georgia militia- 
men, and assume "tie offensive"— which 
reminds one of a pat little story : 

GENERAL MEIGS MVT.S A .tOKE. , 

During the dark days of the siege, 
when fooil and forag ? were scarce, and 
the f^hastly corpses imd bleached skele- 
tons%f starved mule ? lined the thorough- 
fares hereabouts. General Grant and 
Quartermaster General Meigs arrived in 
Chattanooga. Taking an airing on horse- 
back one afternoon, they passed the car- 
cass of a huge mule lying by the roadside, 
whose "ill-savor went up" before and 
around them. The hero of Vicksburg 
removed his briar- root from his lips, and 
remarked sorrowfully, "Ah, General, 
there lies a dead so dier of the Ciuarter- 
ni:ister'3 Departmeni ." "Yes, General," 
replied the Quarte!-master General, m 
subdued tones, "in him yon see the 
'ruling passion stroi g in death' exempli- 
fied, for the old veteran has already as- 
sumed the offensive." Several weeks 
after, while they we'-e standing together 
under a storm of re'iel iron on Orchard 
Knob, General Grait reminded the rank- 
ing Quartermaster of the "oflensive" 
joke, who then realized that the hint had 
not been lost, ISIetaphorically the great 
tacitician is a dead $ oldier of the Quar- 
termaster's Department. His * offensive" 
will incommode no ane so long as cold 
weather lasts. 

m MOK3 OF DISQCIETUDE, 

While atRinggolJ, in pursuit of Bragg, 
General Joe Hookir received by special 
messenger communications from several 
Tennessee rebel regiments, asking for 
terms, as they wen: desirous of surren- 
dering in a body to the United States 
forces and forever abandonifig the cause 
of the confederacy. A suitable reply- 
one not at all calculated to repel their ad- 
vances — was returned; but before they 
received it the rebel officers became 
aware of the state of afTairs, and they 
were ordered to tiie rear. The break- 
ing up of the orgar ziation of Cheatham's 
division followed, and now the Tennessee 
troops are kept close under watch and 
guard. Of course they cannot be watched 
so closely that none can escape, and the 
stories about the highways being crowded 
with refugees and the mountains alive 
with deserters from the rebel army are no 
fictions. Not a few of them reach Chat- 
tanooga, In that portion of Northern 
Georgia within the rebel lines a perfect 
reign of terror is reported by such men 
as ar^ fortunate enough to escape. The 
conscription is merciless and the impress- 
ment of supplies exhausting. How the 

women and children of the war wasted 

ref'ion are to liv? through the coming 

winter Heaven only can tell. 

. -♦■«.♦ « ♦ 



that there were m ours They had pos- 
session of Kentucky likewise, with thou- 
sands of Kentuckians fighting for them 
when as yet none were fighting for the 
Union. The first regiments of Kentucki- 
ans raised to fight for the Union had to 
be organized and encamped on the tree 
side of the Ohio, Even John J. Critten- 
den, wc are assured, discouraged the en- 
listment of Kentuckians to fight for the 
Union, when Buckner, with his "State 
Guards" was sen.i.ng them by regiments 
to fight for the Confederacy. General 
Sherman, about two years ago, estimated 
that he could hold Kentucky with 200,000 
men. To-day. Kentucky is entirely clear 
of rebels in arms, and has more of her 
sons fighting for the Union than agamst 

it. 

II. Tennessee, two years ago, was 
entirely under the feet of the rebellion. 
She had not a regiment in the Union ar- 
mies. She had many regiments in those 
of the Confederacy. Nashville, Mem- 
phis, Knoxville. Chattanooga, were rebel 
depots of supplies. Flour, pork, with 
almost every element of military strengtli, 
were largely supplied by her to the rebel 
armies. She was an immense element of 
strength to the Confederacy. To-day 
her rebel Governor is an exile ; nmc- 
tenths of her population are under the 
Union llag, and she no longer sends a 
ham or a bushel of grain to feed the rebel 

armies. , , 

IV. Maryland, two years ago, had 
far more men in the rebel than in the Un- 
ion armies, and was a source of weak- 
ness and an object of continued appre- 
hension to Unionists. Her great artery 
of communication with the "West, the 
Baltimore and Ohio railroad, was con- 
trolled, or at least obstructed by theno. 
Things are bravely altered since ; she is 
helping our side most to-day, and is no 
more likelv to secede than Vermont is. 

V. Arkansas is at least three-fourths 
recovered to the Union: Louisiana is 
more than half; with liberal slices each 
of Old Virginia, North Carolina, Missis- 
sippi, and Texas. And the prospect to- 
day decidedly is, that we shall have more 
before we have less. 

VI But let us suppose that we simply 
hold our ground henceforth till next 
Spring, let us see where we stand : 

The population of tbe Slave States in 
18G0 was a little over Twelve Millions ; 
and this population was assnmed by Gov. 
Seymour, in his Tweddle Hall speech 
nearly three years ago, as the substantial 
base of the Rebellion then just breaking 
out. " Yo.i can't subdue Twelve Mil- 
lions of People," was the burden of his 
speech. But of these Twelve Millions, 
there are this day reposing under the 
Union flag the following : 

Alabama (north end) IJS'ISS 

Arkansas (at least) 

Delaware 

Florida (alwut) 



BUCK WH KAT, carefully selected for seed ; and 
all kinds of GK ASS SEEDS, adapUd to the cU- 



— The clause in the act appropriating 
$20,000,000, passed last week, prohibiting the 
p ivmcnt of Government bounties after the 5th 
oif J.inuary bevond the §100 nuthorized by 
former laws, is considered a grave mistake at 
the War Ofiice. The apprehension is that it 
will put an end to the re-enlistments of vet- 
eran volunteers, sit ce State and private boun- 
ties, which continu; to tic paid, will give re- 
cruits again a pro> ol ing and unjust advant- 
age over them. An ellort will lie made, upon 
there-convening of Congress, to remedy this. 

— It is reported that a prediction, said 
to have been uttert d by Lord Lyons, tliat the 
war of the rebellioa would be terminated in 
three months, is explained by persons in 
Washington prt/fcssing to know, that he 
meant three niont is after the opening of the 
spriug camp;iign. 



300,000 

112,000 

10,000 

Ken tu cky ^'^'u-l 

Louisiana (at least) «o,W 

»Iaryland T^h^ 

Mississippi (west side) iSi'ai? 

Missouri 'I^'nnn 

North Carolina (fully) Vn'nno 

South Carolina (say) nnn mn 

Tennessee (9-!0ths) 'V^'mo 

Texas (coa-<tJ iJl^ni^ 

Virgi nia, old, (at leasi) il-u, ,qi 

West Virginia • — ''^'''■"- 

Total 5,«87.97l 

Considering the contrabands and other 
Unionists who have escaped from the 
Confederacy into the loyal States and 
sections, there are not to-day one less 
than half the surviving population of the 
Slave States under the Union flag. That 
is to sav : Of the twelve millions relied 
on bv Gov. Seymour to baffle all possi- 
ble efforts to put down the rebellion, at 
least half are to day under the old flag. 

Now we submit to all candid men that 
it was far more difficult to reduce the 
strensth of the rebellion from twelve to 
six millions of people than to overcome 
the residue. Say nothing of material ex- 
haustion — of financial ruin — of stocks of 
goods utterly consumed, and no chance 
of replacing'them — of the swift, of the ig- 
nominious defeat of every attempt to flout 
the rebel flag on the soil of the loyal 
States— we submit that the point is estab- 
lished, that the rebellion can't win. It 
may waste an unreasonable time in dy- 
ing — it may y-t do much mischief, destroy 
thousands of lives, and waste hundreds 
of millions of property — ^but its success is 
no longer to be reasonably feared. And 
the rage, the hate, the venom betrayed 
by the rebel organs prove that their con- 
ductors see this as well as we do. When 
men in their condition are perpetually 
protesting that they will never give up 
—that they don't despair— that they have 
still a chance of success — the world un- 
derstands that their "last ditch" b just at 

hand. 

» »♦ » • 



NURSE GIR . WANTED,— Anply at 
FranVlin * riali's Barker Shop, 3d street, 
I four dooi • west of ^ i^abashaw. JanO-3t* 



— ^Late returns from the several States 
to the War Department indicate that at least 
one-third, and | erhaps one-half, of the men 
under the last call will l)C raised by voluntaiy 
enlistments before the 5th of January. Maine, 
New Hampshire, Kliode Island, Indiana and 
Illinois are expected to raise their full quotas, 
Massachusetts, Vermont and Iowa will not bo 
far t>ehind. Not as good pro>:rc38 has been 
made in Ohio and other Western States. In 
New York and Connecticut recruiting is slow. 
Pennsylvania makes the poorest showing. 
The lait weekly rei^ort from Ohio shows aa 
aggregate of 450 enlistments. 



I 



! 



H ' '■ ^ ' ' 






r 




; 










— — r— 


1 






1 




. 


I 

1 




■ 









» 




i 


■ 


' 







»« 



^■™™ ^'^^y^^ 



1 



amm I * 



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^■■i 




I 



THE SAINT PAUL PRESS, THUBSDAY. JAmrAEY T. 1864. #r 



I 

I 



SiUe fault |aai _f »t^ 

PCr.LlSHED DAUY.TRI-WiiEKLY ASI> WEEKLT. 

Oflic€»— ^\.d.joitiiiiS thLe Uridge. 

"^j^rmn-.-UA 1 l.V I'itKSS-Uv mail, $S.OO per 




WKElvT.Y rKKSS— C>no 



The War Between Germany and 
Denmark. 

From tlio New York Tribune. 

The lonjr hnpeiurmg war between Ger- 
nianv ami Denmark lias virtually begun. 
Tho'Fcjleral Diet of Frankfort lias onler- 
cd Feileral troops to march into llol- 
stoin anil tlu- Danish (lovornnifnt, in ac- 
conlaiK-e ■\vilU a previous ollicial an- 

a iledara- 
another of Uie 



I a iire> 
nounecnient, repanis this as 
(ion of war. Thus 



fjreat 



S;:.:^'*r::;j;:Ji;t*e2^ir'l^«;t:^«n;;^^ European eOMiplu-ations has ripened, in 



of 



$1.50 pach 

In consequenec of the captivity 

M^j,.r White, i>m- of the Union Senators ol 
rciin-^v|va:iia, \vhoi< now in l.ibhy 1 nsou, 
the Senate of that Scate is poli'.icaMy tiea. 

Two bovs, reecnlly connuitted to 

th(^ j:iil in SiKlbvviilc, Indiana, liul tin ir 
tljro.-»ts iMt iVoni t ar tu ear, l.y an insane inan 



18<">'d, lor a solu- 



United States, 
international wars 




to b • liHU-r, it wu". i!ie rerson or lu-rsons 
con-MU-tl the bo: s m the loom with sutU a 

— Iridlr.iia, especiallv the southern part 
of i:, is .It this time ovcr.un with t!i;evos ;im 
bural:.rs to siu-h an vxlc t tl::.t tiie t aiitoinia 
rena-dv of a viJIaiun- euniniittec is l.e-imi.iii- 
to be .scrioitlv talkea cf in mmy lueal.tic 
Tlici.eoj.leof the L-t.ue attribute 
tiiia o! air.ir:., and n « ih.ui>t ju 
surpla^ of t'unfe.ierate ;A>l>liev 

' ■ ■ iiiilitary aiitlionties i-.ttf. 

suleinn iiiuckevy ot 



the course of the year 
tion I y the sword. 

II Europe, like the 
ad(^pteil as a rule in 
the principle of neutrality, Mie conilict 
about SchK'swig and Holstein would af- 
lc«t only Denmark and Germany. But 
the Euiopeati Powers have a dillerer.t 
co.le, andi.i al...o»t tvi.y question that 
disturbs t! - m""-t- f I'urope, they find 
some pretext for interference. Thus 
thev interfered, witliout any semblance of 
rii^iit, in the complicated Danish-German 
»pu-6.:ion by the celebrated protocol 



I^Iills at 



this coniii- 
ily so, to the 
; turned huiA- 

upon them by ilie 

liavin,- gone ihrough the 

an oath. ,.. „ 

— J he Wasl.intiton A\ ullen iMills 
Lawrenic, M.^.->s., sold jioods t.the amount of 
nearly four millions of di.lhirs ]a< year, an.l 
their pr-'it^ were •f.siO.OCti, titty i-cr e.nt. on 
their cai.ital. Tfieir ^l!rl.!as u. w amotmts to 
^5i),0vi', ixul they ^.ro..o^e to invest halt .t 
this bv lulding twenty-livo sets ot laailii.cry 
morc'to thrir railis. 

'[!,». English papers are very Innd ol 

i.lcnt:fvinif th" American (Jener.ils v.ith emi- 
'M-jniK hcaiin:: the urtne nume, who have ilc- 
uarr' rt in vc I'rs tMck from Cinal llritain to 
Ihe li.iea .states. I.a.-t >ear the pwr aw 
c ;inmi-»i.«nLT!« otsonu" insii;!!!!icant l-.n.::.K-n 
Iwr.uu'h, adverti.eLl (Jcnvral Cuiti-^ot Iowa as 
l)em::>m einii-'rant iVoin tiiat place scvcnu 
▼ci's H!ire. wh> lia.i left his Avile ami t.iiiu.y 
io t';e Viipnort ot the parish. Now tlu-y clami 
Gciiorfll (iranl as au cmiu:rant from the I nitcil 

Kini;il":n. ., 

j^n -.x-nj correspoiidont tells art an- 

ecd to '.vl.ih has nver been in prin 

Stonewall J. c<-'n. The rebel ariiiy 

i-s march t > Mi\ry)aii<l. A 

«oui;ht ;iu in:-'rvio 

••(Jciieril, a c 

••D > vu:i ;>;. ii 

this <iiK-:;. n •' 



of 
lV>-'. Foreseeing that the royal family 
of Denmark would soon become extinct, 
an i that in th.at ease, if the established 
law of succession were not ai'andoned, 
the Dani.-h monarchy would fall to pieces, 
(one relation of the last King being en- 
titled to si'.ccession in Denmark Proper 
and .-mother in the Duchies,) a number of 
European Powers undertook to set a-ide 
the succession laws of both Den- 
mark Proper and of tlie two Duchies, 
anil to transfer the right of succession in 
both the component p.arts of the Danish 
monarchy to a prince who was entitled 
to succession in neither. The people of 
P'enmark Projier approved of this ar- 
rangement as the only one that could pre- 
vent the dissolution of tlie Danish mon- 
archy. The people of the Duchies, on 
the contrarv, did not approve of it. for, 
In-ing (iennans, they preferred to avail 
tiieurselves of the chsnce Avliich the extinc- 
tion ol the house of J)enmark gave to 
them, even in the eyes of the advocates of 
th^' historic law, to' dissolve their union 
with Denmark Proper, and to belon 
henceforth to Germany alone 



struggles against corpulency, Bliowmg SPE(]IAL NOTICES.- 

how he grew fatter and fatter, to his great . ^ 

{ disgust, and how, by a determined effort j 
1 in the right direction, he finally succeed- | 
' ed in reducing his weight, to the standard ■ 
I of ordinary men. Not long ago Mr. 

Banting measured five feet hve inches, , 

and weighed fourteen stone and a quarter. 
1 He owns that he had a great deal to bear 
i from his unfortunate make. In the first 

place, the little boys in the street laughed 

at him ; in the next place, ha could not 

tie his own shoes ; and lastly, he had, it 

it ajipears, to eouie down stairs back- 
wards. But he was a man who struggled 

gallantly, and whatever he was reeom- 

merded' to do he honestly tried to 

carry out. He drank mineral waters, 

and consulted physicians, and took sweet 

counsel wAh innumerable friends, but all 

was in vain, lie lived upon sixpence a 

day and earned it, so that the favorite 

recipe of Abernethy failed in his ease. He 

went into all sorts of vapor baths and 

shampooinsj; baths. He took no less th.in 

ninety Turkish baths ; but nothing did 

him a"nv good— he was as fat as ever. A 

knid ir'iend recommended increased bod- 
ily exertion every morning, and nothing 

seemed more likely to be effectual tlnn 

rowing, .^o this stout warrior with fat 

got daily into a good, safe, heavy boat, 

and rowed a couple of hours. But he was 

only pouring water into the bucket of the 
Daiiaides : what he gained in one way he 
lost in another. His muscular vigor in- 
creased, but then, with this there came a 
trious ai)|)etite. which he felt 



^imllmtom. 



being 
ill-judged 



»f 

was on 
seeesh farmer 
wi:!i t-t!newa!l, luul said.- 
\ou p>iiig into Maryland?" 
"int-jrvicw wirh nic to ask inc 
in :ni;vd .Tacksr.n. "No sir," 
rcpliAllhe r.rm r; '-init if yi.n will infyn" 
me I will t-.i V '•-« a secret." "A secret, eh : 
"Yes, sir." "e an you keep a secret .- askca 
Mone.val!, ovcir.:; "the man sieinly. "Oli, 
ve-" '-Well, .-i-," Siiid thf tienera!, "yoa 
keen vour-s an.l I'll keep mine! " and he ro-le 
off, K-avirig his butternut friend in a maze ol 
bewiulcrment. 

— it is .'■•Hid that the War Department 
has orleied Lieutenant Colonel Grave, the 
CJiief (Ju.artcnuasler ot the Depi.rtment of 
W.u-hinirtun, to break up all the fivvdmpu's 
car.ii)s i:: and.iroundjWa-hins'ton.noith of the 
Potoiiir.c, ami transfer all the inmates to the 
cuiUrahaiid farius iu tlie nei.nhljorhood of Ar- 
lia-.;ron, where they will bo put to wmk at 
farrainff on t!ie alianloued estates of abscoud- 
int: •eces=ionists. All nei^voes njt employed 
in>he UnaTtermaster's Dep^i.tment who have 
hcretofoie been depending i ariially or wholly 
oil the government f ir sas p Jit, are aho to be 
hcnt to the ianiis and I'Ui to wi rk. 

♦ » ♦ » ♦ • 

Esctutlou «f a .nurilerfr. 

Cluri-les II. P>rook.-^, convicted of the 
inuide.- of* his i:it\nr, near Vincentown, 
N. .L, in riFaroh lait, was csecited last 
Friday. TUj father of the imirderer. 
Job Brooks, v;as an honest farmer of 
VincfTtown, possessed of a comfortable 
farm f;rd d willing. The property w 



Now that 
the death of King Frederic YH. has 



of 



•roeh- snfhcient to excite the cupiui 
an onlinarv felon, for the recompense 



as too small' for the risk to be underta 

ken in taking foul measures to procure it. 

The vouiig man w.is about twenty-three 

vear/ old, cf fine personal appearance'. 

Ilis parents were not friendly disposed 

towauls each other, and the boy grew up 

in manhood imbned with no respect for 

either. His sifter married a man named 

Timothy Ridgway, who. it is said, was 

anr.ious to got ri I of the "eld m?.n,"that 

Tim. and Charb-? should cr.joy tlie farm. 

In a confession whicii Brooks left he saiil : 

"I hive been coaxed ever since November, 

in I'^r.l, todo th;it murd:v on my father. I lold 

•iiin that I did not want t» kill him, for h'- 

ntvtr done aiivthinu' out of th;- way to kiil 

liini for. I went o:i to work on a farm ai: n:i. 

■\VhPn I did not go home for two or thixc 

weeks he v.o ild a.-k m;i;iir where I was, that 

I di.hi't come home. After I did jro home, 

mcther woiiKl tell m? Tim wanted to see ino 

— lie wanted to see me for somethin-,' partiea- 

lar. I would po and see lum. All his talk 

was at>out i>uttin,;,' the o'd man out of the 

way. I was pi'ked at and tormented aljout 

it so much fur the last eii;hteen months, bo- 

t«;re I done t'.iii Uioadfiil murder, that I 

would rather meet u rattlesnake any time 

th.in nr.- fai!:er." 

On the scaffold he confirmed this state- 
ment. In a speech he said : 

"1 have been coaxed into this thing. They 
gave me no i>caee, and told me if the old man 
was out of the wav I could get along better. 
Timothy RidiTWiiy wa.» always at mo to do it. 
I was •r,toxieare(f at the time, and did nol; 
kn'V.- what 1 was iloit!i4 until it was too late. 
I stniek tl.i' oli't m-.m on the head, and Tim 
Kid- eat hi^throa:. 1 had been eo;:xed 

nnd they 
. ...o .'^un- 
dav af:cr, I went over to ltidj;way's, iind Tim 
wanted me io kill myself, lie found out that 
he fi u! ' -lot get me to kil! myself, then he 
wanted me to break jail and run away. 1 
told l.ini I h:"d no money or clothes to .-ro 
awav with. He said mother liad ])Icnty of 
moier. 1 toJd iii;Ts '.':.il : i.c needed th.-.: to 
live oil. lie t: Id me to never mind tha:-he 
would take ^'o.-d care that she should J :ue 
plentT to eat and wear. 

"Since 1 w::- biouijh' back he told me •' I 
would com'- oijt and say I didn't know t'.y- 
thing about the niurdcf they would give v.-.c a 
new trial. Mr.th.er olfered me $T-> to do ::e 
rtecd. T was coaxed int.) it, and they .; :\t 
coaxed mc ;ire clc-.r when tiiey ought to Ic 
standing here to day where 1 am. Moth.r 
often talked abont it. and went to ihe fortune- 
tellers, .-.nd rhcy told her many ways to get 

rid of the old man." 

♦ ♦ ♦ « ♦ 



brought on the crisis, the people of Den- 
martr demand th.it, in acconlance with 
the stipulations of the Great Powers, ihe 
Prince of AugUitcnburg% wiio is entitled 
to succession in the two Duchies, shall 
be stripped of his rights, and the two 
Duchies remain united with Denmark. 
On the contrary, the j.eople ot the two 
Duchies insist th.at no ioreign Power has 
a right to change their laws without their 
consent, and they call upon the States of 
the German Conl'eder.acy, of which Hol- 
stein forni'5 a part, to protect them in 
ibeir rights. 

The excitement •which this conflict is 
producing in (Jerniany is extraordinary. 
If the decision as f'o what ought to be 
done in tlie case lay in the hands of a 
German Parliament, chosen by general 
sullrage, a vigorous support of the cause 
of the'two Duchies would be at once re- 
solved upon. 'J'he unarimity of the 
licrman people in this question is gen- 
erally acknowledged, even by the cor- 
rcsi)ondents ot the English papers, who 
violently denounce the whole movement. 
Nearly "every German Legislature de- 
mands the protection of the two Duchies, 
and the non-recognition of the Protocol 
of 1.S52. The iiiost important of these 
bodies, the Second Chamber of Prussia, 
adop^:;e<l a resolution declaring the 
as Duchies to be now separated from Den- 
iiy mark, and the Prince of Augustenburg 
to be entitled to succession, by '621 to 
(i:'. votes, and among the latter were about 
oU votes of the most advanced wing ol 
which 



and aimor-t 


!.-u-. 


( 


;u 


do 


t: 


'^ 


d' 


e< 


ought to l>e 


he. 


^ 


i'.*. " 


*•,:'.'! 


r- 


'ir 


e. 


( 



L.\N<:t'AGE.— The F^ngiish language 
must aj^pfar feaiiuUy and wonderfully 
made to a foreigner. One of them look- 
ing at a picture of a rumber of vessels, 
said : " Set', whft a flock of ships. " He 
was told that a flock of ships was called 
a fleet, bat that a fleet of sheep was called 
a floek. And. it was added, for his 
gui'laiice in mastering the intricacies of 
our language, th.'\t " dock of girls is call- 
ed a bevy, that a bevy of wolves is called 
a p.ack, and a pack of thieves is called a 
gang, and a gang of angels is cal ed a 
host, and a ho!!t of porpoises is called a 
shoal, and a slioal of buffaloes is called a 
herd, and a herd of boys is called a troop, 
and a troop cf parjtridgos is called a 
covey, and covey ot beauties is called a 
galaxy, ami a gilaxy of ruliians is called 
a horde, and a horde of rubbish is called 
a heap, and a heap of oxen are called a 
drove, and a drove of b!a:;kguard3 is 
called a mob, and a mob of whales is 
called a schocl, aJid a school of Avorship- 
pers is called a congregation, and a con- 
gregation of engineers 13 called a corps, 
and a corps of robbers is called a band, 
and a band of locusts is called a swarm, 
and a swarm of people is called a crowd, 
and a crowd of gentleman is called elite, 
and the elite of the city's thieves and ras- 
cals are called roughs, and the miscellane- 
ous crowd of the city folks is called the 
community or the public, according as 
they are spoken of by the religious com- 
munity or secular public. 



a 

the Democracy, which goes even 
farther than the majority in its willing- 
ness to support the peopleof the Duchies, 
but objects to the recognition of the 
claim.^ of a Prince. 

F:ngland, France, Sweden, and Russia, 
openly sympathize in this question with 
Denmark. AU of these Powers, more or 
less, set!: to intimidate Germany, and 
some of them to defend the Protocol of 
l^i•>2 by force of arms. The (ierman 
people' everywhere declare themselves 
ready to defend what they consider their 
clear and natural right agiiust any com- 
bination of European princes, however 
powerful it may be. They are .supported 
in this vii;w by' a number of the smaller 
German Governments, but— and here the 
dillieulty begins — they have not the sup- 
port of the Governments of Austria and 
Prussia. 

These two Governments signed the 
Protocol of 1S")2. They are greatly 
alarmed at the turn the Schleswig-Ilol- 
stein movement is now turnina; ; for it is 
clear to them that the more is done and 
achieved in this question in the name of 
the German nation, the less is done in 
the nauie of Austria and Prussia, and 
that in the same proportion in which the 
authority of the German nation shall rise, 
tliat of Austria and Prussia must decline. 
IJoth powers, therefore, areagain anxious 
to settle the whole diUiculty by a com- 
promise, and declare their willingness to 
abide by the Protocol of IS,") -J, and to 
recogni/e the King of Denmark as the 
ruler of the two Duchies. 

But by their membership in the Ger- 
man Confederacy, the Governments of 
Austria and Prussia — as long as they will 
not repudiate laws which they themselves, 
in a hundred instance.'-, have been the 
first to enforce — ate to some extent 
bound by the decisions of the Federal 
Diet at Frankfort. The proceedings of 
this body are, therefore, of considerable 
importance for the peace of Europe. As 
yet, the Diet has not pronounced on the 
quesition of succession. It has decided, 
with only three negative votes, that the 
representative of the King of Denmark 
should be, for the present, excluded from 
the Diet, and in this it has taken sides 
with the German people against the Gov- 
ernments of Austiia and Prussia, which, 
together with Luxemburg, cast the three 
votes of the minority. But subsequently 
a proposition of Austria and Prussia, 
to Older a " Federal execution" in Hol- 
stein instead of, as Bavaria proposed, a 
"Federal occupation," has been agreed 
upon by eight against seven votes — the 
representative of Luxembuig abstaining 
from voting. This is looked upon as an 
indication that Austria and Prussia may 
yet possibly gain a majority of votes for 
their views. 

At all events, there will be in Germany 
itself a conilict of far-reaching conse- 
quences between the governments and 
legislative bodies which desire the execu- 
tion of what is clearly the national will, 
and Austria, Prussia, and their partisans 
among the German Princes, which, for 
the sake of peace, are ready to recognize 
the King of Denmark as Duke of Schles- 
wig-IIoistein. The outbreak of actual 
hostilities between Germany and Den- 
mark will probably begin this conflict, 
between Austria and Prussia on the one 
hand and the mass of the German people 
on the other, to a speedy issue. 



prodigious ai)|)etite, which he leit com- 
pelled to indulge, and consequently he 
got even fatter than he had been. 

At last he hit upon the right adviser, 
who told him what to do, a id whose ad- 
vice has been t.o successful that Mr, Ban- 
tiiiff can now w.alk down stairs forwards 
purh^sold clothes quite over the suit 
that now fits him, and, far from 
made the victim of unkind or 
ehafi' is universally congratulated on ins 
pleasant and becoming appearance. The 
ina<diinerv bv which this was elTected was 
of a very simple kind. He was simply 
told to 'leave olf eating anything b-e.t 
meat. It appears that none of hisfiieiidly 
atlvi^ers, and none of the physicians he 
consulted. Denetrated so far into the se- 
crcsv of his domestic luabits as to have 
discovered that twice a d.ty ho used for- 
merly to indulge in bov.ds of bread an<l 
milk! The Solomon who saved him cut 
nil" this cre.it feeder of fat, and since then 
Mr. Banting has been a thinner and a 
happier man. 

situations lievei««'«l— A C'olor*«l »ol- 
tlier (^uai-diiig- hU former blaster. 

A correspondent of the Cincinnati 
Commtnial, with the army of the Cum- 
berland, narrates the following incident: 
A certain wealthy old planter, who 
used to govern a precinct in Alabama, in 
a recent skirmish was taken prisoner, and 
at a late hour brought into camp, where 
a guard was placed over him. The aris- 
tocratic rebel, supposing everything was 
all right — that he was secure enoughany 
w.iy as a prisoner of Avar — as a committee 
of tlie whole, resolved himself into 
"sleep's dead slutnber." Awakening 
about midnight, to find the moon shining 
full in his face, he chanced to inspect his 
gi'.ard, y.hen, horror of horrors, that sol- 
dier was a negro! And, worse than all, 
he recognized in that towering form, 
slowly and steadily walking a beat, owe 
of his own slaves ! 

liuuian nature could not stand that; 
the prisoner was enraged, furious, and 
swore he •would not. Addressing the 
guard, through clenched teeth, foaming 
at the month, he yelled cut : 
" Sambo!"' 
"Well mas sa." 

" Send f^r the colonel to come here 
immediately. My own slave can never 
stand auard over me ; its a 



BnowN's BuoNciiiAL TuocnES, for 
Coughs and Cold3.-A neglected Cough, Cold 
an Irritated or Sore Throat if allowed to progrees 
results In serious I'ulinonarj Bronchial and Asth- 
maUc Diseases oflentimes incurable. Biowx s 
BnoNCiiiAL TROCHES rcach 'iirtclty tho affected 
parts, and give almost iramediate relief, tor 
Bronchitl'). Asthma, Catarrh, and CoSSLMI-tive 
COUGHS the Troches are useful. Public Speakers 
and Singers should have the Troches to cleir and 
strengthen the voice. Military Ollicers and Sol- 
diers who overtax the voice, and are exposed to 
sudden chiinges should use ihem. Obtain only 
the genuine. " Brown's Bronclilal Troches" hav- 
ingprorc'i their efficacy by a test of many jeirs, 
are highly reconimeuded and prescribed by I'liy- 
icians and Surgeons in the Army, and have re- 
ceived testiniouiaLs from many eminent men. 

Sold by all DruKRists and D«aler* In Medicine 
in the United States and most F oreigu countries 
at -Jo cts., per box. ^ dec^-lrndsw 

HOMK Lll'E IXSUUASCE COMPANY, 
New YoKK,oirers the most liberal advantages to 
parties deiiringto elfoct insurance. 

KliV. K1>W'D. K .GLKSTON, 

StATR AOHM- FOR MiSKKSOTV, 

th nol9-t sept 2 'r>t St. I'aul. 

The MuTiTAi- Life Insurance Com- 
pany OF WISCONSIN, is the best Company for 
AVestern men to insure in. 

It is made up of and managed by VTestern men, 
and is thus having its risks all reside in this the 
hea.ihiest pnrt of the Union. It is believed tluit 
its rate Ol mortality will bo lower than that of 
the Eastern Companies, iu the future cs it ha 

''X'compS'is now in its fifth year of busi- 
ness.audhas proven an entire success, having 
issued over four thousand iwlicie.s. and accumu- 
latcd in re.serve premiums two Imnured thousand 
dollars. It started without guarantee capital, and 
experience has proven that none waa necessary. 
The business o: theCompanyisconductcdupou 
the same general basis as that of the most sue- 
CPSPful Eastern Companies, with Iheadvantage of 
having the experience of tho oMer ones as ut 

^"i here are now a large number of members of 
the Company in St. Paul and vicinity, among 
whom are some of oar be.^t business men. 
NORTH\VESTi;UN AGE^C\, 
Thompson's Block, Third street, St. I'aul. 
O. CURTIS, Manager. 
S. r. SNYDEll, Agent, Jlinneapo is. 
Fither of the above named gentlemen will be 
hai pv to give info:mation to m-^mbers or other-- 
desinn-, in " garl to the Company, and assist in 
making api Ucatlons for rolicies. 



OSEPH I. BEAUMONT, 



DEALER IX 



FOR 90 DAYS I 

HARE BARGAINS 



TEAS, COFFEES, SPICES, 

AND ALL GOODS PEUTAINING TO THE 
GKOCEttY BUSINESS, INCLUDING 

TOBACCOS, ClOAXtS, 

Wines, Liciuors, and. 

Pure Old Rye and Bourbon 
^Y PI I S ICI E S . 

Corner :)d Os JTuckaou arm. no20-d&w8w 

WmES AND LIQUORS, 

FOR 

Medicinal and Private Use. 



IN 



^imlMtm$. 



COME ONE, COME ALL, 



PURE OLD RYE WHISKY, 

PURE OLI) BOURBON WHISKY, 
FINE OLD FRENCH BRANDY, 
FINE SCOTCH WHISKY', 
PALE SHERRY WINE. 
PURE JUICE POKT WINE, 
OLD BURGUNDY PORT WINE, 
WOLFE'S SCHH-:DAM SCHNAPPS, 

OLD JAMAICA RUM, 

MUMMS' CAIilNET CHAMPAGNE, 

CURACOA. 



FOR S.VLK BY 

no":;9 d&w>\v jr. i. 



BEAUWOXT. 



w 



LAM I STORE, 



nob-.ira 



outrage 
it 



— d 
no jientlenian would submit to 



The American Express Company, 

would respectfully announce to the Merclwutt) of 
this city and vicinity tint they aro now yivpared 
to bring forward from La Crosse, Wis., and de- 
liver to points of destination ail "Merchants 
Dispatch" and ordinary Kailroad freight. 

Merchants and others who may wish to aval! 
them«elves of this means of tran-portiUtun, vvi:l 
please mark the'r goods to our care at La Cros=c, 
at the same time giving us notice so that we may 
gee that such goo<ls are delivered ta us at Lu 
Crosse, without any unnccsssary delay. 

For tariff rates call at their otlice, 'JID Third-st.,. 
opposite Stage Office. 

jec'j K. F. -WAUNEU, Agent. 



n.TMITAliLE llAlli KESTORATIVE. 
IT IS NOT A DYE, 
But restores gray huir to its orip;inal color, by 
supplying the capillary tubes with natural susten- 
ance, impaired Dy age or di^ease. All in^tauta- 
ncous (lyes are composed oUHnar caur.tic,di^- 
stroying the vitality and beauty of the hair, and 
afford of themselves no dressing. Hcimstreet's 
Inimitable Coloring not only restores hair toils 
natural color by an easy process, but gives tho 

LnxTiriaTit Beauty, 

promotes its growth, prevents its falling oil 
eradicates dandruff, and imparts health and pleas- 
antness to the he.id. It has stood the test of 
time, being the original llr.ir Coloring and is 
cons antly increasing in O'^'^'': . };f„^, J'^ J^>°1'' 
eentlemebaudladie>. It is so d by all respec.a 
L dealers, or can be procured by them of the 
cmmercial agents, D. S.Wnes &Co..--'0^: Hroad 
waT^^w York. Two sizes, 50 cents and $1. 
au8-eow d tw&w ly. 



7 HOLES ALE 

n<'xt doorto 
3Iinrviii'« Ci*oelcoi*:f' Ira- 

M> *tiiier House. 
LAMPH SHADES. CHIM- 
NEYS, OIL, 
AND ALL THE ARTICLES BE- 
LONGING TO THE TRADE, 

Can be found at the Store ai^-jining Marvin's 
Crockery Importing House. 
An exehi-ive Lainp and Oil Store to meet the 
demanis of the Wholesale aod Kctnil trade, has 
long Ix'eR desint)le in St. I'aiil. CtHintryMer 
chants can now be supplied at l^astetn pi ices 
(tn-usportation added.) Call at the Carbon Oil 
and Lamp Store adjoining Marvin's Crockery 

llouse. . „ , 11 1 

jKS- Country Merchants are eppecially invited. 



Call and see, 



eept'.-'O 



H 



O! 



FOR THE 



CAVALRY ! 



May be made at 

IVo. 13S Third Street, 

SAINT PAUL. 

We offer at reduced prices to close out ;he stock : 
%£0 pcH. Frencli IMer inos. 

At $1.00 to $1.50, worth $1.13 to $1.75. 

lO pes. P»laia Hepps, 

At 75c, worth 90c. 

100 pes. MOHAIR 

DHESS GOODS 

At 30 to COC, worth 40 to 75c. 

lOO pes. FTtTlST^9 

At 2Cc, worth 25c. 

50 PIECES 

COTTON FLANNELS, 

At 35 to 55c, with 40 to COc. 

^O pes. I>ETSriIVlS, 

At 30 to 50c, worth 40 to 65*. 

500 POUNDS 

WOOLLEN YAllN, 

At $1.25, worth $1.50. 

1,000 Poixiuls 

WOOLLEN YA11:N, 

At $1.50, worth $L75. 
A FULL LINE OF ALL OTHER 

DOMESTIC GOODS, 

At Proportionate Prices. 
IN HOSIERY", 

GLOVES, 

WHITi: GOODS, 



AND BUY TOUR 



r> . 



CHRISTMAS 

AT 

THE CHEAP CASH STORE, ^- 

For that is the place you can get your 

MONEY'S \VORTII. 

We have a splendid assortment of 

IMIEIMIVOES I 

AND '< 

EMPRESS CLOTHS, \ ( 

Which we will tell 

As Lo-^v as tlie LoTf^est. 

IF you WANT 

Sontags, Nubias or Hoods, 

Go lo Ihe Clicap Cash Store. 

IF YOU WANT 

BALIMORAIL. SKIRTS, 

OK 



I 



Oapt 

Uaving received aulhority from (he Covernor 
propo^ies to raise a Company lor the 

Sd Minnesota Cavalry. 

All nbo wish to avoid the Dr.AKT which is I'o.si- 
TiViiiv to take place on the r>th of Jan., iNVt- 
have a chance to eabst in a regiment that wih 
P(.srrivi:i.\ never leave the ^tate in ae.y case at 
lone as forces are needed on our frontier. Ihe 
BOLN lY is the same a.-i iu any other r.'sinjent, 
old or ni'w. Sub.sistence and trani^portatioii fur- 
ni-hid to .'ver • recr i.. rerson.s desirin;r to en 
list in (apt. 1{us.<p!1's Company, c;in see him btv 
tweenthe hours of A.M. and 4 i'. M. at the 
Uuiou Hoti'l, corner of ith and >\ abashaw-sts., 
St. I'aul. CAl'T. A. K. liU.ssKI.L. 

dccy-lm KecTUiting Omcr-r. 



J. 



H. ]MURPHY, U. D., 



AND 

EMBROIDERIES OR NOTIONS, 
We will not be Uniersold. 

Remember the rule, 

ALL GOODS GUAUASTEED AS REPRE 

SENTED, OK NO SAIE, 

And the place. 

No. 132 Third-St., St. Paul. 
C^^TKC A-]RT .& CO. 

docll Im 



rpo 



dark- 
out. 



Laughing; through bis sleeve the 
faced soldier promptly called 
" corj/l de ^'ard !"' 

Tliat dij^nitary appeared, and presently 
tho colonel followed. 

After littjning to the Southerner's ira- 
pa«sioned haranj^'ue, which was full of in- 
vectives, the colonel turned to the negro 
with, 

"Sam!" 

" Yes, Colonel." 

' You know this gentleman do you ?" 

"Oh conrdc; ke's mas*a B., and has 
big ])lantation in Alabam\" 

"Well, Sam, just take care of him 
to-night !'' and the ofTicer wr.lked away. 

As the sentinel again paced his beat, 
tho gentlemen from Alabama appealed 
to him in an argument. 

"Listen, Sambo I" 

"You hush, dar ; I's done gone talkin' 
to you now. Hush, rebel!" was the 
negro's emphatic command, bringing 
down his musket to a charge bayonet po- 
sition, by way of enfori'i.'.g silence. 

The iiabob was now a slave — his once 
valued negro the master ; and think you, 
as he .lank back upon a blanket, in hor- 
ror and shame that night, that he believed 
human bondage was a divine institution, 
ordained by God? 

A Story About the Clay Family. 

The CincInnatu^HjMtrer tells the fol- 
lowing story : 

"When the prcat statesman Ilcnry Clay was 
livinjr he purehascd a fami in Kentucky for 
his .son Thomas, and stocked and iircpared it 
thoroughly for his use. After a few years 
residence on the farm Thomas wrote to his 
father for more money, that his fm-m needed 
important improvements and he h:ul not the 
wherewith to procure what he needed. Mr. 
Clay replied to the clfect that as he (Thomas) 
had squandered the means he had ^ivcn him 
in preparing' the farm for his use, he should 

now j,'o to ■ . Thomas replied in a brief 

letter to his father as follows. This letter is 
now with a friend in this city, and may be 
given to the Sanitary Fair : 

"My Do£ir Father— Your kind letter of — ;- 
instant is before mo. I have perused and di- 
gested its contents, and am obliged to return 
von mv warmest gratitude for the kindly ad- 
monition it contains. The destination you 
direct me to go will be strange to me, and I 
have deemed it the p.irt of a dutiful sou to 
request of you a letter of introduction. 

"Hoping soon to hear from you, I remain 
your most obctMent and dutiful son. 

THOMAS CLAY." 



LYON'S KATIIAIRON. 
Kathalron is from the Greek word " liathro," 
or "Kathairo," signifjing to cleanse, rcjuvinate 
and restore. This article is what Its name .digni- 
ties. For preserving, restoring and be.iutifying 
the human hair it is the most remarkable prep >- 
ration in the world. It is again owned and put 
up by the original proprietor, and is now made 
with the same care, skill and attention which gave 
t a sale of over one million bottles per annum. 
It is a most delightful Hair Dressing. 
It eradicates scurf and dandruff. 
It keeps the head cool and clean. 
It makes the hair rich, Koft and glossy. 
It prevents the hair from falling off and 

turning gray. 
It restores hair upon bald heads. 
Anj lady or gentleman who values a beautifu 
head of hair should use Lyon's Kathairon. It is 
known and used throughout the civilized world. 
Sold by all rasped able dealers. 

DEMAS S. BARNES & CO., 
aulS-eow d tw&wly Proprietors, New York. 



HAGAN'S MAGNOLIA BALM 
Thin is the most delightful and cxtiaordinary 
article ever discovered. It changes the sun burnt 
face and ban Js to a pearly satin texture of rav. 
Ishing beauty, imparting the marble purity ol 
youth, and the <Z*><i«sr«« appearance so inviting 
in the city belle of fashion. It removes tan, 
freckles, pimples and roughness from the skin, 
leavin" the complexion fresh, transparent and 
smooth. It contains no material injurious to the 
skin. Patronized by Actressen and Opera Sing 
era. It Is what every lady should have, 
everywhere, 



Sold 



DEMAS S. BARNES & CO., 
General Agents, 
202 Kroadway, N. Y. 



t « ♦ » ♦ 



UotT a Fat M.»n l<«daced bit Fl«»Ii. 

A ICnglisman named Banting has just 
published in London an account of hia | 



^ORTH WESTERN 

Ale and Porter Brewery* 

ST. PAUL, MINNESOTA. 

ORE WItY Sc SCOTTEIV 

Brewer.; of 

Stock and Cream Ale and 
Porter. 

Delivered to any part of the city in Barrels, Half 

and Quarter Larrels. 

ALSO 

Bottled JU.G &I*orter 

EXPRESSLY FOR HOTEL AND 
FAMILY USE. 



aa8 dtw&w ly 

[Communicated. J 
PULMONAUY CONSITMPTION A CURABLE 
DISKASKI!I-A CARO.-TO CONSCMFTIVES.- 

The undersigned havirg been restored to health 
in a few weeks, by a very simple remedy, after 
having suffered several years with a severe lung 
affection, andthatdread disease Con.«umptlou-is 
anxious to make known to his feUow-suflerers 
the means of cure. 

To all who desire it, he will send a coP/ <>J t'f 
prescription used (free of charge), with the di- 
rections for preparing and using V,'*'f I"'!' !^^^'^'' 
thev will llnd a sure cure lor CuNsi .mpiion, 
ASTHMA, BRONrmris, Coucius, Cou.s, &c. 
The onlv object of the adverti.s. r in sending the 
Prescription is to benefit the aiUicted, and spread 
Information which he conceives t'j be invaluable ; 
and he hopes every sufferer will try his remedy, as 
It will cost them n,-.thlng, and may prove a bless- 
In? Parties wisbinKtlie prescription will please 
address RKV. KDWAKD A. WILSON, 

Williamsbnrgh, Kings County, 

oo8-3mdiw New York. 

A Bad Breath— Tii e Gre atest C ures 
TUE Human Family is Hkir to.— How many 
lovers it has separated— how many friends forev 
er parted. The subjectlssodelicate.yournearest 
friend will not mention it, and you are Ignorant 
of the fact. To effect a radical cure, use the 
"B.\LMOF THOUSAND FLOWEllS" as a 
dentritlce, night and morning. It also beautifies 
tho complexion, removing all tan, pimples, and 
freckles, leaving the skin soft and white. Prise 
50 cents. For sale by 

DAY & JENKS, St. Paul, and 

septlO-eowly N. HHEMIUP, St. Anthony. 



PHYSICIAN AND SUlKiEON. 

Office on Jackson street, in the office formerly 
occupied by D.s. .Morton & Wharton, (opposite 
th.< Tenipera-.ice House.) , „„ . 

Especial attention paid to Surf ery. dec23 6m 

PROMOTE G'J0l7 HE ALTH 

USK Till-; 
AND 

"Wild Olierry Bitters. 

In Pint Hetties, jjriceiiOc; in Quart Bottles, 75. 

These Bitters are composed of the best Hoots. 
Barks and Herbs known, and peculiarly adapteit 
to the immediate cure of all diseases produced by 
an inactive liver. 

Dandelion and Wild Cherry Bitters 

CUHE SICK Hj-ADACH^. 

Dandelion and Wild Cherry lUtt. rs 
CUKE JAUNI>1CB. 

DandeUonand™Clverry^.mt.rs^^^ 

Dandelion and WiidClier^;Bitters^^^^_ 

Dandelion and Wild Cherry Bitters 

Cl.KE HEAltT BL'RN. 

Dandelion and Wild Cl^erry^mter^^^^^^ 

Dandelion and Wild Cherry Bitters 
CLUE AtU'E, 
In its worst forms. They perform these cure- 
simply, by one office, regulating the liver. 

For sale by dealers in .>rf-dicines, everywhert 
ii. HUNTINGTON, Proprietor, 
Fann'Tsbuig, Clayton County, Iowa 

For sale by E. H. Biggs, H. W. Kobinson, Pam 
Reicer St. Paul ; S. N. Wickersham, Charles Ben- 
son, L. Welnnnd & Co., and S. Ed ■ ards Wholc-- 
sale Agent, Winona; Charles Hawley, Chatfield, 
O. B. Stout, Preston; S. Y. Hyde, Fillmore- 
Charles Mors 111, Marion: Capt. Mills andJ.D. 
Biince, I'ltasint Grove; S. B. l•ob^u^^on, Geuera: 
Wliole-i'.le Agent, address CiiatUeld, Min. 

Also— Huntington's Writinc Fluid; Howe K 
Stevens' Family Dve Colors ; Van Dusen's Worn. 
Confections; Van busen's Mag cal Blueing; Al- 
den's Condition Powders; Tdman & Collins 
Concentrated Evti-act of lemm; lalman &Col 
lins' Leather Preservative; Datcher^s Dead Shot 
for Bed Bugs; Sleeper's Ligliuiing Fly Killer. 
]>A1b' & JE.liKS, St. Paul, 

my27-ly Wholesale and lietail Agents. 

SPRING TR.^DE.TO THE MER- 
CHANTS oF THE NORTH-WEST. 
Werespectfully invite you to examine our une- 
qualled .Miscellaneous i tock of 
STAPLE AND FANCY DRY GOODS, TAN- 
KEE NOTIONS, WOOLEN GOObs, 
HOSIERY, Ct:0< KERY, CHINA, 
GLASS, CUTLEKY, PLATED 
GOODS, ETC., ETC. 
No house in the country offer.s better induce- 
ments in goods and prices. We have every facil- 
ity and are prepared to sell the Best Cash Trade 
at a profit below Eastern figures . 

*^Sriecial attention paid to all orders accom- 
nled with money or reference; . 

BOWE3I BWOTHFWS, 
Kniportem Hitd Xo(»l»«>rs, 
No8. 7i, 74 and 76 Lake St., Chicago. 
m31-ly. 



,S. r^. BAILEY .& CO , 

Are not the Agents for Cooper's Cibinet Photo- 

gniphs, but they have on liand the 

largest stock of 

Cabinet and Cliair 

TO BE FOUND IN SI. PAUL. 

Oral Frames, Gilt and Foseii-ood llouldings, ifc. 
Also, a few Photographs whicli they will sell 
(not at cost) but at (Cahill & Co.' the Agents' 
prices. dec8-lm 

XJ^OR THE HOLIDAYS! 

AT COMBS' BOOK STORE, 

CAN «E FOUND A LARGK STOCK OF 

Cliilili'^n^*' Booksi, 
Oif t Boolcj-s, 

Bil>les, Prayer T3ool£S, 

&c., suitable for presents. Call ir and examine. 

DIA-PtlES fox' 1864., iiU Styles, 
decl-tf AT COMBS' BOOK STORE. 



HOOP SKIRTS, 

GO TO THE CHEAP CASH STORE. 
We have a fine assortment of 

L AI>IES' CLOAItS 

Which we are gelling low to 
CLOSE OUT TIIE STOCK. 

IF YOU WANT 

HOSIERY OR GLOVES, 

For the cold weather, go to 

FOR THE GENTLEMEN WE HAVE 

Cloths, Beavers, Cassimeres, Satinetts, Neck 
Ties and Collirs, which we will sell 

CHEAP FOR CASH. 
Xlie Cheap Casli Store 

Is the place to buy any kind of Domestic Goods, 
either Cotton or Woollen. 

Remember the plaoe, 

And that we will sell goods as cheap as the 
cheapest. 

H. KNOX TAYLOR, 

No. 218 Third Street, St. Paul, 

IWCinnesota. 

dec20-tf 



ST. PAUL LAMP STORE, 

(Branch of the great Ali.ddln,) 

Opposite Pioneer:- Oflice. 



OILS, 

LAMPS, 

SHADES, 

GLOBES, 

LANTERNS 


» (4 

9 '5 f« "^ 

H f4 !^ r 

a ::> ^ u 
o « o «« 


( Largest Stock, 

and :1 


The G -eatest Variety, 
thQ 



AT COST ! AT COST ! 

FOR THE NEXT FOUR WEEKS WB WILI. 

SELL A.T COST 

Our stock of 

CLOTHING, 

Shirts, Drawers, Hats 

A.lfD 

Fumish-ingr Groods, 

.Vs at the end of that time we Intend leaving for 
the East to purchase our 

SF>R,I]VGt^ SXOCIi. 

Those who want BARGAINS IN CLOTHING, 

will find this a rare chance. 

BLOOIUINGDALE & RHINE, 

213 TUIRD-ST., ADJOINING THE AMER 
ICAN EXPRESS OFFICE. 

decl5-lmd&w 



Clieapest Goods 

EVER EXHIBITED IN THIS CITY. 
Jty Wholesale Buyers supplied at Eastern 
cash prices. 



dec3-tf 



TTORSE BLANKETS, 

S K ^^ T E 8 



AND 



SLEIOH I3ELLS. 

Large assortment juFt received and for t^ale low 
at the Saddlery Warehoute of 



OC29 



C. PROAL, 
Corner of Third and Fobcrt-atg, 



Geieral Insurance Agent, 

OFFICE IN 

Tliompson's Bloclc. 

dccl6-ti 



JUST RECEIVED 
ANr> FOR SALE, 

lOO Barrels 
C^4..RBOTV OIL. 

CHAS. A. UPHAM <Se CO., 

lVo.4, :Prli»ce'» Block, jrarlison Street, 

St. I'aul, minii. 

nolO-ly 



Ad BUSHELS CHOICE RIPE 

Just received by A. H. WIMBISH, 

no'<5 Jackson Street. 



TJEIIIM> STREET, 



HOODS, SONTAGS & NUBIAS, 
BA.Ll\i:OIt.A.L 



AND 



HOOI^ SKIRTS, 



JUST RECEIVED BY 



L. C. BURT, 



14 6 



DEEDS 



rp A X 

THE PRESS PRINTING COMPANY 
Have now on bond the latest at a beat form o 
tax deeds. It I. ■? suitable for sal* s under the eov 
eralaet.s of the Legislature, ami in conformity 
with all their requleitions, and is prepared by ;ae 
State aufhoritieb 
Pf)(.(, vi ..or>f « p*"' drtifin. or ss per nnnareo. 



4^ Ordars ftom the country tolioited. 



JanVlf 



100 



BARRELS CIDER, 



Just received on consignment and tor 
oc-^5tf J.C. &U.C. BURBANK 



: ale low, 
.. CO. 



TOBACCO, CIGARS, PIPES, 
SNUFF, &0. 

F. TT. TXJCHELT. 

Wholesale and Retail D^-aler iu Tobacco, Cigars, 
&c. Jine Imported Cigars, S ■ okiiig and Chew- 
iue Tobacco. Fine Cut ChPAviiip, superlorto any 
in the city. Sweet Briar Root Pipes, a large as- 
•ortment. F. W. TUCHELT, 

Thlrd-st,, near Edgerton'e Bank, 
mye-ly St. Paul. 



l^EW BOOK OF CHURCH MUSIC. 

Till", HARP OF JUDAH; A Collection of 
Sacred and Secular Music for Choirs, Schools, 
Musical Conventions, Societies and tho Home 
Circle; Bv L. O. Emerson, Author of the " Gold- 
en Wre.itli." " Sabt)ath Harmony," &c. 

A book embracing every variety of choice mu- 
sic adopted to the capacities of all grades of sing- 
er*. Though published but a few moniha since 
it has already been used bv twelve Musical Con- 
ventions, and nearly oil tlio leading conventions 
in the United States are olfecting arrangement. < 
to do so the coming sea!>on. Choirs and i cach- 
ers are rajddly adopting it Iwcause they can find 
no book equal :o it in every requirement desira- 
ble in such a work. Specimen p.iges (20 tunes) 
will be sent free to any one on application. 

Price of the " Harp of Jndah" «1 per copy, 
$9 per dozen. OLIVER DITSON & CO 

dcCi3-lyd&W PubUsh.rd 



■vy ANTED, 

Spikcrs and Laborers on the construction work 
of t'le St. Paul and Pacific Rj.ilroa'i. Liberal 
wages will be paid. Payment i made weekly. 
Apply to I". U. D'elano, AssisUnt Superintendent, 
at Freight Depot, St. Paul, or John Murphy, 
Foreman, Minomin. 

ociO-tf W. B. LITCHIi'IELD fc CO. 



4-00 Ii A R R E L S 

GOOD WINTER APPLES, 

FOR SALE BY 

Scbxiat^el, 



THIRD STKEET. 

ocM-ty 



T S 



/^ A R P E 

STRONG'S CARPET HALL, 
225 Third-St., Bogers' Block, 

where will be found a hirge assortment of 

Carpets,OilCloths,Mattmgs, 

CURTAIN AND SHADE MATERIALS, 

MATTEESSES, FEATHERS, WALI. rAPER, tC. 

New Goods constantly arriving and sold M 
low as the lowest. 

UPHOLSTERLVG 
inarl2-ly 



DONE 

n. o 



TO ORDER. 
iiTROMC 



Oeo. E. 



Boston. « <]«cl2-tf 



Cor, Jacks an and 4th-ttJ. 



"VTEW PHOTOGRAPH GALLERY. 

Third St., between Cedar and Wabashatr, 
M:. C. XXJTT1L.E. 

Has just opened a New Gallerv on the ground 
floor, where he will be pleased to »ee Lis old 
friends and customers, rfls stock and apparaiu. 
are new, an.l have all the Utest improvements. 

«3-E.SPKCIAL ATTEKTION OIVKN TO TAKIKO 

Children's PicTi'itES. ^ -,,, _. ^ i« tu. 
. Pictures from Locket Siae to Life Site, In tbe 

Finest Style. 

*a- Photograph Albutiu A»m«»*ed at cheap at 
a»7 other ifouie, and a CarU de VitUe taken 



aoM-tf 



T 



» 

%■ 



\. 



f •--"-— ~ 









I 



L 



— ^^ 



V 



) 












— 










« 







— »_ . ..^. 



' I IIW ■ >»«<%■ 



"rrarrr-sT 



r«'-'- 



i 



[ ■ JiU ' i ' A ' 



■« L - ,tg."a" 



r-*r- 



1 



1 



i 



^■■1" ■ 




SATCrr PATJIi PRESS, THURSDAY, J-AmJARY T, 1864. 



« 4 



gtug $ and pcdirittCjg. 

SIMS, VAWTEB & ROSE. 

DRUGS, DRUGS, DRUGS, 

AT 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

(UNION BLOCK,) 

No. Ill Tliii-cl Street. 

Our aim is to keep in store a well selected and 

COMPLETE ASSORTMENT OF GOOD?. 

We fpfl thnt th«3 far our enTorts have been duly 

c;.preoi:itea, an'l irustinn a continuauce 

of patronage, wc renew our 

unieavors. 

OILS, PAINTS AND GLASS. 

Our BlUMN'O OILS we notice especially, and 
ask a trial of its mei-its. The Oil that is 
most niKARi.K, giving the same 
lii,'lit, is of cjurse^ 

Tlie Oil to X3iTy. 

TILIEN'S FLUID EXTRACTS, 

Pills and Granuletf, at card prices. 

Hiltoii'5 Insoluble Cement, 

ror mending rurnlture and wood in all shapes; 

Ivory. Uon ', C'rockery, Glas-', Karihou- 

Ware, LeatlK-r, Paper, &c., &c., 

SUPE'ICEUES ALL OTHERS. 
Tlie. ^Vmorican Mo-ariietlc 

Geo. II. DatM, Veterinary Surgeon, says " I hare 

examined and pronounce them, the be«t 

COXUrnt'N POWUlilt, nowiu 

WE HOLD 'I HE AGENCY. 

Our Ptock of PKKFUMKKIES and Fancy Goods 
will e>iual any iu the city. 

CALL, KXAMINK. PRICK AND PUUCHASE. 



pavdwate* 



J. B, BHAOEIV, 

lias now received from the Eastern Manufacturers 
a full and complete assortment of 

IRON, 

Hardware, JVails, 



^wtttk$. 



"^^"^ 



steel of all kinds, Springs, Axles, Bolts, Nuta, 
, Horse Nails, Sleigh 
Carriage 



Axe!<, Horse Shoes 

Shoes, Thlmblf Skeins, 
Trimmings, 

AVagon and Buggy AVood, 

Iron Kettles, Coal, Window Glass and Sash, 
ami all other Goods iu our Hue, sold V> holesato 
and Retail. „ _ , 

Warehouse 154 Third street, St. Paul. 

apl7-ly 

lONEER FOUNDRY AND 

AGRICULTURAL WORKS, 

ST. PAUL, - - - mNNESOTA, 

Manufactures all kinds of Machinery, Steam 
Enirines, Horse Powers, Mill and Maclune (.act- 
ings of ail descriptions. Having the largest as- 
sortment of I'atterns of any establishment in 
this State, we are prepared to do all kind- ol Iron 
and Uratts Casting, ot^ li niching, promptly, at tlie 
lowest J-:asterii rates. I'articular attention given 
to Threshing -Machine, Steam Engine and BoiUr 

'''^;^'^ GILMAW ftCO . 

rpIlRESIIING MACULNES, 

1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8 and 10 Horse Power, for sale ^ 
low, at the Pioneer Foundry and Agricult 
Works^ (aull) GILMAN fc C< 

ft)RDAGE, SLEIGH SHOES AND 



G 



O 



T O 



1804. 



1804. 



for sale ver> 
■rai 
CO. 



PXJTIVAIM'S 

FOB 

FRESH CANNED 

RASPBERRIES, 

BLACKBERRIES,^ 
STRAWBERRIES, 
PEACHES, 

PINE APPLES, 

TOMATOES, 

CHERRIES 

NEW DRIED 

BLACKBERRIES, 

RASPBERRIES, 
CHERRIES, 

PEACHES, 

APPLES, 

RAISIXS, 

CITRON, 
CURRANTS, SAGO, FARINA, 

TAPIOCA AND HOMONT. 

Stuart's White Drip, Extra Honey, Golden, Am- 
ber and Sugar House Syrups. 
New Sugar Cured Dried Beef, and Pine AppU 
Cheese, aod a complete and desirable 
stock ol" Frerh 

Ac Provinionai. 

b. K. PUTNAM. 

near the PostOffioo. 



COOLEY, CARVER & CO., 
WHOLESALE GROCERS. 

IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 

FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC LIQUORS, WINES, 

CIGARS, &C., &0. 

Jackson Street, betvreen Levee and. Third, 



git^a §0\kt$. 



N 



O T I C E 



itg (^ticA^ 



IJBE 



janl-tf 



SAINT P-A.TJIL1. 



Oroceries 



C 



F.VNNING MILLS. 



For sale by 
jeH-tf 



KICOL S. DEA N fc CO . 

A R B O N 



OIL 



C 

Cai*l>ott Oil l>ytlio Barrel. 



je5-tf 



For sale low. 

NICOLS, DEAN k CO. 



OHEET IRON. TIN PLATE, COP- 
PER BOTTOMS, 
ZINC AND TINNERS' STOCK, 



sm.ns, VA1»XK» * 



ROSE, 

St. Pacl. 



T 



HE CELEBRATED FAMILY DYE 
COLORS. 

to suit dealers, and also at 



In cases, assorted 
retail. 

SIMS, VAWTER 



k ROSE, 
No. Ill Third street. 



}y25-tf 

STERLING'S AMBROSIA. 

IIEIMSTREKT'S IXJMITAIiLE IJAin 
COLoniSG FOR THE HAIR. 

SIMS, YAWTER fc ROSE'S, 



Jy25-tf 



No. Ill Third street. 



ap 24 ly 
npATENT 



For sale by 
NICOLS. 



DEAH fc CO. 



AMAL(iA:SI BELL, 



CIDER. 

100 bbls. pure Juice of the -Vpple, at PUTNAM'S. 

GRAPES. 

23 boxes Isabellas and Catawbas, at PUTNAM'S 



BRADFORD BROTHERS, 

WHOLESALE DEALERS, 
JVos. l^r and 1^9 East "Water Street, 

Are now opening an immense Stock of Domes- 
tic, Staple and Fancy Dry Goods to which they 
call the attention of the Merchants of the North 
west— among which we offer the following : 



A P I> L E S . 

400 barrels Winter, at PUTNAM'S. 



no4 



(.KO 



E. SCIINABEL 



GENKKAL DEALER VS 



Family Grroceries, 

GRAIN AND PROVISIONS. 

la Moffct's Castle, corner Jackson and Fourl 
street, 
Goods deUvered to all parts of the City fl-eo ol 



25 Cases W. De Laines, 
25 Bales Twilled Flannels, 
20 " Plain colored do., 
100 Cases Denims, 



75 
30 
50 

20 






(i 



Stripes, 






charge. 



no-.:o-ti 



A 



P P L E S 



CoUon Flannels, 

Linseys, 
;3000 lbs. Wool Yarn, 
1000 doz.AYool Socks, 
200 Bales assorted Batting, 



250 Cases Prints, 
200 Bales Shirtings, 
50 Bales Fine Shirting, 
24 Bales Satinets, all grades, 
10 *• Grey Cassimeres, 
10 Cases Fancy Cassimeres, 
100 Pieces Alpaccas, 
2000 " Cobergs, 
Twine, Wicking, 
AVadding, Cotton Yam, 
&c., &c^, &c., &c. 



SUITABLE FOR A SCHOOL HOUSE 
S.VALL CHURCH. 



on 



For sale low by 
decJ-tf 



NICOLS, DEAN & CO. 



F 



OR SALE CHEAP. 



stoves, Tin Ware, Hardware, Hollow Ware, 
Steel Traps and Shingles. Highest price paid in 
cash for Wheat, Wool, Old Copper, Iron, Lead 
and Itajcs. Uobert-st., «rst store from fhird-st 

m'.rl4-tf 



WEST & CO. 



DOZEN DUBOIS BEST CAS'J 

steel Axes. Also 30 down Red Rivei 
Axes : also 25 Boxes assorted 
quality, at 



50 



Blued Tacks, firs'. 
J. C. fc H. C. BURBANK fc Co.'s 



TROIS and STEEL, 



II 



AGAN'S BALM, 
FOR THE COMPLEXION. 
SIMS, VAWTER & ROSE, 



Jy25-tf 



Union Block. 



itttbauV^ (&0lnmn. 



1864r. 



1864:. 



1864r. 

'Winter' A-r-raiifiroM*-©™^*- 

MlNKESOTA STAGE COMPANY. 
PASSENGEIl LINF- 



UEAYY HARDWAEE< 



O H D 
SHEET 






The roaas are well stocked with ftrst cUsg 
horses, Concord Coaches, with careful andexpe- 
"eoced drivers, all under the control of compc- 
tent agents. 

SCHEDUl^i: OF DEPARTT?KE3 FROM 3AIST PAUl; 

For Hu^^tiugs, Upd Win?, Lake City, Reed's 
WabLhaw, Minneiska, Wiuona, and La Crosse 

at '>'a o'clock A. M. 

For Stillwater— Dally, at 8 A.M. 

For Shakapee, Jordan, St. Lawrence, BeU 
Plain HeuJeMoi, Le 8ui-ur, Ottawa, Traver.-^.- at 
Siolix, St^Peter and Maukato-Daily at 4 o'cloc* 

'*"For Roaemount, Castle Roc*- No^hfl^ld, Cat 
non City, Faribault, Medford, Clinton tails an 
Owatoana, counecting at Owatouna, /or VV. to:. 
8t: Mary-Is. Winnob:v-o Agency f"*! ,«aukuto 
Aldo for Kic^ Lake, Clareiaont, N^ ?i^'oJa, Man 
^nille, Kocaester, ChaiUeld, and Winona-DaU) 

*S*or' ^Industriana, Anoka, Orono, Orlanda 
Montioello, Clearwater, St. Augusta and St. 
Cloud— Daily, at 7 A. M. 

F 
Crow 
dir* at T o'clock A. M. _ . , j_j- 

Far Kicbmond, Sauk Cent^'^ V ^ • w^ t^?- 
Ciiippewa. Pomn.e do Terre, Breckinridge, *ot. 
Aborcromlie, Mondays and Ihur^days at . 

** For Little' Canada, Columbus, Sunrise 
Mondays, Wednesdays and eridays, 

"'^Vorfarthpr particulars inquire at the General 

^'^^'^'^'^"'"ic. BURBANK fc CO. 

.,l,y Proprietors 



NORWAY NAIL BODS, 
BURDEN'S HORSE SHOES 

ISTails and Spikes, 
S.LEIGH SHOES, 

CTJTTICR SHOES. 

Sleigli and Cu-ttei 
I^ XJ IV IV E K^ S 5 

Bent Cutter StnfF, 



200 bbls. selected 

Fall ana TViiiter Apple* 

AT PUTNAM'S. 
Choice Wliite 

Winter ^Vheat Flour. 

AT PUTNAM'S. 

CHEESE— ONE THOUSAND LBS. 
Extra Hanabargrli, 

oc9.tl AT PUTNAM'S. 

f^ W. WOOLLET, 

*LOWEB LEVEE, SAINT PAUL, 
FOR^WARDINO- 

AND 

Oomntissiou Mercliaiit, 

DKALKR IN GROCKRIK8 
GRAIN, PROVISIONS, LIME, fcC, fcC, fcC. 

AKD 
AGENT FOR THK 

PENlfSYLVANIA RAILROAD AND 

CONNECTIONS. 

Contracts for transportation between St. 1 aul 
Boston, New England, Montreal, New \ ork and 
all points East, made upon the lowest and most 
favorable terms. wnnxTFY 

Mark packages , •*€. W . WOOLLE 1 , 

janl-dly J!££nZZ:_ 



J. 



P. HUTCHINSON & CO. 



Commission Mercliants 

AND 

PRODUCE DEALERS, 

SIBLEY STREIiT, NEAR LEVEE 

oci6-lr St. Paul, Minnesota. 

T3EAUPRE & KELLY, 
FORWARDING AND COMMISSION 



ALSO, 

A FULL LINE OF YANKEE NOTIONS, 

WHITE GOODS, RIBBONS, HOODS, 

SHIRTS and DRAWERS, RIBBED JACKETS, 
BLANKETS, SAXONY PLAIDS, HOSIERY, 
GLOVES, BUCK GLOVES and MITTS; 

AND 

Inmimerable otlier goods pertaining to the Jobbing 
Dry Goods Business, making an Immense btock 
wliicli for EXTENT, ASSORTMENT and CHEAP 
NESS is unrivalled in the West. 

To those wishing to buy at New-York Prices 
and less, we would solicit an examination of our 
Stock and Prices. Respectfully, 

BRADFORD BROTH ERS.^^^ 



In the matter of the application of the Minne- 
apolis, Faribault and Cedar Valley Railroad Com- 
pany lor the appointment of thieeCommissioni^s 
to examine and assess the ilamagcs which may bo 
sustained by the Fevpral owners or claimants ot 
the lands through which the road ot said Compa- 
ny (the St. Paul branch) is I )catod within the 
county of Ramsey in the Stat* of Minnesota, by 
reason of the appropriation of such lands for 
Railroad purposes by said Com lany: 

To the several owners and claimants of tne 
lands in this notice mentioned, or of any part 
thereof, and to all and every person or persons 
having or claiming any estate, ight or interest in 
any portion of such lauds : "i tu and each of you 
arellerebv notified that an application will be 
made by and in behalf of the itlinneapolis, !■ an- 
bault and Cedar Valley Railroai Company, to the 
Hon. Edward 0. Palmer, Jud?e of the District 
court, of liie Second Judicial District, of the 
State of Minnesota, at the Court House, in tlie 
city of Saint Paul, in said Rimsoy County, on 
the thirteenth day of January, A. i>. 3804, at 
el'-ven o'clock in the forenoon of that day, tor 
the appointment of three Commissioners to ex- 
amine and assess the damages which may be sus- 
talnc.-i by the several owners aid claimants < 1 the 
several pieces, paiO«ls, lots jr tracts of land, 
through or upon which the road of said Company, 
to wit: the Sc. Paul branch th ;reof, is located m 
said county ol Kamsev, by reason of the appro- 
nriati->i) and taking thereof by said Company, tor 
Kailroad purposes, to wit : foi the right ol way 
for their said road, the necessary turnouts. Rites 
for water buildings, conduits, ti.uks, depots, store- 
houses, machine and other shops, and extra 
tracks necessary therefor, and to ascertain and 
tix the compeusaiion to bo pa id therefor by said 
Company. , ., , , 

The following is a descripaon of the lands 
wilhinthe said county of Ki msey, through or 
upon which said road is locited, and which is 
sought lo be taken and appropriated for the pur- 
poics aforesaid : 

In Rice if Irvine^s Addition to St. Paul. 

Part of lots 5,0,7 and 8, in block 30. ,, , ,^ 

Part of lots (., 7, 8, », 10, U ;ind 12, in block 37. 

The whole of block 3d. 

The whola of block 3i». 

The whole of block ■10. 

Part 01 lots 5, , 7, 8 aud 9, in block 41. 

The whole of block 43. ^ „ , »,, , aa 

Part of lots 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 0, 7, 3 and 9, in block 44. 

Part of lots 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 1, in block 4o. 

The whole of lots 1, i.', 3, 4, 5, aud / , lu block 40. 

The whole of block 47. 

The whole of block 48. ui -u ^a 

The whole of lots 1, '-.', 3, 4, > and C, in block 49. 

In Jrvitu^s Enlatgement. 

Part of lots 8, 9, 10, 11, 12ard 13, and the whole 
of lots 17 to 25, inclusive, in block 68. Also, the 
strip of land Iving between lots 8 and 9, in said 
block OS, aud the whole of blocks 09 and 70. 

/)( LcacWs Addiiion t > St. I'atU. 

Part of lot 7, in block 7. 

In Winslow's Addlilor, to St. Paul. 
Part of lots 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5, in block 14. 
I'art of lots 4, 5 and 0, in bl JCk 15. 
Part of block 17. 
In Stinstn, Broicn if Hamvey's Addition to St. 
Paul. 

Part of the south half of block 15. ^ 
Part of lot 11, in the north lalf of bloc* 15. 
Part of block 10. _, _„ ., , 

Part ol lota 11, 12, 28, 29, 30 59,00, 61. 63, 04 and 

05. in the s«!'-dicii»ow of block 2S. . 

Part of lots 2, 3, 4 and 5, ii. the sub-dwiston ol 

block 29. 
Ai-'O, I'art of the s e U ol the s e ,Si of sec. 1, 

of township 2t>, range 23, and part of the n w >4 

of ihe n e ,'4 of sec. 12, of th( same township aud 

II. R. BIGELOW, Attorney for the 
M., F. & C. V. IL U. C)., St- I'aul; Minn. 
Dated December 12th, A. 1 . lfc*i . de«ia-td 



D. W. INGEBSOLL & CO 



Milwaukee, Sept. 28, 1803. 



MIIL'W-A.XJKEE. 



CASH BUYERS OF DRY GOODS 



ARB OFVERBD TUB 



AND 



Wholesale Grocers, 

Prince's Block, Jackson-st., St. 



Paul. 



Slau^'kapdV-BcU; Pniirie, Fort Riplo/and 
ow Wing— Mondays, Wednesdays and Fii 



FREIGHT AGENTS FOR 

Milwaukee & Prairie du Chien B.B 



MOST MANIFEST INDUCEMENTS, 

BY THE NEW HOUSE, 

172 and 174 East Water Street. 



au20-d tw&w 



LAFLIN, SMITH & CO.'S 
St Paul, October 13, 1863 



ool3-0m 




ov 



City- 
o'clock 



OJ5ce en 
ap2l- 



LpOR THE CARS 



Onr Omnlbussos will run to and from the prin 
cipal iioielr- and Boats in connection with the 
tTiins of the 

ST. PAUL AND PACIFIC RAILROAD. 

Pass"n»ors and baggage will be called for In 
»a wer to ordtrs lelt at^the American, Interna 
Uo-1 and Merchants, or -* -r offic«^ ^^ ^^^^ 



HALL, KIMBARK & CO., 

c n I O A Gh o . 



aa?9-d&wt feb 29 



Wheeler & Wilson's 



SAG2i23 WORKS 
MANUFACTUEING COMPANY 



M 



DISPATCH 



EKCHANTS 

OWVBD A3f O MA5AGKD BT 

/S.MKKICA.lSr ^XPRKSS CO 

AU overcharge'* aetUod bj J. C. ft n. C 8ur 
bank ftCo.,A entf". ^^ 

New Yor'.< effice, 1*4 Murray 9tr«»rt. 
Boston ortice, 69 Washington street, 
mai-iS-dly 




WANT 




CUTTER, SECOMBE & CO., 

HAVE ESTABLISHED A 

WHOLESALE PAPER WAREHOUSE 

In this city, In connection with their 
And desire to call the attention of buyers to their 

Immeiise StocU of" 

TFTTFR NOTE AND CAP PAPER, ENVELOPES, BOOK AND NEWS PRINT, FLAT AND 
'-'^'^'^ALriaNDS OF WRAPPING PAPKRS. PRINTKRS' AND WRIFIKG INKS 

AND FLUIDS, PENS, PENCILS, &c., &.C. 
Agents for 

GREENLEAF & TAYLOR'S MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

We will sell as low as Eastern Jobbers with Freight added. 

THE HIGHEST MARKET PRICE IN CASH PAID FOR 

PAPER RAGS, ROPE, GUNNIES & OLD NEWSPAPERS. 

Office ISTo. 230 Ttiird-St., St. 3?anl, IVLiii. 



CHANCERY SALE-C I R C U I T 
COURT OF TUi: U> ITED STATRS OF 
AMEIUC A-NIXTII CIRCUIT-IN AND FOR 
THE DISTRICT OF MIXI.'ESOTA— ss : 

Peres R.Pitts and Gideoi. Pitts vs. the Little 
FaUs Manufacturing Conipaiy. 

FORECLOSURE IN CHANCERY. 

Decree, October Term, A. d. 1803— $3,802.50, with 
interest and costs. 
Pur«uant to the decrela! order of the Circuit 
Court of the United States of America, for the 
Di'^lrict aforesaid, made iu the above entitle«l 
cause at the October Term a. d. 1803, of said 
Court the underoigned, Special Master in Chan- 
cery, of said Court, appointed by said Court to 
execute said decretal order, will sell at public 
auction, to the highest casi bidder, on 

SATURDAY, THE THIRTIETH DAY OF 
JANUARY. A. V. 1864, 

at eleven o'clock in the forenoon, at the front en- 
trance to the place of holding said Court, in 
Brown's mock, Third street, in the city of St. 
Paul, in said District of Minnesota, the following 
described premises, to wit: ., , . 

All and singular ilie folio ving described pieces 
or parcels of land situate 1; ing and b«iing in the 
county ot Morrison, and t.tate of Minnesota, to 
wii: Block numbered two (2), block numbered 
three 
ed five 

numbered v--. . , .. j /-> 

three (3), four (4), live (5), six ((.), and seven (.), 
in block numbered six (0) lots one (1), two (>'), 
three (3), and four (4), ia block numbered seven 

( " 
four 

block niVmberVd nine (9); Ijts' numbered one (1), 



Are BOW eeelring an extensive itock of 

Fall and "Winter 

DRYGOODS, 

from 

Late Cash Sales in New York 

Consisting in part of 

MUSLIN DE LAINES, 

LUPIN'S FRENCH MERINOES, 
EMPRESS CLOTHS, 

FRENCH REPS, 

PARIS SILK STRIPES, 
PARAMATTAS, 

Alpaccas, Mohairs, &c., &o 
Mionmingr Ooods. 

LADIES' LONG AND SQUARE 

In every variety. 

Cloakiugs, Balmoral Skirls, 

Kid Padded Hoop Skirts, 



Hoods, Scarfs, Sontaijai. 

Consisting of Engli^hand German Cotton, Wool 
len and Worsted Hoie. 

LADIES fc CHILDREN'S BALMORAL HOSE. 

White and mixed 

WRAPPERS & DRAWERS 

CLOTHS andCASSnttERES. 

White, red and mixed " 

FLAJNTTELS. 

Sheetings, Shirtings, Tickings, 

I^eniiiis, BlanUjets- 

ALL COUNTRY MERCHANTS who purchaie 

FOR CASH. 

Should examine our stock before purchasliif . 



t 



\ 



• Block numbered two (2), biocK numoerea 
ee (3'> block numbered lour (4), block number- 
five (5), except lot numbered live (5) in block 
rubered five (5); lots numbered one (1), two (2), 



Wt will not be undersold in this market. 
U, \ir. Iniarersoll &- Co., 



Sept. l:lv 



ST. P^17l>. SUV. 



7) ; lots numbered one (1), two (,-i), three (3), and 
our (4), in block numbcrea eight (8); lots num- 
)ere(lone(l),tw..C2), thr.'O (3), and four (4) in 
olock numbered nine (0) ; IJts numbered one (1), 
two (.i). throe (:i),and four [4), lu block numbered 
eleven (11); lots numbered one (1), two CJ), three 
CD and four (4), in block numbered (la), all in 
the town of Utile Falls iccordiag to a map of 
said lown, made by H M. Putnam, and recordod 
iu the olflce of the Regi>^t!r of De.'ds in and for 
said counfv of Jlorrison. Also, thosa tracts or 
parcels of'land lying witliin the limits of said 
town, and known and des,guat( d on said map of 
Little Fnlls, as the " l{ailr)ad KeM-rvo," and the 
"Mill Reserve," and "lumber \ard." AIho, 
those islands in th.t Mis.issippi River at Little 
Fills designated on i?aidr.iapus " I'.oom Island, 
"Mill Inland." and "Ms pi" Island.'' said last 
three ni« ntioned pieces of land being lot number 
od MX (0) in section eight [S), lot numbered three 
(3) in section seven (7;, and lot numbered five in 




parcels of land belonging 



or parcels oi muu ui-iuui^n.^ •.« «...-- -..^...— --, 
and lying between First si reet and tho \IisHissip- 
,.i River, according to the map of Little I ails 



atoresaid. 
St. Paul, Minn., Doc. IC, 1863. 

XJ . 1'^. 3IA-N-N, 

Special Master iu Chancery. 
F R.E.&W.B.CoBNELL, Plaintiff's Solici- 
tors', t'' decir-ow 



0C22-tf 



m^mm 
1 15,000 



ST. PAUL & PACIFIC RAILROAD— WINTER ARRANGEMENT. 



20 



BBLS. STU.Ua^'S BEST HON- 

"^^TS:l1l!'^^BKBA^'l^\"to".^'s." 

~ R. CHEESE; A 



BOXES VV. 



lo O prime article, at low fi^re^ at 
-^^^ F J C. & II. C. BURB ANK fc Co.'s 

aT 



STEAM EMiWESOR BOILERS 



PATENT FIRE EVAPORATORS. 
PATKNT SUGAR CANK MILLS, 

PATENT STKAM COIL EVAPORAT0B8, 

PATENT STAMP MILLS 

FOB 

PIKE'S PEAK OR LAKE SUPERIOR 

Send for Circulars, with cuts and descriptions, 
prices, fcc; also, 
SAW MILLS, FLOURING MU.LS, 

AND MACHINKRY OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS, 

Too numerous to mention. 

CHICAGO, • -^^lUm^'j ♦ 
P. W. GATES, President. 
N. B. Agen wanted everywhere. mr7-d&wy 



LARGE STOCK OF CKJARS, 

hich we offer at price? that wUl insure 



quick sales, at 



J. C. fc H. C. BURBANK fc Co.'b 



Of them in uae in this country 
and Europe. 

These are the only machines making 
th« Locic Stitch with th« Rotating 
Hoolc. 

Are profitable and available & life 

time. 

Equal to ten seamstresses. 

An annual dividend of 100 to 600 
per cent, (on their cost) may be obtained in 
use — by their possessor. 

The Class Cloth-Presser, (so popu- 
lar.) can only be had with these Machines. 
W. H. JOliartiOIV, A.g«nt, 

jyl4 264 Third street, St. Paul. 



On and after JANUARY 1st, 1»&4. the Passenger Trains will run as foUows 

EVENING. 



MORNING. 

Leaves St. Paul I '^ ^' ^,' 

Leaves St. Anthony b .'ns* i m 

Leaves Manomln a Itn » \i 

Arrive at Anoka b :w a . 31 . 



To-^ PACKAGES ASSORTED 

1120 Fruits, consisting of Plums Pnines 
^mnU and Citron, all new crop, for sale a> 

prices '-O^J^'r^gH: C. BURBANK & Co.'» 

ONE OF THE 




-CT^OU WILL FIND 

X largf St anC best selected stocks of Grocer- 
ies in tho West, at tlie warehouse of 

d€cU» J. C. fcH.C. 



, BURBANK & Co. 



420 

Lrauuti, at 



BOXES ASSORTED TO 

comprising all the favorite 

& n. C. BURBANK & Co.'s 



bacco, 
J.C. 



ii&rkf\ WHOLE, H.U.F iVND QUAR 

Jtj\J\7 ter boxes- Raisirs, crop of 186.. at 
.^^^'^ J. C. fc H.C. BURB ANK fc Co.'g 

]iiY~FRIENDS & PATRONS. 




Uavin 
C. fcH 

ley stretts, 



red 



J. 



e engnjrea fl»y services to the Messrs 

. ,,,?€!^yfeifnai^'-^;fw?^-^'G- 
^i^y^Ppar'tmenf. whe" e it will afford me pleasure 

^T^sSK^a Kefn^^ ^^d^se^ect^d stock 

.VreCwhefe Uo^ to merit for tho house a 
t"rt!oa «t le"> of thVt Patronage you have here- 
L"^,o liberaUy »>«.towed^u^onme^^^^^ 



F AIRE ANK'S 

STANDARD 

SCALES 

OF ALL KINDS. 

Also, WarehouseTrucka, Lettet 

Presses, fcc, fcc. 

rAIRBANKS,GREENLEAFfcCO., 

172 Lake Street. Chicago. Fo.- sale in St. Paul, 

bvJ.C. & n.C. Burbank&Co. .^.^ h«i. 

Be careful to buy only tho genuine. jel4-dwiy 

JTNITED~^TATES 

PENSION AGENCY 

AT 

ST. PAUL, - - - MINNESOTA. 

Ofuce in Rogers' Block, 3d-8t., near the Bridge. 

Office hours from 8 to 10 A. M. 

All letters to the o^ce must inclose stamps to 

pay return postage. ROBERT P. /-J-^ 7 *f • . 

^ iol-d t w&wly Panslon Agent. 

L BEACH & CO., 
• Manufacturers of superior 

SOAI» AlVr> CAJVr>LES, 

Eagle- St., near Upper Levee. 

HIGHEST MARKET PRICE PAID FOB 

Lard, Tallo vr aiicl Orease 

L. BKACH. fSPt^e-lyd&wl A. W. PKARSOM 

KEGS SUGAR HOUSE, GOLr 

den and Ambre, a choice article, at 
J. C. fc H. C. JBUBBAKN fc Co.'l 



300 



T S AND SHOES 



AT 



NEW YORK PRICES. 

20 per Oent. Saved. 



Leaves Anoka 

Leaves Manomln . . . . 
Leaves St. Anthony. 
Arrive atSt. Paui... 



aplStf 



..8 -.55 A.M. 
,.9 :30 A.M. 
..9:55 A.M. 
.10:35 A M. 



Leaves St. Paul 

Leaves St. Anthony. 
Leaves Manomln.. . . 
Arrive at Anoka 

Leaves Anoka 

Leaves Manomln. . . . 
Leaves St. Anthony. 
Arrive at St. Paul... 



,.2:45 P. 
,.:J::50P. 
..;>:50P. 
..4:25 p. 



M. 
M. 
M. 

M. 



^ESTABLISHED 1760. 

I?eter I^^rillai-d, 

SnulT and Tobac(!0 Manufacturer, 

in tand 1.*t Ctiaiubera*($t., 

(Formerly 42 Chambers Street, New York,) 
Would call the attention if Dealers to tlie articles 
of his manufacture, viz : 

BROWN SNUFF. 



/CLOTHING AND 

Gent's Furnishing Goods, 

AT THK STORE OF 

THIRD ABOVE MINNESOTA ST. 

Overcoats. 

FINE BEAVER $14, $18 and $23. 

BLACK DOESKIN, CASSIMKRE 

AND CLOTH $14 to $20. 

PETERSHAM, PILOT & SATINET.. $8 to $18. 

Business Coals, Frocks & Sacks 

A large assortment, $6 to $20. 

Pantaloons for the Million. 

From a coarse Satinet to a flee Doeskin, all new 
goods, and made up in style. 

VESTS. 

Black Doeskin, Ch th, Figured Ca.=!8lmere, Silk 
and Silk Velvet, of diflTerent grades. 

Sliirts and. I>rav«rei:^, 

Winter Caps, Hats, Gloves, Socks, Ties, 
FINE WUITE AND FAN*CV WOOL SHIRTS. 

We have now in store one of the largest slocks 
of Clothing in the State Our goods have been 
bought so that we can give bargains 
want of any article iu our " 
give us a call. 

my."JO-tf 



Those in 
line would do well to 

IWiyifMAK. 



m^. M 



Demigros, 

Pure Virginia, 
Coafee Itippee, Nachitocheg, 

G( 



Jacaboy, 

Fine Rappee, 




ESIRABLE LANDS FOR S.U.E. 



. ..♦.40P. M 
...5:15 P. M. 
...5:40 P.M. 
...C:J0p. M. 



Assistant Supcriutenaeiit. 



BY 



BUYING YOUR SHOES 




AT 



BROWN'S 

ISr]Ii:A\^ STOKES, 
113 Tliird Street, 

One block above the Merchant's Hotel. 
Je5-y 



THE GALENIC INSTITUTE. 

FOR THE TREATMENT OF 

VENEREA^L DISEA.SES, 

AND 

All Affections of the Urinary and Generative 

Organs, &c., &c. 

JV.X Pt:Bi.,sHK.n-A MKmcAL R-f^^^^^^SmSl-S T?^a/n^?^/' 1^^^^^^^ 
^Kn^" s ^'Sf.^^*^:^Ste;uaiUbS; and Z Stro^Masturbation o^ Self Abuse on the Body 
andMind,'in^d^ a^rea^se_on ^^^ DISEASES, 

S^^?Sf!ii?^l?^^!^^?S^?S^ 

ception, &c. t-'ent to 

This Institution was 
is the same as that em 
physician is a regular ( 

Thoi» afflicted with aay of the above diseases, should let no false deUcacy doter them, but apply 

at once and be cured 

Female Disease? 

unhealthy Menstruat 



American U( nlleman, Copenhagen 
YELLOW SNUFF. 
.Scotch Honey Dew Sco:ch, High Toast Scotch, 
Fresh Honey Dew .-cotch, Irish High 
Toast, or Luiidyfoot, tresh 
Scotch. 
Ml- Attention is calL'd to the large reduction 
inTricesofFino-(;utChjwing and Smoking 10- 
bacco, which will be found of a superior quality. 
TOB/VCCO. 
FINE CUT CHEWIIfG.— P. A. L., or plain; 
Cavendish, or Sweet; Ijweet Scented Oronoco; 

""'s^IoirVG.-lig ; ^ o. 1 ; NO. 2 ; Nob. 1 and 2 
Mixed; Granulated; S. Jago; Spanish; Canas- 

*^N b"-A Circular of i)ricc8 will be sent on ap- 
plication. marl5-ly 



Lands in ihe valley of the Upper Mississippi, 
and adjacent to (he line of the St. Paul and Pad- 
llc Railroad. „ ., . ^, _ 

The St. Paul and Pacific Railroad Company 
now ofler in tract* of 40, 80, I20 and 100 acres and 
upwards— 120 sectiors, or 70,800 acres oi land, m 
the following townships, viz : 

Town. 32, Range 22. 
33, " 22. 
32, " 23. 
83, " 23. 

32, •' 24. 
83, " 24. 
24, " 24. 
35, " 24. 

33, •' 25. 
31, " 25. 
:i5, " 25. 

" 84, " 26. 

" 35, " 26. 
Tliese lands are situated in the counties of 
Anoka, Isanti and Sherburne, and compris*' some 
of tho most valuable lauds in the townships 

Th*"/ will be sold for cash, the bonds ©f 
Companv at par, or on long credit. 
For 01 ices and terms of payment apply to 
^ LAND COMMlS.<I,)NER, 
St. Paul and Pacilic Railroad Company, 
oc27-d&wGm St. Paul, Minnesota. 



^ 






11 
if 

K 
It 

t< 



i< 
tl 






§mu. 



f 



Ml 



N 



O T I C E 



;« 




>d witn any 01 viie»i>oyoui2v»ov;=,oi.v/».«» a^- — 

EA^.-rartlcular attention given to all Fem-Je D««^«=»- "^ {\%7:PP4':^''!JC 
struation. Leuchorrhea, Chlorosis, Di. eases »< the yomband o, U.eri, &c. Also. 
U Fr«»«/. /^W/s,for obstnicted Menstr^^^^^^^ 



100 



SALE.— A yoke of Oxen suit- 
able for the Pineries. Enquire of 

Q. N. BEMAN & CO., 
daen Cornar JKobarts and Sth-sts. 



-pOR 




rpEMPERANCE HOUSE. 

JOHN BURNHAM,Proprietor, would respect 
fully announce to the traveling public that he has 
ooened the new and commodious building on the 
cdrner of Jackson and i-'ourth streets, for the_ ac 
commodatioi) of traveh rs, where he will be hap 
DT to sra his old friends , and all others who ma> 
favor him with their jatronage. The house is 
onlv two blocks from tl e steamboat landing and 
railroad depot. Uageajfe will be carried > om and 
to the boats free of c7w roe. Table suppl le J w itb 
the best tho market 8 Cforda. (iood sUbUng at- 
tached to the premises. ..-Ill, 

St. Paul, April 9A8M, im-^J 

■VITHITCHERS HOTEL, 

Fourth- St., bettcem Robert and Jackson 

ST. PAUL, MINNESOTA. 

E. B. WHITCHER, - - -Proprietor 

The above house ha'ing recenllv been onened 
and thoroughly renovited and refurnished, the 
Proprietor would res] icctfully solicit a share ol 
the public patronajfe 
carcnil Hostlers iu att 



MADAME ANDREWS, 
Clairvoyant, 

Has returned and taken the two story frame house 
on Tenth-st., two doors west of St. Peter-8t_, on 
right hand side, where she can l)e Contu.U'd for a 
sbort time only. . ^. -^ .. t, <. 

Clairvoyant Examinations $1. Past, Present 

and future, 50c. 

Persons wishing to consult her, are requested 
to walk up stairs without knocking. Hours from 
9A. M to9P. M. dec8-3m 






hours 
directed to 



and confidential. OflSo* 
AU letters should be 

THE GALENIC INSTITUTE 

(««x 190 J Saint Paul. litnne«otft 



:liy 
•Go 



49- Good 

mdance. 



Stabling and 
lylO-tf 



KECEFVTED im CONSIGNMENT, 
4,000 Pot MPS Eriep Peaches, and 7,00C 
PotiNDS Dribij Appi K8, to be sold 1<- w for cash. 
Jeb J. C. * a. C. BURBANK k CO. 



rpiIIRD STREET PROPERTY. 

FOR SA.3L.E, 

Lot 2, Block 22, Rice & Irvine's Addition— corner 
lot. 72 feet front on Third street and 156 feet on 
Hill street, adjoining Hope Engine House. Wlli 
be sold low. 
TERMS— Part tash and part «re««. 

Apply to !>• 9^?^,*^^;^», 
apiotf Irvine's Bl— k 

DeMONTREVILLE, 

i> k kt t i s t , 

(Offlce in French's Block,) 

Third 8»ree«, ■••r •*• ^—t •A««t 

SAINT PAUL ..••••• IflNHKSOTA 

)aB29-l7 








! 






■ 



■* ^ n - 



X fir • ' • 



- ^ - *• ■ ■* 




lliHi iMlftUi^lii 



I- 



■M^ka 





I 



■P ^ ■ 



nnwrat: 



•#iiWi 



— ■■ ■ ■■ 



i»^i" 



i 



^ 



THE SAINT PATIL PBESS, THURSDAY, JAKDABY 7, 1864. 



THE O I J^^l^ 

,KPT BT HAT i. .KyZ~:^^voo.^rn,co^^^^ot 



JASCART. 

1 Frioav 

2 SntnrJiy ••• 

3 Sunday 

4 Momluy.... 

5 Tupsrtay ... 
t^ AV»'il!i"s.lay 

•Below Zero. 



THlun ASD rKPAP. STREETS. 
7:30 A.M. 1P.M. 



6 p. M. 



i:?* 

18* 
10* 
10* 



ao* 


z\* 


12* 


ir>* 


3* 


:• 


4* 


4* 


21* 


»•.* 






zero 





SKILI.IN HOUGHTON, Howard Asuociation, 
No. 2 Soiitli Ninth street, Pliiladelphia, I'a. 
dpc2 d&w3m 

Grand, Rafile.— A grand raffle will 
Uikc place at Jim Davis' M^rchanta' Exchange, 
on Saturday evening, the 9th Inst., lor a fine 
Horse. Cutter, Harnens and Robe— the whole 
valued for ♦110. The chances are placed at $2 
each— only 05 chance". 



Jtn5-lw 



At a Ministers' roi-eting beKl on Uon- 
clav.nornin*.', January 5tl., at Miniicnpohs, it 
was thought best to give up the planpr.-poscd 
on Thank..pviug Day, vi/. : that of appomim. 
u comuiittce in each church represented ni tlu 
nniou service for the pun^osc of socmmg s>- 
natnros to a petition, nr.^ing Congress "at the 
earliest practk-al.Ic day" to emancipate all 
slaves in the United States. 

It wa< thouj?ht Lett, r to place "petitions in 
the -tores of Messrs. Ciishman and Williams, 
and let the public iicnerally volunteer their 
si.matures. The form of the petition dillors 
a Uttle. , It asks Congress to "use all practica- 
ble measures to secure the total and linal ex- 
tinction of slavery." 

Tho article in the State Atlas has reference 
to the action nt Thanksgiving Day, and was 
proposed by the Ministers present at the meet- 
ing of Monday morning. 

CoMi'UMENT.un- SriTKu.— We wire 
present last niu'Iit at a very pleasant supper. 
given by the Provost M.irshal, Captain George 



Enlist and Avoid tuk Duakt.— 

Recruits will be permitted to enlist In any of the 
organized Regiments or liatteries they may select 
and will receive 83<« bounty and premium. I or 
^ons desiring to enlist can get any particular*, by 

appiving to m.\uk: uknurhks, ««-"""'"« 

Agent, at tho Northweblern Expre.-^s OtJice, No. 
8,C, Third-9t., St. Paul. Offic« hour* from !) A. M 

to F. M. 

piiE.ss r.-.u 

cisiou to i«:f • "1 «""• 



i,u,u..aY.— We take oc- 
' ■ id^ and the public that 



ind assistants, at 
.\bout thirty-five 



II. Keith, to his dc:>uties 
the International Hotel, 
gentlemen suiToundedthc "festal board," and 
the oeca>ion wa^ a most pleasant one to all 
concerned. The viands were not only choice 
and savory, but the menutl and social feast 
was rich and entertaining. Captain Keith 
made an excellent speech in response to a 
toast, and Mr. Keid sang some comical songs, 
while Captain Hendricks kent the table in a 
roar by his Irish stories. All present enjoyed 

it highly. 

— — *■ 

I. O. O.F.— At tie election for ofTtcers 
of Saint raul Lodge No. 2, on Tuesday cven- 
mg, the follow iag were chosen : 

.V. (;.— Chas. D. Strong. 

y (;._Kol)crt L. '.Vharton. 

Recordini; Serdary.-J. Fletcher Williams. 

Permanent Sccrctaru.—T. J. King. 

Treasurer. — K. II. Yit/.. 

Trustees—Sht'TWOOyl IluUgh, C. D. Strong, 
and J. V. Williams. 



we have in conneciion with thU office one of the 
best liOOK BINDERIES and BLANK BOOK 
M .\NU FACTOUIKS in this city, and are prepared 
♦ o do KtLiso and binkisu a? desired. MAGA 
ZINES PERIODICALS, &c., bound in any stylo 
required, and OLD BOOKS re-bound at .■^hort 
notice Ledgers, Journals and Blank Books, lor 
Railroads, ffamboat*. Banking Houses, fcc, 
mam.fiictured on a" reasonable terms as any oth- 
er establi^liment. Merchants and others will do 
well to give us a call. 

]SIks. Leonard, late from Mt. Auburn 

Seminarv. Mississippi, vi»hes to inform the pub- 
lic that she wUl give lessons iu Vocal or lustru- 
mental Music, Piano, etc. Persons not hUYUig 
a-i instrument of th-ir own, can practice on Mrs. 
L *s Piano. For terms apply to her rooms, at Dr- 
Crary-s, Kobcrt-st., or Dr. C. D. Williams. 6th-st. 
RErKBr.>ci8.-Uev. Dr. MoMasters, Mung.^ 
Brother., A. T. C. Pierson.Kev. Dr. Crary,Fred. 
Drl coll, Dr. C. D. Williams. 



Strong, healthy and unhealthy, because it 
tends to create lazv habits and encourage 
that feeling of serVile dependence which 
is a real injury to the Indians themselves. 

^Ve sav f^ive to the old and infirm and 

to the sickknd lielple.ss ; but let the young 
and the able work for a livelihood. 

But we are digressing. \\ hat we 
meant to observe w.t8— that there was 
sullicent burden already thrown upon our 
settlers by our own Indian.s, without add- 
in .» some i-ight hundreil or a thousand 
Sioux. And let it be rememl ered that 
our Indians have some claim^ upon us, 
while the Sioux have none. The Saul- 
teaux have been born and brought up 
here ; some have been baptized, and are 
struggling against their Indian habits and 
customs with more or less success etc. 
But what claims have the Sioux? ^a- 
tives of a foreign country, and utter 
strangers ; fierce and ferocious savages— 
sometimes openly hostile, generally 
treacherous— their hands crimson with 
the blood of American citizens, and not 
even free from the blood of some of our 
own people ! These are facts that only 
recjuire mention ; our readers can easily 
illustrate for themselves. 

Ti en, over and above the mere (lues- 
tion of supplying them with food— which 
is, af^er all, a very secondary one— there 
is the vital (jucstion 



Union, and our only authority for exhorting or 
coiupeiling the allieganc- of the !?o'V'|- . . „, 
It will oppose every infraction ol Hit- .'''*■"» 
in high pliies or in low, by reckless and »V-'g'| d- 
od partisans, or by tho adininistration which has 
been their example. ,, , » .i „ 

It will fearlessly exercise the freedom of the 
Press; it will constantly uphold and defend 
Freedom of Speech and Freedom of the ballot. 

To the lawless ac»s of the Administration, is 
arbitrary and unjust arrests and expatnations.its 
denial of the right to the writ of hnheas ^C'/""' 
its illegal proclamations, its abroga Ion ofbtate 
and federal laws, its despotic accumulations of 
ungrantPd power, its; subversions of the safe- 
guards of civil and personal lilK'rty, it will con- 
ftanstantlv oppose the letter and the spirit of our 
supreme law and the advocacy ot our sai.nd doc- 
trine until American freemen shall bo roused to 
the recovery of their rights, their lib-Tties, their 
laws, and tlieir limited and well-balanc4>d govern- 
ment hv the resistless decision of the bailot. 

Profoundly impressed with the desire to con- 
tribute all that it may to the great work of the 
eeuerat ion, —namely, to restore our national uni- 
ty and to place the United States again foreiiio-st 
a'nong the nations of th'- earth, and lirscinthe 
peace, prosperitv, and happiness ol its people,— 
THE WORLD seeks from those who desire such 



J!s 00 



of our own 



safety 
but a 



d-?c'20-3in 



Wk will do IT— in order to sell ofl' 
and reduce our extensive atock of Clotiuxo 
vxn GENT'S FUBNisii'XO Goons, wo oiler eiir 
vvHolo stook at from 10 to 25 per cent, les.s than 
our regular price. We think it safe to say V at 
thos" purcha^-iag of us will get Goods about the 
wholesale price. We offer these inducements to 
the people ratho. than to Merchants Oor Lmv 
Ksi-,-u cK wii.i. lii: sT.vr;iu at oxcb A cal 
Loin those iu want of any article in our hue is 
rosrectluUy solicited. 

no 'l-tf W. H. 1 EMPLE, Third-st. 

Another stock of Wheeler & Wilson's 
splendid ScN^ing Machines received by express 
to-day at JvH Third-st 



F. M. JOHNSON, Agent. 



December iSth, lNi3. 



dec."J-lw 



•e* 



Members of the Legislature who are 
in want of Station er>- or other things in my 
line, will tind a large assortment at lowest 
Cash prices, for scrip at par, at James Daven- 
port's 2U1 3d Street, next block above the 

Post Onice. 

-••* 

St. Pail Libuauv Assoctatio>c.— -V 
meeting of the Board of Directors of the St. 
Paul Library Association will be held this 

evening at 7 1-2 o'clock. 

CHAS. li. MAYO, Secretary. 



GoLi» Pens Kk-pointed Equal 

TO New, on the receipt of ;>5 cent.s. 
Circulars lor the Johnson Pen, sent on 
applicatioT!, by Mail or otherwise. 
E. S. JOHNSON, Manufactory and Office, 
15 MAIDEN LANE, New York City. 



dec2r-lm 



Tlie Sioux ia tli9 Red River 
Settlements. 



►•»■ 



Our Neighbors over the Line in 
Trouble. 



Editors of thv- .St. Paul Uicss : 
Oliltuur.v. 

The Pnrssofa few days since br.efly noticed 
the death of Mr. Nathan Fletcher, of Minne- 
apolis. Llciili.ied with our early history as a 
territory, he left many friends in his Western 
home to sympathi/.3 with those who mourn 
his loss; and by a wide circle at the Ea.^t, the 
announcement will be received with painful 

interest. 

Naturally of a strong character, his clear 
jpdgmcnt and unhesitating will made him a 
leader, but tl.ese eharacteristics were tempered | 



WHAT SILVLL BE DONE WITH THE 
INDIAN.-?. 



From the Nor'-Wester, Dec. 17. 

Meet anybody, now-a-days, and the 
topie is at once, 
Are there any more in 



The Sioux ! the Sioux ! 
? Have any gone 
? Wh.at are they coming for? Are 
actual murderers, or are they 
merelv aiders, abettors and accomplices? 
How many are there of them ? Such are 
of the thonsand queries addressed 



We cannot forget that we are 
small community, in the heart of a vast 
unpeopled waste, far removed from 
other civilized communities, and without 
lacilities for getting help if it became 
necessary. Is there not, under such cir- 
cumstances, danger to life or property, 
or both? Consider this, people of Red 
River! These Sioux, as we .see them, 
are, apparently, a poor, ill-fed, and ill- 
anned set : but whatever they may ap- 
pear in this the hour of their extremity, 
let us not forget that they have ever been 
a daring and formidable tribe, and that, 
in the recent massacres in Minnesota, 
they evinced such a cruel spirit, and such 
a power to do mischief as might well 
cause uneasiness. 

The moral is obvious. Something 
ought to b.' done, and that right speedily, 
to get them removed. The best method 
of accompli- hiug this end, is the question. 
For our own part; we aie by no means 
clear about the ellicacy of any plan, but 
trust our authorities will seriously en- 
deavor to use judicious and effective 
means. We understand that Governors 
Dallas and Mactavish have been striving 
to get them away, for the past week or 
teifdavs ; and for so doing they are de- 
serve the thanks of the community. But 
the trouble is— even if they are got away 
bv inducements, they may return again ; 
aiid what then ? The ditliculty is— how 
to get rid of them permanently— how to 
prevent their return — how to make them 

stay away. . 

The plan contemplated by the authori- 
ties for their removal was to offer them 
a large (juantity of provisions— only to 
be didivered, however, beyond the bound- 
ary line. The offer was made, and. as 
we are informed, was for a while agreed 
to by the Sioux; but they now refuio to 
leave on any terms, saying they will only 
die yonder and may as well die here ! In- 
deed, the Chiefs allege that they dare 
not order their men to leave. Their lan- 
<Tuage is, — "If we bid our young men 
strike their tents, they will shoot us." In 
the circumstances it is difficult to know 
what to do ; but we strongly deprecate 
violent measures. Our best policy is to 
exercise moderation and caution in deal- 
in" with these Indians. 



*:i 00 


.'. w 


7 50 


IJ 00 


•-'•-' 60 


.i?'2 CO 


. 5 00 


. H O-) 


. IS 00 


. v;j 00 



things their svmpathv and support, and, nbov? 
all, the favor of Him who crowns every good 
work. 

TERMS: 

naily Worltl. 

Yearly subscribers by mail 

8eitii->Ve«'kI>- ^forltl. 

Single subscribers, i)er annum 

Two copies to ono address •• 

Threo " " 

Five '' ' 

Ten •' " 

Weekir H'orWI. 

.•^iiigl'^ sub.^cribers, per annum 

T!' -• coi)ies (address on each paper). 

Five •' 

T.n «• " .'' • 
Twenty copies (all to one address) 

(Mubs of twenty or over can have address put 
on each paper for an additionsl charge of ten 
cents each. _ ,„ , 

For evei v clab of twenty an extra copy will be 
added lor I'he gctier up ot the club. 

For tfvery club of liftv, the Senii-Weckly. and 
for every club of oae hundred, tin- Daily will be 
sent, when reiiue-ted, in lieu of the extra copies 
otWi-ekly. . X .1 . 

Address to Clubs may be tnad" at any timi- at 
same rates. l'ai)ers cannot be cli«ng<d irom one 
cUib to another, but on re.pie.st of the person or- 
dering the Club, and on receipt ollifty cents ex- 
tra, single papers will be taken from the clum 
and sent to a seperate address. 

All orders must bo accompanied by the Cash. 
ADDRKSS, THE W«»I.», 

3.» l»arl* It«»\», Xew York. 



WrNtS AND LIQUORS 

SUITABLE FOR 

Mediciual aud Family Use. 

OLD BOURBON AND RYE WHISKY, 
OLD QUEEN'S PORT WINE, 
OLD MADEIRA W^NE, 
ITNE OLD PALE SHERRY^ 
FINE OLD COCJXAC BRANDY, 
CHOICE OLD HOLLAND GIN, 
JAMAICA AND ST. CROIXRUM, 
CHAMPAGNE WHINES, 
SPARKLING C A T A W B A , 

And all other Articles in our lino of busincfB 

jr. l*'ATllOX IT EBB, jrr„ 

SuoceaBor to WALTEK W. WEBB, 

Sibley Block. 



^»t(Iud aud §tvn\x^. 



A 



T A. BLAKEMAN'S, 



< 4 p REENBACKS ABE GOOD, BUT 
ROBACK'S ARE BETTER." 




nOBACK'S STOMACH BITTE»». 
n<»BACK'8 STOMACH BKTTE»» 
nOBACK'S STOMACH BKTTEBS 

USED BY EVERYBODY. 
USED BY EVERYBODY. 
USED BY EVERYBODY. 
USED BY EVERYBODY. 

FOR ALL BILIOUS DISEASES. 
FOR ALL BILIOUS DISEASES. 

TBE NEW JEWELRY STORE, i for all bilious diseases. 

FOR ALL BILIOUS DISEASES. 
Four doors belov THOMPSON & BROTHEB'S 
Bank, and next door below .SH AAN 'S 
Fashionable Hat Store, 



my 19 



MERCHANTS IN 
COUNTHY 



THE 



CAN 



FIND AT OUR STORE A 
LARGE STOCK OF 



Oil Tliirtl Street, 

Can be seen splendid 

SILVER TEA SETS, CAKE BASKETS, ICE 

i'lTCHEIlS, CASTOKt., 

SoUd Silver Spoons— Pure as Coin, 

Diamond, itpal and Ruby Rings, Solid Gold Ear- 
Kiags and Tins in sets, 

From ^IS to #SO. 

#10,000 worth of SETH THOMAS CLOCKS 
JUST RECEIVED. 

Those wiohing to supply t'»'^'"f;'l^«,i?„^:V*J' A^®'' 

feet Clock, will buy the. SETH lUOM-AS 

CLOCK of 

N. B.— The Cheap American Gothic Clock, at 
Factory prices. All wurraiited to i un well. 

A FINK AssoitT.MF.NT of the American 
manufactured Watch adjusted to lieat and cold, 
aud the most perfect timer made. A. BLAKE- 
MAN ylls th^m at manufactory prices. Don't 
mistake the place. Be sui-e Iha you call in at 
THE NEW JEWELRY STORE. apl8-ly 

'y^ 0. G RE E N l'e'a F ' S 

Fashionable Jewelrj Store, 



THE BEST TOXIC IN THE WORLD. 
THE BEST TONIC IN THE WORLD. 
TilE BEST TONIC IN THE WORLD. 
THE BEST TONIC IN THE WORLD. 



1ST. F. IVICIIOL:^, 

General Insurance Agent, 

THIRD-ST., 
St. r»anl, jMinnesota. 

Policies issued in the following New York Co 
panies : 

Lorillai-d, Metropolitan, 
Niaj^ara, Vlieiiix, 

AND MUTUAL BENEFIT LIFE INS. CO., OF 
NEW JERSEY. 

jaar Combined cash assets over $0,M»0,000 
** decU-t novlO'fl 



MEN'S BUFFALO SHOES, 



Tbird »«r«w» 




ROBACK'S CATAWBA BRAWB*' 
liOBAi KM CATAWBA BBAXMY' 
IIOBACI«.'S CATAW^BA BBAHBY. 
«OBACi4'S CATAWBA BBA^fBlT. 

MADE FKOM THE CATAWBA GRAPE. 
MADE FROM THE CATAWBA GRaPE. 
MADE FROM THE CATAWBA GRAPE. 
MADK FROM THE CATAWBA GRAPE, 

USED IN ALL HOSPITALS. 
USED IN ALL HOSPITALS. 
U.-^ED IN ALL HOSPITALS. 
USED IN ALL HOSJ'ITALS. 

ADOPTED BY THE U. S. GOVERNMENT. 
ADOPTED BY THE U. S. GOVERNMENT. 
ADOPTED BT THEU. S. GOVERNMENT. 
ADOPTED BY THE U. S. GOVERNMENT. 

Sold ill St. Paul by 
Sold ill St. Paul by 

CHARLES A. UPHAM. 
CHARLES A. UPHAM. 

DR.C W. R(JBACK, Preprietor, Cin., O. 
§alnt r»al. c. A. COOK, Chicago, General N. W. Ajent. 

nol7-€odly 



AND 



Women's Buffalo Shoes. 



away 
tlicte 



to 



bv a child-like simplicity, a total absence of j • ^^-^ g^,„^,rv to ' all and sundry 
political ambition, and an unfailing sympathy 1 .^ ' 
with the weak, the buiVering, and the op- 
pressed. 

Tnrr.ugh many Ticissitndes he possessed a 
patient contentment, a uniform cheerfulness, 
and an unfailing faith in a graci(.u.s Trovi. 
dence that grew stronger under trial ; while 
the even tenor of his life harmonised with, 
and gave empha-is to his verbal testimony, 
to the transcendent value of the gospel of 

Christ. 

His transparent integrity secured the re- 
spect of others, if not their imitation, while he 
made his stvle of living correspond with his 
pecuniary "hopes, rebuking all extrav:^gant 
family expenditures to keep up appcar.mce 
that so certainly brings final misery into the 
honsehold. His brief and unique way of im- 
pressing truth made it impossible that the les- 
son should be forgotten ; and many of his 
sayings liave become proverbs among his im- 
mediate friends. 

Those of us who knew him best loved him 
best, and cherish the memory of his life as 
the richest of legacies. As a christian, his ex- 
ample best illustrates his faith. As a patriot, 
he was long since committed to the policy of 
freedom, and witched with the keenest inter- 
est fa- 1.:= adoptiriM, 

"We can say noth!nr to enhance tl:: v.- ,vth of 
him who has gone, but it is a melancholy 
pleasure to keep his memory fresh in our 
heart; a memory— not merely of passive 
virtues, as having no bitterness, and without 
gtain— but rich in elements that will long keep 
our friend a liviug pleasure wiih us. 

•♦•- 



Mail Arrivep.— An Eastern mail ar- 
rived at 8 o'clock last night, the first one that 
haa arrived since Friday last. 

««» — 



Medical and Surgical.— Thaddfvs 
Williams, M. D., omc3 in Concert Hall, oppo- 
titc GrecTdeaf 's, St. Paul, Minnesota. 

Dr. T.WILLIAMS, hating been engaged in 
ftn extensive practice iu Louisville, Ky., fcr fi\0 
years, has 8>ntl -d In St. Paul, aud re^p-ctfully 
offers his services to the public. Mes.^agei left at 
M.4 oince, or at Day & Jenk'.-i Drug Store, prompt- 
ly attended to. Dr. Williams lanuot mate night 

call!. 

JO- RKKunENCKS :— G. W. Bayle?s, M D. ; M. 
Goldsmith, M. D., Brigade Surgeon; Maj. Gen. 
L. Rou?ieau,all of Louisville, Ky. Hon. F. B.ill; 
Prof. L. M. Lawscn. M. D.; Geo. C. Blackinm 
M. D., Surgeoa to ConiinLTcial Hospital, and St. 
MaryU; I'rof. M.B.Wright, M. D.; Prof. Nel- 
son Layler, Chemist, all of Cincinnati. jan7-0m 



StiR and Gartkk Saloon, Jackson 

•treet, next to lllingworth's Mammoth Town 
Clock. The only place where you can get a genu- 
ine Half and Half. The Bar is supplied with the 
choiceit Liquors and Cigars. Oysters served up 
in every style and at all hours. jan5-lw 

Metropoliten Rilliakd Hall and 

Rkstai'K AST.— Joseph Hall, Proi)rletor. — This 
eitablUhment ia one of the most fashionable and 
popular in tho city, and is lltted up in a style that 
will compato with any in the East. Tho Billiard 
Room is furnished with six of Phalen's best 
marble bed Tables— two of which are arranged 
for the carom game. Oysters, and all kinds of 
game, kc, will be served up on bhort order in 
the Restaurant Department. 



fanS-lm 



Diseases of the Nervous, Seminal, 
Ubisabt aitd Sexual Systems-Ncw and re- 
liable trcatment-in Reports of tho HOWARD 

-"OCIATION— Sent by mail In sealed letter 
op«i, free of charge. Address, Db. J. 



but to no purpose. Assuredly 
no purpose," for the countless rumors 
atloat are so conllictinrr and contra- 
dictory that they unsettle everybody's 
knowledge of flicts ; and the general re- 
ply to queries is, "I don't know,'] or "I 
heard so, and heard the contrary." 

Now there are some things deserving 
of consideration in connection with these 

Sioux. 

It is <|uite a new thing to have hnn- 
diedd of them living amongst us. During 
the past twenty or thirty years, we have 
had occasional visits Ironi them— these 
visits, however, being very few and far 
between. Moreover, only a few would 
come, and thefe professedly on some 
special errand which was no sooner exe- 
cuted than they left on their return. Tliey 
felt they were' strangers, they acted as 
such ; they were received and treated as 
such. Now, however, they are coming 
in multitudes— men, women and children 

"baf and baggage" — without any 

speciaf object apparently beyond getting 
something to eat and escaping the hated 
"long knives." Here they pitch their 
tents'and in their own way take up their 
abode amongst us. Like our own In- 
dians, they move round from house 
to house in truest of something to 
support frail nature, and then return to 
their wigwams with each day's aceumu- 
ation. 

Is this to continue ? Are these Sioux 
reallv expecting to remain permanently 
in this settlement or its vicinity, or even 
on this side the boundary line? Arc 
they thus easily and without lurther cer- 
mony, to become part and parcel of our 
own Indian population ? Are they, after 
exciting our alarms for hall a century by 
their dliring and their treachery, thus 
suddenly to be domf,'sticited, and ac- 
cepted by us as poor harmless beings 
whom charity would bid us tolerate if 
not welcome? Thes'A are important 
ipiestions.gand it behooves the people at 
large to con.sider them. 

For our own part, we doubt very much 
the poliey and the propriety of allowing 
thein to get a footing here. We do not 
think it would be for the good of the set- 
tlement or the country. As regards this 
settlement, experience shows that much 
gratuitous help has to be afforded to the 
Indians properly belonging to the place 
— as much as settlers can reasonably be 
expected to alFord. Some Indians, cer- 
tainly, are industrious, prove to be use- 
ful servants, and burden nobody ; but 
many are thriftless, and too often beg 
when they should labor. The consequence 
is, that people have to give, give, give, 
ad infinitum. We have so got into the 
habit that we cannot get out of it. An 
Indian enters your kitchen and quietly 
seats himself. He announces no errand ; 
you do not expect him to have any, and 
"therefore do not question him, at the 
same time you feel quite sure that he 
wants something to eat, and, in accor- 
dance with long-established custom, or- 
der that something to be given him. The 
moment this is done, you take lor grant- 
ed that he will be gone, and you aye not 
disappointed. 

Now this spirit of liberality is a good 
thing, and we should be very sorry to 
check it ; but we must observe that the 
only fit objects for such charity are the 
old and infirm, and those who may have 
been unfortunate in ways unavoidable. 
We disapprove of indiscriminate charity 



Strike Anions: Teamsters. 

On Thursday morning, when the teams 
loa<!ed with provisions and supydies were 
ready to start from this place to the re- 
lief of Caotain Whitney's command, re- 
turning from the Mi.ssouai river, the 
teamsteri refused to leave until they had 
received their pay. These men were 
brought here a week ago from Fort Slid- 
ing, and before starting from th.at post 
demanded their pay in the same manner, 
which they reci-ived up to the first of 
December, so that there is but one 
month's pay now due them. Not having 
the money "on hand. Captain ;McKusick 
could notpay them, and was compelled to 
hire other teamsters, which delayed the 
starting of the relief tram until Friday 
morning. — Mankafo Becord. 

_' » » ♦ » ♦ 



Do You Want a Sleigli Ride? 

If so, you will need 

SLEICm BELLS AT>^E> 
Moi'se lilanUets. 

The largest a.«sortment of which in the city of 
Saint I'aul may be found at the Harness Store ol 

S. B. LOYE, 

Who is selling them as low as the lowest. 
«y Store next door to Edgerton's Bank, Third 
etreet. '^^«^-^'-<'' 

co:mfoiitai?le s l e i g ii 

RIDE 

Can be had by using tho 

IVcAV Foot Htove. 

LAMPS CHEAPEll THAN EVER, 

Some as low as 

THIRTV-n VE C ENTS. 

Those usually sold for $1.50, we now sell for 

E. & II. Y. BELL 
SLPaulj^ec^'tU^ ^^"^'^ 

r^ A R D . 



A 



Being fortunate in the purchase of these, we are 

selling them for much lesi than they 

bring in Chicago. 



We have also a full supply of 



ivip ]\iocoAsiiVf-;, 



OIL TAN MOCCASINS, 



The ladles and gentlemen ot thi j city and vIoJb- 
Ity, are invited to call and examine the 

LARGEST AND CHOICEST .LSSORTMENl 

OF NKW 3TTLKS OF JKV^ELET, 

Ooia autl Silver If'i^atclies, 

CLOCK.S, SILVER WAKK, PLATED WARE, 
DIAMOND GOODS, SILVEH TEA SETS, 

Castors, Cake Baskets, Gold Chains, Rings 
ThimUles, aud everything else pertaining to a 

FIRST CLASS JEWELRY STORE 

My goods were purchased exclusively for (»sh 
from the largest wholesale hourea in the Lmon 
and are for sale at tl)<^ 

LOW^EST P]?MCES. 

AH Roods warraned precisely as represented 
Ca'ih paid for old Gold and t>ilver. A full supply 
WATCH MATERIALS always on hand. 

Agent for Seth Thomas' Clocl «, also agent for 
the d'lebrated 

American Watclies. 



pRlNCE & CO^S. 
IMVROVED 

•VTARRANTKD FOR FIVK YKAR8. 

The oldest establishment in the United States, 
employing 2C0meM, and linishing eighty Inetni' 
ments per week. 
MANUFACTORY CORNER OF MARYLAND AND 
NIAGAUA STRK.ET8, 

BUFFALO, N. Y. 



WHOLESALE DEPOTS. ^ _. . 

47 Fulton street /M.jr«In 

8.1 Lake street •••• cmcago 

».$ i.aie ^vijoLESALE AGENTS. 

Henry ToUnian & Co ®?^*f "' "l*^ 

W. F. Colburn *- inclnnat 1, v 

Balmer k, Weber ^v^^^^aX ytt 

James Bellak ;?^l"'*f ^V,iM 

A.Couse ?>'^''^^'A'?'« 

Ph.P.Worlein •.;.^«^^.9'i?''Sf 

A. &S. Nordheimer 



..Toronto CM 



MITTS A2nD (iLOVKb. 



Please call on us and we guarantee to show jou a 



Oomplete ©tocU 



^ LOW 



AT 

PRICES. 



It is estimated that about five hun- 
dred colored recruits will bo obtained from 
IJoone, one of the largest slaveholdins and 
most desperately rebel counties in Misoouri. 
The negroes are enlisting in crowds, and their 
masters do not appear nuxinus to secure any- 
thin-^ except receipts of $:i'JO for their sable 
property. 



We will offer [ for f)0 days] our entire stock ol 

MILLINERY, 

at from '.'0 to 25 per cent, reduction ; 

SHAWLS, CLOAKS, CLOAKINGS 

AND FANCY ARTICLES, 

10 to 15 per cent. 
DRESS AND HOUSEKEEPING GOODS, 

at Eastern prices. 

Those Goods were delaved until too late, and 

now must be slaught'-red to raise nion y. It 

would pay any lady to keep them over. 1 he Hon- 

net or Hat that cost $10 \esterday, and cheaj) at 

that will be $:.50 to $S to dav. This is worth 

saving. You can pav your dollar with 75 or Kic. 

We rao=t re8|M>ct fully solicit from onr former 

customers and ladies throupliout ihe St.ite. Our 

8tcrei8lK.-low I)av& Jenk's Drug Store, Third 

street, St. Paul, Minnesota, where ihe W ax t ig- 

ure is in the Window. .. „ , , nx^rAV 
,1 ,;54 Mas. J. J. DLOAN. 



W31. jr. SMITH &: CO., 



ST. PAUL. 



dcclC-am 



o 



p 



ROSFECTUS FOR 1804. 



THE A\OP^LI>: 

An Independent DemocraticDaily , 

Semi-Weekly and Weekly 

liewspaper. 

UNION OF THE WOULD AND AllGUS. 

THE WORLD, to which the New York Weekly 
Arr/iis \iAA been unit*^d, has to-day five times the 
n^iregate circulation ol auv Democratic or con- 
servative newspaper. Itaddre.'ises weekly alone 
more than 10(',l''Xi hubscribers and constant pur- 
chaser^, and reaches at least half a million reud- 
frs With the .steady iucreasi- in circulation 
which it now eiijjys, these numbers will soon be 
doubled. Nothing less than this should satisfy 
tbo*e who believe that the only hope of restoring 
the Union and the authority of the Constitution 
over a now distracted and divided country, lies in 
wresting power from the hands of those v hose 
fanaticism has helped to provoke, invite, and pro- 
lone tlie war; and that to accomplish this end, no 
means is so elTective as the ditlusion, throuch 
able and enterprising newspap-'rs, of sound polit- 
ical knowledge among the working men, the 
thinking men, and the voting iiu n ot; the North. 
Knterprise, Industry and mon'\v will bo hberal- 
Ir expended to m.ike THE WORI.D the BKST 
NEWSPAPER IN AMERICA. Its news from 
I'vcry part of the world will be early and authen- 
tic Wherevt r the telegraph exteuds.or railroads 
run or steamboats ply, it will gather the latest 
inielli"ence. It has a large staff of f coniplished 
correspondents with all the federal armies, who 
will ti'legraoh and write to us the latest news 
from the va'iious seats of war. It has corre.spon- 
dcnisandreporfers in every political and com- 
mercial centie in America and Europe, whose 
U- t -rs and dispatches will leave nothing worthy 
of note unknown to its reader.^. 

ThcM^.K»'Ki' Rki'o Tsof the Wor.un are more 

complete than those of any other u"wsp:ii)er. The 

Fdliors invite comparison in this respect and 

point to the reports of the Cattle Market the 

oneralaud country Produce Markets, and the 

lonev Markets in its columns, as proof of its ex- 

edan.c in this respect. The Wonn. has also a 



ced 



to all Indians, old and young, we.ak and 



8i>eclaldepartimnt devoted to Agriculture, idled 
with editorial articles, communications from 
uractical formers, and selected matter, making a 
valuable and useful paper for the !■ armers and 
Mechanics of the country. , . . 

The war In which the nation is engaged against 
armed and iutatuated Hebels, aud the radical par- 
ty policy of lliH admiuls ratiou which prolongs it, 
have conspired to bring together upon one pat- 
form all conservative, C nion loving and Cousti- 
tution-loving men, ot whatever former name auo 
creed Many of those who, within the limits of 
the Constitution, fuujiht the battles ol the ballot 
box underthe leadership of those patriotic states- 
men of ofier and better days, H. nry Clay and 
Danit-1 A'ebster, together with the masses w lo.-e 
principles were those of such atriotsas Andrew 
Jackson and William L. Marcy, .Silas Wright and 
Stephen A. Douglas, now stand ehoulder to 
fchoulder upon the same plutforni and under the 
same banner. The platform is a plain one. It is 
to restore the Union, maintain ilie Constitution, 
aud enforce tho Laws. Whatever makes for this 
end the exercise of force or the policy of concil- 
iation. THE WORLD will advocate; whatever 
makes against it, THE WORLD will oppose. 

It wUT oppose every enemy to lUELMON, 
whether armed in rebellion at the South or insid- 
iously planting the seeds of disunion and essen- 
tial disloyalty at the North. 

It will oppose every violation of THE CONSTI 
TUTION, which is the only hope and l)ond of 



J ADIESLOOK FOR YOURSELVES. 
UO Fei- Oent. 

BELOW COST! 

LARGE REDUCTION IN 

MLILLIIVERY OOOI>8, 

From this date tlU the Ist of February. 

MRS. J. B. LYGO, 

Proposes sell ng 

WINTER MILLINERY GOODS, 

At the following low prices, via : 

Velvet Bonnets at ?''>.00 worth $8.00 

SilkBonnets **«« " $5.00 

Velvet Flowers 30c each " 60c 

FeltHats $1.25 " $1.75 

do $L00 " $1.50 

Beaver Hats ^1-50 " $2-'X) 

Muslin Flowers '5c each. 

C L O -A K S , 

And all articles usually sold in a 

]M:iLr^IlSERY SXOK.13, 

Including a very large assortment of Ribl)ons at 
a proportionate reduction. Call and see for your- 

''*''" NO HUMBUG! 

p. a.— Mrs. LYGO having Imported one of the 
largest M'Ulncry i-tock of Goods ever brought to 
tho West, and paid cash prices for the same, is 
thus enabled to offer to the Public the above 
Goods at the largely reduced prices to her Patrons 
and tho Public In general. 

N. D.— Having such a large stock of Goods on 
hand, I am obliged to sacrifice my Goods to make 
room for my Spring Importations. 

!nn». jr. b. jlyoo. 

Third slrect, two doors below 
dec30-2<f Thompson's Bank. 



■T>ENJA]MIN S. liULL, 

WHOLESALE AND RKTAIL DEALER IH 

CROCKERY, CHINA AND GLASSWARE, 

Harrison's Stone Block, MinneapoUs, Afin^ 

Keeps constantly on hand a large assortraeut ot 
the above named goods, eithei at 

AVholesale or Retail. 

Orders solicited. noil fi«nd*w 



Y S T E R S-O Y S T E R S . 

rhe undersigned are now and have ^^^ foj <'!^ 
past TKN Y EAUS, the only Agents in Minnesota 

MALTBY^S CELEBRATED 
BALTIMORE 

O Y S TE K S . 

We GUARANTEE to the public tlft these 
Oy.-ters are superior to any "t»'e" brought to ■ I'* 
market. The cans are larger, and are tilled with 
Oysters. . ^, , _„ j 

«*- A large supply constantly on hand. 

Orders Irom any part of the State promptly at- 
tended to. 

Depot «10 Tliird Street, 
St. I*a,iil. 

no26-tf .1. C. BURBA NK fc CO. 

MICHIGAN CENTRAL RAIL 
ROAD. ^ 

Great Central Itoiite 

To New Y'ork, New England and the 
Canadas . 

On and after SUNDAY, ^«V.'^*'l'^^^'?;.f?iv£ 
leave the Great Central Union Depot.foot of Lake 

street, as follows: 

e 30 a. m.— (Sundays excepted,) arrives at 
Detroit at 6.30 p. M. ; Toronto 1.0./ 
A.M.; Suspension Bridge 4.05 A. 
M.; Hufl'alo, 4.noA.M.; Albany, 
3.45 1'. M. : New York, 9..30 r. M.; 
Boston, 12.50 A. M. 
5.*0 i». m.— (f^aturdays excepted,) arrives at 
•^ Detroit at O.oo A. M.; Toronto, 

4.45 V. M.; Suspension Bridge, 
4. 15 r. M. ; Bufialo, 5.00 i-. m. ; Al- 
bany. 5.45 A. .M. ; New York, 11.50 
A..M.; Boston, 4.00 r.M. 
lOOOn.m.— (Saturdays and Sundays except- 
*"•"' '^ cd ) arrives at Detroit 10.00 A. >t. : 

Toronto, y.05 P.M.; .SuspensKm 
Bridge, H.IO p.m.; Albany, 8.40 
A. M. ; New York, li 45 P. m. ; Bos- 
ton 5.00p.m. 
Cincinnati trains via M. C. Railroad, IcAve 
Chicago at O-JW A.M., Mail Train; 10 P. M. l^t 
Express. 

The 10 p.M.tralnleavingChicago runstlirongh 
to Cincinnati without change of cars or baggage. 
RITTTAN'S PATENT VENTILATING AND 
W\ AlING APPAR.ATUS on all Cars of this 
f\)mi -diiy An elegant .Smokers' Car, witliEuchre 
Tables, lias lately been added to our Day Traine. 

Patent Sleeping Cars on Night Trains. 
Bafffftttf* CI»ecUe«l Xhroufrl*. 

M- Through tickets for sale at all Principal 
RiUlroad Olftct^s iu the AVest.at the Generaionice, 
corner Lake and Dearborn streets, (under the 



Particular attention paid to repairing every 

description of Watches, Clock? and Jewelry in 

the best possible mannir. We manufacture aU 
kinds of 

Or any otherpattem of .Tewelry, fcc. In our line. 
All work will be done promptL' in a woiltman- 
Uke manner and BKiTti: 1"^ ' ANY othkr ES- 

TABLISHMKST N . 1118 SFCTION OK THK < OUS 

THY. All ord^i s oy letter or otherwise will re 
ceive prompt attention. • i-.i^ 

All kinds of new wheels and new parts of the 
watch manufactured for the Irsde at a reasonable 

S^toreiti Greenleaf's Block, opposite Concert 

°aK!" ''" ''""' """^"h. C. GREENLEAF. 

^OSTERr&^"HARD]:NBUR^^ 

SHIP CHANDL13RS AND 
SAIL MAKERS, 

Mo. «1» Soutli Wa»er Street, Clilcaffo' 

Have constantly on hand a Urge assortment ol 

Manilla &> Tari-ed K-ope, 
liitcUingr Ii^opes, 

Old Canvass, Oakinii, Tar, Pilch. 

CHAINS, TACKLE BLOCP S, TENT?, AWK 

INGS, WAGON COVF RS, COTTON 

AND RUSSIA I'UCKS, 

Common aud Patent Hoi«t 'Wrheel»,for build 
Ings, constantly en hand. 

GEO. F. H-OST KR. (jeniv) C. M. HARDENBtJROy 

piANOS AND MELODEONS. 

F. O. TTILOER, Sc CO., 

Deal'^rs in Plano-Fortes, Melodeons, Harmoni- 
ums, Cabinet Organs, Sheet Music, Music Books, 
&c., &c.. No. 2:tO rhird-st.,cornerof St. reter-st., 
St. Paul. Minnesota. Ageni s tor the celebrated 
A. M.McPhnil & Co.'s Star and Grand fecale 1 1- 
an'os.'.Also, the PrrlorGem , ._ . . 

Mr. Wilder is a Piano Maker, and hfls been in 
the bu«iness over 20 years, ind will sell nothing 
but first-class instrument-". Every Instrunient 
will be warranted, and all Pi inos sold by the firm 
will be k<'pt in tune one year free of charge, it 
within a reasonable distance. 

as- Pianos and Melodeons tuned and repaired. 

Lesson given on the Piano and Melodeon. 
noafi-d'ttwly 

TTURRY UP! HURRY UP! 

All you Mechanics, that want TOOLS, come 
right along, and fill up your jhests, while you can j 
do it at low prices. 

no22-3m JOHN McCLOUD, Brown's Block. 



Persons unacquainted with the Melodeon an( 
Its history, will bear in mind that we are the pl« 
neers and leading manuf.vcturers, not only in lb 
United States, bSt in the world. AN e coiiimence« 
the manufacture of Melodeons m the fall of thj 
year 1847, and since that time have hmshedanj 
sold TWENTY-SEVEN THOUSAND. IhesJ 
Instruments are now in u^e not only i^^^^^l' 
ted States and Canada, but a so in ^f [''Pf .^^"a. 
Africa, South America and the AN est lud'^s fni 
from all these quarters we have the most flatten 
tng testimonials of the high estimation in whici 
they are held. _„„- 

AT ALL INDUSTRIAL EXHI?ITIONS THKl 
HAVE INVARIABLY BEEN AWAKDF.D 
THK HIGHEST PREMIUM WHEN- 
EVER EX HIIUTEU IN COMPE- 
TITION WITH OTHERS. 
We shall take pleasure in forwarding by mail, 
(at our own expense), our Illustrated Catalogue, 
in which every instrumonv wo manufacture U 
fully described and illustrated by elegant engra- 

^^A^f Melodeons of our manufacture, e>thfr "o^ 
by us or dealers In any part of the Lnited States 
or Ca.-ada, are warranted to be perfect in every 
respect, and should any rejmlrs be necessary be- 
fori the expiration ol live years from date of 
sale, we hold our^^elvps ready and willing to make 
the same free of charge, provided the injury is 
not caused by accident or c-esign. 

Agents for the sale of our Melodeons in«y be 
found iu all the principal towns of the Lultea 
States and Canada. 

Address either ^ „ -. , « v 

GEO. A. PRINCE & CO., Buffalo, N. Y. 
GEO. A. PRINCE & CO , S7 I-mton-st., N. Y. 
GEO. A. PRINCE & CO., 43 Lake-st., Chicago. 
Or either of the above Wholesale Agents. 
M- For sale by MUNGER BROS., Agents, bt. 
PauLMinnesoU. •r.r-jo-.lkwlv'M 



apn^g-d&wlyHX 



/-CHICAGO 



BREWERY. 



LILL & T>IVERSY 

BREWERS OF 

LILL'S SXOCIC 

A»D 

Cream I»ale A.le, 

PORTER AND BROWN STOUT: 

FOR SALE BY 

WM. CONSTANS. 

0C2MtTO AGF.ST. ST. PATT.. 



u 



NITED STATES NAVY. 



J. 



U c 



CLOUD, J R 



Trcmont House.) Chicago, and at the Depot. 

lilCE, General Suwrlntendent. 
H.C.WENTWORrH, 
my5-tf Gen'l Western Pass. Ag't, ClUcago" 



/^RIENTAL POWDER CO., 
Offer for sale a superior quality of 

RIFLE SIZE TO COARSE DUCKING, 
In kegs and ^annlster. Also the famous Diamond 
Grain Powder. G. NEWnA.L.Li, jk., 

Wholesale Agent, 10 River street, Chicago. 
ENOCH WOODS, 180 Lake-st., 
doc20»m Agent for Cbic».?o. 



Commercial Broker, 

No. lt>:5 Third Street, (Catholic Block.) 

Will buy and sell 

REAL ESTATE, AND, MERCHANDISE 

Of all kinds on Coramission, 

LOAN MONEY, MAKE COLLECTIONS. PAY 

TAXES, Iti., fcC. 

jM- Commissions soUcit'd and promptly at- 

te^cd to. "» ^-^"^ 

Y ECTURES. 
Prof. C. S. POWERS, 

WUl commence a short caurse ol Lectures on 
various Scientilic and Socif 1 Questions, at 

nsTOEiisoriivs hall, 

inthlscit'.on 
SATURDA Y E VEXIXir, January 9tf», 1864 
/^- fee posters aud circulars. 
dec27-td A. TO WNSON, Agent. 

-^^n^O. 1 CARBON OIL, 

For sale low, wholesale snd retail to close con- 
signment, at 
Xlio St. Paul I^amp Store, 

decS-tf Opi osite Pioneer Office. 



FOR 



M: E N WA.3VTEI> 

THE UNITED STATES NAVY, TO 
SERVE IN THE MISSISSIPPI 
SQUADRON. 

Good pay and prize menev given. 

Recruits will be shipped for ono, two, or tlir«« 
years, or during the war. 

The fact that men may enlist for one yew- with 
good quarters on ship board, good pav and prize 
money; which has thus far amounted to mor« 
than the bounty paid for the army recruits. 

EichretruftfoV one year will receive the foL 
lowing articles of clothing. 

One Ilea jacket. 

One pair blue cloth trousers. 

One blue flannel overshirt. 

Two under flannel shirts. 

Two pairs of flannel drawers. 

Ono mattrars. 

Two blankets. 

One seamless cap. 

One black silk handkerchief. 

lilpll atVhe'unUed States Naval Renderrons^ 
over^LANGLEY & TEMPLE'S AUCTION 
STORE, Third .tre^et,^St.J^a^ul.^ ^^^^^ 

no25-2m Recruiting Agent U. S. Navy. 



COIN AND EXCHANGES QUOTATIOKS OF 



••» 



K(\f\ VOLUNTEERS WANTED 

For the 5tli Regiment Minnesota 
Infantry Volnnteera. 

f -tots Bounty will be paid to veterans. 
ft303 " to new recruits, rations, clothing, 

''ApVly'io LTe^t'^'col. WILLIAM B. GERE,at 

recruufng rendezvous, McKubin's block, Third 
street St. Paul; Capt. k. A. RICE, Faribault, or 
CaJt.T; J.SHKKltAN, Albert Lea, Becrultinc 
Officcra. 



noaS^nC 



TliompsoBL 

Saint P.\ai., January 0, 1H64. 

Bankersand licensed />««'^"<"/^»^ Y^tCt^'^'. 
Revolutionary and Adu>t Half Breed i>crip,tfc 

BXCrtASOK RATES. 

Sellinjfor. Premium 

Bankable Funas X perot.prem 

American Gold 46,'iperct. 

Orders for United States Land Warrants, Sttt 
warrants. &c., promptly esecuted. 

Ka&arunited States Coupons paid at oai 

""*p]?8B*^e Certificates vlu Llverrool and Ham 
bu«D«ftB on England IrelanS and Scotland 
&e, Germany and Swtierland, Sweden and 
Norway, for «»le at our ofice. 



4 PPLES— APPLES- APPLES. 

A very choice lot of selected Winter Fruit, for 
sale by the single bbl. or quantity, by 

J. P. HUTCHINSON fc CO., 
B oM Sibley St, between Third and Levee. 

TEAM ENGINES AND BOILERS, 



S^ 



New and second hand, for aaie extremely low, 
at the Pioneer Foundry, 
aall 



OILMAN h CO. 



INKS 



PRINTERS' 

at manut^ejs^rt^ce^^^^ BUWUHK » 00. 



*i 




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